• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Cinderella
 The house that Jack built
 Old King Cole
 Sing a song of sixpence
 Dick Whittington
 The babes in the wood
 Bluebeard
 Little Bo-peep
 Jack and Jill
 Sleeping Beauty
 Puss-in-boots
 The cat and the fiddle
 Poor Robin
 Dickety dock
 cuckoo
 Little Red Riding-Hood
 Beauty and the Beast
 Old mother Hubbard
 Back Cover






Group Title: Warne's little playmates
Title: The nursery world
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055025/00001
 Material Information
Title: The nursery world comprising, Cinderella, The house that Jack built, Old King Cole, Sing a song of sixpence, Dick Whittington, Babes in the woods, Bluebeard, Little Bo-Peep, Jack and Jill, Sleeping Beauty, Puss in boots, the cat and the fiddle, Dickety Dock, Poor Robin, Cuckoo, Little Red riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast, Old Mother Hubbard
Series Title: Warne's little playmates
Uniform Title: Cinderella
House that Jack built
Whittington and his cat
Children in the wood (Ballad)
Sleeping Beauty
Puss in Boots
Little Red Riding Hood
Beauty and the beast
Alternate Title: Little Bo-Peep
Old King Cole
Sing a song of sixpence
Jack and Jill
Cat and the fiddle
Dickety Dock
Poor Robin
Cuckoo
Physical Description: 32 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Perrault, Charles, 1628-1703
Martin, Sarah Catherine, 1768-1826
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: 1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Chromolithographed by Kronheim & Co.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055025
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224381
notis - ALG4645
oclc - 67837444

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Cinderella
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The house that Jack built
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Old King Cole
        Page 8
    Sing a song of sixpence
        Page 8
    Dick Whittington
        Plate
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The babes in the wood
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Bluebeard
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Little Bo-peep
        Page 16
    Jack and Jill
        Plate
        Page 17
    Sleeping Beauty
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Puss-in-boots
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The cat and the fiddle
        Page 24
    Poor Robin
        Page 24
    Dickety dock
        Page 24
    cuckoo
        Page 24
    Little Red Riding-Hood
        Plate
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Beauty and the Beast
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Old mother Hubbard
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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NURSERY WORLD.



COMPRISING

CINDERELLA. SLEEPING BEAUTY.
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT. PUSS IN BOOTS.
OLD KING COLE. THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.
SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE. DICKETY DOCK.
DICK WHITTINGTON. POOR ROBIN.
BABES IN THE WOOD. CUCKOO.
BLUEBEARD. LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.
LITTLE BO-PEEP. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
JACK AND JILL. OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.






















LONDON AND NEW YORK:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,
1886.






THE NURSERY WORLD.

CINDERELLA.
'ii, THERE was once a poor little
,we girl whose father and mother
Ii were both dead, and who had been
left under the care of two much
older step-sisters; the daughters of
her father's first wife. These women
were very unkind to the poor child,
Sand made her a little servant in
"their house. Her hands were often
smutty from cleaning grates and
sifting cinders, so they gave her
_--= the name of Cinderella. One
evening they ordered her to dress them for a ball
at the palace, given on the king's son's birthday.
When they left in their rich dresses, Cinderella
sat down and wept; it seemed so unjust to make
her only a drudge and never take her out.
Suddenly, hearing a soft sound, she looked up, and
saw a lovely fairy floating on a cloud close by her.
" Fear not, Cinderella," she said, I am your god-
mother, and I mean to send you to the ball.
Bring me a pumpkin and six lizards from the
garden, and the mouse and rat-trap." Though





4 THE NURSERY WORLD.

she was a little frightened I -
the girl obeyed at once; and h
the fairy changed the pump- L
kin into a splendid coach;
the lizards into footmen; the '
rat in the trap into a fat ii, .
coachman; and six mice _l
into fine horses. Then she
touched Cinderella with her
wand, and her rags changed
to a satin dress, trimmed -
with gold; diamonds shone I
in her hair, and on her feet
were little glass slippers.
"Go to the ball," said the
fairy, as the girl thanked her,
"but be sure to leave at
twelve o'clock, or your gifts ',
will change to their old P'1
forms."
So Cinderella went to the _
ball and danced with the
Prince. At twelve o'clock-
she left the ball and drove
home. The Prince gave
another -ball the next week,





THE NURSERY WORLD. 5

and Cinderella went again. She took care to leave
at twelve, and so the fairy sent her to a third
ball. But that night Cinderella, talking to the
Prince, forgot the time, and heard the clock
strike twelve. But then she ran away. Too late!
As she ran she left one glass slipper on the
stairs, her dress turned to rags; and when she
reached the door, she
i, ,. i ." saw a great pumpkin
o.';^ roll away, followed by
I i six squeaking mice and
| I a rat, so she had to
run home on foot. The
Prince found her slipper;
0 ', I and as he was determined
to find her, he sent out a
Proclamation that who-
.____ __, ever could put on the
little glass slipper should
be his wife. All the young ladies in the country
tried, but no one could put it on but Cinderella.
She drew the other from her pocket, and
then the Prince knew who she was. The
fairy appeared, changed her rags again to
velvet and satin, and gave her to the Prince
for his wife, and she became a wise Queen.






6 THE NURSERY WORLD.

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
THIS is the house that Jack built.
This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack
built.
This is the rat that ate the malt that lay in the
house that Jack
built. -- ---
This is the cat .. "
that killed the rat i tha
that ate the malt tl
that lay in the i
house that Jack
built.
This is the dog 25'
that worried the
cat that killed the
rat that ate the
malt that lay in
the house that
Jack built.
This is the cow -
with the crumpled
horn, that tossed
the dog that worried the cat that killed the rat, that
ate the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.






THE NURSERY WORLD. 7

Here is the maiden all for-
lorn, that milked the cow with
Sthe crumpled horn, that tossed
the dog, that worried the cat,
that killed the rat, that ate the
malt, that lay in the house
that Jack built.
This is the man all tattered
te and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked
the cow with the crumpled horn, that tossed the
dog, that worried the cat, that
killed the rat, that ate the malt,
that lay in the house that Jack
built.
This is the priest all shaven and
shorn, that married the man all
tattered and torn, that kissed the maiden all for-
lorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, &c., &c.
This is the cock that crowed
in the morn, that waked the
priest all shaven and shorn, that
married the man all tattered and
torn, that kissed the maiden all
forlorn, &c., &c.,






8 THE NURSERY WORLD.


OLD KING COLE.
OLD King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
SA merry old soul was he,
He called for his pipe
And he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.

i Every fiddler he had a fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Tweedle-dee, tweedle-dee went the fiddles.
Oh, there's none sorare
As can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.

SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE.

SING a song of sixpence, ,
A bag full of rye,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie;
When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing,
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king ?

The king was in the counting-house
Counting out his money,
The queen was in the parlour
Eating bread and honey;
The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes,
By came a little bird
And snapt off her nose.






8 THE NURSERY WORLD.


OLD KING COLE.
OLD King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
SA merry old soul was he,
He called for his pipe
And he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.

i Every fiddler he had a fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Tweedle-dee, tweedle-dee went the fiddles.
Oh, there's none sorare
As can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.

SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE.

SING a song of sixpence, ,
A bag full of rye,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie;
When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing,
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king ?

The king was in the counting-house
Counting out his money,
The queen was in the parlour
Eating bread and honey;
The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes,
By came a little bird
And snapt off her nose.



















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DIC W I TTINGTON.





THE NURSERY WORLD. 9

DICK WHITTINGTON.
S-I-.!', -: DICK WHITTINGTON
i .... ,.-- was a poor little boy, who
came to London to seek
Shis fortune, for he had heard
in his own village that the
__tho i-streets of London were paved
with gold. But he soon found
r that he must work or starve; so
L -"". he went as a boy to help the
A cook in the family of a rich
merchant. This woman was,
however, so bad-tempered and cruel that Dick
was miserable, and made up his mind to run
back to the country. He had walked as far
as Highgate, when, feeling tired, he sat down
by a stone to rest; suddenly, there came on
the air the sweet sound of Bow Bells chiming, and
as Dick listened, he thought they said: "Turn
again, Whittington Lord Mayor of London
Town; turn again, Whittington." The boy thought
that it was worth trying to make this promise
come true; so he did turn, and went back to the
old place. The cook was as cross as ever, but
Dick was resolved to be patient, though he had






10 THE NURSERY WORLD.

very little to eat, hard blows often, and he slept
in a garret, where the rats ran over his face when
he was asleep. But one day a starving street
cat mewed to him as if asking for food; and Dick,
[ ,,::_ who had a kind
-7 *'1i,,, heart, picked her

Sand took her
Si home to his gar-
I ret. He shared
Shis food with her,
I and in return
(for she was still
S-. hungry), she
caught and drove
away the rats, so
that he could
,,J. sleep in peace
i. '-". and safety. One
day the merchant called all his servants and told
them that a ship of his was going to sail to far-off
lands, and if they liked they might each send a
venture, that is, something to sell in her. They
were all glad to do so; but poor Dick had nothing
but his cat, and he did not like to part with her.
However, Miss Alice, his master's daughter, per-





THE NURSERY WORLD. 11

suaded him to send her, and Dick did not like to
refuse, though he wept at parting from Pussy.
The ship sailed till she came to an island which
was overrun with rats, because no cats were found
there. The King and Queen invited the captain
to dine with them, but while they sat at table,
the rats ran in and got ---
into the dishes and ;- ...
upset the drinking
cups. Then the cap- ,
tain sent for Dick's cat. --2 i
She jumped on the -
table and soon drove '- /,-
all the greedy animals i ;
away. The king was
so pleased that he at I
once wanted to buy ;'
the cat. The captain -..
asked a large sum for
her, but the king not -.- --_. _--_
only gave it, but sent great bars of gold to its
owner. So Dick found himself a rich man. His
master took him as an apprentice, and at last into
partnership, and Dick married Miss Alice. He
was three times Lord Mayor of London, and the
king knighted him for his goodness to the poor.





12 THE NURSERY WORLD.


THE BABES IN THE WOOD.
A VERY long time ago, there lived a gentleman
and his wife who had two little children whom
1 they greatly loved.





--------- -- -'-i caught it, and knew
S tt ty But at that time,
take care of his der there was a great
now have no fhdeal of fever in
shedding, or pg to England, and both
-- nephewa- :nie. Teprthese kind parents









believing that he would keep his word. But un-
caught it, and knew
__ l that thev must die. Then the
ly f t leittlean sent for his brother, and
S- on his dleath-bed, asked him to
take care of his dear little children, who would
now have no father or mother. The brother
shedding, or pretending to shed, many tears,
promised to take care of, and to love, his little
nephew and niece. The parents died quite happy,
believing that he would keep his word. But un-
fortunately for the little ones, they were very rich;
and if they died the uncle would have all their
lands and money; and he was a greedy, avaricious
man. Not long after the funeral of his brother
and his wife, he hired two wicked men to take his
nephew and niece into the forest and kill them





THE NURSERY WORLD. 13

there. But one of these men, whose hand little
Jane held, had pity on the babes, and said that
they should not be killed. The
other murderer quarrelled with .
him about it, and they fought, ," -
l -- .--. .I Ill .r "'I -'
and the man who had pity on {I ,
the poor babes killed his com-
panion. But then he ran away
and left the children in the
wood. The poor little ones were
very much frightened. Little Jane cried bitterly
.` when night came on; she was tired and
hungry, and wanted to be at home to go
to bed. Arthur tried to comfort her; but
/;"" i he was tired and hungry also. They
':' never could find their wav out of
'.,- ,.the wood; nor could they get any-
S"; thing but berries to eat, so at last the
poor little things lay
'' down and died. The
i holy angels took
their souls to heaven,
.. and the dear robins
picked green leaves
and put over them,
and thus buried the dear little babes in the wood.





14 THE NURSERY WORLD.


BLUEBEARD.
FATIMA'S mother made her marry
S Bluebeard because he was so very
1' .-A 1' 6
Ii rich; he had had seven wives, who
were all dead, but then Fatima's
mother said that he must have
married delicate women. Soon
___-- after she was married, Bluebeard
called Fatima to him and told her that he was
going away on a journey, and that he meant to
trust her with all his riches and his keys. But,"
he added, be sure that you don't open the closet
in the west corridor. If you do, I shall cut your
head off for disobedience." Fatima took the keys.
Her sister Anne came to stay with her; and when
Bluebeard was gone they ran about the castle and
opened all the doors, except the closet. But
by-and-bye Fatima grew so curious about what
could be in it that she opened the door. What do
you think she saw? A row of ladies' heads that
had been chopped off hanging up! She was so
frightened that she dropped the key in the blood
on the floor, and ran back to tell her sister. They
tried very hard to rub the blood off the key, but
they could not; for it was a fairy key, and would





THE NURSERY WORLD. 18

keep the stain. By-and-bye Bluebeard came home,
and asked for the key of the closet, and when he
saw it he said, Ah! you have opened the for-
bidden closet-you must die!" Fatima begged
for a little time alone; and when he granted
her request she sent her sister to see if any one
was coming; for she expected her brother and
his friend, who had been a lover of hers, to visit
them. Every now -
and then Fatima -
cried, "Sister Anne, 7/ -- -
sister Anne, do you
see anyone coming?" { ---- I
But no one cami e; .K, .-
only a flock of sheep :-.. .;
passed by. At last ^ -.
Bluebeard's patience -
was exhausted, and V- 'II
he called her down -"
to die. But then,
just as his sword was at her throat, she heard
footsteps and shouts, and Selim, her. lover, fol-
lowed by her brother, rushed in, attacked and
killed Bluebeard, and thus saved poor Fatima's
life. All Bluebeard's riches then were hers. She
married Selim, and lived happy ever afterwards.





16 THE NURSERY WORLD.


LITTLE BO-PEEP.
LITTLE BO-PEEP has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Let them alone and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.
Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
When she awoke she found it a joke,
For they were all still fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them, indeed, but it
made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.
Little Bo-peep went out one day
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side,
Hung up on a tree to dry.
Then up she took her little crook,
And over the meadow went smack, 0,
And did all she could, as a shepherdess should,
To tack them again to their back, 0.








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JAK AN JILL.
OF4
'I;

7-I .. I





THE NURSERY WORLD. 17

JACK AND JILL.
ACK and Jill Then Jill came in
Went up the hill, And she did grin
To fetch a pail of To see Jack's paper
water, plaster,
Jack fell down Her mother told her
And broke his crown, That she should scold
And Jill came tumbling her
after. If she laughed at Jack's
disaster.
Then up Jack got
And home did trot This made Jill pout,
As fast as he could And she ran out,
caper, And was sadly teased by
Dame Gill did the Jack;
job Till the goat came by
To plaster his nob And made Jack cry
With vinegar and brown By knocking him on his
paper. back.
Hearing the rout
Dame Gill ran out,
And matters were all set right,
Then all the three
Went in to tea,
And I wish you now Good-riight.





18 THE NURSERY WORLD.

SLEEPING BEAUTY.
ONCE upon a time a King and Queen had a little
daughter to christen. They invited the fairies to be
god-mothers; but unluckily they forgot to ask the
Spinning Fairy. Perhaps they thought she would
not be of much use to a princess. The Spinning
Fairy was, however, very angry; she appeared
suddenly at the feast, and said: This child shall
live happily till she touches
I,, l'l a spindle; as soon as she
:. i'i does so she shall fall asleep,
7C and shall not wake till the
:ii destined prince shall rouse
1 her with a kiss."
i The parents were very
.. 1 sorry to hear this; but to
prevent any harm, they
,'i, ordered all spindles and
spinning- wheels to be
Banished from the country.
-This was done, and the
Princess Beauty grew up a fair and happy girl.
One day, however, as she was running about the
palace she came to a room where she saw an old
woman spinning. "Oh! what is that funny wheel?"
she cried, and laying her hand on it she instantly

(





THE NURSERY WORLD. 19

S fell fast asleep. She was carried
.. by the old woman (who was the
wicked fairy) to her bed, and there
-she lay for a hundred years fast
b asleep; and all the people in the
_b kingdom fellasleepwith her. The
king and queenand ministers, the
., soldier at his post, the poor man
at his plough.
~, [-fAfter a hundred years, a young
prince, who had heard the story,
set out to find the princess. He passed through
many dangers, but at last he found the palace.
Then passing the
sleeping guards, he --
went into the room
where the princess .
lay asleep and gave "'
her a kiss. She
opened her eyes, and
all the people woke -
with her, and the
long, long silence was
broken to the great satisfaction of everybody.
Then the prince married Sleeping Beauty, and
took her to his own country.






20 THE NURSERY WORLD.

PUSS-IN-BOOTS.

ONCE upon a time a miller, who had three sons,
died, and, by his will, left to the eldest son, his
mill; to his second son, his ass; and to his third
son, his cat. The youngest son was very sad when
he heard that he had only a cat. I shall starve,"
he said; "my brothers can live on their legacies,
but of what use is a cat, except to catch mice."
Suddenly Puss jumped on the table and said, My
dear master, do not fret, I will earn our bread; but
first you must buy me a pair of boots and a bag."
I---------] ] ^ ^
The lad saw that the cat
was very clever; so he did
; as he had asked; and
Pussy put on his little
I 'boots, and tied the bag
~ rl' _- t if round his neck, and went
-- out to get their dinner.
I ..He knew where there
X was a rabbit-warren, so he
__ i__ -.- _-_'___ 'made haste there, first put-
Stimng some bran in his bag.
Here he hid amongst the
ferns, putting his bag open,
and very soon two little rabbits ran into it. Puss





THE NURSERY WORLD. 21

pulled the string, and killed both. Then he went
home, cooked one for his master's dinner, and took
the other to the king, "--7-"..-
saying, "Sire, my Lord -."
Marquis de Carabas sends '. ,.
you this rabbit with his
duty to your Majesty.
"Tell your master," said
the King, "that I thank iI'
him." Another day. he
caught some partridges in ..4 :-
his bag, and took a brace L -- :_J
to the king, who was much pleased with the gift.
One day he knew that the king and his daughter
were going to take a drive by the river; so he told
his master that if he would go and bathe in the
stream he could make his fortune. The miller's
son obeyed: and while he was in the water the cat
hid his clothes under a great stone. Then running
to meet the king's carriage, he cried, Help! help
for my Lord the Marquis of Carabas. While he
is bathing in the- river some thieves have stolen his
clothes." The king at once sent home for some of
his.own rich garments, and told his servants to
take the Marquis out of the water and dress him.
Then he offered him a seat in his carriage. The





22 THE NURSERY WORLD.

cat ran on before, and coming to a meadow where
some men were mowing, he said, "Good people, if
Syou do not tell the king
_.-_- -~w" ?'i ..
that these meadows belong
j,^^s- to the Marquis of Carabas,
_._ you shall be chopped as
small as mincemeat."
When the king drove up
he asked the mowers to
Whom those meadows be-
-"- : I^. Longed. "To the Marquis
of Carabas," they said.
Now the cat came to some
S"-- wheat fields, and he said
_--..- to the reapers, "If you do
not tell the king that all these fields belong to the
Marquis of Carabas, you shall be chopped as fine
as mincemeat." And the reapers, very much
frightened, obeyed him. Then the king thought
that the marquis must be a very rich man.
Meantime Puss ran on till he came to the castle
of the Ogre, who was really the owner of all the
land. The Ogre received Puss civilly, and Puss
told him that he had much wished to see him, as
he understood that he had the wonderful power of
changing himself into other forms. The Ogre,





THE NURSERY WORLD. 23

proud to show his cleverness, instantly changed
into a lion. Puss was very much frightened, and
ran up a pillar out of his way. When the Ogre
changed to his former shape, Puss said, That was
very wonderful, my lord; but I suppose you can
only change into large creatures ?" Oh, yes," said
the Ogre, I can." And he instantly and foolishly
turned into a very small mouse. That instant Puss
jumped on him and eat him up, as the Ogre had
eaten little children before.
And now the king's coach drove up, and Puss
ran out and bowed very
low and said, "Will your
Majesty honour the Mar- I 1
quis of Carabas by entering 1i -.
his castle ?" .. ',
The kingand his daughter
came in, and found a grand
feast spread for them; the
Ogre had prepared it for
himself, and it was of nice
food-game of all kinds.
The king was so pleased
with the miller's son, and
thought him so rich, that he invited him to Court,
and after a time married him to his daughter.






24 THE NURSERY WORLD.


THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.

;' 1 HEY diddle diddle,
S/ The cat and the fiddle,
V The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed
TTo see the sport,
And the dish run away with the spoon.

-POOR ROBIN.
//HE north --
winds do blow,
And we shall
DICKETY DOCK. have snow,
HICKETY, dickety, dock, And what will the
The mouse ran up the Robin do the
clock; poor thing ?
The clock struck one, He'll sit in a barn,
Down the mouse ran, And to keep him- ?,:..'!I
Hickety, dickety, dock. self warm
Will hide his head under his wing, poor
thing.

CUCKOO.
W-HAT do you do? In June
.In April I change my tune;
I open my bill; In July
S In May Away I fly;
I sing night and In August
day; Away I must.






24 THE NURSERY WORLD.


THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.

;' 1 HEY diddle diddle,
S/ The cat and the fiddle,
V The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed
TTo see the sport,
And the dish run away with the spoon.

-POOR ROBIN.
//HE north --
winds do blow,
And we shall
DICKETY DOCK. have snow,
HICKETY, dickety, dock, And what will the
The mouse ran up the Robin do the
clock; poor thing ?
The clock struck one, He'll sit in a barn,
Down the mouse ran, And to keep him- ?,:..'!I
Hickety, dickety, dock. self warm
Will hide his head under his wing, poor
thing.

CUCKOO.
W-HAT do you do? In June
.In April I change my tune;
I open my bill; In July
S In May Away I fly;
I sing night and In August
day; Away I must.






24 THE NURSERY WORLD.


THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.

;' 1 HEY diddle diddle,
S/ The cat and the fiddle,
V The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed
TTo see the sport,
And the dish run away with the spoon.

-POOR ROBIN.
//HE north --
winds do blow,
And we shall
DICKETY DOCK. have snow,
HICKETY, dickety, dock, And what will the
The mouse ran up the Robin do the
clock; poor thing ?
The clock struck one, He'll sit in a barn,
Down the mouse ran, And to keep him- ?,:..'!I
Hickety, dickety, dock. self warm
Will hide his head under his wing, poor
thing.

CUCKOO.
W-HAT do you do? In June
.In April I change my tune;
I open my bill; In July
S In May Away I fly;
I sing night and In August
day; Away I must.






24 THE NURSERY WORLD.


THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.

;' 1 HEY diddle diddle,
S/ The cat and the fiddle,
V The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed
TTo see the sport,
And the dish run away with the spoon.

-POOR ROBIN.
//HE north --
winds do blow,
And we shall
DICKETY DOCK. have snow,
HICKETY, dickety, dock, And what will the
The mouse ran up the Robin do the
clock; poor thing ?
The clock struck one, He'll sit in a barn,
Down the mouse ran, And to keep him- ?,:..'!I
Hickety, dickety, dock. self warm
Will hide his head under his wing, poor
thing.

CUCKOO.
W-HAT do you do? In June
.In April I change my tune;
I open my bill; In July
S In May Away I fly;
I sing night and In August
day; Away I must.































:343













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5tt..
















I '4















LITTTLE: RED RIDING HOOD.





THE NURSERY WORLD. 28

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.
ON the borders of a great forest, there lived long
ago, a woodman and his wife, who had a sweet
little daughter. She
was such a good
child that her
mother made for
her a little red cloak
with a hood to it,
and she looked so
pretty in it that their
neighbours used to
S e i call her Red Riding-
Hood. One day her
mother called the child to her, and told her that
she wished her to take a
present to her grandmother
who lived in the midst of ,
the wood. She tied on Red
Riding-Hood's cloak and
gave her a basket; in it were
nice cakes, a little butter, '
and a bottle of cowslip wine. .^".
Little Red Riding-Hood
kissed her mother and went on her errand; never





26 THE NURSERY WORLD.

having heard that there was a large, fierce wolf in
the forest, who would eat her if he could. She
ran merrily along the green-
wood paths, sometimes
"'^ f stopping to gather a few
S i flowers, sometimes to chase
a butterfly, and once to
speak to Hugh, the wood-
"'I ." man, who, with his hound
', beside him, was cutting
Sd own trees.
.,.. ,-But, by-and-bye, she saw
S''".' an animal rather like a dog
by her side. He said, "How
do you do, little girl?" "Very well, thank you," said
the child. And where are you going," asked the
wolf (for it was that cruel beast). I am going to
see my Granny who lives in the house in the midst
of the wood," she answered; "and to take her some
nice things." Now the wolf would have eaten
her up then, only he knew that Hugh and his dog
were very near them; so he said, "Good-bye,"
and ran off, taking the road that led to Granny's
house. As soon as he reached it, he rapped at
the door with his paw, and Granny, who wa$, in
bed ill, asked, "Who is there ?" "Little Red





THE NURSERY WORLD. 27

Riding-Hood," said the wicked wolf. "Pull the
string, my dear," said Granny, "and the latch will
come up." The wolf did so, rushed in, and ate
poor Granny up. Then he got into bed.
Red Riding-Hood came at last, and knocked at
the door. Pull the string!" cried the wolf. The
child did so, came in, and gave her mother's
message. "Come and sit up on my bed," said the
pretended Granny. Red Riding-Hood obeyed
her. "Granny," said the little innocent, "what
great ears you have." "All the better to hear with,
my child," growled the
wolf. "And what a great .
nose you have, Granny." : ,
"All the better to smell
with, my child." What
1 i i *d
large red eyes you have,
too." "All the better to
see you with, my dear." :l, i,.. .i
"And, oh, what great
teeth!" "All the better to
eat you with." And the 4"-"
wolf sprang at the child,
but an arrow came through the open door, and the
wolf fell over dead. Then Hugh and his dog rushed
in and the woodman carried her to her mother.





28 THE NURSERY WORLD.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
ONCE upon a time a merchant, who lived in the
East, had to make a long journey to see after
some business. He asked
his three daughters what

.. a present. The eldest
-"- asked for a diamond
Necklace; the second
:. -,chose a cashmere shawl;
-but the youngest said,
S"I should like a white
rose. The merchant
finished his business
very successfully, and then bought his promised
gifts for his children: but he could nowhere find
a white rose, for the roses of that country were all
red or pink. One evening he lost his way in a
wood, and seeing a fine castle near, he rode up to
it, and blew the horn at the gate; the doors flew
open, but he saw only a lighted hall and a pair of
hands. One of these hands led him in, and the
other took his horse, and he found himself placed
before a table, spread with a delicious supper. He
was so hungry that when the hands handed him





THE NURSERY WORLD. 29

the dishes, he helped himself without asking any
questions; when he rose from the table, the hands
lighted him to a bedroom, and he was glad to rest
and sleep. The next day the hands brought
breakfast; and showed him a beautiful garden, in
which was a splendid white rose tree. He was just
gathering a rose when, with a terrible roar, a great
lion sprang out from the trees and seized him.
What do you mean by stealing my roses," said
the Beast, "after my hospitality to you?" The
merchant, very much frightened, explained that
he did not know it was wrong to gather a rose for
his daughter. The Beast asked him if his daughter
was good and gentle; and the father answered,
"Yes, and very lovely." "Then," said the Beast,
" if you will give her to me, I will spare your life;
but you must swear to me that you will either bring
her or come back yourself in a month's time, or I
shall tear you to pieces." The merchant swore as
the beast desired him. He did not mean, however,
to send his child, but to return himself when his
affairs were settled. The Beast then let him go
with his white rose.
When he told his children what had happened
they were sad, but Beauty said that he must keep
his promise, and made him take her to the lion's





80 THE NURSERY WORLD.

castle. She thought it
better to die than break
her promise. But the
Beast did not eat her.
He gave her every-
thing she wished, and
amused her with fairy
music. But she longed
Sto pay a visit to her
Some. The Beast said
she might do so, but if
she did not come back in a week he should die.
Beauty promised that she would. But she was so
happy at home that ten
days passed before she ',.
remembered her pro- -iiii. j
mise. When she got.-_
back to the castle, she c-" n
found the poor Beast 10h
dying. "Oh! what can I
do for you, she cried. r
The Beast said, "If you
will kiss me without -J- i
fear I shall live." Beauty
did so, and to her surprise he changed into a prince.
He married Beauty, and they were very happy.





THE NURSERY WORLD. 31



OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.
_-- "^ OLD Mother Hubbard
i ;i Went to the cupboard
To get the poor dog a bone,
S. But when she got there
The cupboard was bare,
S~A .' nd so the poor dog had none.
I'll:_ She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
And when she came back
.. I I The poor dog was dead.
ll/Sl i aia She went to the joiner's
T To get him a coffin,
B.But when she came back
The poor dog was laughing.
She took a clean dish She went to the tavern
To get him some tripe, For white wine and red,
But when. she came back And when she came back
He was smoking his pipe. The dog stood on his head.
She went to the fish shop She went to the hatter's
To buy him some fish, To buy him a hat,
And when she came back But when she came back
He was licking the dish. He was feeding the cat.
She went to the ale-house She went to the barber's
To get him some beer, To buy him a wig,
And when she came back And when she came back
The dog sat on a chair. He was dancing a jig.





82 THE NURSERY WORLD.

S !She went to the fruiterer's
', To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.
She went to the tailor's
i To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
SI He was riding the goat.
She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes,
j But when she came back
.. I He was reading the news.
i ,- She went to the sempstress'
To buy him some linen,
-- But when she came back,
The dog was a-spinning.

She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dressed in his clothes,. .

The dame made a curtsey, --. ,
The dog made a bow, -
The dame said, Your servant," /
The dog said, Bow, wow."-


THE END.




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