• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Index
 Bingo
 Hunt the slipper
 I'll be out in the morning...
 Green gravel, green gravel
 Lady Queen Anne
 Here we dance Lubin Lubin
 I wrote a letter to my love
 London bridge (old version)
 London bridge (new version)
 Jinny Jo
 Here we come up the green...
 Here come three tinkers
 How many miles to Barley Bridg...
 Do you know the muffin man?
 Milking pails
 Four thirsty geese
 In the woods let us roam
 Here come three Dukes
 Mary Brown
 Nuts in May
 Oranges and lemons
 The peasant
 When I was a lady
 Our boots are made of Spanish
 Seek it, seek it
 Here we go round the jingo...
 Here comes a poor woman
 Here comes the abbess
 Chickens come clock
 The mulberry tree
 Spanish knight
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Merrie games in rhyme from ye olden time
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055026/00001
 Material Information
Title: Merrie games in rhyme from ye olden time
Physical Description: 1 score (64 p.) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Plunket, Emmeline M ( Emmeline Mary ), b. 1835 ( Collector , Illustrator )
Wells Gardner, Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Wells Gardner, Darton & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Games with music   ( lcsh )
Singing games   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: collected and illustrated by Emmeline M. Plunket.
General Note: Date of publication from t.p. verso.
General Note: For voice and piano.
General Note: Printed in red and black ink.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements p. 62-64.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055026
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224242
notis - ALG4503
oclc - 67837449

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Index
        Page 7
    Bingo
        Page 8
    Hunt the slipper
        Page 9
    I'll be out in the morning early
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Green gravel, green gravel
        Page 13
    Lady Queen Anne
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Here we dance Lubin Lubin
        Page 16
        Page 17
    I wrote a letter to my love
        Page 18
        Page 19
    London bridge (old version)
        Page 20
        Page 21
    London bridge (new version)
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Jinny Jo
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Here we come up the green grass
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Here come three tinkers
        Page 28
        Page 29
    How many miles to Barley Bridge?
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Do you know the muffin man?
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Milking pails
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Four thirsty geese
        Page 36
    In the woods let us roam
        Page 37
    Here come three Dukes
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Mary Brown
        Page 41
    Nuts in May
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Oranges and lemons
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The peasant
        Page 46
    When I was a lady
        Page 47
    Our boots are made of Spanish
        Page 48
    Seek it, seek it
        Page 49
    Here we go round the jingo ring
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Here comes a poor woman
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Here comes the abbess
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Chickens come clock
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The mulberry tree
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Spanish knight
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Advertising
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text














































































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at e
0 ooe house

WYelts GatLnet, Datton I
ilatermoster uldttim3s
Sondom.












ERRIEM GAMES

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ingo. 8 ady ueen nne. 14
I o ondon bridge (new version.) 22
" 1 ic ens, come clock. 56 :l hondon Bridge (old version.) 20

0_ o you know the PRuffin FRan? 32 ary brown. 41
1 P lK ~ ~ing pails. 34
our thirsty (ieese. 36 N
uts in M y. 42
reen gravel, preen travel, 13 O
H ranges and Eemons. 44
ere comes a poor woman. 52 ur toots are made of panisb. 48
ere comes the 6bbess. ** 54 '
Jere come tree Dues. 38 eek it, ee t. 49
Here come tree kinkers. 28 panisb kniqgbi. 60
I Here we dance hubin hubin T6 T
H ere we go round the Iingo Iinp. 50 be FRulberry iree. 58
l ere we come up the green grass. 26 i be Peasant. 46
How many miles to Barley Bridgel 30 W
Hunt the lipper. 9 ben was a lady. 47
I 0 o -, 0\Ao/V\0----O 0O '
II be out in the morning early. o ---
In the woods let us roam. + 37
7 Purom thbe talian.
wrote a letter to my love. 19 rom e tal
S** From tle Rerman.
S" inny 24 T Prom tbe French.














One child holds a slick; the others dance round& sing




B, I, N, G, O, B, I, N, G, O, B, I, N, G, O,








Bingowashisname, Oh! Bingowashisname.





Then the child with there stick touches,irst one, th/en another ; the Ist touched says"B," the and "I," the j rd,,AN,"
the -th "," Glthe 5th "OA Bingo roas his name." Whoever fails so to do must take theplace in the middle.


RZ/
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T TE
Th cidren sit on te floor in a circle. One in the middle gives a sli per to one of the circle saying-
Thismustbequickly mended." Thecobblerpromises.Thecircle, pretendingtowork, chant thefolluowing


obblr, cobblermendyourshoe,Haveitdone by half-pasttwo





Stitch it up and stitch it down.Ad then Ille you half acrown



The customer demands his shoe. The cobbler has not got it. It is quickly passed about; the child wilt wom it is found goes into the middle.


K9.

















i
g r~r-L----












r -: '








El
-.- r ;I f- N









One girl stands in the middle ; the others join hands and dance round, singing-
-. _


I'll be out in the morn-ing ear- ly, I'll be out on board the ship; I'llbuy you a
l ot- EFO -I2







pair of gold earrings, I'llbuy you a guinea gold ring, I'll buy you a sil-ver cra-die For to rock the ba by in.


N a
--- ___- _--- -- _














The girl in the middle answers-
'LL have none of your pair of gold ear-rings,

IM1 have none of your guinea gold ring,

Il have none of your silver cradle,

Por to rock the baby in.

J.~L have none of your nasty fish,

I'll have none of your barley,

But Ill have some of your very best flour,

f To bake a cake for Charley.

S~ Then they all sing the last verse with great sfiit.

Another girl goes into the middle Sp tte game begins again.




-verthe wa-terand o ver the lea, And
*-







over thewaterto Char-ley; AndCharleyloves good cakes and ale, And Charley is a







dan dy, And Char- ley loves a pret-ty girl A sweet as su- gar can dy.
2~~~~~Ak 7o'orc tebb n








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The children form a cirde and dance round, holding hands, and singing-





Green gra vel, green gra -vel, The grass is so green, The











pret ti est fair maid That e ver was seen.





We'll wash her with new milk; And clothe her in silk; And write down her name, With a brass pen and ink.
Dear Mary, Dear Mary, Your true love is dead; He sends you this letter, So turn round your head.

Mary must now turn round and face outwards; the game goes on till each child has keen named and allface outwards.







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rr.-





The children divide into two

parties, one representing Queen .

Anne and her ladies. A hall C

is hidden in the pinafore 'or

dress of one of the opposite -1--



if they too had the ball; they"

advance and sing to the words

"Begs that you'll read one."

The Queen then guesses.

If the Queen's guess is right, __.

"Bessie" and her companions J -

take the place of Queen Anne

and her ladies; these must

now1 hide he ball; fthe guess i 1
is wrong. "Bessie" and party? .. .

singthelast verseand again ide




.-














La.dyQueqnAnneshesitsinthesun, As fair as a li-ly, as









white as aswan KingJohnhassentyou three letters to read, and



-A J 4P


% Queen Anne. Miss Bessie.



begsthatyou'llread one. I cannot read one un less I read all, So pray, Miss Bessie, de liver the ball.The ball is mine,it


I7_. _--






isnotthine The ball is mine, it is not thine. So you proud Queen,sit









on your throne,While we poor gip sies go and come.



4. -o 4L
f; Ic ~s










































7e cAildrenjoin hands and dance in a irde, singing-





HerewedanceLu-bin, Lu- bin, HerewedanceLubin light;









Here we dance Lu bin, Lu bin, All on a Sat ur day night,













16














Now they toint their right hands in; urn round and joint tMem out; then each whirl roud. They take hands for nert verse.




All yourright hands in, All yourright hands out,









Shakethema lit-tle, a lit- tie, And turn your-selves a bout.




ERweace Lun, n, Here we dance Lubin light, Here we dance Lubin, Lubin, All on a Saturday
All your left hands in, All your left hands out, Shake them a little, a little, And turn yourselves
[about.
ERE we dance Lubin, Lubin, Here we dance
Lubin light,
Here we dance Lubln, Lubin, All on a Bturday

All your right feet in, All your right feet out,
Shake them a little, a little, And turn your- -
[selves a out.
ERE we dance Lubin, Lubin, Here we dance
[Lubin light,
Here we dance Lubin, Lubin, All on a Saturday
[night
All your left feet in, All your left feet out,'/
Shake them a little, a little, And turn gozr
ERE we dance Lubin, Lubin,Here we dance
.Lugin light,
eare wedance Lubin, Lubin, AIL ons r

All your noddles in, All your noddles out,
Shake them a little, a little, And turn your-
[selves about.






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0---
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One child holding a handkerchief walks round the outside of a circle formed by the other children, andsings-




I dropp'dit, 1 dropp'dit,I dree,Idree,I dropped it! I wrotealett-ter tomyLove,AndonthewayIdropp'd it!l










dropped it, I dropped it, I dree, I dree. I dropped it Butone ofyouhaspick'ditup, And put it in your pocket!




(Spoken)

It wasn't you, and it wasn't you, and it wasn't you (ad lib.); but it was YOU. The child now

touches some one with the handkerchief and drops it. Whoeveris touched must fick up the handkerchiefand pure

* the first child in andout, under the arms ofthe others; when caught, thefirst childjoinsthe circle, the captor sings















( -

c_. CU-- ) k -J---
.. ,_ _b t _L <... c -- .. c ,.-- -- -







... ..........













,^ .*" :breaking down of the bride was announced as the dancers moved round in a circle, and the
----









.** I on-don Bridgeis bro-ken down! Dance o'er my La-dy Lea.

._ --I.



.A. London Bridge is broken down,Witha gay La dy. Howshall we build it up a-gain





Dance o'er my La-dy Lea? How shallwebuild it up again, With a gay La dy.

'4.
_-ALI
Lodnrigi brke donWih ***** ****. osal ebil tup -ai





.. ........
...........S
--..... t-- UILD it up with silver and gold,
Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
.' Build it up with silver and gold,
S ......................... ...... With a gay lady.
ILVER and gold will be stolen away, Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
Silver and gold will be stolen away, With a gay lady.
8 UILD it up with iron and steel,
Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
Build it up with iron and steel,
With a gay lady.
V:J ^ RON and steel will bend and bow,
5 Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
Iron and steel will bend and bow,
With a gay lady.
.* .- .. UIELD it up with wood and clay,
Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
Build it up with wood and clay,
: With a gay lady.
\i 0OD and clay will melt away,
Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
SWood and clay will melt away,
.With a gay lady.
i UILD it up with stone so strong,
'Oil Dance o'er my Lady Lea;
SHuzza 'Twill last for ages long,
.. With a gay lady.
HE verses were sung alternately by the
chorus and the leader, and the dance
ended with a shout.



6T4:Y5N^
;s-.-:y ^s^....... .... "*s
\;~~rLi

















S. **














S. Two of the players form an.arch with their raised arms; the others march in line round

and under the arch. Those in the line and "t te wo" sing the following verses alternately-
*-



on-don bridge is brokendown, Brokendown, broken down,










S .Lon don Bridge is bro ken down, My fair Lady!





SUILD it up with penny loaves, Penny loaves, Penny loaves,

', : Build it up with penny loaves, My fair lady.

/ f ENNY loaves will melt away, Melt away, Melt away,

Penny loaves will melt away, My fair lady.

, **. nUILD it up with iron and steel. Iron and steel, Iron and steel,

.Build it up with iron and steel, My fair lady.


*2
S... 22.


22.









RON and steel will bend and bow, Bend and bow, Bend and bow,
Iron and steel will bend and bow, My fair lady.
a UILD it up with silver and gold, Silver and gold, Silver and gold,
o Build it up with silver and gold, My fair lady.
ILVER and gold I have not got, Have not got, Have not got,
f IJ lSilver and gold I have not got, My fair lady.
During this verse the arch-makers lower arms and catch the child then passing under. The line" continues to sing--
HAT did this poor prisoner do? Prisoner do, Prisoner do ?
What did this poor prisoner do? My fair lady.
TOLE my watch and broke my chain, Broke my chain, Broke my chain,
Stole my watch and broke my chain, My fair lady,
SOW many pounds will set him free ?
Set nim free, Set him free,
How many pounds will set him free ?
S~My fair lady.
HREE hundred pounds will set him free,
.g Set him free, Set him free,
Three hundred pounds will set him free
My fair lady.
SHE half of that I have not got,
Have not got, Have not got,
Sc The half of that I have not got,
,,. i My fair lady.
HEN off to prison you must go,
You must go, You must go,
Then off to prison you must go,
.My fair lady.
They lead the prisoner to a den ; when the last child
is captured they all rush out. The two "pursue and capture another two to form the next arch.









































One child, as "Mother," hides finny Jo's face from"

the Suitors. The Suitors advance and sing-





I've come to court Jin ny Jo, Jin ny Jo

I






Jin-ny Jo I'vecome to court Jin-ny Jo, is she at home?
. 2 j
























he Mother, still hiding finny Jo's face, sings in answer- She's upstairs washing clothes,
Washing clothes, Washing clothes; She's upstairs washing clothes, All the day long.
he Sui!,rs listen a/l/ti;'ry', and /Ien retire singing- Then fare you well, ladies all,
Ladies all, Ladies all; Then fare you well, ladies all, I'll call again.
i( The pause for a moment, and Ihen advance singing- ryve come to court Jinny Jo,
Jinny Jo, Jinny Jo; I've come to court Jinny Jo, Is she at home?
other. She's upstairs baking bread, &c.
All the day long.
uitors retire &- advance, singing as before-
other. She's upstairs sick in bed, &c.
All the day long.
suitors retire &- advance, singing as before-
other. Oh poor Jinny Jo, &c.

Jinny Jo's dead.
uitors.Thenfare you well, ladies all,&c.
Never, 0 never will I call again.
t the end of ftis verse 7inny Jo jumps --

up and runs after the Suitors. The
one sUc ,atchies must act as Jinnyv fo.























:HE children form two lines the elder on one side,. the younger

on the other. The elder children advance and sing-




































1st Tim e. -, -ire.
Herewecomeup the green grass, The green grass, the











greengrass, Herewecomeup thegreengrassOn a dusty, dusty day. Fair maid, pretty maid, Give your hand to me,

W -W _o w -








You shall see the pret-tiest sightthat everyoucare to see. You shall see the cuc koo, The blackbird, and the wren


-_0-







You shall see the pret ty man that want ed you to come. Will you come? No. Will you come? Yes.

1 -- ---





HE youngest of the younger -
children answers them (at this
SinNaugh ty Miss shewon'tcome out, she won'tcomeout, she
first time of asking), "No."
The elders dance of in high

dudgeon, singing as they go--
SLIE elders advance
i again and sing the first

won'tcomeout, Naughty Miss shewon'tcomeout, To help us with our dance ing. verse. The youngest child now
-.1 0- i_ It -- answers, Yes," and the elders
.E 600" WOOF,.-- ... .I take her by the hand, and dance
of singing-



ow we have our bon -ny lass, Our bon ny lass, our








bon- ny lass, Now we have our bon -ny lass To help us in our danc-ing.




Now reinforced by their "bonny lass," they advance and persuade theyounger ones,
one by one, to join them, till the whole party dance round in a ring.






.14
,.:i:':i. i, '- "r A- '.,' WTI
----- ---/.-.-.-.- ': ,.






















M I








One child retes to e ; another, as her Mother,

stands beside her. The others advance assuitorssinging



Herecomethreetin kers three by three To court yourdaughter fair la dy. Oh,
-- I low












can wehave a lodging hereOhhere, Oh, may we have a lodg ing here ?




Moth-.] Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake! Here come three tinkers we cannot

take, Theycannot have lodging here, Oh here, They cannot have lodging here.


23.






0 00 @0.00 00 0000
The suitors who have retired advance again.

Suitors.] Here come three sailors, three by three,

To court your daughter, fair lady,

Oh I can we have lodging here ? &c.
Mother.] Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake I
Here come three sailors we cannot take,

They cannot have a lodging here, &c.


Suitors.] Herecomethree soldiers,three bythree,

To court your daughter, fair lady,
Oh can we have a lodging here? & c.

Motherr] Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake I Here come three soldiers we
cannot take, They cannot have a lodging here, Oh I! here, &c.


Strs.) Here come three princes, three by three, To court your daughter,
fair lady, Oh! can they have a lodging here, Oh! here? &c.
Mother.] Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake Here come three princes we
cannot take, They cannot have a lodging here, Ohl here, &c.


Suitors.] Here come three kings, three by three, To court your daughter, fair

lady, Oh I can we have a lodging here? &c.
Mother.] Wake, wake, daughter, daughter, wake I

Here come three kings that we can take,
And they can have a lodging here, &c.

Suitors.] A fs for your daughter, another for you're
I 'Threei farthing more would get a far better wife,
We will not take a lodging here, Oh I here, A.

At the end of this verse the suitors run away. The mother

and daughter pursue them, and the two whom they catch
Must take the parts of mother and daughter.

* ~- T~~ Ii ~-SS-i ererIrlC





VOW-- -
































at one end represent gatekeepers, the child at the


Three-score and ten.



Can I get there by candle light ?
Yes, and back again.

0 Open the gates and let us go through,
aNot without a beck and a boo;

OHere is a beck and here is a boo,
So open the gates and let us go through.


T the words "Here is a beck and here is a boo," the

o 7 0 children all curtsey and bow; the gatekeepers hift
up their arms and they run under them, still
holding hands and singing-


30







00

o0
55
pen thegates as high as the sky, And let King Charl-es' men come by; It










is so dark we can-notsee TothreadlemyGrandmother'snee die.






HE outermost gatekeeper stands firm ; but

the other one twists under the arch, and

the game begins again. but now the two

last knights are gatekeepers, and the gate-

keepers knights.












JI
-(Ii











-S







-- -


-1- d .
















































child who knows "the muffin man" asks any other child-



Do youknowthe muf-fin manThe muf-fin man,the











muf- fin man, Do you know the muf- fin marnWholives in Drun ry Lane ?














32.











If the child appealed to does not know "the muffin man," the singer, much surprised, deplores-
Ei doesn't know the muffin man, The muffin man, The muffin man I
He doesn't know the muffin man, Who lives in Drury Lane I
The singer then turns to some other child and puts the question as before, and if this time, perhaps, the
child should know the "muffin man," he sings in reply-
ES, I know the muffin man, The muffin man, The muffin man,
*Yes, I know the muffin man, Who lives in Drury Lane.
0 The two children then rejoice together, singing-
LVIWO of us know the muffin man, The muffin man, The muffin man, &c.
They then question some one else, and at those who cannot answer they point contemptuously and sing--
ONEof them know the muffin man, The muffin man, The muffin man, &c.
But each right answer is warmly applauded; and, with gestures of ever-increasing pride, they sing-
E all know the muffin man, The muffin man, The muffin man, &c.





0 T





0






-0 0



























N I










ooo

















he children, all except the "Mother," advance hand in hand and sing they retire

while the Mother replies, and advance again singing the alternate verses.





Buy me a pair of milkingpails, milking pails, milking pails, Buy me a pair of milking pails, Oh sweet g-m




3IN




S3 A






HERE shall I get the money from ? Money from? Money from ?
SWhere there I get the money from ? Oh I! beautiful daughter mine.
SELL my father's feather bed, Feather bed, Feather bed,
SSell my father's feather bed, Oh I! sweet gentle mother mine.
HERE could your father sleep ? Father sleep ? Father sleep ?
Where could your father sleep ? Oh I beautiful daughter mine.
LEEP in the boys' bed, Boys bed, Boys' bed,
Bleep in the boys' bed, Oh I sweet gentle mother mine.
HERE could the boys sleep ? Boys sleep ? Boys sleep ? hle
Where could the boys sleep ? Oh I beautiful daughter mine.
UT them in the pig-sty, Pig-sty, Pig-sty,
S Put them in the pig-sty, Oh! sweet gentle mother mine.
HERE could the pigs go ? Pigs go ? Pigs go ?
Where could the pigs go ? Oh! beautiful daughter mine.
UT them in the washing tub, Washing tub, Washing tub,
Put them in the washing tub, Oh! sweet gentle mother mine.
HAT could I wash the clothes in? Clothes in? Clothes in ?
SI What could I wash the clothes in ? Oh! beautiful daughter mine.
ASH them in your thimble, Thimble, Thimble,
S Wash them in your thimble, Oh! sweet gentle mother mine.
HERE then could I dry them? Dry them ? Dry them ?
S Where then could I dry them ? Oh I beautiful daughter mine.
S1 RY them by the river side, River side, River side,
Dry them by the river side, Oh I sweet gentle mother mine.
UPPOSE the clothes should blow away ? Blow away ? Blow away ?
Suppose the clothes should blow away ? Oh! beautiful daughter mine.
AKE a boat and fetch them back, Fetch them back, Fetch them back,
Take a boat and fetch them back, Oh! sweet gentle mother mine.
At the end of this verse the children all run away; the "Mothker "pursues, and whoever is caught takes her place.

^^^~W^^ N^r WA~























OUR THIRSTY GEESE


.0. 1 a
Four thirs ty geese on the wingNVho want-ed to drink at the well of the king, Four thirs-ty geeseonthe wing,Whowant-ed to





drink at the well of the king, and fivegeese,and sixgeese,andsevngeeseand a gos- ling.
i a


An the sn rd Gosling they let go hands and all try to secure partners, as t e a the dete
caught by the child in the middle. Whoever is caught tahes the
cgh ye ild e e middle taes the



36
















r -.v











N THE WOODS LET US ROAM
One child as "wolfP' crouches in some den; the others hold hands in a drde and dance round, singing-



In the woods let us roam, While the wolf is not at home. Wolf,areyouathome?
---d-,
Ou/ h F --IA I F-~_F _--- -- --








Sometimes the wolf says No," and sometimes Yes," then the children rush to some safety lace. But f the wlf can catch
one first, that child must be wlf.





A-'





~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 060 geeeseesesetesaessqgeegoes eseesee* 0000600 gs



.. .... .....OO~h0000OO~.e000...RE COME THREE D UK(ES






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verse, they eie h t children ashDkes advance & singt er following
.r ,
ThE-c COMlE HE DUKE




























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* Herecomettreee~iDuke sa D ri-i, adanc -t riing, a rid-ingHr
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Our will is to be married, With a Raney Taney Tee.
* "





































SHE fairest one that I see, That I see, That I see,
0 0
* *


* I 0


0* And r ha is you will, ihT

* A any hi





* *
o r














* .
* 0







* ** Ou*rwi***llistoe*m*arried, With a Rancy*Tancy** *Tee. e
L/ Are ny hereyou lik, SirsWith a ancy Tacy Tee




















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ring, And now we shut poor Ma ry in.






Mary I will not stand up upon my feet, To see my poor mother go through the street.

Th RiJng;Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor father go through the town.
Ma. I w not stan n my eet see y father go through the street....






ST/sn Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor sister go through the town.
SMary I will not rise up upon my feet, To see my poor sister go through the street.

The Rig Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor brother go through the town.

Mary I will not rise up upon my feet, To see my poor brother go through the street,
SR Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor sweetheart go through the town.

Mary I will t stand up upon my feet, To see my poor sweetheart go through the street.







-"Mary" now jumps to her feet; the ring breaks s. "Mary" catches some --e, who then must take "Mary's" parst.
....i' lsg" Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor sister go through the town.
Mary -- I will not rise up upon my feet, To see my poor sister go through the street.

T7h Ring, Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor brother go through the town.

Mary... I will not rise up upon my feet, To see my poor brother go through the street.
Th Ring, : Rise up, rise up, poor Mary Brown, And see your poor sweetheart go through the town.

Mary I will stand up upon my feet, To see my poor sweetheart go through the street.

Maryw nowjums toherfeet; the ring breaks ut. "Mary" catcihs som one, wo/w tln must take "Mary's "part.











-2)I































S(... .. (.. .."
I I .





















Here we go ga-thering nuts in May, nuts in May, nuts in May,








Herewe go ga-thering nuts in May, On a cold and frosi ty morn ing.
-I-----.










































*.2.










The either set now advances--and so on, the sets advance and retire singing the verses alternately-
HO will you gather for nuts in May ? Nuts in May, Nuts in May;
Who will you gather for nuts in May? On a cold and frosty morning.
E'LL gather Katie for nuts in May; Nuts in May, Nuts in May;
We'll gather Katie for nuts in May; On a cold and frosty morning.
HO will you send to take her away ? Take her away, take her away ?
Who will you send to take her away ? On a cold and frosty morning.

E will send Willy to take her away; Take her away, take her away;
We will send Willy to take her away; On a cold and frosty morning.
A TIE &- Wily advance &-(holdingeach other by the righthand) try which of them can
Sfull the other across the line marked. The conquered one joins the ranks of the victor,
the set that has lost its champion advances singing the 1st verse, &5 so the game goes on.















I-A




,3 Ii,~-~~ECSI;P~:i~lgf N'









GES&IEMONS
Two children join hands and form an arch ;
secretly they settle who shall be called Oranges"
and who Lemons." The other children sing
the following words, marching in a line round
about and under the arch.


Oranges and le-mons, say the bells of Sain






Cle-ment's. You owe me five farthings, say the bells of Saint Mar-tin's, When will you






pay me, say the bells of Old Bai-ly? When I grow rich, say the bells of Shoreditch.

e oI



When will that be? Say the bells of Step ney. I do not know, says the

- --- .,-- -~- ---.------,--- --A--L
'~~~~~~~~ ~ ~~~ l r ,, l ,'i: ,'i

















great bell of Bow. Here comes a can dle to light you to









bed, And here comes a chop per to chop off your head.




At the last words "the two" lower their arms and catch one of the line, whom they ask,

in a whisper, to choose Oranges or Lemons." The captive goes behind the child chanced
upon. The game goes on till all are placedbehind one or olher of the arch, then comes the tug.




























465.









.. ..... ... ..... ... ............



The children join hands in a circle and dance round, singing-





Wouldyou know how does the pea sant, Wouldyouknowhow does the



=-m




pea sant,Wouldyouknowhowdoes the pea-sant,Sowhis bar-ley and wheat





uringthe second verse the children let go hands and each pretends
to sow his barey and wheat." They join hands while they
sing the questions; but separate while their, act the answers.

Look, 'tis so that does the peasant Sow his barley and wheat.
Would you know how does the peasant Reap his barley and wheat ?

Look, 'tis so that does the peasant Reap his barley and wheat.
Would you know how does the peasant Thresh his barley and wheat ?
Look, 'tis so that does the peasant Thresh his barley and wheat.
Would you know how does the peasant Sift his barley and wheat ?
Look, 'tis so that does the peasant Sift his barley and wheat.
Would you know how rests the peasant When his labour is done?

Look, 'tis so that rests the peasant When his labour is done.

Would you know how plays the peasant When his labour is done ?
Look, 'tis so that plays the peasant When his labour is done.










.I The children join hands and dance round; then

'. : :*they let go hands and imitate a lady" frst; ten
J eg ah.... each in turn chooses what is to be imitated.





o When I .wasa la-dy, a la-dy, a la-dy,When









o I was a la-dy, a la-dywas 1; Iwentthisway, Iwentthatway,Iwint









o ty-
thiswayI wentthatway When I was a la- dv a la dywas I.






00 0 0
















0o 0 0 M 0 o 7






0o oooo o0 Co0 .0




The children hold hands and dance in a circle, singing--




Ourboots aremadeof Span ish, Our stock-ingsare of silk, Our

**- ...*







pin -a -fores of ia per As white as a -ny milk Here we go a round, a-round, a-








round, Here we go a round, a-round, a round, Till we fall down on the ground.



At the last word they all drop down sitting on the ground, then they jump p gain and dance round, singing as before.











0o









*o* o0 o 0 o









o -






0 0




o












The children form a circle, each child gras ing, with its left hand, the right hand
of its neighbour, a ring is quickly fassedfrom hand to hadnd, they dance round singin,,-




S Seek it, seek it, Tra Ia la la la, Seek it, seek it, Tra la la la.





T4The child in the middle tries tofind the ring; the child in whost kand it isfound takes the i edd/ejilacc
[ JJ-















0 0



0f
O (
i0















...... ..... *
The children join hands in a circle and dance round singing--




Herewe go round the jin go-ring, The jin-go-ring, the jin-go-ring,









Herewe go round the jin go-ring, A- round theMer.ry-ma-Tan sie.





WICE about and then we fall,

Then we fall, Then we fall,
Twice about and then we fall, Around the
Kerry-ma-Tansie.
Here the children fall down ; the ast to rise goes

into the middle; the others dance round singing--

S: HOOSE a good man or hide yonrface,

Hide your face, Hide your face,

Choose a good man or hide your face, Around the, ac

The children now fause in their dance and song,

while tM child in the middk sings-

SHAT would youglive toknow his name

: j To know his name, To know his name,
What wonld yoau gve to know his nam o A~ roUn,

... ..










Sr
F/-















The children sing-
EN thousand pounds to know his name, To know his name, To know his name,
Ten thousand pounds to know his name, Around the Merry-ma-Tanzie.
The child in the middle names one of the circle and sings-
SARRY GREENE it is his name, It is his name, It is his name,
Harry Greene it is his name, Around the Merry-ma-Tanzie.
Harry now stands in the middle with the first child; the others dance round and sing-
SHEY are married with a gay gold ring, A gay gold ring, A gay gold ring,
They are married with a gay gold ring, Around the Merry-ma-Tanzie.
OW they are married we wish them joy, We wish them joy, We wish them joy,
NOW they are married we wish them joy, Around the Merry-ma-Tanzie.
During the last verse, the children let go hands and all whirl round clapping their hands; the first child r
joins the circle. "Harry" stands in the middle, the others dance round singing Choose a good wife."





Pi.
it. .... .. ... '....// .' "'
. .'- ..,... '. ,:. .... .. "

































0 ERE COMES A POOR WOMAN.

One child in the middle, the others in
0
a ring, dance round and sing




Here comes a poor woman from






o o---_ .

Ba by -lon With six poor chil dren all a lone. *





**~ *~ e0






652















NZ can bake, and one can brew,

One can shape, and one can sew,

One can sit at the fire and spin,

One can bake a cake for a king.

Come chooseyoneast,comechooseyouwest,

Come choose the very one you love best.

HE child in the middle chooses one

from the ring; they stand kand in hand,

whil the others dance round singing-




Now you're war-tied and ar ied a way, and







when you're mar- tried you're found to o bey; So
11 It~f*~-$---F----~ ~---7--3 I CP--- ------ -P~R J~





love one an -o-ther,Like sis-terandbro-ther,And



T the end of tMe verve tey

W kiss. The first child tmen joins
kiss care a way.
the ring, the second remains and

the game begins again.


0* .












others hold hands in aline.
"..%

.... .....





He c o, s the a es sn in Te

















.:.*
*: r :*: -I









. *
eahes ... hand s i ali"n
~L C\9l


=~CW~at~tff ffFi foll de roll de roll day.~sin~ng.lit
r r-2
























.... ~~~~~~ ~ ~ ..... so.. :siii?i~i!::iiiiii
t44'o: 4 .0. "
09 09, go, "0" 9"0Eff





m.e**.* :. A .. 0
*.,:.......:.... ..:... ...... ... ...:.......:..*..... ... .:.. .. ..: .. .. .. ...... .. ... .:*.. .....*.*.

*0 The Abbess now retires, and the Maidens" advance singing-- :*
i : ei oll de roll de roll day.
SMaidens Why comes the Abbess ? why in such state? Fi foil de roll de roll day. :c)
.......... She
Abbess She comes to seek for a maiden fair, Fi foil de roll de roll day. *
S! Maidens Whom will she take as a maiden fair ? Fi foil de roll de roll day.
0.0 ...... .
.: Abbess The lovely Emma it now shall be, Fi foll de roll de roll day. :
.* Maidens The lovely Emma it can not be, Fi foil de roll de roll day.
A nun she will not, she can not be! Fi foil de roll de roll day.
....... And Emma we may not give to thee, Fi foil de roll de roll day.
Abbess Your windows I will break with might, FI foll de roll de roll day.
......Maidens Our shutters we will fasten tight, Fi foil de roll de roll day. *
SAbbess Your cottage i'll burn your ears about, Fi foil de roll de roll day.
*: Maidens. With water we will put the fire out, Fi foil de roll de roll day. .
o Abbess" I seize her now by her right hand, Fi foil de roll de roll day.
SAnd lead her away to a distant land, Fi foll de roll de roll day.
S7.1 TA bbess takes Emma by her hndand leads her of, then they together advance and sing as kfore, and so on,
till all are chosen but one; that one ten runs away. Whew caught s&e must b the Abbess.












Ies
,.... ... '.. .I
*i 22 "
.. ,...

~_'-
.r g .. g g '




























4 1













A child sits on the fwor andrectnds to cry, another heads a troop and siNgs-




Chick ens come clock, come clock, come clock,









Chick-ens comeclock, come clock, come clock, The kites are a way and the.
W!9 "--*-




.. .. *. ** *


















crows are a sleep,And it's timeformychick-ens to get some-thing to eat.






The children march round and round, then the leader in the character of en '" says to te crying girl,
What are you trying for, my poor old woman (Old Woman). I' lost my nedle I and m looking for it.

(The Hen). What doyou want your needle for? (Old Wom). To ew a bag with.

*(Ther Hen). What do you want a bag for? (Old woman). To put malt into.
(The Hen). What do yowant the malt for ? (OM Woman). To sour my mancepan with.

(T e Hn). What do younwant your aucepa for? (Old Woman). To bol oa of your hikes in.
At these words the Old Woman jumps up and tries to catch one of the Chicens. The Hen does her

best to defend them. Whoever is caught must be old woman.
















... .....c ..r.s








M ir







On (






















....... .. ... .... . . . .. ...





The chldren all take hands and dance round, singing-





.**.Here we goround the mulberry treeThemulberrytree, the mulberry tree,





00 C1
logJ


































0 o 0-
o~P a














Here we go round the mul-ber-ry tree, So ear ly in the morn ing.


'-o
S. The children let go hands and pretend to wash their dresses, singing-- 0
This is the way we wash our clothes,
-We wash our clothes, We wash our clothes,
This is the way we wash our clothes,
So early in the morning.
At the words, "So early in the morning," they each whirl round; then take hands and repeat ist verse.
This is the way we wash our hands,
We wash our hands, We wash our hands,
This is the way we wash our hands,
So early in the morning.
This is the way we
brush our hair, &Ac.
This is the way we *
tie our shoes, &c.

This is the way we
go to school, &c.
This is the way we
dance and play, &c.
Other verses can be
added at pleasure. -















r-


0








PA KNIGHT
One child makes the art of night, another that of glther-,
th ret stand in a ra ; te knight" advancesandsines-



I am a knight all






South of Spain; I come to court your daugh ter Jane.







"60.









Mother. l
Y daughter Jane is far too young,
She can't abide your flattering tongue.
Knight.
SH I be she young, or be she old,
'Tis for her beauty, and she must be sold.
Mother.


SAnd rub your spurs till they be bright. _-_ "
o O Kni it.
Y spurs they are of costliest wrought,
And in your town they were not bought;
^ Nor in your town will they be sold,
- O Neither for silver, nor yet for gold;
So, fare you well, my ladies gay,
0 For I must ride some other way.
O Mother.
U1N back, turn back, you courteous knight,
And choose the fairest in your sight.


S~o HE fairest maid that here I see,
Is Katie Moss, come dance with me.
He dances off ith*k "Katie Moss." Then together they advance and sing, "We are tWO knights." When the next child
ERE are your daughters safe and sound, is chosen they sing,
And in each pocket a thousand pound, e are three knipkes," &c.
SIOn each one's finger a gay gold ring, When au are choen they
They are fit to marry any king. advance again, and the
knigf sings the last verse; at the last word they run away. The Mother" pursues and catches any she can,

At nd t e a sh n
-^ ^ W ^ y ^s- <-lo\b








L-USTRATED 0OKS

T,. PYM. T

QlniilORen $ujsy,



CnILDRen jio. '
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stories by L. C. will be the more attractive. They display a delicate fancy, and will be read with real pleasure
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_Iop URas FROm iea? o&e s.
A Book of Selected Extracts from Ancient and Modern Sources, illustrated by Child-life, carefully printed
in Chromo-lithography.in Brown and Red Tints. Oblong 4to. Illustrated cover, cloth back, 3s. 6d.
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Beautifully printed in the best style f Chromo-lithography. The Illustrations represent Gerda and Kay's
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SFcap. 4to. Illustrated cover, cloth back, coloured edges, 5s.
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TOR THE LITTLE NES TO UOLOUR
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IUST PUBLISHED.


Printing in colours in the best style of Chromo-lithography. ach illustrated letter is accompanied with
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A most desirable and dainty present for a child.
62.





THE NEW VOLUME, NOW READY, CONTAINS UPWARDS OF

200 ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS.

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Reading for the Young.


SOME OF THE NOTICES.
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or the means for purchasing it. It is absolutely full of EDINBURGH DAILY REVIEW.-Its contents are
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are unquestionably better than those which one finds in
some similar periodicals. NONCONFORMIST.-Cannot fail to be appreciated.
CHURCH TIMES.-We know of no better Magazine We are bound to say the editor has succeeded in a very
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upon a child. SATURDAY REVIEW.-Deservedly a favourite.
NEW YORK CHURCHMAN.-Well calculated to
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LITERARY WORLD.-Cannot fail to be popular with Several of the readings have a sound spiritual ring
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BRIGHT. PURE. ATTRACTIVE.



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WORKS by the AUTHOR of



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NE OF A OVEY

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