• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The skillful huntsman
 Claus and his wonderful staff
 How dame Margery twist saw more...
 Clever peter and the two bottl...
 Hans Hecklemann's luck
 Farmer Griggs's Boggart
 The bird in the linden tree
 The apple of contentment
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Pepper & salt, or, Seasoning for young folk
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055012/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pepper & salt, or, Seasoning for young folk
Alternate Title: Pepper and salt
Seasoning for young folk
Physical Description: xiii, 1, 115, 5 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pyle, Howard, 1853-1911
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: Harper and Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Howard Pyle.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy donated by Robert Egolf.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055012
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232692
notis - ALH3088
oclc - 06992098
lccn - 04005482

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Preface
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
    List of Illustrations
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
    The skillful huntsman
        Page xv
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Two opinions
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Ye song of ye foolish old woman
            Page 10
            Page 11
        A newspaper puff
            Page 12
            Page 13
    Claus and his wonderful staff
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Three fortunes
            Page 24
            Page 25
        Venturesome boldness
            Page 26
            Page 27
        Superficial culture
            Page 28
            Page 29
    How dame Margery twist saw more than was good for her
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Ye song of ye gossips
            Page 40
            Page 41
        A victim to science
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Play and earnest
            Page 44
            Page 45
    Clever peter and the two bottles
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        The accident of birth
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Ye romantic adventures of three tailors
            Page 58
            Page 59
        Fancy and fact
            Page 60
            Page 61
    Hans Hecklemann's luck
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Ye two wishes
            Page 70
            Page 71
        A verse with a moral, but no name
            Page 72
            Page 73
        Ye song of ye rajah and ye fly
            Page 74
            Page 75
    Farmer Griggs's Boggart
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Pride in distress
            Page 84
            Page 85
        Profession and practice
            Page 86
            Page 87
        A tale of a tub
            Page 88
            Page 89
    The bird in the linden tree
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Ye story of a blue China plate
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Moral blindness
            Page 102
            Page 103
        Overconfidence
            Page 104
            Page 105
    The apple of contentment
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        The force of need
            Page 116
            Page 117
        A disappointment
            Page 118
            Page 119
        Ye sad story concerning one innocent little lamb and four wicked wolves
            Page 120
            Page 121
    Advertising
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1885, by

HARPER & BROTHERS,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.


All rigds reserved.






























H ERE, my little man, you may hold my cap and bells,
--and you, over there, may hold the bauble! Now,
then, I am ready to talk as a wise man should, and am a giddy-pated jester no longer!
This is what I have to say:
One must have a little pinch of seasoning in this dull, heavy life of ours; one should
never look to have all the troubles, the labors, and the cares, with never a whit of
innocent jollity and mirth. Yes; one must smile now and then, if for nothing else
than to lift the corners of the lips in laughter that are only too often dragged down
in sorrow.
It is for this that I sit here now, telling you all manner of odd quips and jests until
yon sober, wise man shakes his head and goes his way, thinking that I am even more
of a shallow-witted knave than I really am. But, prut! Who cares for that? I am
sure that I do not if you do not.
Yet listen! One must not look to have nothing but pepper and salt in this life of
ours-no, indeed! At that rate we would be worse off than we are now. I only mean
that it is a good and pleasant thing to have something to lend the more solid part a
little savor now and then
So, here I'll sit; and, perhaps, when you have been good children, and have learned
your lessons or done your work, your mother will let you come and play a little while
with me. I will always be ready and waiting for you here, and I will warrant your






viii PREFA CE.

mother that I will do you no harm with anything that I may tell you. If I can only
make you laugh and be merry for a little while, then my work will be well done, and I
will be glad in the doing of it.
And now give me my cap and bells again, for my wits are growing cold without
them; and you will be pleased to reach me my bauble once more, for I love to have
him by me.
Will you be seated? And you, over there, seat the baby on the grass! Are you
ready? Very well; then I will tell you a story, and it shall be about "The Skillful
Huntsman."














Table-of-Contents.


H-. p.



PAGE
THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN .
Two OPINIONS ..9
YE SONG OF YE FOOLISH OLD WOMAN .
A NEWSPAPER PUFF .

CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL STAFF .15
THREE FORTUNES 25
VENTURESOME BOLDNESS. 27
SUPERFICIAL CULTURE 29

HOW DAME MARGERY TWIST SAW MORE THAN WAS GOOD
FOR HER 31
YE SONG OF YE GossIPs 41
A VICTIM TO SCIENCE 43
PLAY AND EARNEST 45

CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO BOTTLES-. 47
THE ACCIDENT OF BIRTH 57
YE ROMANTIC ADVENTURES OF THREE TAILORS 59
/ FANCY AND FACT 61

HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK 63
YE Two WISHES 71
A VERSE WITH A MORAL, BUT NO NAME 73
YE SONG OF YE RAJAH AND yE FLY. 75

FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART .77
PRIDE IN DISTRESS 85
PROFESSION AND PRACTICE 87
ATALE OF ATUB 89






x TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PAGE
THE BIRD IN THE LINDEN TREE 9
YE STORY OF A BLUE CHINA PLATE IOI
MORAL BLINDNESS '. 103
OVERCONFIDENCE 105

THE APPLE OF CONTENTMENT. 107
THE FORCE OF NEED. 117
A DISAPPOINTMENT 19
YE SAD STORY CONCERNING ONE INNOCENT LITTLE LAMB AND FOUR WICKED
WOLVES .... 121
























PAGE
THIS IS THE WAY THAT ONE IN CAP AND MOTLEY STOPS FOR A WHILE ALONG THE Frntp
Frontisfiece
STONY PATH OF LIFE TO MAKE YOU LAUGH .
JACOB'S MOTHER AND THE HERR MAYOR 2
JACOB AND THE RED ONE 3
JACOB SHOOTS AT THE MAGPIE 4
JACOB AND THE MAGIC PLOUGH 5
JACOB AND THE RED ONE GO HUNTING TOGETHER 6
JACOB AND GRETCHEN GET THE BEST OF THE RED ONE AND GO HOME TOGETHER HAPPILY 7
Two OPINIONS .. .. 9
YE SONG OF YE FOOLISH OLD WOMAN. .II

A NEWSPAPER PUFF. 13
CLAUS AND THE MASTER OF BLACK ARTS 16
CLAUS AND THE WHITE SNAKE 17
THE MASTER IS ANGRY .. . 18
CLAUS LISTENS TO THE TALK OF THE TWO RAVENS .19
CLAUS AND THE MANIKIN 20
HANS DISCOVERS CLAUS'S LUCK 21
How HANS WAS -CAUGHT 22
THREE FORTUNES . 25
VENTURESOME BOLDNESS 27
SUPERFICIAL CULTURE .. . 29
DAME TWIST DRINKETH TEA .. 32
THE LITTLE MAN AND THE GREAT HORSE .. 33
DAME TWIST VISITS A STRANGE PATIENT 34
DAME TWIST DRIVES AWAY .THE LITTLE FOLKS 35
DAME MARGERY TWIST OOETH TO SEE THE MERRY DOINGS AT THE FAIR 36
DAME TWIST SEES THE LITTLE MAN. IN GREEN FOR THE LAST TIME 37
YE SONG OF yE GOSSIPS .. . . 41







xii LIST OF ILL US TRA TIONS.
PAGE
A VICTIM TO SCIENCE 43
PLAY AND EARNEST 45
CLEVER PETER AND THE LITTLE GENTLEMAN IN BLACK 49
CLEVER PETER RIDES TO THE KING'S PALACE UPON HIS FINE HORSE 50
PETER EATS WITH THE KING AND PRINCESS .
CLEVER PETER AND THE UNLUCKY BOTTLE 53
CLEVER PETER OPENS THE UNLUCKY BOTTLE FOR THE KING AND PRINCESS 54
THE ACCIDENT OF BIRTH 57
YE ROMANTIC ADVENTURES OF THREE TAILORS 59

FANCY AND FACT 6
HANS HECKLEMANN 64
CATHERINE 64
HANS HECKLEMANN GOES TO THE COTTAGE OF THE OLD WISE WOMAN IN SEARCH OF HIS
LUCK 65
HANS HECKLEMANN AND THE OLD WISE WOMAN 66
HANS FINDS HIS LUCK 67
HANS HECKLEMANN PLOUGHS FOR GOLD 68
YE TWO WISHES 71
A VERSE WITH A MORAL, BUT NO NAME 73
YE SONG OF YE RAJAH AND YE FLY 75
FARMER GEORGIE GRIGGS .78
DAME MALLY GRIGGS 79
FARMER GRIGGS AND THE BOGGART 80
THE DEPARTURE 81
FARMER GRIGGS AND THE WISE MAN 82
THE BOGGART REJOICES 83
PRIDE IN DISTRESS 85
PROFESSION AND PRACTICE 87
A TALE OF A TUB .89
YE KING 92
PRINCE JOHN 92
THE PRINCE AIDS THE OLD WOMAN 93
THE GREAT UGLY TROLL FINDS THE PRINCE BY THE FIRE 94
THE GOOSE-HERD AND HER DAUGHTER MEET THE PRINCESS AT THE ROADSIDE 95
THE PRINCE LOOKS THROUGH THE MAGIC KEY 96
THE OLD KING REJOICES AT HIS NEW DAUGHTER-IN-LAW 97
YE STORY OF A BLUE CHINA PLATE IOI
MORAL BLINDNESS 103







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. xiii

PAGE
OVERCONFIDENCE 105
THE LITTLE MAN ASKS FOR HIS CAP 8
CHRISTINE AND THE APPLE .. .
CHRISTINE'S MOTHER AND SISTERS WISH FOR THE APPLE IIO
THE KING REACHES FOR THE APPLE III
THE KING TALKS WITH THE WISE MAN 112
THE KING'S STEWARD AND CHRISTINE 113
CHRISTINE GIVES THE APPLE TO THE KING 14
THE FORCE OF NEED 117
A DISAPPOINTMENT 19
YE SAD STORY CONCERNING ONE INNOCENT LITTLE LAMB AND FOUR WICKED WOLVES .121






















I' "













THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN


Showing how a man may gain
y" best of y Bargain with
y" Red One by y
help of his
wife

















THE 6KILLFULHUNTJJ\AN







NCE UPON A TIME there was a lad named Jacob Boehm, who was a
practical huntsman.
One day Jacob said to his mother, Mother, I would like to marry Gret-
chen-the nice, pretty little daughter of the Herr Mayor."
Jacob's mother thought that he was crazy. Marry the daughter of the Herr Mayor,
indeed! You want to marry the daughter of the Herr Mayor? Listen; many a man
wants and wants, and nothing comes of it!"
That was what Jacob Boehm's mother said to him.
But Jacob was deaf in that ear; nothing would do but his mother must go to the Herr
Mayor, and ask for leave for him to marry Gretchen. And Jacob begged and begged so
prettily that at last his mother promised to go and do as he wished. So off she went,
though doubt was heavy in her shoes, for she did not know how the Herr Mayor would
take it.
"So Jacob wants to marry Gretchen, does he ?" said the Herr Mayor.
Yes; that was what Jacob wanted.
"And is he a practical huntsman ?" said the Herr Mayor.
Oh yes, he was that.
"So good," said the Herr Mayor. "Then tell Jacob that when he is such a clever
huntsman as to be able to shoot the whiskers off from a running hare without touching
the skin, then he can have Gretchen."
Then Jacob's mother went back home again. "Now," said she, "Jacob will, at least, be
satisfied."
"Yes," said Jacob, when she had told him all that the Herr Mayor had said to her, that
is a hard thing to do; but what one man has done, another man can." Sp he shouldered
Shis gun, and started away into the world to learn to be as clever a huntsman as the Herr
Mayor had said.
He plodded on and on until at last he fell in with a tall stranger dressed all in red.
"Where are you going, Jacob?" said the tall stranger, calling him by his name, just as if
j he had eaten pottage out of the same dish with him.






2 PEPPER AND SALT.

I am going," said Jacob, "to learn to be so clever a huntsman that I can shoot the
whiskers off from a running hare without touching the skin."
That is a hard thing to learn," said the tall stranger.
Yes; Jacob knew that it was a hard thing; but what one man had done another man
could do.
"What will you give me if I teach you to be as clever a huntsman as that ?" said the
tall stranger.
"What will you take to teach me?" said Jacob; for he saw that the stranger had a
horse's hoof instead of a foot, and he did not like his looks, I can tell you.
Oh, it is nothing much that I want," said the tall man; "only just sign your name to
this paper-that is all."





















.2ACOBV. 0




But what was in the paper? Yes; Jacob had to know what was in the paper before
he would set so much as a finger to it.
Oh, there was nothing in the paper, only this: that when the red one should come for
Jacob at the end of ten years' time, Jacob should promise to go along with him whitherso-
ever he should take him.
At this Jacob hemmed and hawed and scratched his head, for he did not know about
that. "All the same," said he, "I will sign the paper, but on one condition."
At this the red one screwed up his face as though he had sour beer in his mouth, for he
did not like the sound. of the word "condition." "Well," said he, "what is the condition?"
It is only this," said Jacob: "that you shall.be my servant for the ten years, and if, in







THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 3

all that time, I should chance to ask you a question that you cannot answer, then I am to
be my own man again."
Oh, if that was all, the red man was quite willing for that.
Then he took Jacob's gun, and blew down into the barrel of it. "Now," said he, "you
are as skillful a huntsman as you asked to be."
That I must try," said Jacob. So Jacob and the red one went around hunting here
and hunting there until they scared up a hare. "Shoot!" said the red one; and Jacob
shot. Clip! off flew the whiskers of the hare as neatly as one could cut them off with the
barber's shears.
"Yes, good !" said Jacob, "now I am a skillful huntsman."
Then the stranger in red gave Jacob a little bone whistle, and told him .to blow in it
whenever he should want him. After that Jacob signed the paper, and the stranger went
one way and he went home again.





















acob. a nd.The'ec One:.



Well, Jacob brushed the straws off from his coat, and put a fine shine on his boots, and
then he set off to the Herr Mayor's house.
How do you find yourself, Jacob ?" said the Herr Mayor.
So good," said Jacob,
"And are you a skillful huntsman now?" said the Herr Mayor.
Oh yes, Jacob was a skillful huntsman now.
Yes, good! But the Herr Mayor must have proof of that. Now, could Jacob shoot a
feather out of the tail of the magpie flying over the trees yonder?
Oh yes! nothing easier than that. So Jacob raised the gun to his cheek. Bang! went






4 PEPPER AND SALT.

the gun, and down fell a feather from the tail of the magpie. At this the Herr Mayor stared
and stared, for he had never seen such shooting.
"And now may I marry Gretchen ?" said Jacob.
At this the Herr Mayor scratched his head, and hemmed and hawed. No; Jacob could
not marry Gretchen yet, for he had always said and sworn that the man who should marry
Gretchen should bring with him a plough that could go of itself, and plough three furrows
at once. If Jacob would show him such a plough as that, then he might marry Gretchen
and welcome. That was what the Herr Mayor said.
Jacob did not know how about that; perhaps he could get such a plough, perhaps he
could not. If such a plough was to be had, though, he would have it. So off he went
home again, and the Herr Mayor thought that he was rid of him
now for sure and certain.
But when Jacob had come home, he went back of the
wood-pile and blew a turn or two on the little bone whistle
that the red stranger had given him.
No sooner had he done this
than the other stood before .
him as suddenly as though f
: he had just stepped out of
C, the door of nowhere.
"What do you want, C
Jacob ?" said he.
"I would like," said
Jacob, "to have a plough that
can go by itself and plough
three furrows at once."
That you shall have," said
C o the red one. Then he thrust *

co.hoot.a- et, and drew forth the prettiest
little plough that you ever saw.
He stood it on the ground before Jacob, and it grew large as you see it in the picture.
"Plough away," said he, and then he went back again whither he had come.
So Jacob laid his hands to the plough and-whisk!-away it went like John Storm-
wetter's colt, with Jacob behind it. Out of the farm-yard they went, and down the road,
and so to the Herr Mayor's house, and behind them lay three fine. brown furrows,
smoking in the sun.
When the Herr Mayor saw thIm coming he opened his eyes, you may be sure, for
he had never seen such a plough as that in all of his life before.
"And now," said Jacob, "I should like to marry Gretchen, if you please."
At this the Herr Mayor hemmed and hawed and scratched his head again. No; Jacob
could not marry Gretchen yet, for the Herr Mayor had always said and sworn that the man
who married Gretchen should bring with him a purse that always had two pennies in it and.
could never be emptied, no matter how much was taken out of it.
Jacob did not know how about that; perhaps he could get it and perhaps he could not
If such a thing was to. be had, though, he would have it, as sure as the Mecklenburg folks g






THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 5

brew sour beer. So off he went home again, and the Herr Mayor thought that now he was
rid of him for certain.
But Jacob went back of the wood-pile and blew on his bone whistle again, and once
more the red one came at his bidding.
"What will you have now ?" said he to Jacob.
I should like," said Jacob," to have a purse which shall always have two pennies in it,
no matter how much I take out of it."
"That you shall have," said the red one; whereupon he thrust his hand into his pocket,
and fetched out a beautiful silken purse with two pennies in it. He gave the purse to
Jacob, and then he went away again as quickly as he had come.
After he had gone, Jacob began taking pennies out of his purse and pennies out of his
purse, until he had more than a hatful-hui. I would like to have such a purse as that.
Then he marched off to the Herr Mayor's house with his chin up, for he might hold his
head as high as any, now that he had such a purse as that in his pocket. As for the Herr
Mayor, he thought that it was a nice, pretty little purse; but could it do this and that as
he had said?
Jacob would show him that; so he began taking pennies and pennies out of it, until
he had filled all the pots and pans in the house with them. And now might he marry
Gretchen?
Yes; that he might! So said the Herr Mayor; for who would not like to have a lad
for a son-in-law who always had two pennies more in his purse than he could spend.











SJacob. and.fhe.P agic Plough,,-;


So Jacob married his Gretchen, and, between his plough and his purse, he was busy
enough, I can tell you.
So the days went on and on and on until the ten years had gone by and the time had
come for the red one to fetch Jacob away with him. As for Jacob, he was in a sorry state
of dumps, as you may well believe.
At last Gretchen spoke to him. ."See, Jacob," said she, "what makes you so down in
the mouth ?"
Oh! nothing at all," said Jacob.
But this did not satisfy Gretchen, for she could see that there was more to be told than
Jacob had spoken. So she teased and-teased,:until- at last Jacob, told her all, and that the
red one was to. come the next day and take him- off as his servant, unless he could ask him
a question which he could not answer.






6 PEPPER AND SALT.

"Prut!" said Gretchen, "and is that all? Then there is no stuffing to that sausage, for
I can help you out of your trouble easily enough." Then she told Jacob that when the
next day should come he should do thus and so, and she would do this and that, and
between them they might cheat the red one after all.
So, when the next day came, Gretchen went into the pantry and smeared herself all
over with honey. Then she ripped open a bed and rolled herself in the feathers.
By-and-by came the red one. Rap! tap! tap! he knocked at the door.
Are you ready to go with me now, Jacob ?" said he.
Yes; Jacob was quite ready to go, only he would like to have one favor granted him
first.
What is it that you want ?" said the red one.
"Only this," said Jacob: "I would like to shoot one more shot out of my old gun
before I go with you."
Oh! if that was all, he might do that and welcome. So Jacob took down his gun, and
he and the red one went out together, walking side by side, for all the world as though
they were born brothers.
/ i" -

















e.Red-Onae,' -



By-and-by they saw a wren. "Shoot at that," said the red one.
"Oh no," said Jacob, that is too small."
So they went on a little farther.
By-and-by they saw a raven. "Shoot at that, then," said the red one.
Oh no," said Jacob, that is too black."
So they went on a little farther.
By-and-by they came to a ploughed field, and there was something skipping over the
furrows that looked for all the world like a great bird. That was Gretchen; for the feath-
ers stuck to the honey and all over her, so that she looked just like a great bird.






THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 7

Shoot at that! shoot at that!" said the red one, clapping his hands together.
Oh yes," said Jacob, I will shoot at that." So he raised his gun and took aim. Then
he lowered his gun again. But what is it ?" said he.
At this the red one screwed up his eyes, and looked and looked, but for the life of him
he could not tell what it was.
No matter what it is," said he, only shoot and be done with it, for I must be going."
"Yes, good! But what is it?" said Jacob.
Then the red one looked and looked again, but he could tell no better this time than
he could before. It may be this and it may be that," said he. Only shoot and be done
with it, for they are waiting for me at home."
"Yes, my friend," said Jacob, that is all very good; only tell me what it is and I will
shoot."
"Thunder and lightning!" bawled the red one, "I do not know what it is "
"Then be off with you!" said Jacob, "for, since you cannot answer my question, all is
over between us two."
At this the red one had to leave Jacob, so he fled away over hill and dale, bellowing
like a bull.
As for Jacob and Gretchen, they went back home together, very well pleased with each
other and themselves.


And the meaning of all this is, that many another man beside Jacob Boehm
would find himself in a pretty scrape only for his wife.













Jacob and- Gretchen- get-fhe.be6t-of- fhe-Red.One-and.g~-home.togefhe-happity-tj
I

















wo Opinions











^('. ^ ,'(YC, oOrst- op inyuron.d
S|!noOy. chatterin gagpe -once-
.' 'A-talkingmor abbTing-hairbra.ned-dunce.
Cae-o-wh saiereanv ign-pot-or stood
.vHe-noddred-ohivhead-wifrom-inamodinhair
: Andy.o is-dthgoodday forhedrwal-ptaware-
"' I-Theat-.fr6-ignp-po fole riindgltrlf. nger- fher-

S'i oyuWasget-.onlyablo -dof-woodubt har.
I mor& -lik e-june. ffhan -fhe -firs tofoA ayr
T '1hep t- said never- a-w ord .
]^ '* < "IPvejust dropped-over-from -Lincolnshire,
S!I o yfihome-isdin-fhe-Caftedral- Spire-
,iZ`li '7 fhe-air-is-cooler-andrpurefh 6hi her.
You-get-as-you~v e-doubtless. eard."
0o. on-he-chatter ed.-wifh-nevr-a- stop.
And-on.andon-till.you'd: fhink -he.would-.diop
('Ihe-post-was, dumb a -your- hat-)_
f B ut, 5 o. as-:fhepi- co uld-, sa -hi s.- av -
H e-did.n't- care.whefh er.if poke-afl-day.7-
1 For- fhu'.he.obseryed-ai.he.walked wav-
,^/ oT An-intelligen cpreature-fhat.".
(Yteiecond. opinion. J. ',
o "
"OC Now.once-when-fhe sky-wa spouring-rain,
SThe- Lagpie-chanced,.to.come-by.again-
(C And-fhere-stood-:fhe-poit-in-fhe-wet. ,
"Helloa." s aid-fhe-Al agpie.."What-you-here. 'r, '
Pray.tell.me.-Ibefg.i-fhere.heltering.near-
A.terrible. day-for."this-timeofr.fhe-year.
'T.would. make .-a- 5aint-Anfhony. fret."
"IFbeg.your-pardon-I.did.n't-quite-hear." i
(Then. louder)" Iay-is-fhere sheltering.near"' i
But-fhe-post.was-as- dumb.as-De ath.- .'
"What*can.t.you.answer-a.question-pray.
You.will.not-No-hen-I.ll-s11 ay. good-day.
And-flirting. his. tail. hewalked. away- '" '"
You.'r.a. fool." (fhis. under-hi$.breaf.)
L'. ENVo Y.
The-moral.fhat-fhis-story.traces. .
13- C ircumstances-alter.cases. ,,






2















* Song of y
Foolish Old Jloman





















Sr Coing-ofr-
yoefoolifh.
old-woman.

I faw an old woman go up a fleep hill,
And fhe chuckled and laughed,as fhewent,wifhawill.
Andyet,as fhe went,
Herbody was bent,.
Wifhaload asheavy as fins in lent.
"Oh!why doyou chuckle,old woman;"fays I,
As you climb up the hill-fide fo fteep and fo high?"
"Becaufe,do n't you fee.
I'll preCently be,
At fhetopoffhe hill. He! he! "fays fhe.
I faw fhe old woman go downward again;
And the eafily travelled,with never a pain;
Yet fhe loudly cried,
And guffily fighed,
And groaned; though fhe road was level and wide.
"Ohlwhy,myold woman,~fays I,"do you weep,
Whenyo laughed,as you climbed upfhe hill-fidefb oo
"High-ho! I am vexed, Iftep?
Because I expects,
Says the," I hall ache in climbing fhe next.

H-Pyle















Newspaper Puf












puff.
Twelve geee "Stand here
In, a row Steadily,
(5 fhefe Neverfear,
Always go). Wait for me."
Down=hill.
They meander, '- Forfh hewent,
Tail to bill; Cautious,flo,
Firft the gander. Bodybent,
50 fheyftalked, Head low.
Bold as.bra., ... Al Ifhereft
As fheywalked d4 Stood fatt,
TIo the graf. Waiting for
-r- ( ~What paffed.
Suddenly
Stopped the throng; '' -" Wind cam
Plain tofe Withfacaper,
Something's wrong. Caught fame
Ys, there is- Dally paper.
Something white! | V q Up it failed
No quiz; Infheair;
Clear to'fight. Courage failed
('Twill amufe Then.an d here.
When you're told -- caredwell
"Twa a. news- -Outofwits
Paper old.) Neary fell
Into fits.
Gander poke. Offfheyfped,
Braver bird Helter- kelter,
Never broke 'Till fhey'd.fled
Egg,I've heard : Under shelter.

SPoor geefe!
_:-"" Never.mind;
Ofhergeefe
Onecan.find,
CCuftfhe fame
Foolish caper
Atempty wind
Inapaper.
lt ,yf, l

















CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL

STAFF


Showing how one should not seek to take
more than one can carry










a
























; TJH ANS and Claus were born brothers. Hans
t was the elder and Claus was the younger;
Hans was the richer and Claus was the poorer-
-_ that is the way that the world goes sometimes.
Everything was easy for Hans at home; he
drank much beer, and had sausages and white bread
three times a day; but Claus worked and worked, and no luck came of it-that, also, is
the way that the worldgoes sometimes.
One time Claus spoke to Hans of this matter. See, Hans," said he, "you should
give me some money, for that which belongs to one brother should help the other."
But Hans saw through different colored spectacles than Claus. No; he would do
nothing of the kind. If Claus wanted money he had better go out into the world to look
for it; for some folks said that money was rolling about in the wide world like peas on a
threshing-floor. So said .Hans, for Claus was so poor that Hans was ashamed of him, and
wanted him to leave home so as to be rid of him for good and all.
This was how Claus came to go out into the world.
But before he went, he cut- himself a good stout staff of hazel-wood to help his heavy
feet over the road.
Now the staff that Claus had cut was a rod of witch-hazel, which has the power of
showing wherever treasure lies buried. But Claus knew no more of that than the chick
in the shell.
So off he went into the world, walking along with great contentment, kicking up little
clouds of dust at every step, and whistling as gayly as though trouble had never been
hatched from mares' eggs. By-and-by he came to the great town, and then he .went to the
market-place and stood, with many others, with a straw in his mouth-for that meant
that he wanted to take service with somebody.
Presently there came along an old, old man, bent almost double with the weight of the
years which he carried upon his shoulders. This was a famous doctor of the black-arts.
He had read as many as a hundred books, so that he was more learned than any man in all
of the world-even the minister of the village. He knew, as well as the birds know when
the cherries are ripe, that Claus had a stick of witch-hazel, so he came to' the market-






16 PEPPER AND SALT.

place, peering here and peering there, just as honest folks do when they are looking for a
servant. After a while he came to where Claus was, and then he stopped in front of
him. Do you want to take service, my friend ?" said he.
Yes, that was what Claus wanted; why else should he stand in the market-place with a
straw in his mouth ?
Well, they bargained and bargained, and talked and talked, and the end of the matter
was that Claus agreed to sell his services to the old master of black-arts for seven pennies



































a week. So they made their bargain, and off went the master with Claus at his heels.
After they had come a little distance away from the crowd at the market-place, the master
of black-arts asked Claus where he had got that fine staff of hazel.
Oh, I got it over yonder," said Claus, pointing with his thumb.
But could he find the place again ?
Well, Claus did not know how about that; perhaps he could, and perhaps he could not.
But suppose that Claus had a thaler in his hand, then could he find the place again ?






CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL STAFF. 17

Oh yes; in that case Claus was almost sure that he could find the place again.
-So, good. Then here was a bottle of yellow water. If Claus would take the bottle of
yellow water, and pour it over the stump from which he had cut his staff, there would come
seven green snakes out of a hole at the foot of the hazel-bush. After these seven snakes,
there would come a white snake, with a golden crown on its head, from out of the same
hole. Now if Claus would catch that white snake in the empty bottle, and bring it to the
master of black-arts, he should have not one thaler, but two-that was what the master
said.
Oh yes, Claus could do that; that was no such hard thing. So he took the bottle of
yellow water and off he went.
By-and-by he came to the place where he had cut his hazel-twig. There he did as the
master of black-arts had told him; he poured the yellow water over the stump of hazel
from which he had cut his staff. Then everything happened just as the other had said:
first there came three green snakes out of the hole at the foot of the hazel-bush, and after
they had all gone, there came a white snake, with a little golden crown on its head, and
with its body gleaming like real silver. Then Claus caught the white snake, and put it
into the bottle and corked it up tightly. After he
had done this he went back to the master of black-
arts again.
Now this white snake was what the folk call a
tomt-snake in that land. Whoever eats of a broth
made of it can understand the language of all the
birds of the air and all the beasts of the field;
so nobody need wonder that the master was
as glad as glad could be to have his white
snake safe and sound.
He bade Claus build a fire of dry wood,
and as soon as there was a good blaze he set
a pot of water upon it to boil. When the -'
water in the pot began to boil, he chopped Us-nd-ffe
up the white snake into little pieces and
threw them into it. So the snake boiled and
boiled and boiled, and Claus stared with -won-
der as though he would never shut his eyes again.
Now it happened that just about the time that the broth was cooked, the master was
called out of the room for this or for that. No sooner was his back turned than Claus
began to wonder what the broth was like. I will just have a little taste," said he to him-
self; "surely it can do no harm to the rest of the soup." So he stuck his finger first into
the broth and then into his mouth; but what the broth tasted like he never could tell, for
just then the master came in again, and Claus was so frightened at what he had done that
he had no wits to think of the taste of anything.
Presently the master of black-arts went to the pot of broth, and, taking off the lid, began
smelling of it. But no sooner had he sniffed a smell of the steam than he began thumping
his head with his knuckles, and tearing his hair, and stamping his feet. "Somebody's had
a finger in my broth / !/" he roared. For the master knew at once that all the magic had
been taken out of it by the touch of Claus's finger.
3






18 PEPPER AND SALT.

As for poor Claus, he was so frightened that he fell upon his knees, and began begging:
"Oh! dear master-" But he got no further than this, for the master bawled at him,
"You have taken the best,
You may have the rest."

And so saying, he threw pot and broth and all at Claus, so that if he hadn't ducked
his head he might have been scalded to death. Then Claus ran out into the street, for he
saw that there was no place for him to stay in that house.






















STHEl'1A5TER' I"ANCRY',



Now in the street there was a cock and a hen, scratching and clucking together in the
dust, and Claus understood every word that they said to each other, so he stopped and
listened to them.
This is what they said:
The cock said to the hen, Yonder goes our new serving-man."
And the hen said to the cock, "Yes, yonder he goes."
And the cock said to the hen, He is leaving the best behind him."
And the hen said to the cock, "What is it that he is leaving ?"
And the cock said to the hen, He is leaving behind him the witch-hazel staff that he
brought with him."
And the hen said to the cock, Yes, that is so. He would be a fool to leave that behind,
yet he is not the first one to think that peas are pebbles."
As for Claus, you can guess how he opened his eyes, for he saw how the land lay, and
that he had other ears than he had before.






CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL STAFF. 19

"Hui!" said he, "that is good! I have bought more for my penny than I had in my
bargain."
As for the hazel staff, he was not going to leave that behind, you may be sure. So he
sneaked about the place till he laid hand on it again; then he stepped away, right foot fore-
most, for he did not know what the master of black-arts might do to him if he should
catch him.
Well, after he had left the town, he went along, tramp! tramp! tramp! until, by-and-by,
he grew tired and sat down beneath an oak-tree to rest himself a little.
Now, as he sat there, looking up through the leaves, thinking
of nothing at all, two ravens came flying and lit in the tree
above him. After a while the ravens began talking
together; and this was what they said:
The one raven said, Yonder is poor Claus sitting
below us."
And the other raven said, "Poor Claus, did you
say, brother? Do you not see the witch-hazel lying
on the ground beside him ?"
The one raven said, "Oh yes; I see that, but
what good does it do him ?"
And the other raven said, "It does him no
good now, but if he were to go home again and
strike on the great stone on the top of the hill
back of Herr Axel's house, then it would do him
good; for in it lies a great treasure of silver and
gold."JA
Claus had picked up his ears at all this talk,
you may be sure. "See," said he, "that is the
way that a man will pass by a great fortune
in the little world at home to seek for a little
fortune in the great world abroad "-which
was all very true. After that he lost no
time in getting back home again.
"What! are you back again ?" said Hans.
"Oh yes," said Claus, I am back again." C -/i.
"That is always the way with a pewter "-
penny," said Hans-for that is how some of r.The-.t
us are welcomed home after we have been away.
As for Claus, he was as full of thoughts as- an
egg is of meat, but he said nothing of them to Hans.
Off he went to the high hill back of Herr Axel's house, and there, sure enough, was the
great stone at the very top of the hill.
Claus struck on the stone with his oaken staff, and it opened like the door of a beer
vault, for all was blackness within. A flight of steps led down below, and down the steps
Claus went. But when he had come to the bottom of the steps, he stared till his eyes
were like great round saucers; for there stood sacks of gold and silver, piled up like bags
of grain in the malt-house.







20 PEPPER AND SALT.

At one end of the room was a great stone seat, and on the seat sat a little manikin
smoking a pipe. As for the beard of the little man, it was as long as he was short, for it
hung down so far that part of it touched the stone floor.
How do you find yourself, Claus ?" said the little manikin, calling Claus by his name.
So, good !" said Claus, taking off his hat to the other.
"And what would you like to have, Claus ?" said the little man.
I would like," said Claus, to have some money, if you please."
Take what you want," said the little man, "only do not forget to take the best with you."
Oh no; Claus would not forget the best; so he held the staff tighter than ever in his
fist-for what could be better than the staff that brought him there ? So he went here and
there, filling his pockets with the gold and silver money till they bulged out like the pockets
of a thief in the orchard; but all the time he kept tight hold of his staff, I can tell you.





ri7^ Gm













Claus-and.fthe, 4Aan ikin




When he had as much as his pockets could hold, he thanked the little manikin and
went his way, and the stone door closed behind him.
And now Claus lived like a calf in the green corn-field. Everything he had was of the
best, and, he had twice as much of that as any of the neighbors. Then how brother Hans
stared and scratched his head and wondered, when he saw how Claus sat in the sun all day,
doing nothing but smoking his pipe and eating of the best, as though he were a born
prince! Every day Claus went to the little man in the hill with his pockets empty, and
came back with them stuffed with gold and silver money. At last he had so much that
he could not count it, and so he had to send over to brother Hans for his quart-pot, so that
he might measure it.
But Hans was cunning. I will see what makes brother Claus so well-off in the world.
all of a sudden," said he; so he smeared the inside of the quart-pot with bird-lime.






CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL STAFF. 21

Then Claus measured his gold and silver money in Hans's quart-pot, and when he was
done with it he, sent it back again. But more went back with the quart-pot than came with
it, for two gold-pieces stuck to the bird-lime, and it was these that went back with the pot
to brother Hans.
"What!" cried Hans, has that stupid Claus found so much money that he has to meas-
ure it in a quart-pot? We must see the inside of this business!" So off he went to Claus's
house, and there he found Claus sitting in the sun and smoking his pipe, just as though he
owned all of the world.
"Where did you get all that money, Claus?" said Hans.
Oh! Claus could not tell him that.
But Hans was bound to know all about it, so he
begged and begged so prettily that at last Claus had to
tell him everything. Then, of course, nothing would do
but Hans must have a try with the hazel staff also.
Well, Claus made no words at that. He was a
good-natured fellow, and surely there was enough .
for both. So the upshot of the matter was that
Hans marched off with the hazel staff.
But Hans was no such simpleton as Claus; no,
not he. Oh no, he would not take all that trouble
for two poor pocketfuls of money. He would have ... '
a bagful; no, he would have two bagfuls. So he ..-
slung two meal sacks over his shoulder, and off he
started for the hill back of Herr Axel's house. "
When he came to the stone he knocked upon
it, and- it opened to him just as it had done for "
Claus. Down he went into the pit, and there sat
the little old manikin, just as he had done from
the very first. HansdiscovenrsClaus'-Luck.
How do you find yourself, Hans ?" said the
little old manikin.
Oh, Hans found himself very well. Might
he have some of the money that stood around the room in the sacks ?
Yes, that he might; only remember to take the best away with him.
Prut! teach a dog to eat sausages. Hans would see that he took the best, trust him
for that. So he filled the bags full, of gold, and never touched the silver-for, surely,
gold is better than anything else in the world, says Hans to himself. So, when he had
filled his two bags with gold, and had shaken the pieces well down, he flung the one
over one shoulder, and the other over the other, and then he had as much as he could
carry. As for the staff of witch-hazel, he let it lie where it was, for he only had two
hands and they were both full.
But Hans never got his two bags of gold away from the vault, for just as he was
leaving--bangl came the stone together, and caught him as though he was a mouse in
the door; and that was an end of him. That happened because he left the witch-hazel
behind.
That was the way in which Claus came to lose his magic staff; but that did not mat-







22 PEPPER AND SALT.

ter much, for he had enough to live on and to spare. So he married the daughter of
the Herr Baron (for he might marry whom he chose, now that he was rich), and after
that he lived as happy as a fly on the warm chimney.


Now, this is so-it is better to take a little away at a time and carry your
staff with you, than to take all at once and leave it behind.



















4





















































~P.



O















.O













three Fortunes






















Amerrye Houng fhmaker,- ido-
And a tailorand a baker, h ''ll l
Went to feek afeir fortunes, for tey had been told,
Wllhere a rainbow touched fhea ground,
(If if only could be found) TAILOR'0
\Wa a purfo ofat should be always full of gold. ; Y-ae? l*V

So fhtndy traveled daybyday, Ito ay.
Till fhe fhoomaker a pretty lasi-espied; -<
hn quofh he," It fro eem bad tore,
Flhore can never, never be,
Better luck fhanfhb in all fhenowh world beto ide.ay.







ather fro is an I'v tridto od-bye n,)
And went on,till by-and-by
They espied'a fhadyinn beside, fhe way; \1 ^l^ ^^^^^ ^ "0''
Where fhe Hoftefl fair,- awidow-
In a lone fectifion hid5"Oh, 0 1
Here-i5 luck! "fhe Itailor-faid; "and he'rel'll Ray'.")





r theo taker th lukogged alongay
Or ajert land noffifng tempted him1to tay
Buthewent fromwbad towor' a,
For he never found fhe purfe,
"And for all .know'ha'l \-andering tofh1is day-

It iBbetter;on fhe-wholo,
For an ordinary foul, S'
(5ol gather fromffhis rong I've tried.to Cang,) -
or to take fha luck fhat-may
Vtofdllwifhinhis way, J
han oi for an imaginary _hing. *



4
k~jk 44 *
4'I~i~~7L;i~~l ucl1















enturesome Boldness













enturefome Boldnef .

A tailor came a-walking by,
The fire ofcourage in his eye.
"Where are you going,fir?" Said I.
IA-
"I slew a&mouAe
Inour houro,
Where ofher tailors liv ," faid he,
"And not a Jack
Among the pack
Would dare to do the like; pardie!
Therefate,I'm going out to try
If faere be greater men fhan I;
Orin the land
CAs bold ahand
At wielding brand as I ,you fee!"
The tailor came a-limping by
riC l Wifh woful face and cloffhes awry
1C .' And all his cou rage gone to pie .
"I met a knight
Ina rmor bright,
--- And bade him land and draw,"Caid he
6 1-00 Alp"He iraightway did
As he wasbid,
And treated me outrageoufly.
i SoI i(hall got rne home again,
Si And probably hall there remain.
/^. -A Brittle man,
Sir,always can
Be great wifh Colkof lefs degree!'


33b















Stuperfcial Culture




I




u porficial-


Culture.
I'll tell of a certain old dame;
The fame '
Had.abeautiful piggy, whofo name \
Was Jame- 0
-5; and whoje beauty and worfh,
From fhe day of his birfh,
Were matters of popular fame,
And his claim
To gentility no one could blame.


So, feeing his promife,fhe thought
She ought
_^ 5 To have him sufficiently taught
Theart
Of deportment,to go
Into company ; fo
A after ofdancing the brought,
Whowas fraught
n ^ Wifh a. flyle which fhe pigiwig caught.

So hiS company manners were rare.
isT care,
Of social obflrervances there o -
Would bear
'The clof eft Inf pec tion,
And not a reflection
Could reton his action however 2 B
You might care ,' "
To examine 'emr down to a hair.

Now, things went beau- ti-ful-ly,
Till he
SFell in love with a. dalmeof degree;
Pardi'e!
\ When he tried fori to fopeak,
0 0 But could only Cay:'Ow-e-k-k"
orwhatever Mis polith might be,
.. Why,.dear mer!
.He, was pigat tfhe:bottom,you fee.
.. H.PYLEV














HOW DAME MARGERY TWIST
SAW MORE THAN WAS
GOOD FOR HER

A Story that shows how one should hold
one's tongue as to what one sees



















f ow Damer *7argery. Twist- saw-

more fhan. was-good- for.herr





IF one could always hold one's tongue as to
what one sees, one would be the better for it.
They are the wise people of this world who keep silence as to what they see; many such
there are who behold things such as neither you nor I may ever hope to look upon, and
yet w9 knof nothing of this' because they say nothing'of it, going their own ways like com-
mon folks, and as. though 'they saw nothing in an egg but the neat.
-Dame Margery Twist of Tavistock town was not one of these wise folks who hold
their tongues; she was a good, gossiping, chattering old soul, whose hen never hatched a
chick but all of the neighbors knew of it, as the saying goes. The poor old creature had
only one eye; how she lost the other you shall presently hear, and also how her won-
derful tulip garden became like anybody else's tulip garden.
Dame Margery Twist lived all alone with a great tabby cat. 'She dwelt in a little cot-
tage that stood back from the road, and just across the way from the butcher's shop. All
within was as neat and as bright as a new pin, so that it was a delight just to look upon
the row of blue dishes upon the dresser, the pewter pipkins as bright as silver, or the
sanded floor, as clean as your mother's table. Over the cottage twined sweet woodbines, so-
thaf the air was ladened .with their fragrance in the summer-time, when the busy, yellow-
legged bees droned amid the blossoms from-the two hives that stood along against the
wall. But the wonder of the garden was the tulip bed, for there were no tulips in all
England like them, and folks came from far and near, only to look upon them and to
smell their fragrance. They stood in double rows, and were of all colors-white, yellow,
red, purple, and pied. They bloomed early, and lasted later than any others, and, when
they were in flower, all the air was filled with their perfume.
Now all of these' things happened before the smoke of the factories and the rattling
of the steam-cars had driven the fairy folks away from this world into No-man's-land, and
this was the secret of the dame's fine tulip bed. For the fairies dwelt among the flowers,
and she often told her gossips how that she could hear the fairy mothers singing their
babies to sleep at night, when the moon was full and the evening was warm. She had


^ .







32 PEPPER AND SALT.

never seen the little folks herself, for few folks are given to look upon them, and Dame
Margery's eyes were not of that nature. Nevertheless, she heard them, and that, in my
opinion, is the next best thing to seeing them.
Dame Margery Twist, as I said, was a good, kind, comfortable old soul, and was, more-
over, the best nurse in all of Tavistock town.. Was any one ill, it was Dame Margery who
was called upon to attend them; as for the dame herself, she was always ready to bring a
sick body into good health again, and was always paid well for the nursing.













A o















One evening the dame was drinking her tea by herself with great comfort. It was
just at the dusking of the twilight; the latticed-window was opened, so that the little
breezes came rushing into the room, or stayed a while to play wantonly with the white
linen curtains. The tabby cat was purring in the door-way, and the dame was enjoying
the sweetness of the summer-time. There came a knock at the door. "Who is it ?" said
Dame Margery.
It's Tommy Lamb, if you please, ma'am," said a little voice.
"Come in, Tommy," said the dame.
So in came Tommy Lamb, a little, curly-headed fellow, not any older than you. "What
is it you want, Tommy ?" said the dame.
If you please, ma'am, there's a little gentleman outside, no taller than I be; he gave
me this box, and told me to tell you to rub your eyes with the salve and then to come
out to him."






HOW DAME TWIST SA.W MORE THAN WAS GOOD FOR HER. 33

The dame looked out of the window, but never a body stood there that she could
see. "Where is the gentleman, dearie ?" said she.
"Yonder he is, with a great white horse standing beside him," said Tommy Lamb,
and he pointed with his finger as he spoke.
The dame rubbed her eyes and looked again, but never a thing did she see but the
green gate, the lilac-bushes, and the butcher's shop opposite.
The truth of the matter is, that little children like you,
my dear, see things which we grown folks, with the
dust of the world in our eyes, may never behold.
"Well," said Dame Margery to herself, "this
is strange, for sure! I see no little old gentle-
man in green." Then she opened the box
that she held, and looked into it and saw
that it was filled with a green salve. I'll.
rub some of it on my eyes, at any rate,"
said she; whereupon she did so. Then
she looked again, and lo, and behold!
there stood a little old man, no taller than
Tommy Lamb. His face was as brown,
and as withered, and as wrinkled as a
winter's crab-apple left on the bare'
tree when the frost is about. He was
dressed all in green from top to toe,
and on his head was a tall green cap,
with a bell at the peak, which tinkled
at every movement of his head. By
his side stood a great, tall, milk-white
-horse, with a long tail and mane tied "'
with party-colored ribbons.
Dame Margery went out to the
little old gentleman in green, and -
asked him what he would have
with her. He told the dame that
his wife was sorely sick, and that
he wanted her to come and nurse T
her for the night. At this Dame
Margery hemmed and hawed and
shook her head, for she did not
like the thought of going out at -
night, she knew not where, and
with such a strange little body.
Then the little man begged her and
pleaded with her, and his voice and his
words were as sweet as honey. At last he persuaded her to go, promising her a good
reward if she would nurse his wife back into her health again. So the dame went back
into the cottage to make ready for her journeying, throwing her red riding-cloak over her
5






34 PEPPER AND SALT.
shoulders, and drawing her thick shoes upon her feet. Then she filled her reticule with
a parcel of simples, in case they should be needed. After this she came out again, and
climbed up behind the little man in green, and so settled herself upon the pillion saddle
for her ride. Then the little man whistled to his horse, and away they went.
They seemed to fly rather than ride upon the hard ground, for the hedges and cottages
and orchards flew past as though in a dream. But fast as they went, the old dame saw
many things which she had never dreamed of before. She saw all of the hedge-rows, the
by-ways, the woods and fields alive with fairy-folk. Each little body was busy upon his
or her own business, laughing, chatting, talking, and running here and there like folks on
a market-day.


seeme 0 0 0 0 an -i i nt 0 0 t a t e l e m i

!/ / -
6 xk














6 STRAN GE




So they came at last to a place which the dame knew was the three-tree-hill; but it
was not the three-tree-hill which she had seen in all of her life before, for a great gateway
seemed to open into it and it was into this gateway that the little man in. green urged
the great white horse.
After they had entered the hill, Dame Margery climbed down from the pillion and stood
looking about her. Then she saw that she was in a great hall, the walls of which were
glistening with gold and silver, while bright stones gleamed like so many stars all over the
roof of the place. Three little fairy children were playing with golden balls on the floor,
and when they saw the dame they stopped in their sport and stood looking silently upon
her with great, wide-opened eyes, just as though they were little mortal children. In the







HOW DAME TWIST SAW MORE THAN WAS GOOD FOR HER. 35

corner of the room was a bed all of pure gold, and over the bed were spread coverlets of
gold and silver cloth, and in the bed lay a beautiful little lady, very white and ill. Then
Dame Margery knew well enough that every one of these little people were fairies.
The dame nursed the fairy lady all that night, and
by cock-crow in the morning the little woman had ease
from her pain.
Then the little man spoke for the first time
since Dame Margery had left home. "Look 'ee,
Dame Margery," said he; "I promised to pay
you well and I will keep my word. Come hith-
er !" So the dame went to him as he had bid-
den her to do, and the little man filled her ret-
icule with black coals from the hearth. The
dame said nothing, but she wondered much
whether the little man called this good pay for
her pains. After this she climbed up on the P
great horse again, and behind the little man, and
they rode out of the place and home, where they
were safe and sound ere the ,day had -fairly broken.
But before the little man had left her he drew out an-
other little box just like the one that Tommy Lamb '
had brought her the evening before, only this time
the box was filled with red ointment. "Rub
your eyes with this, Dame Margery," said he.
Now Dame Margery Twist knew but-
ter from cheese, as the saying is. She
knew that the green salve was of a
kind which very few people have
had rubbed over their eyes in :
this world; that it was of a kind
which poets would give their
ears to possess-even were
it a lump no larger than a
pea. So, when she took the -
box of red ointment, she only
rubbed one eye with it-her left /.
eye. -Her right.eye she pretend-
ed to rub, but, in truth, she never
touched it at all.
Then the little man got upon his
horse again, and rode away to his /
home in the hill.
After he had gone away, Dame Mar-
gery thought that she would empty her reticule of the dirty black coals; so she turned
it topsy-turvey, and shook it over the hearth, and out tumbled-black coals ? No; great
lumps of pure gold that shone bright yellow, like fire, in the light of the candle. The






36 PEPPER AND SALT.

good dame could scarcely believe her eyes, for here was wealth enough to keep her in
comfort for all the rest of her days.
But Dame Margery's right eye! I wish I could only see what she saw with that
right eye of hers! What was it she saw? That I will tell you.
The next night was full moon, and Dame Margery came and looked out over the fine
bed of tulips, of which she was very proud. Hey-day!" she cried, and rubbed her eyes,
in doubt as to whether she was asleep or awake, for the whole place was alive with little
folks.
But she was awake, and it was certain that she saw them. Yes; there they were-
little men, little women, little children, and little babies, as thick in the tulip bed as folks
at a wedding. The little men sat smoking their pipes and talking together; the little
women sat nursing their babies, singing to them or rocking them to sleep in cradles of
tulip flowers; the little children played at hide-and-seek among the flower-stalks. So the
dame leaned out of the window, watching them with great delight, for it is always a delight
to watch the little folks at their sports.
After a while she saw where one of the tiny fairy children hid himself under a leaf,
while the others who were to seek him looked up and
down, and high and low, but could find him
--. nowhere. Then the old dame laughed
.. and laughed to see how the others .
--" looked for the little fellow, but
could not tell where he







Dame-.argery.Twi st oefh- to see -fe -merry. doings at fhe Fair.- @



was. At last she could hold her peace no longer, but called out in a loud voice, Look
under the leaf, Blackcap!"
The words were no sooner out of her mouth than, whisk! whirr! off they scampered
out of the garden and away-fathers, mothers, children, babies, all crying in their shrill
voices, "She sees us! she sees us!" For fairies are very timid folk, and dread nothing
more than to have mortals see them in their own shapes.
So they never came back again to the dame's garden, and from that day to this .her
tulips have been like everybody else's tulips. Moreover, whenever she went out the fairies
scampered away before her like so many mice, for they all knew that she could see them
with her magical eye. This, as you may see, was bad enough, but no other harm would
have come of it if she had only gathered wisdom at that time, seeing what ill came of her
speech. But, like many other old dames that I wot of, no sound was as pleasant to her
ears as the words of her own mouth.
Now, about a twelvemonth after the time that the dame had nursed the fairy lady, the






HOW DAME TWIST SAW MORE THAN WAS GOOD FOR HER. 37

great fair was held at Tavistock. All the world and his wife were there, so, of course,
Dame Margery went also. And the fair was well worth going to, I can tell you! Booths
stood along in a row in the yellow sunlight of the summer-time, and flags and streamers
of many colors fluttered in the breeze from long poles at the end of each booth. Ale
flowed like water, and dancing was going on on the green, for Peter Weeks the piper was
there, and his pipes were with him. It was a fine sight to see all of the youths and maids,
decked in fine ribbons of pink and blue, dancing hand-in-hand to his piping. In the
great tent the country people had spread out their goods-butter, cheese, eggs, honey,
and the like-making as goodly a show as you would want to see. Dame Margery was
in her glory, for she had people to gossip with everywhere; so she went hither and thither,
and at last into the great tent where these things of which I have spoken were all spread
out for show.























S^TTLEE.:A.N1




Then, lo and behold! who should she see, gliding here and there among the crowd
of other people, but the little man in green whom she had seen a year ago.. She opened
her eyes mightily wide, for she saw that he was doing a strange thing. By his side hung
a little earthen-ware pot, and in his hand he held a little wooden scraper, which he passed
over the rolls of butter, afterwards putting that which he scraped from the rolls into the
pot that hung beside him. Dame Margery peeped into the pot, and saw. that it was half
full; then she could contain herself no longer.
Hey-day, neighbor!" cried she, "here be pretty doings, truly I Out upon thee, to go
scraping good luck and full measure off of other folk's butter !"







38 PEPPER AND SALT.

When the little man in green heard the dame speak to him, he was so amazed that he
nearly dropped his wooden scraper. "Why, Dame Margery! can you see me then ?"
"Aye, marry can I! And what you are about doing also; out upon you, say I!"
"And did you not rub your eyes with the red salve then ?" said the little man.
One eye, yes, but one eye, no," said the dame, slyly.
Which eye do you see me with ?" said he.
"With this eye, gossip, and very clearly, I would have you know," and she pointed to
her right eye.
Then the little man swelled out his cheeks until they were like two little brown dump-
lings. Puff! he blew a breath into the good dame's eye. Puff! he blew, and if the dame's
eye had been a candle, the light of it could not have gone out sooner.
The dame felt no smart, but she might wink and wink, and wink again, but she would
never wink sight into the eye upon which the little man had blown his breath, for it was
blind as the stone wall back of the mill, where Tom the tinker kissed the miller's daughter.
Dame Margery Twist never greatly missed the sight of that eye; but all the same, I
would give both of mine for it.
All of these things are told at Tavistock town even to this day; and if you go thither,
you may hear them for yourself.


But I say again, as I said at first: if one could only hold one's tongue
as to what one sees, one would be the better for it.






























































V7















e Song of y Gossips









. ( C ( I ) .. :'. One old maid,
I ) ) .. And another old maid,
Ik And another old maid fhat's free -
And fhey were agoffiping,I am afraid,
A5 they fat fippfng fheir tea.

They talkedoffhis,
And fhey talked pffhat,
Infhe ufual goffrping way
until everybody was black as your hat,
II 1 And fhe only ones-white were fhey.

O ne old maid ,
SAnd anofher old maid,-
For fhe olhird had gone into the fireet-
o talked in away of fthat third old maid,
wWVhich never would do to repeat.





-~-L---- r ;







And nowbut one
Dame, fat. all alone,
For Lhe offers were bofh away.,
"I've never yet met', faid fhe,with.agroan, /
"Such fcandalous'talkers a they.

Alas! and alack!
.We're allofa pack!
For nonmatter how we walk,
Or what folk fay to our face,outr back
Is fure to breed gomffp and.talk ."

.-H.PLE.:
6

















SVictim to Science



















VICTI/A
oTo
SC I ENCE.c
I Thre were two wise physicians once,of glory and renown,
S. Who went to take a little walk nigh famous Concord town.
-- Ohivery,very great andwise and learned menwere they,
And wise andlearned was thf talk,as fhey walked onfhr way.
SAnd as they walked,and talkedand talked,fheycame towhv they
SA Crow as blacks any hat, a-sitting on ye ground. found
ye Crowwas very,verysick, as you mayquickly see
By just looking at ye picture fht Is drawn hre by rme.
Nowwh" ye doctors came to him fhey mended of thrpace,
And said one unto ye other, "Hre~ s an interesting case
Acase fhl shld be treated,and be treated speedily.
I have-yes,here it is- a pill fth has been made by me.
Now, I have had occasion-" $aid yeother,dIn most cases
Yourpillh are excellently good,but hre,myfriend,are traces
Ofa lassitude, a lang~ur,ith your pills ld hardly aid;
* In short ,fhey'rerafher violent for fthlam afraid.
I have atncture Saidy'first,'Your tincturecannot touch
S A case as difficult as fh' rny pills are better, much.
"Your pills, sir, are too violent." "Your tonic is too weak."
"As I.have said, sir, in fth case-" "Permit me,sir,to speak!
And so fheyargued long and hlgh,and on,andon, arndon,
Until fheylost their tempers, and anhour or more had gone.
. o But long before fheir arguments ye question did decide,
YOCrow, notwaiting for ye end, incontinently died.
Y-E MORAL
( is apparent )













BMlay and Earnest









A! a \ \ arne f:-)


Over dewy hill and Iea
P'eorrily
Rufhed a mad-cap breeze at plays
And fhe daiies, like fhe bright
Stars at'night,
Danced and twinkled inits way.

S/ Now,a tree called to fhe breeze:
"'Little breeze
/ / Will you come and have a play?"
/ Arnd the wind uponlts way
S1/1 Stopped to play.
S Then fhe leaver,wifh sudden ihlver,
Sudden n quiver,
S/ vettfhe light
PXad-cap breeze
WifhA delight.
--\ / / Preently fhe. breeze grew ffronger,
\ \I ~' Foritcared toplaynolonger.
S / Soit flung fhe limbs about,
/ / And it toffed fhe.leaves inrout,
/ / Till it roared,as though wifhfhunder.
g''i/ Then fhe poor tree gtraned and bent,
.. "And he breeze,-a temped,-rent
S./ Leavesrand branches fromrits crown;
STill, at laft,ftiflung.It down,
) .. Stripped, and bare,and torn afunder.











i ^ .















CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO
BOTTLES


T" Story of one who took his
eggs to a good market










<-^-T






I ovemer-Petor. f he Two -BottlS Ie








"y ES, Peter is clever." So said his mother; but then
I every goose thinks her own gosling a swan.
The minister and all of the people of the village said Peter was but a dull block. Maybe
Peter was a fool; but, as the old saying goes, never a fool tumbles out of the tree but he
lights on his toes. So now you shall hear how that Peter sold his two baskets of eggs for
more than you or I could do, wise as we be.
"Peter," said his mother.
"Yes," said Peter, for he was well brought up, and always answered when he was
spoken to.
My dear little child, thou art wise, though so young now; how shall we get money to
pay our rent?"
"Sell the eggs that the speckled hen has laid," said Peter.
But when we have spent the money for them, what then?"
"Sell more eggs," said Peter, for he had an answer for everything.
"But when the speckled hen lays no more eggs, what shall we do then ?"
"We shall see," said Peter.
"Now indeed art thou wise," said his mother, "and I take. thy meaning; it is this, when
we have spent all, we must do as the little birds do, and trust in the good Heaven." Peter
meant nothing of the kind, but then folks will think that such wise fellows as Peter and I
mean more than we say, whence comes. our wisdom.
So the next day Peter started off to the town, with the basket full of nice white eggs.
The day was bright and warm and fair; the wind blew softly, and the wheat-fields lay like
green velvet in the sun. The flowers were sprinkled all over the grass, and the bees kicked
up their yellow legs as they tilted into them. The garlic stuck up stout spikes into the
air, and 'the young radishes were green and lusty. The brown bird in the tree sang,
"cuckoo! cuckoo!" and Peter trudged contentedly-along, kicking up little clouds, of dust
at every footstep, whistling merrily and staring up into the .bright sky, where the white
clouds hung like little sheep, feeding on the wide blue field. If those clouds were
sheep, and the sheep were mine, then I would be a great man and very proud," said Peter.






48 PEPPER AND SALT.

But the clouds were clouds, and he was not a great man; nevertheless, he whistled more
merrily than ever, for it was very nice to think of these things.
So he trudged along with great comfort until high noontide, against which time he had
come nigh to the town, for he could see the red roofs and the tall spires peeping over the
crest of the next green hill. By this time his stomach was crying, "give! give!" for it
longed for bread and cheese. Now, a great gray stone stood near by at the forking of the
road, and just as Peter came to it he heard a noise. "Click! clackl" he turned his
head, and, lo and behold! the side of the stone opened like a door, and out came a little
old man dressed all in fine black velvet. "Good-day, Peter," said he. "Good-day, sir,"
said Peter, and he took off his hat as he spoke, for he could see with half an eye that this
little old gentleman was none of your cheese-paring fine folks.
Will you strike a bargain with me for your eggs ?" said the little old man. Yes, Peter
would strike a bargain; what would the little gentleman give him for his eggs? "I will
give you this," said the little old man, and he drew a black bottle out of his pocket.
Peter took the bottle and turned it over and over in his hands. It is," said he, "a
pretty little, good little, sweet little bottle, but it is not worth as much as my basket of eggs."
"Prut !" said the little gentleman, "now you are not talking like the wise Peter. You
should never judge by the outside of things. What would you like to have?"
I should like," said Peter, "to have a good dinner."
"Nothing easier!" said the little gentleman, and he drew the cork. Pop! pop! and
what should come out of the bottle but two tall men, dressed all in blue with gold trim-
mings. What will you have, sir?" said the first of these to the little gentleman.
A good dinner for two," said the little man.
No sooner said than done; for, before you could say Frederic Strutzenwillenbachen,
there stood a table, with a sweet, clean, white cloth spread over it, and on this was the
nicest dinner that you ever saw, for there was beer and chitterlings, and cheese and good
white brad. fit for the king. Then Peter and the little man fell to with might and main,
and ate till they could eat no more. After they were done, the two tall men took table
and dishes and all back into the bottle again, and the little gentleman corked it up.
"Yes," said Peter, "I will give you my basket of eggs for the little black bottle." And
so the bargain was struck. Then Peter started off home, and the little man went back
again into the great stone and closed the door behind him. He took the basket of eggs
with him; where he took it neither Peter nor I will ever be able to tell you.
So Peter trudged along homeward, until, after a while, the day waxing warm, he grew
tired. I wish," said he, "that I had a fine white horse to ride."
Then he took the cork out of the bottle. Pop I pop! and out came the two tall fel-
lows, just as they had done for the little old man. "What will you have, sir ?" said the
first of them.
I will have," said Peter, "a fine white horse to ride."
No sooner said than done; for there, before him in the road, stood a fine white horse,
with a long mane and tail, just like so much spun silk. In his mouth was a silver bit; on
his back was a splendid saddle, covered all over with gold and jewels; on his feet were
shoes of pure gold, so that he was a very handsome horse indeed.
Peter mounted on his great horse and rode away home, as grand as though he were a
lord or a nobleman.
Every one whom he met stopped in the middle of the road and looked after him.






CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO BOTTLES. 49

"Just look at Peter!" cried they; but Peter held his chin very high, and rode along with-
out looking at them, for he knew what a fine sight he was on his white horse.
And so he came home again.
"What didst thou get for thy eggs, my little duck?" said his mother.
"I got a bottle, mother," said Peter.
Then at first Peter's mother began to think as others thought, that Peter was a dull
block. But when she saw what a wonderful bottle it was, and how it held many good things
and one over, she changed her mind again, and thought that her Peter was as wise as the
moon.































And now nothing was lacking in the cottage; if Peter and his mother wanted this, it
came to them; if they wished for that, the two tall men in the bottle fetched it. They
lined the house all inside with pure gold, and built the chimneys of bricks of silver, so that
there was nothing so fine between all the four -great rivers. Peter dressed in satin and his
mother in silk, and everybody called him Lord Peter." Even the minister of the village
said that he was no dull boy, for nobody is dull who rides on horseback and never wears
wooden shoes. So now Peter was a rich man.
7
.~4 ' '















Andnownohin wa ]ckig i te cttae;If ee nhsmte atdti,






50 PEPPER AND SALT.

One morning Peter said to his mother, Mother, I am going to ask the King to let
me marry his daughter."
To this his mother said nothing, for surely her Peter was'as good as any princess that
ever lived.
So off Peter rode, dressed all in his best and seated astride of a grand horse. At last
he came to the palace, which was finer than the handsome new house of Herr Mayor
Kopff. Rap! rap! rap! Peter knocked at the door, and presently came a neat servant girl
and opened it to him. "Is the King at home, my dear?" said Peter.
Yes, the King was at home; would he come into the parlor and sit down? So Peter
went into the parlor and sat down, and then the King came in, dressed all in his best
dressing-gown, with silver slippers upon his feet, and a golden crown upon his head.
"What is your name ?" said the King.
Peter Stultzenmilchen," said Peter.
And what do you want, Lord Peter," said the
King; for, as I have said, Peter was dressed in his -To.YErP
best clothes, and the old King thought that he was
a great lord.






lelver--Peter-ricdes-to-fhe -King's -Palaxceupon-his* fine. Horse. 04 %


I want to marry your daughter," said Peter.
To this the King said Hum-m-m," and Peter said nothing. Then the King said that
he had determined that no one should marry his daughter without bringing him a basket-
ful of diamonds, rubies, topazes, emeralds, pearls, and all manner of precious stones; for he
thought by this to get rid of Peter.
Is that all ?" said Peter. Nothing is easier."
So off he went, until he came to a chestnut woods just back of the royal kitchen-gar-
den. There he uncorked his bottle. Pop! pop! and out came the two tall men.
"What will you have, sir ?" said they. Peter told them what he wanted, and it was no
sooner said than done; for, there on the ground before him, stood a basketful of all
kinds of precious stones; each of them was as large as a hen's egg, and over all of them
was spread a nice clean white napkin. So Peter took the basket on his arm and went
back again to the palace.
But how the King did open his eyes, to be sure, and how he stared! "Now," said
Peter, I should like to marry your daughter, if you please."
At this the King hemmed and hawed again. No, Peter could not marry the Princess
yet, for the King had determined that no man should marry his daughter without bring-
ing him a bird all of pure silver that could sing whenever it was wanted, and that more
sweetly than a nightingale; for he thought that now he should be rid of Peter, at any rate.
Nothing easier," said Peter, and off he went again.


,C-'-






CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO BOTTLES. 51

When he had come to the chestnut woods, he uncorked his bottle and told the two
tall men what he wanted. No sooner said than done; for there was a bird all of pure
silver. And not only that, lut the bird sat in a little golden tree, and the leaves of the
tree were emeralds, and rubies hung like cherries from the branches.
Then Peter wrapped this up in his handkerchief and took it to the palace. As for the
King, he could not look at it or listen to it enough.
Now," said Peter, I should like to marry your daughter, if you please."
But at this the King sang the same tune again. No, Peter could not marry his daugh-
ter yet, for the King had determined that the man who was to marry his daughter should
first bring him a golden sword, so keen that it could cut a feather floating in the air, yet'
so strong that it could cut through an iron bar.



























Nothing easier," said Peter, and this time the men of the bottle brought him such
a sword as he asked for, and the hilt was studded all over with precious stones, so that it
was very handsome indeed. Then Peter brought it to the King, and it did as the King
would have it-it cut through a feather floating in the air; as for the iron bar, it cut
through that as easily as you would bite through a radish.
And. now it seemed as though there was nothing else to be done but to let Peter
marry the Princess. So the King asked him in to supper, and they all three sat down
together, the King and the Princess and Peter. And it was a fine feast, I can tell you,
for they had both white and red wine, besides sausages and cheese, and real white bread
and puddings, and all manner of good things; for kings and princesses eat and drink of
the best.



4-






52 PEPPER AND SALT.

As for Peter, he made eyes at the Princess, and the Princess looked down on her
plate and blushed, and Peter thought that he had never seen such a pretty girl.
After a while the King began to question Peter how he came by all these fine things
-the precious stones, the silver bird, and the golden sword; but no, Peter would not
tell. Then the King and the Princess begged and begged him, until, at last, Peter lost his
wits and told all about the bottle. Then the King said nothing more, and presently, it
being nine o'clock, Peter went to bed. After he had gone the King and the Princess put
their heads together, and the end of the matter was that the wicked King went to Peter's
room and stole the bottle from under the pillow where he had hidden it, and put one in its
place that was as empty as a beer barrel after the soldiers have been in the town; for the
King and the Princess thought that it would be a fine thing to have the bottle for them-
selves.
When the next morning had come, and they were all sitting at their breakfast
together, the King said, Now, Lord Peter, let us see what your bottle will do; give. us
such and such a kind of wine."
Nothing easier," said Peter. Then he uncorked the bottle, but not so much as a
single dead fly came out of it.
But where is the wine ?" said the King.
"I do not know," said Peter.
At this the King called him hard names and turned him out of the palace, neck and
heels; so back poor Peter went to his mother with a flea in his ear, as the saying is. Now
he was poor again, and everybody called him a dull block, for he rode no great white
horse and he wore wooden shoes.
Never mind," said his mother, "here is another basket of eggs from the speckled hen."
So Peter set off with these to the market town, as he had done with the others before.
When he had come to the great stone at the forking of the road, whom should he meet
but the same little gentleman he had met the first time. Will you strike a bargain ?"
said he. Yes, Peter would strike a bargain, and gladly. Thereupon the little old man
brought out another black bottle.
Two men are in this bottle," said the little old man; "when they have done all that
you want them to do, say 'brikket-ligg' and they will go back again. Will you trade
with me?" Yes, Peter would trade. So Peter gave the little man the eggs, and the
little man gave Peter the second bottle, and they parted very good friends.
After a while Peter grew tired. Now," said he to himself, I will ride a little;" and
so he drew the cork out of the bottle. Pop! pop! out came two men from the bottle;
but this time they were ugly and black, and each held a'stout stick in his hand. They
said not a word, but, without more ado, fell upon Peter and began threshing him as
though he was wheat on the barn floor. Stop! stop!" cried Peter, and he went hopping
and skipping up and down, and. here and there, but it seemed as though the two ugly
black men did not hear him, for the blows fell as thick as hail on the roof. At last he
gathered his wits together, like a flock of pigeons, and cried, "brikket-ligg! brikket-ligg!"
Then, whisk! pop! they went back into the bottle again, and Peter corked it up, and
corked it tightly, I can tell you.
The next day he started off to the palace once more. Rap! rap! rap! he knocked at
the door. Was the King at home? Yes', the King was at home; would he come and sit
in the parlor?






CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO BOTTLES. 53

Presently the King came in, in dressing-gown and slippers. "What! are you back
again ?" said he.
"Yes; I am back again," said Peter.
"What do you want ?" said the King.
"I want to marry the Princess," said Peter.
"What have you brought this time ?" said the King.
"I have brought another bottle," said Peter.
Then the King rubbed his hands and was very polite indeed, and asked Peter in to





















"oi






TtCky-


breakfast, and Peter went. So they all three sat down together, the King, the Princess,
and Peter.
"My dear," said the King, to the Princess, the Lord Peter has brought another bottle
with him." Thereat the Princess was very polite also. Would Lord Peter let them see
the bottle? Oh yes! Peter would do that; so he drew it out of his pocket and sat it
upon the table.
Perhaps they would like to have it opened. Yes, that they would. So Peter opened
the bottle.
Hui what a hubbub there was! The King hopped about till his slippers flew off, his






54 PEPPER AND SALT.

dressing-gown fluttered like great wings, and his crown rolled off from his head and
across the floor, like a quoit at the fair. As for the Princess, she never danced in all of
her life as she danced that morning. They made such a noise that the soldiers of the
Royal Guard came running in; but the two tall black men spared them no more than the
King and the Princess. Then came all of the Lords of the Council, and they likewise
danced to the same music as the rest. "Oh, Peter! dear Lord Peter! cork up your men
again!" they all cried.
"Will you give me back my bottle?" said Peter.
"Yes! yes !" cried the King.
"Will you marry me ?" said Peter.
Yes! yes!" cried the Princess.
Then Peter said brikket-ligg!" and the two tall men popped back into the bottle again.
So the King gave him back his other bottle, and the minister was called in and married
him to the Princess.
After that he lived happily, and when the old King died he became King over all of
the land. As for the Princess, she was as good a wife as you ever saw, but Peter always
kept the bottle near to him-maybe that was the reason.


Ah me! if I could only take my eggs to such a market and get two
such bottles for them! What would I do with them?
It would take too long to tell you.
















SClever.. Poter'popens-ffe-Unlucky.Botle -for, he Ki ndPincss





















Ni















he Accident of Birth




















Ti n ing Friedrich?1
Sr many yoieai
f That hewould sendunto his Queen and him,
A baby boyto eye King some day
At lastye Saint yeKing's petition heard,
And called to hirna m ober long-legged bird.

LQaofhl he GoodWi[helmStork.uchwas its name)
Here is a baby boy to take away.
Itis for Fritz; sobearhimtoye mame,
Or rather to hi Qeen,wifhout delay
F or one grow weary wenoneal.ways hears
Ye same.words daily dinning inone'jears.

N\ -owWilhelm Storkwasold,and dull of wits,
ye For age not always sharpenswisdomi-uch,
$ tork. what does he but bear gfL toFpitz
ye cobbler, whohad half a scope of such.
And soyebabey,fhrough a blunder, passed
e YFrom.being first of all, unto- last.

Fromfhis I gather thatanewborPrince, kow<
From newvxborn cobbler somewhat hard
For which ofus could telly- difference,,ince
One fhus experienced was mistaken so
Also, perhapsI should be great Instead
f -writng fustoeawn my daily breadhuZ



8















Romantic Adventures
of
Three Tailors









"" RomanticAdvonturiosfThrerceTailors- s


m three. I little. men.w ent. ajoggi n g.along-
Along.in. fhe. sunshiny weather.
And-fhey-Taughed and. fhey.sang.an.occasiona song
Which-they all-of. (hem.caroled.togefher.
And.fhegreat-whi ie-cl ouds.floated.over.fhesky.
Ard:-fhe-.day it.waswarm and-the- sun-it-was-hig ____
As-fhreejolly.tailor-men.all-were. fhey. y~. Py.
As-you'd. find-in.a.doze n.of-years.
One-carried-fhe-yardstick.another.he.e-goose
And. the.brave s t-of- all.bore .the.
shears.
So-fhey.merrily-trud ged-until.after ,
awhile-
They-came.where fhree.milk-
maids-sat- all.on-.astile.-
The.grass.it-was-green.and.fhe.
flowers.were-gay.
And.t.was.fhe-pleasantespe f
weather
And-fhe.milkmaid s.were- ".
pretty-ar-blossomsin.lay.
As-ghey-sat.on.fhe-stile a
all-togefher.
Then.fhey.topped.on-fhe.high-
-way.fhose- hree.gallant-men
For-fhey-never. had.seen.as-fair

Then-up-spake tfhe.first-of-fhe.
tailor.men-fhree.
SAnd.fhe.one .wifhfhe-.goodlierst o Z. -
parts.. .-
We-are-all.of.u5. goo d-m en. gall an 0
and-free,
An d-have-never.yet-plg hted.our.hear t .o
So.pri fheedfai r-m aidS.wil .you marnry.us-all ..
For.ourhearts.fhey-be.great.fho'.our.bodi esbesmaCl
Then.up spake-fhe-first-of fhe fhree-pretty.dears. -. ,-
"Pray.-tel .-what-your.fortunes.m ayrbi- s it. ". h ,
aOh-three-loling-hearts-and-a-yard-goose-and sh Z.
Thenyou've-not-enoug~h.frtune-.for-mesir-
So-get-you-alon g-while-your-boots$are-still-green*
or- richer-young-men-wes h all-marry .1. ween
Three-little.tailor.me nJog going. along-
A] ong.in-fhe sun hiny we afher.
N0o.longer.fhey; lau gShw iAtha.'est- and.a. song
B utifhe y-walkvery. sadlyiftogether-
For-w-hen-maideni- are -prou d11 te fi.milkm aidens.c old*
The- I ds'-they-grow'va'dlIke'fhe'taillr"'$ /
0 ..















ancy and Fact
















, V. -" -

I FANCY'AND' FACGT.\
-!a fhepherd and a. fhepherdefs,
SThey dwelt in Arcadee,
And fhey were dreffed inWatteau dreMfs
^oft charming for to fee,.

They sat upon fhe, dewy grafi,
With buds and bloffoms fet.
And the shepherd played unto the lafs,

It seemed to me as though it was
Avery pleasant fhing;
Particularly fo because, Fi
The time of yearwas Spring.

But, 0! the ground.was damp,an
At loa-f, I have been told,
1The shepherd caught the lumbago,
The fhepherdefs,a cold.

S\'ity darling Child tfhe fact is o
\ -That the Poet often find 0)
0 Of those joys which in fhe practice
Are ano other fort of thing.
.0 0eofya arSpig. ""
0
0 u, n rudwsdm














HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK


A Story concerning one who would
have done better to let
Well Enough
alone
















ians Hecklenann's Luck .






SANS HECKLEMANN had. no luck at all.
Now and then we hear folks say that
they have no luck, but they only mean that their
luck is bad and that they are ashamed of it. Everybody but Hans Hecklemann had luck
of some kind, either good or bad, and, what is more, everybody carries their luck about
with them; some carry it in their pocket-books, some carry it in their hats, some carry
it on their finger tips, and some carry it under their tongues-these are lawyers. Mine is
at this moment sitting astride of my pen, though I can no more see it than though it
was thin air; whether it is good or bad depends entirely as to how you look upon it.
But Hans Hecklemann had no luck at all. How he lost it nobody knows, but it is
certain that it was clean gone from him.
He was as poor as charity, and yet his luck was not bad, for, poor as he was, he
always had enough for his wife and his family and himself to eat. They all of them
worked from dawn to nightfall, and yet his luck was not good, for he never laid one
penny on top of the other, as the saying is. He had food enough to eat, and clothes
enough to wear, so his luck was not indifferent. Now, as it was neither good, bad, nor
indifferent, you see that it could have been no luck at all.
Hans Hecklemann's wife was named Catherine. One evening when Hans came into
the cottage with just enough money to buy them all bread and not a cracked farthing to
spare, Catherine spoke to him of this.matter.
Hans," said she, "you have no luck at all."
"No," said Hans, I have not," which was the truth, as I have already told you.
"What are you going to do about it ?" said Catherine.
Nothing at all," said Hans.
Doing nothing puts no cabbage into the pot," said Catherine.
It takes none .out," said Hans.
"See, Hans," said Catherine; "go to the old wise woman in the wood and talk to her
about it; who knows but that she can tell you how and where you lost your luck ?"
If I should find my luck it might be bad and not good," said Hans.
It is worth having a look at," said Catherine; "you can leave it where you find it if
it does not please you."







64 PEPPER AND SALT.

"No," said Hans; "when a man finds his luck he has to take it, whether he likes it or no."
So Hans talked, but he had made up his mind to do as Catherine said, to go and see
the old wise woman in the wood. He argued with her, but he only argued with her to let
her know how little was her knowledge and how great was his. After he had clearly
shown her how poor her advice was, he took it. Many other men are like Hans Heck-
lemann.
So, early the next morning, Hans jogged along to the old wise woman's cottage, while
the day was sweet and fresh. The hedgerows were covered all over with white blossoms,
as though it was with so much snow; the cuckoo was singing among the budding branch-
es, and the little flowers were looking up everywhere with their bright faces. "Surely,"
said Hans to himself, "if I find my luck on this day, it must be good and not ill."
So he came to the little red cottage at the edge of the wood wherein lived the wise
woman who knew many things and one. Hans scraped his feet on the stones until
they were clean, and then he knocked at the door.
"Come in," said the old wise woman.
She was as strange an old woman as
one could hope to see in a lifetime. Her
nose bent down to meet her chin,
and her chin bent up to reach her
nose; her face was.gray with great
age, and her hair was as white as
snow. She wore a long red cloak
over her shoulders, and a great
black cat sat on the back of her
chair.
"What do you want, Son
Hans ?" said she.
0 ""I want to find my luck, 9)
c0 mother," said Hans.
"Where did you lose it, Son
Hans ?" said she.
"That I do not know, mother," said Hans.
Then the old wise woman said Hum-m-m!"
in a very thoughtful voice, and Hans said nothing at all.
After a while she spoke again. "Have you enough to eat?" said she.
Oh yes!" said Hans.
Have you enough to drink ?" said she.
Plenty of water, enough of milk, but no beer," said Hans.
Have you enough clothes to cover you ?" said she.
"Oh yes !" said Hans.
"Are you warm enough in winter ?" said she.
Oh yes !" said Hans.
Then you had better leave well enough alone," said she, "for luck can give you
nothing more."
But it might put money into my pocket," said Hans.
"And it might take away the good things that you already have," said she.







HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK. 65

"All the same, I should like to find it again," said Hans; "if I could only lay my
hands on it I might make good out of it, even if it is bad."
I doubt that," said the old wise woman. Nevertheless, she saw that Hans was set in
his own way, and that he only talked stiffness into his stubbornness. So she arose from
her chair with much groaning, for her joints were stiffened with age, and limping to a
closet in the wall she brought a book thence. Then she ran her finger down one page
and up another, until she had found that which she sought. When she had found it she
spoke:
Son Hans, you lost your luck three years ago when you were coming from the fair
at Kneitlingen. You sat down on the overturned cross that lies where three roads meet,
and it fell out of your pocket along with a silver shilling. Now, Hans, your luck was
evil, therefore it stuck to the good sign, as all evil things of that kind must, like a fly to
butter. Also, I tell you this: when an evil manikin such as this touches
the sign of the good cross, he becomes visible to the eyes of every-
body who chooses to look upon him. Therefore go to the stone
cross and you will find your luck running this way and that,
but never able to get away from it." So saying, the old
woman shut her book again. Then she
arose from her chair and went once
more to the closet in the wall. This





-'k Hans Hecklemann.goes to. fhecottage.f. fhe.old-Wise-Wornan.in. search.of hisiLuck.



time she took from it a little sack woven of black goat's hair. "When you have found
your luck again, put it into this little bag," said she; "once in it, no evil imp will be able
to get out again so long as you keep the strings tied. And now good-bye!"
Then Hans slipped the little sack into his pocket, and set out for the overturned stone
cross where the three roads meet. When he had come to the place, he looked here and
there, and this way and that, but for a long time he could see nothing at all. At last,
after much looking, he beheld a little black beetle running hither and thither on the
stone. I wonder," said Hans, "if this can be my luck."
So saying, he caught the little beetle betwixt his finger and thumb, but very carefully,
for he could not tell whether or no it might bite him. The beetle stuck to the stone as
though it had been glued there, but, at last, Hans pulled it away; then -lo! it was not a
beetle that he held in his hand, but a little manikin about as long as your thumb and as
black as ink. Hans Hecklemann was so frightened that he nearly dropped it, for it kicked
and screeched and rolled its red eyes in a vey ugly way as he held it. However, he
popped it into the little sack and pulled the strings tight, and there it was, safe and
sound.
That is what Hans Hecklemann's luck was like.
9






66 PEPPER AND SALT.

So Hans having his luck secure in the little sack began to bargain with it. "What
will you do for me if I let you out?" said he.
"Nothing at all," snarled his luck.
"Very well," said Hans, "we will see about that."
So he carried it home with him, and threw sack and all into a nasty pot where Cath-
erine cast the scrapings of the dishes-the fat and what not that she boiled down into
soap now and then. There he left his luck to stay until the next day, and then he went
to it again. "What will you do for me if I will let you out now ?" said he,





























Nothing at all," snarled his luck.
"Very well," said Hans, "we will see about that." So he let him stay where he was
for another day. And so the fiddle played; every day Hans Hecklemann went to his luck
and asked it what it would give him if he would let it out, and every day his luck said
nothing; and so a week or more passed.
At last Hans's luck gave in.
See, Hans," it said one morning; "if you will let me out of this nasty pickle I will
give you a thousand thalers."
"Ah no!" said Hans. "Thalers are only thalers, as my good father used to say.
They melt away like snow, and then nothing is left of them. I will trust no such luck
as that!"
".I will give you two thousand thalers," said his luck.






HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK. 67

"Ah no!" said Hans; "two thousand thalers are only twice one thousand thalers. I
will trust no such luck as that either !"
Then what will you take to let me out, Hans Hecklemann ?" said his luck.
"Look," said Hans; "yonder stands my old plough. Now, if you will give me to find
a golden noble at the end of every furrow that I strike with it I will let you out. If not--
why, then, into the soap you go."
"Done!" said Hans's luck.





































Done!" said Hans.
Then he opened the mouth of the sack, and-puff! went his luck, like wind out of a
bag, and-pop it slipped into his breeches pocket.
He never saw it again with his mortal eyes, but it stayed near to him, I can tell you.
"Ha! ha! ha it laughed in his pocket, "you have made an ill bargain, Hans, I can tell
you!"






68 PEPPER AND SALT.

"Never mind," said Hans, I am contented."
Hans Hecklemann did not tarry long in trying the new luck of his old plough, as you
may easily guess. Off he went like the wind and borrowed Fritz Friedleburg's old gray
horse. Then he fastened the horse to the plough and struck the first furrow. When he
had come to the end of it-pop! up shot a golden noble, as though some one had spun it
up from the ground with their finger and thumb. Hans picked it up, and looked at it
and looked at it as though he would swallow it with his eyes. Then he seized the handle
of the plough and struck another furrow-pop! up went another golden noble, and Hans
gathered it as he had done the other one. So he went on all of that day, striking furrows
and gathering golden nobles until all of his pockets were as full as they could hold. When
it was too dark to see to plough any more he took Fritz Friedleburg's horse back home
again, and then he went home himself.
All of his neighbors thought that he was crazy, for it was nothing but plough, plough,
plough, morning and noon and night, spring and summer and autumn. Frost and dark-
ness alone kept him from his labor. His stable was full of fine horses, and he worked
them until they dropped in the furrows that he was always ploughing.
Yes; Hans is crazy," they all said; but when Hans heard them talk in this way he









kle m nn.. i.o uah. ` 1t r



only winked to himself and went on with his ploughing, for he felt that he knew this from
that.
But ill luck danced in his pocket with the golden nobles, and from the day that he
closed his bargain with it he was an unhappy man. He had no comfort of living, for it
was nothing but work, work, work. He was up and away at his ploughing at the first
dawn of day, and he never came home till night had fallen; so, though he ploughed golden
nobles, he did not turn up happiness in the furrows along with them. After he had eaten
his supper he would sit silently behind the stove, warming his fingers and thinking of
some quicker way of doing his ploughing. For it seemed to him that the gold-pieces came
in very slowly, and he blamed himself that he had not asked his luck to let him turn up
three at a time instead of only one at the end of each furrow; so he had no comfort in his
gathering wealth. As day followed day he grew thin and haggard and worn, but seven
boxes of bright new gold-pieces lay hidden in the cellar, of which nobody knew but him-
self. He told no one how rich he was growing, and all of his neighbors wondered why he
did not starve to death.
So you see the ill luck in his breeches pocket had the best of the bargain after all.
After Hans had gone the way of all men, his heirs found the chests full of gold in the





HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK. 69

cellar, and therewith they bought fat lands and became noblemen and gentlemen; but
that made Hans's luck none the better.

From all this I gather:
That few folks can turn ill luck into good luck.
That the best thing for one to do is to let well enough alone.
That one cannot get happiness as one does cabbages-with money.
That happiness is the only good luck after all!


























Two Wishes





*




















H OWAPHD'PYLE- DES-C-DEL-


YE- TWO -WISHES-

SAn Angel went walking out one day, as I've heard faid .
And,coming to a faggot-maker, begged a cruft of.bread
Theo faggot-maker gave a crufi and something rather queer
HE. To wafh it down wi hall ,from out a bottle that flood near. HE
eo- he Angelfinifhed eating; but before he left ,faid he, I
ET"H 'Thou fhalt have two wifhe, granted,for that fhou haft given me. ETH
INTO Onewifhfor that good drinkable,another for the bread." 'I vT
YE. hen he left thefaggot-maker all amazed at what he'd faid. of.Y
BoT- BoT-
- "Iwonder," Cays the faggot-maker, after he had gone,
"Iwonder if here's any.truth in that famelittle Cong !"
$o, turning this thing overinhismind, hecalt around,
'Till he faw the empty bottle where it lay upon the ground.
"Iwifh," aid he jut as a teft," ifwhat he faid is fo,
Into fhat empty bottle, now, that I may itraightway go."
Nofooner fald thandone; for,- Whi k! into theflafk he fell,
Where hefound himself as tightly packed as chickeninfhe hell.
Invainhe kicked and twifted,and invainhe howledwithpain;
For, in fpite of al his efforts, he could not get out again.
So, feeing how the matter stood, he had to with once more.
When, out heflipped,as eafily as he'd gone in before.
Ifwe had had two wishes, granted by an Angel thus,
We would not throw away the good to kind ly given us.
For firiR we'd afk for wifdom ,which,when we had initors,
I'm very doubtful ifwe'd care to afk for anymore.

( {-?7 v ^ vg^ ^iilllllllll11111111^ 1^^ ^\\\>















VI Verse with a Moral
but no Name







AIVERSEWITH-A.XORAL-BUT NO -NAPE :















And llhquelioned everywhere,
Swipe man once,of H aarlorn town,
Went wandering up,and wandering n
And ever fhe question afked:

"If all fhe world was paper,
And if all fhe fea was ink,
And if fhe tre- were breadandcheese,
What would we do for drink?"
Fuhenall nher folk,bofh great and d mall,
Began to beat heir brains,
But fhey could not answer him at all,
In fpite of'all fheir pa ins.
But fnl o e h wandered here and there,
WThate man o f feat renown, '
And tiOll he queftioned everywhere,
The folk of Haarlem town:
Ifall fheworld was paper, -" "
'And if all fhe fea was ink, ,,
And iofhetrees were bread andchoese,
What would cwe dotfor drink? "
Full fhin he grew, as,day by day,
He toiled with mental train, Uri V/b
Until fhe wind blew him away, '.
And he no'er was fen again.
And now mehinki I hear. you say,
"Was ere* a man f foolifh, pray,
Since first fheeworld began?" ,
Oh,hufh! I'lltellyou secretly,
DownEafl here dwells a man,and he "
Is afking quetfflons conflantly,
That none can anfwer,fhat Isee;
Yet heis awise-wise manr!


Q

IO















SSong of y Rajah
and y Fly








e-Songrof .

yeRajah. j



G reat and rich beyond comparing
WasfheoRajah Rhamajaring,
As he went to take an airing
Wifh his Court one summer day.
All weregay wifh green and yellow l
And little darky fellow
Bore a monftrous fun-umbrella,
Forto fhade him on fhe way.

Now certain fly, unwitting
Of this grandeur, came a-flitting ,
To fhe Royal nofe, and fitting,
Twirled his legs upon the fame.
Then fhe Rajah's eyes blazed fire
Atfhe infult,and fhe ire
fnhis heart boiled high and higher.
51ap! hedfiruck;-butmiffed his aim.

Then all trembled at his paffion,
For he poke in furious faihion..
"'awye howyon fly did dafh on
To our auguft nofe?" he faid.
"Now letallwifthinour nation -
Wage, awarwifhout ceffation-, -
Warof b-lood, ex- ter-ri-nation,
Until every fly is dead !! "

Now fhewhile fhis war was raging.
That fhe Rajahwas a-waging,
Things fhatihould have been engaging /
His attention wenttopot.
Sohe came at laft to begging,
Though the flies continued plaguing,
For it's not fo eafy pegging'
Out vexations fhu,I wot. ,' 4

Fromfhi tyou may fee what. all have to ex pect,
Who,fighting mall troubles, great duties neglec t.














FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART

Showing how easy it is to let
Trouble into the House
and how hard to
turn it out
















armer GriggSs Boggart




D ID you ever hear of a boggart? No- J
Then I will tell you. A boggart is a
small imp that lives in a man's house, unseen by any one, doing a little
good and much harm. This imp was called a boggart in the old times,
now we call such by other names-ill-temper, meanness, uncharitableness,
and the like. Even now, they say, you may find a boggart in some houses.
There is no placing reliance on a boggart; sometimes he may seem to be
of service to his master, but there is no telling when he may do him an
ill turn.
Rap! tap! tap! came a knock at the door.
The wind was piping Jack Frost's, for the time was winter, and it blew from the
north. The snow lay all over the ground, like soft feathers, and the hay-ricks looked
as though each one wore a dunce-cap, like the dull boy in Dame Week's school over
by the green. The icicles hung down by the thatch, and the little birds crouched shiver-
ing in the bare and leafless hedge-rows.
But inside the farm-house all was warm and pleasant; the great logs snapped and
crackled and roared in the wide chimney-place, throwing red light up and down the walls,
so that the dark night only looked in through the latticed-windows. Farmer Griggs sat
warming his knees at the blaze, smoking his pipe in great comfort, while his crock of
ale, with three roasted crab-apples bobbing about within it, warmed in the hot ashes
beside the blazing logs, simmering pleasantly in the ruddy heat.
Dame Griggs's spinning-wheel went humm-m-m! hum-m-m-m-m! like a whole hiveful
of bees, the cat purred in the warmth, the dog basked in the blaze, and little red sparks
danced about the dishes standing all along in a row on the dresser.
But, rap! tap! tap! came a knock at the door.
Then Farmer Griggs took his pipe from out his mouth. "Did 'ee hear un, dame ?"
said he. Zooks now, there be somebody outside the door."
"Well then, thou gert oaf, why don't 'ee let un in ?" said Dame Griggs.
"Look 'ee now," said Georgie Griggs to himself, "sure women be of quicker wits
than men!" So he opened the door. Whoo! In rushed the wind, and the blaze of the
logs made as though it would leap up the chimney for fear.
"Will you let me in out of the cold, Georgie Griggs ?" piped a small voice. Farmer






78 PEPPER AND'SALT.

Griggs looked down and saw a little wight no taller than his knee standing in the snow
on the door-step. His face was as brown as a berry, and he looked up at the farmer with
great eyes as bright as those of a toad. The red light of the fire shone on him, and
Georgie Griggs saw that his feet were bare and that he wore no coat.
"Who be 'ee, little man ?" said Farmer Griggs.
I'm a boggart, at your service."
"Na, na," said Farmer Griggs, "thee's at na service o' mine. I'll give na room in
my house to the likes o' thee;" and he made as though he would have shut the door
in the face of the little urchin.






















SORIGGS' 4





"But listen, Georgie Griggs," said the boggart; I will do you a good service."
Then Farmer Griggs did listen. "What service will 'ee do me then?" said he.
I'll tend your fires," said the manikin, "I'll bake your bread, I'll wash your dishes,
I'll scour your pans, I'll scrub your floors, I'll brew your beer, I'll roast your meat, I'll
boil your water, I'll stuff your sausages, I'll skim your milk, I'll make your butter, I'll
press your cheese, I'll pluck your geese, I'll spin your thread, I'll knit your stockings,
I'll mend your clothes, I'll patch your shoes I'll be everywhere and do all of the
work in your house, so that you will not have to give so much as a groat for wages
to cook, scullion, or serving wench!"
Then Farmer Griggs listened a little longer without shutting the door, and so did
Dame Griggs. "What's thy name, boggart ?" said he.






FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART. 79

"Hardfist," said the boggart; and he came a little farther in at the door, for he saw
that Farmer Griggs had a mind to let him in all of the way.
I don't know" said Georgie Griggs, scratching his head doubtfully; "it's an ill thing,
lettin' mischief intull the house! Thee's better outside, I doubt."
"Shut the door, Georgie !" called out Dame Griggs; "thou'rt letten' th' cold air intull
th' room."
Then Farmer Griggs shut the door, but the boggart was on the inside.
This is the way in which the boggart came into Farmer Griggs's house, and there




i i


























he was to stay, for it is no such easy matter getting rid of the likes of him when we
once let him in, I can tell you.
The boggart came straightway over to the warm fire, and the dog growled-"chur-r-r-r!"
-and showed his teeth, and the cat spit anger and jumped up on the dresser, with her
back arched and her tail 6n end. But the boggart cared never a whit for this, but laid
himself comfortably down among the warm ashes.
Now imps, like this boggart, can only be seen as the frost is seen-when it is cold.
So as he grew warmer and warmer, he grew thin, like a jelly-fish, and at last, when he
had become thoroughly warmed through, Farmer Griggs and the dame could see him
no more than though he was thin air. But he was in the house, and he stayed there,






80 PEPPER AND SALT.

I can tell you. For a time everything went as smooth as cream; all of the work of the
house was done as though by magic, for the boggart did all that he had promised; he
made the fires, he baked the bread, he washed the dishes, he scoured the pans, he
scrubbed the floors, he brewed the beer, he roasted the meat, he stuffed the sausages,
he skimmed the milk, he made the butter, he pressed the cheese, he plucked the geese,
















3)


















he spun the thread, he knit the stockings, he mended the clothes, he patched the shoes
-he was everywhere and did all of the work of the house. When Farmer Griggs saw
these things done, and so deftly, he rubbed his hands and chuckled to himself. He sent
cook and scullion and serving maid a packing, there being nothing for them to do, for,
as I said, all of these things were done as smooth as cream. But after a time, and when
the boggart's place had become easy to him, like an old shoe, mischief began to play the
pipes and he began to show his pranks. The first thing that he did was to scrape the
farmer's butter, so that it was light of weight, and all of the people of the market town






FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART. 81

hooted at him for giving less than he sold. Then he skimmed the children's milk, so that
they had nothing but poor watery stuff to pour over their pottage of a morning. He
took the milk from the cat, so that it was like to starve; he even
pilfered the bones and scrapings of the dishes from the
poor house-dog, as though he was a very .magpie. He
blew out the rush-lights, so that they were all in the
dark after sunset; he made the fires burn cold, and
played a hundred and forty other impish tricks of
the like kind. As for the poor little children, they
were. always crying and complaining that the
boggart did this and the boggart did that; that : '
he scraped the butter from their bread and
pulled the coverlids off of them at night.
Still the boggart did his work well, a ,
and so Farmer Griggs put up with his
evil ways as long as he could. At last
the time came when he could bear it no
longer. "Look 'ee, now, Mally," said he .
to his dame, "it's all along o' thee that
this trouble's coome intull th' house. I'd is
never let the boggart in with my own
good-will!" So spoke Farmer Griggs,
for even nowadays there are men here
and there who will now and then lay
their own bundle of faults on their wives'
shoulders.
I bade thee do naught but shut the
door!" answered Dame Griggs. i'
"Ay; it's easy enough to shut the ,,.
door after the trouble's come in!" ( '
"Then turn it out again !"
"Turn un out! Odds bodkins, that's
woman's wit Dost 'ee not see that -
there's no turning' o' un out? Na, na;
there's naught to do but to go out .
ourselves !"
Yes; there was nothing else to'
be done. Go they must, if they
would be rid of the boggart. So H
one fine bright day" in the blessed ; 'I TURE :-
spring-time, they packed all of their
belongings into a great wain, or cart, and
set, off to find them a new home.
Off they trudged, just as you see in the
picture, the three little children seated high up in the wain, and the farmer and the
dame plodding ahead.
II






82 PEPPER AND SALT.

Now, as they came to the bottom of Shooter's Hill, whom should they meet but
their good neighbor and gossip, Jerry Jinks. "So, Georgie," said he, "you're leaving' th'
would house at last ?"
High, Jerry," quoth Georgie. "We were forced tull it, neighbor, for that black bog-
gart torments us so that there was -no rest night nor day for it. The poor bairns'
stomachs are empty, and the good dame's nigh dead for it. So off we go, like th' field-
fares in the autumn-we're flittin', we're flittin'!"
Now on the wain was a tall, upright churn; as soon as Georgie had ended his speech,
the lid of the churn began to clipper-clapper, and who should speak out of it but the bog-
gart himself. "Ay, Jerry!" said he, "we're a flittin', we're a flittin', man! Good-day to ye,
neighbor, good-day to ye! Come and see us soon time!"




















cand. he-Wise -P^an-"V-e



High!" cried Georgie Griggs, "art thou there, thou black imp? Dang un! We'll all
go back tull th' old house, for sure it's better to bear trouble there than in a new place."
So back they went again-boggart and all.
By this you may see, my dear, if you warm an imp by your fire, he will soon turn
the whole house topsy-turvey. Likewise, one cannot get rid of a boggart by going from
here to there, for it is sure to be in the cart with the household things.
But how did Georgie Griggs get rid of his boggart? That I will tell you.
He went to Father Grimes, the wise man, who lived on in a little house on the
moor. Father Grimes," said he, "how shall I get rid of my boggart ?"
Then Father Grimes told him to take this and that, and to do thus and so with them,
and see what followed. So Farmer Griggs went to Hugh the tailor's, and told him to
make a pretty red coat and a neat pair of blue breeches. Then he went to William
the hatter's, and bade him to make a nice little velvet cap with a bell at the top of it.






FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART. 83

Then he went to Thomas the shoemaker's, and bade him to make a fine little pair of
shoes. So they all did as he told them, and after these things were made he took them
home with him. He laid them on a warm spot on the hearth where the boggart used to
come to sleep at night. Then he and his dame hid in the closet to see what would follow.
Presently came the boggart, whisking here and dancing there, though neither the
farmer nor the dame could see him any more than though he had been a puff of wind.
Heigh-ho !" cried the boggart, these be fine things for sure." So saying, he tried the
hat upon his head, and it fitted exactly. Then he tried the coat on his shoulders, and it
fitted like wax. Then he tried the breeches on his legs, and they fitted as though they
grew there. Then he tried the shoes on his feet, and there never was such a fit. So he
was clad all in his new clothes from top to toe, whereupon he began dancing until he
made the ashes on the hearth spin around with him as though they had gone mad,
and, as he danced, he sang:
"Cap for the head, alas poor head!
Coat for the back, alas poor back I
Breeks for the legs, alas poor legs!
Shoen for the feet, alas poor feet!
If these be mine, mine cannot be
The house of honest man, Georgie !"

So he went singing and dancing, and skipping and leaping, out of the house and away.
As for Georgie Griggs and his dame, they never heard a squeak from him afterwards.


Thus it was that Farmer Griggs got rid of his boggart. All I can say is, that if I
could get rid of mine as easily (for I have one in my own house), I would make him
a suit of clothes of the finest silks and satins, and would hang a bell of pure silver on the
point of his cap. But, alackaday! there are no more wise men left to us, like good Father
Grimes, to tell one an easy way to get rid of one's boggart.











0\
r 0
















ride in distress




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