• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Introduction
 The fall of great Chung Kee
 The Christmas party in the back-yard,...
 The grammar court
 The laughing-gas brownies
 J. Frost, Esq
 The angel and the pansies
 Tiny link
 Conclusion
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The children of the week, 1886 : : being the honest and only authentic account of certain stories, as related by the Red Indian to Alexander Selkirk, Jr.
Title: The children of the week, 1886
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055011/00001
 Material Information
Title: The children of the week, 1886 being the honest and only authentic account of certain stories, as related by the Red Indian to Alexander Selkirk, Jr.
Physical Description: 161 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Peters, William Theodore, b. 1862
Peters, DeWitt Clinton, b. 1865 ( Illustrator )
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Rand, Avery & Co
Publisher: Dodd, Mead & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Electrotyped and printed by Rand, Avery, and Company
Publication Date: c1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children with disabilities -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- New York (State) -- New York -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Ownership: LC copy is a copyright deposit: Copyright Sep 4, 1886, no. 19885.R¹.
Statement of Responsibility: herein truthfully set down by William Theodore Peters ; with pictures thereunto by Clinton Peters.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black.
General Note: In original publisher's binding: brown cloth with title and illustration stamped in white and gold.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055011
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224454
notis - ALG4718
oclc - 00651744
lccn - 2006573175

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Dedication
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
    List of Illustrations
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Introduction
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The fall of great Chung Kee
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Monday's story
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
    The Christmas party in the back-yard, and who were invited
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Tuesday's story
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
    The grammar court
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Wednesday's story
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
    The laughing-gas brownies
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Thursday's story
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
    J. Frost, Esq
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Friday's story
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
    The angel and the pansies
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Saturday's story
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
    Tiny link
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Sunday's story
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
    Conclusion
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


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THE CHILDREN
OF THE WEEK.

MD C C LXXXV- V1.


Being the honest and only authenfie
account of certain stories.&s related by
the Red IndiaLn,toAlexander5elkirk,7r.
herein truthfully set down by
Will iamTheodore Peters.with
pictures thereunto by ClintonPeters.







Published by
DODD,CAD, 8 COMPANY. 75f B OADWAY.
Nw &%0 YORK.




































COPYRIGHT, 1886,

BY DODD, MEAD, AND COMPANY.



























ELECTROTYPED AND PRINTED

BY RAND, AVERY, AND COMPANY,

BOSTON.
























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TO

BABY BO, THE VIKING,

THzs BOOK

IS DEDICATED.








/ -



SOne loves a baby face, with violets there,
Violets instead of laurel in the hair,
As those were all the little locks could bear."

Protus." Robert Browning.
















































































































a



































THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK. PAGE

INTRODUCTION 27


THE FALL OF GREAT CHUNG KEE.

MONDAY'S STORY 53


THE CHRISTMAS PARTY IN THE BACK-YARD, AND WHO
WERE INVITED.

TUESDAY'S STORY 65


THE GRAMMAR COURT.

WEDNESDAY'S STORY 79
9







CONTENTS.


THE LAUGHING-GAS BROWNIES. PAGE

THURSDAY'S STORY .


J. FROST, ESQ.

FRIDAY'S STORY 113


THE ANGEL AND THE PANSIES.

SATURDAY'S STORY 137


TINY LINK.

SUNDAY'S STORY 153


CONCLUSION 161


























S-LI T- OFr

SILLU STR NATIONS .


DESIGNED AND ARRANGED BY CLINTON PETERS.


NO. PAGE
i. PORTRAIT OF CHUNG KEE'S RIVAL. . Frontispiece.

ii. TITLEPAGE . . 3

II. THE KNOCKER . .

Iv. DEDICATION PAGE . . 7

v. HEADING TO TABLE OF CONTENTS . 9

vi. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS . II

vii. TAIL-PIECE TO ILLUSTRATIONS. . 19
II







LIST OF ILLUSTRA TIONS.


NO. PAGE

viii. HALF-TITLE TO THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK" 25


ix. HEADING TO THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK". 27


x. INITIAL LETTER 27


xI. "FOR A LONG TIME CHARLOTTE HAD NOTICED, IN ONE

OF THE WINDOWS OF THE FRONT HOUSE, A LITTLE

LAME BOY, ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, WHO HAD SILVERY

HAIR, AND A VERY DIGNIFIED, WISE LOOK ". 29


xii. "THIS GRATIFIED ALEXANDER EXCEEDINGLY. HE PLACED

IT AT THE WINDOW IN THE SUNNIEST SPOT, AND

CALLED IT HIS 'GARDEN" . 30


xIIi. "AND TOOK OUT THE TWO COINS" . 32


xiv. "SOME BOYS BLOWING HORNS IN THE STREET EXCITED

HIM SO, THAT HE GOT UP OUT OF BED, AND DRESSED

HIMSELF". 33


xv. "HE GLANCED WISTFULLY AT SOME CHILDREN WHO

WERE HURRYING BY IN THEIR SUNDAY-GO-TO-MEET-

ING CLOTHES 35


xvi. "AND CHOPPED AROUND THE SPOT WITH ALL HIS PUNY

MIGHT 36

xvii. "AND LOOKED HIM SQUARELY IN THE FACE" 37
12









LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE
xviiI. "THERE WAS A MONKEY CASHIER ON THE OUTSIDE OF

THE BANK, WHO WORE A SCARLET COAT, AND WHO

RANG A BELL, WROTE RAPIDLY IN A LARGE BOOK,

AND STOPPED WITH A JERK AS I WAS PUSHED IN" 40

xix. "HE HAD TAKEN THE WHITE GLOBE TO TRY TO HAVE

IT DYED, AS A SURPRISE TO HIS MOTHER" 41

xx. "A GERMAN BAND WAS PLAYING TUNES 42

xxi. STOPPED TO SHOW THEM THAT SHE COULD DANCE

THE 'ONE, TWO, THREE, AND A KICK'" 43

xxII. "BY AND BY A WHITE-HEADED GENTLEMAN I COULD

SEE HIM QUITE PLAINLY THROUGH A CRACK IN THE

CURBSTONE-TOOK PITY ON THE LITTLE GIRL, AND

GAVE HER AN INDIAN IN MY PLACE 44

xxII. LEANING OVER SIDEWAYS, SO AS NOT TO SPILL

ANY .45

xxiv. "'VERY WELL, THEN,' SAID ALEXANDER. 'BEGIN'". 49

xxv. HALF-TITLE TO MONDAY'S STORY. . .51

xxvi. HEADING TO "THE FALL OF GREAT CHUNG KEE" 53

xxvil. "WHICH WAS DECORATED WITH THE SMALL SALMON-

COLORED TICKET- SOLD- THE FIRST DAY OF THE

EXHIBITION .54

I3







LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE

xxviii. "WHEN THE ARTIST TIED THE STRINGS OF A BIG

WHITE FRILLED NIGHT-CAP UNDER HER CHIN, AND

POSED HER IN A FUNNY BIG OAK CHAIR, THE LITTLE

LIVE MODEL RATHER LIKED IT" . 56

xxix. "SUDDENLY THE LITTLE LIVE MODEL CAUGHT HIM IN

HER STICKY FINGERS, AND THREW HIM ON THE

FLOOR ." ... 59

xxx. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE FALL OF GREAT CHUNG KEE ". 60

xxxI. HALF-TITLE TO TUESDAY'S STORY . 63

xxxIr. HEADING TO "THE CHRISTMAS PARTY IN THE BACK-

YARD, AND WHO WERE INVITED". . 65

xxxIII. "ALL THROUGH FLOWER-TIME, EVENING AND MORN-

ING, HER BROAD STRAW HAT NEATLY ADJUSTED,

AND A BASKET AND SCISSORS IN HER KIND HANDS,

I WATCH HER PRUNING AND TYING, WATERING AND

DIGGING .66

xxxiv. "I SEE THEM ON THE STREET OCCASIONALLY, BOTH

IN THIN MUSLIN. SAMUEL BALANCES HIMSELF UPON

THE CURBSTONE WITH GREAT CREDIT TO HIS

FAMILY" ... 68

xxxv. "MASTER BEN ZINE HAD WILFULLY CHOPPED OFF THE

HEAD OF HER FAVORITE ZINNIA WITH A STICK" 70

14









LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE

xxxvi. "I THREW UP THE SASH, AND LEANED OUT ON THE

SLIPPERY STONE WINDOW-SILL" . 72


xxxvii. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE CHRISTMAS PARTY IN THE BACK-

YARD, AND WHO WERE INVITED" . 74


xxxviii. "WE ARE GIVING THE BIRDS A CHRISTMAS PARTY" 75


xxxix. HALF-TITLE TO WEDNESDAY'S STORY . 77


XL. HEADING TO "THE GRAMMAR COURT" . 79


XLI. INITIAL LETTER . . 79


XLII. "THOUGH HE WOULD NOT CRY ABOUT A THRASHING". 8o

XLIII. "SO HE BEGAN CLIMBING UP" . 83

XLIV. "AWAY UP AT ONE END, UNDER AN IMMENSE RAINBOW,

SAT A HAUGHTY-LOOKING KING; AND THE GAY AND

FESTIVE PEOPLE RANGED THEMSELVES ON EITHER

SIDE OF HIM" 85

XLV. "IMMEDIATELY A SMALL BOY, IN A MIGHTY PAIR OF

SLIPPERS, WHO LOOKED A VERY LITTLE ARTICLE IN-

DEED, STOOD TREMBLING BEFORE THE KING" 87

XLVI. "SIR PREPOSITION OBEDIENTLY DREW BACK THE CUR-

TAIN, AND LED FORWARD A LADY ENVELOPED IN A

LONG, THICK VEIL" 88

15








LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE

XLVII. "THE KING, I AM ASHAMED TO SAY, TURNED AROUND,

AND SHOOK HIS FIST AT THE TIMID LITTLE ARTI-

CLE . . 89


XLVIII. "HERE SHE FLUNG HERSELF INTO SOMEBODY'S ARMS" 90


XLIX. "A HANDSOME YOUNG COURTIER RUSHED FORWARD, AND

THREW HIMSELF AT THE FEET OF THE KING" 92


L. "YOUR GRACE WILL PARDON THE RASHNESS OF AN

AGED MAN" 93

LI. CONJUNCTION" 95

LII. "I AM GLAD YOU DO" 96

LIII. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE GRAMMAR COURT". . 97

LIV. HALF-TITLE TO THURSDAY'S STORY . 99


LV. HEADING TO "THE LAUGHING-GAS BROWNIES" .101


LVI. INITIAL LETTER .101


LVII. "SO HIS MOTHER PUT ON HER WRAPS, AND TOOK HIM

AROUND TO DR. BROWN'S" . . 103


LVIII. "ON THE ROUNDEST PART OF THE LOWER LIP STOOD A

BROWNIE ABOUT AN EIGHTH OF AN INCH HIGH". 105


LIX. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE LAUGHING-GAS BROWNIES" 1og

16









LIST OF ILLUSTRA TIONS.


NO. PAGE

LX. HALF-TITLE TO FRIDAY'S STORY .. III


LXI. HEADING TO "J. FROST, ESQ." . 113


LXII. INITIAL LETTER 13


LXIII. "THE TOWN BECAME A PARADISE OF CEDAR-TREES AND

HOLLY. THE SLEIGH-BELLS JANGLED MERRILY" 114


LXIV. "BUT THE TATTERED COMFORTABLE DID NOT QUITE

COVER THEIR LITTLE COLD NOSES" . 115


LXV. "SHE SAW THE STRANGEST-LOOKING OLD MAN IMAGI-

NABLE, COMING TOWARDS HER" . 118


LXVI. "AT LENGTH THEY CAME TO A LARGE GATE" 121


LXVII. "EVER SO MANY CHILDREN, IN GROUPS OF SEVEN" 123


LXVIII. "THEY ALL, INCLUDING MR. J. FROST, FELL TO ROMP-

ING AS HARD AS EVER THEY COULD" . 125


LXIX. "AND RAN WITH ALL HIS MIGHT" . 127


LXX. THE LAST DAY OF THE OLD YEAR . 28


LXXI. "BY HER BABY BROTHER, WHO WAS EATING BREAD AND

MILK OUT OF A CHINA MUG, WAS A LADY DRESSED

IN SILK AND FURS 130

17







LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE

LXXII. WITH A BASKET ON HIS ARM, CRAMMED WITH

GOODIES 132


LXXII. TAIL-PIECE TO "J. FROST, ESQ." 133


LXXIV. HALF-TITLE TO SATURDAY'S STORY 135


LXXV. HEADING TO "THE ANGEL AND THE PANSIES 137


LXXVI. INITIAL LETTER .137


LXXVII. "BABY PAUL, WHO WAS SO SWEET AND GENTLE THAT

THE ROBINS WOULD FLY DOWN AND EAT OUT OF

HIS PUGGY HANDS .138


LXXVIII. "HIDING HER FACE IN THE COOL GRASS 140


LXXIX. "A SNOW-WHITE ANGEL STOOD BEFORE LIECHEN" 142


LXXX. SHE RAN TOWARDS HIM, AND HELPED HIM TO COME

INTO THE PLEASANT GARDEN" .. 146


LXXXI. "AND CARRIED IT HOME" 147


LXXXII. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE ANGEL AND THE PANSIES 149


LXXXIII. HALF-TITLE TO SUNDAY'S STORY 151


LXXXIV. HEADING TO TINY LINK" 153


LXXXV. "HE EVEN PUT IT IN HIS UPSTAIR POCKET" 154

18









LIST OF ILLUS TRATIONS.


NO. PAGE
LXXXVI. "SHE KNEW IT WAS SANTA CLAUS, BECAUSE HE WAS

MUFFLING HIS HANDS IN HIS SLEEVE, JUST LIKE

THE IMAGE OF HIM ON THE TOP BRANCH OF THE

CHRISTMAS-TREES" . 156


LXXXVII. TAIL-PIECE TO "TINY LINK". . 16o


LXXXVIII. TAIL-PIECE TO "THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK" 162






















*i



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THE' HILDREN*Or TFXH@e

































MONDAY'S CHILD IS FAIR OF FACE;

TUESDAY'S CHILD IS FULL OF GRACE;

WEDNESDAY'S CHILD IS MERRIE AND GLAD;

THURSDAY'S CHILD IS SOUR AND SAD;

FRIDAY'S CHILD IS LOVING AND GIVING;

AND SATURDAY'S CHILD MUST WORK FOR/HIS LIVING;

BUT THE CHILD THAT IS BORN ON THE SABBATH DAY

IS BLITHE, AND BONNIE, AND GOOD, AND GAY."

OLD RHYME.

























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I.

"I'll tell you a story
About Jack A Nory,
And now my story's begun."


HARLOTTE RUSSE was a
shop-girl who received three

dollars a week for selling bits
of ribbon at the remnant

iI counter of a large store on
Fourteenth Street.
She wore a red jersey, and spent most of her salary
on bandoline and chocolate cla7irs.

In Williamsburgh, where she passed her nigb-s, the
27






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


people never called her a shop-girl, but spoke of her
respectfully as a saleslady.
The tenement where Charlotte Russe lived was on
South First Street, not far from Roosevelt Ferry.
It stood directly behind another house; so that, to
reach the street, Charlotte had to cross a short court-
yard, and pass through the hall of this other house.
For a long time Charlotte had noticed, in one of the
windows of the front house, a little lame boy, about six
years old, who had silvery hair, and a very dignified,
wise look.
The windows were near the pavement; and the
wooden shutters attached were painted green, with slits
in them like new moons.
Charlotte Russe, having read about Robinson Crusoe,
and being struck by the lonely appearance of the little
boy, called him Alexander Selkirk, Jr.
She used to see him every morning as she went to
work, and would watch eagerly for him when she came
home at night. They had never exchanged a word, and
she always found him gazing seriously over the way.
28







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Although Charlotte had not a nice discretion on the

subject of dress, she possessed a good, kind heart, which

is perhaps the best thing to own, after all.









S-""--- .










.' .



Alexander was so patient, sitting there day after day,

with nobody to play with but his curious thoughts, that

he quite won her.

From time to time she would bring him the most

incongruous presents as tributes, and lay them on the out-
29






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


side window-sill as she went by in the mornings. When
she returned at night, they were gone; and by that sign
she knew that he had received them, and was pleased.
Now it was a "jaw-breaker;" now it was a piece of
patent chewing-gum, or three or four "migs;" once a


















-LA C.P.

" moon-agate;" and once a pink celluloid ring, which
she recognized on his first finger at their next meeting.
But Charlotte's most successful present was a varie-
gated verbena, planted in a tomato-can.
30







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


This gratified Alexander exceedingly. He placed it
at the window in the sunniest spot, and called it his
"garden."
It began to be the busy holiday season, and Char-
lotte Russe was kept at the store until very late. She
recompensed herself by spending more than usual for
bandoline and chocolate eclairs.
On Christmas-eve, after she had paid her ferry-money,
she had only fifty cents and a penny left in her round
gray leather purse.
When she reached the hall-door of the front tene-
ment on South First Street, she stopped, opened her
purse, and took out the two coins. She jingled them
once or twice in her hand, and let them slide back into
the purse.
Then she changed her mind, and took the penny
out again.
It was a quarter to twelve, and a beautiful starlight
night.
She turned, and went out to Alexander's window.
It was as dark as Egypt inside.
31






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


The silver rays of the moon were glinting on the























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panes of glass. There was a great bustle and a dazzle

of electric light on Fourth Street.
32







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Charlotte laid the penny on the sill, which was
already covered with a heavy rime of frost.
"I hope Alexander will see this in the morning,"
she said; and I wish him a merry Christmas."
When Alexander woke up, Christmas had dawned,


I 1 i











*.D-*C -* q


and the whole world was glad of it. He lay and
listened to the sleigh-bells coming nearer- NEARER -
NEARER; and then growing fainter and fainter, until
lost in the distance.
Some boys blowing horns in the street excited him
so, that he got up out of bed, and dressed himself.
33






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


He found some bluefish and potatoes soldered on-
to a tin plate in the oven, and a pot of coffee boiling
itself to destruction on the top of the stove.
His mother, who did every kind of work for ten
shillings a day, had left before sunrise to assist at the
cooking of a big Christmas dinner.
After finishing breakfast, he limped to the window
on his crutch, and poured a little water over the
"garden."
He glanced wistfully at some children who were
hurrying by in their Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes.
"They are bound for their grandfather's, who lives
around the corner," Alexander said to himself; and
they will come back with a market-basket full of
presents."
It never occurred to him to be envious, or that
their lot and his might have been reversed.
The people on the sidewalk had their arms loaded
with bundles.
Suddenly he noticed a copper-colored spot sparkling
in the frost on the outside window-sill.
34







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


After much trouble, he pushed the sash up, for it
was sticky with ice, and he was very weak.




























Then he took a three-pronged fork off the table,
and chopped around the spot with all his puny might.
35






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


It was slow business, and he grew real warm and
tired.



















While he was still chopping, the copper-colored spot
flew up and hit him coldly on the cheek, bounced into
the room on the floor, and rolled under the table.
Alexander crawled down after it, caught it, and
held it tight in his tiny blue hands. It was one
cent.
He carried it triumphantly to the stove to thaw it
out.
36







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Poor little Red Indian!" he whispered, looking down
at it. You have come to spend Christmas Day with
me, haven't you ? "
All at once the head of the Red
Indian on the copper cent turned slowly
round, and looked him squarely in the
face.


Yes," replied the Red Indian abruptly, after a
pause; "I have been waiting for you on the window-
sill all night."
I suppose She placed you there?" Alexander in-
quired.
She did," answered the Red Indian. "I was the
only one she had. She wished you a merry Christ-
mas.
She is a very excellent person," remarked Alex-
ander.
"There is only one serious fault in her character,"
returned Alexander's visitor: she is too ready to part
with her Red Indians. But that is a common failing,
37






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

as I have noted while travelling from pocket-book to
pocket-book."
"I have travelled myself," said Alexander, with
interest: "I have been to Far Rockaway.
"Have you ever been to Far Rockaway ? It is a
lovely place.
There are ever so many trees on the road,
whole forests of them, as many as four or five
together.
"You see, the way we came to get to Far Rock-
away was this. A preacher-man and his wife brought
a whole lot of us childern to it for a week, to keep
them company. We had cake and milk and apple-
sauce, and once we had ice-cream. Gracious! but the
water is big down there. It rolls up all over the
road.
Some of the childern went into it; but I did not,
cause maybe, perhaps, it might. have hurted my foot."
Alexander was never so contented as when discuss-
ing the blissful week at Rockaway.
If he had been entertained by crowned heads at
38







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

every capital of Europe, he could hardly appear to have
travelled farther.
You must have had an extensive experience also,"
observed Alexander.
"Yes, indeed," answered the Red Indian: "my birth-
day you may have remarked it under my collar -
was in the year 1864.
I was one of the first of a large tribe of Red
Indians struck off at the Philadelphia mint.
"The crash we made in being poured out of a
sack upon the floor, was louder than a load of coal
emptied on the sidewalk."
We buy our coal by the bushel, in a basket,"
put in Alexander.
Yes," said the Red Indian reflectively, without
appearing to notice this remark, I have seen some-
thing of life in my time.
"Ah! once I was a prize in a package of caramels.
Those were proud, happy days. It is not every Red
Indian who can be a prize.
"Then I lay on the nursery mantel-piece, in an iron
39






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

bank, for nearly three weeks. There was a monkey
cashier on the outside of the bank, who wore a scarlet
coat, and who rang a bell, wrote rapidly in a large
book, and stopped with a jerk as I was pushed in.














I was being saved up to buy a Christmas present
with for a little boy's mamma. I believe the little boy
bought a ruby glass globe for the gas-jet in the hall.
I understood from the monkey cashier that he had
taken the white globe to try to have it dyed, as a
surprise to his mother; but, finding this impossible,
had purchased the ruby glass globe instead.
One evening in August," the Red Indian continued,
40







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


"a man gave me, with seven other Red Indians, to a

little girl, and sent her around after beer. The little
girl dropped us, one after the other, into a tin bucket,
























0D "C -P *

which the man called 'The Growler,' and capered over

the pavement, jolting us like mad.
A German band, which goes by the title of The
41







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Five Lazy Brothers,' but which works as hard as, or
harder perhaps than, the most of us, I take it, was
playing tunes in front of the saloon as we approached;
and a number of ragged children were waltzing in
couples.




















The little girl who carried us in the bucket
stopped to show them that she could dance the 'One,
two, three, and a kick.'
At this, myself and my brothers became so terri-
42








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


bly angry, that, at the first kick, we sprang up into

the air, and sped away on the sidewalk in every direc-

tion.


























*D.C.p.


SI concealed myself in the gutter, near the curb-

stone.
43






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


I heard the little girl crying bitterly at not having
found me.













I \R










/
t;*




















SBy and by a white-headed gentleman.- I could see
him quite plainly through a crack in the curbstone-
44







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


took pity on the little girl, and gave her an Indian
in my place.
"This comforted the little girl at once: she entered
the saloon, and in a few moments afterward came





















running out with her pail of beer, and leaning over
sideways, so as not to spill any.
Her footsteps died away down the street; then I
became interested in something else.
45







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


"The night closing in, a man appeared with a lad-
der, and lit a street-lamp.
"About that time a great many workmen, with
dinner-cans in their hands, were jogging home to
supper.
"At ten o'clock the streets became very lively, and
kept so until towards eleven, when the noise began to
subside.
It was after twelve o'clock in the morning, and
there was nobody on the whole block but a big, lum-
bering night-watchman.
I was just settling myself for a comfortable sleep,
when, above my head on the curbstone, I caught a
glimpse of several quaint, childish feet, passing grace-
fully back and forth, as though they were dancing as
they sang.
"The song was this : -

"'Monday's child is fair of face;
Tuesday's child is full of grace;
Wednesday's child is merrie and glad;
Thursday's child is sour and sad;
46







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

Friday's child is loving and giving;
And Saturday's child must work for his living;
But the child that is born on the sabbath day
Is blithe, and bonnie, and good, and gay.'

"When they had finished singing, they came and sat
side by side along the curbstone above my head,--seven
pairs of quaint, childish feet.
I counted them, but could see nothing else at that
time.
I gathered from their song, and from what they
said, that they were the Children of the Week, and that
their names were

MONDA Y, THURSDAY Y,

TUESDA Y, FRIDA Y,

WEDNESDAY, SA TURDA Y,

and SUNDA Y,

that, thousands of years ago, the man who makes the
almanacs had made a mistake; that, in consequence of
this mistake, every few hundred years the world was
47







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

cheated out of an hour. That, not wishing his mistake
to be discovered, that sly man who makes the almanacs,
had taken no account of this in his almanacs; that,
in the course of hundreds of years, the lost Hours had
grown up into Days; and that, on this identical Mon-
day night, there was a whole week of them. Here
they were, seven, lost, unaccounted-for Days, sitting on
the curbstone above my head."
How delightful!" said Alexander.
"They were the most congenial people I ever lis-
tened to," answered the Red Indian. "Their conversa-
tion was charming.
Monday, who was the first Child of the Week,
related a story.
For seven nights in succession, during which time
I remained concealed in the gutter, they were on the
sidewalk, promptly at half-past twelve, entertaining each
other with stories and singing."
And these tales, -you will tell them to me?"
suggested Alexander.
"Only one every day during the holidays," replied
48








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


the Red Indian. It tires me to turn my head, and my
lungs are not strong; besides, in this way the stories
will last longer."
"Very well, then," said Alexander. Begin."












C. -



'" I :. ", :..


















f)

Tw :FALL- O'FGR AT.CHUNGKEE,











II.

T HE Red Indian cleared his throat in a dignified
manner.
"Stop a moment!" cried Alexander. Are you
quite thawed ?"
Thank you," said the Red Indian, "yes. I am
naturally so warm-blooded, that I often burn holes in
people's pockets. But come, let us get to the story."
I am all attention," replied Alexander.
The Red Indian moistened his lips with his tongue,
and began : -
It is a singular fact, now I think of it," he
said, that I never had a good look at either of
the Days of the Week. They all kept too near the
curbstone.
I did hear Monday say that she was named
after the Moon, who was her godmother. After that,
I heard her relate this story.
52




















MONDAY'S STORY.

1" Monday's child is fair of face."

HE artist called him
i Chung Kee. He was
a little still-life Chinese model, with looking-glass eyes,
and a scarlet mouth, nicely tucked in at the corners.
There were many rich, beautiful draperies, curious
vases, swinging-lamps, soft rugs, and I don't know
what all, in the artist's studio; but Chung Kee was
considered by far the most perfect thing there.
He must have been a "mandarin," or something,
in his native country, he wore such a splendid buff-
paper robe, shot all over with crimson poppies and
olive-leaves.
53






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Chung Kee was conscious of his high calling, for

all day long there hovered about his lips a completely

self-satisfied smile. The artist had made what he













I / 'I












-11 C *C-P*

called an arrangement" out of him; that is, he had

stood him on a mantel-piece covered with blue velours,

in front of an old yellow sampler, in the shade of a
54
























































" WHEN THE ARTIST TIED THE STRINGS OF A BIG WHITE FRILLED NIGHT-CAP UNDER HER CHIN, AND POSED HER IN A
FUNNY BIG OAK CHAIR, THE LITTLE LIVE MODEL RATHER LIKED IT."
FUNNY BIG OAK CHAIR, THE LI'ITLE HIVE MODEL RATHER LIKED IT."








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

peacock fan. The artist then painted a full-length
portrait of Chung Kee in this position, which he sent
to the Academy, and which was decorated with the
small salmon-colored ticket Sold-the first day of
the exhibition.
But Chung Kee was destined to have a rival. One
morning a little live model walked into the studio.
It was a nice, cool, shady place to come to on such
a hot June day.
When the artist tied the strings of a big white
frilled night-cap under her chin, and posed her in
a funny big oak chair, the little live model rather
liked it.
At first Chung Kee gazed down serenely from his
velours mantel-piece at all this. But, when the little
live model was treated by the artist to Boston chips
and marshmallow drops, his parchment whistle burned
with jealousy.
He never offered them to me, and I have posed
by the hour," Chung Kee thought bitterly; and I
could not have eaten them if he had."
57






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Things were growing worse and worse. The next
day the little live model came again. As she did not
have pretty hair, the artist in the mean time had painted
in, with his clever brush, a profusion of lovely golden
curls.
The little live model walked straight to the big
chair, tied on the night-cap, and sat down. When it
was time to rest, she looked over the artist's shoulder
at the golden curls in the picture.
"That isn't me," she said, tossing her head. My
hair is berrer 'en that."
And she pulled off her night-cap to show her back
hair, which was about an inch long.
Chung Kee's looking-glass eyes sparkled with cruel
pleasure.
The artist, while glancing about to find something
with which to amuse the little live model, met those
same envious looking-glass eyes.
He went to the mantel, and, taking Chung Kee
down, carried him over to show her. For a moment
the two models were face to face.
58








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Then suddenly the little live model caught him in
her sticky fingers, and threw him on the floor.


























It was a naughty thing to do, and it broke Chung
Kee's parchment whistle.
When they lifted him up, there was a sticky stain
59







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


on his chin. It would not wash out. When they

stood him on the blue velours mantel, under the pea-

cock fan, his head hung down, and they could not

persuade him to lift it.



\ \ -.6 /
7 /



\

























60




























* BTHE*-CHRI"TMASpAPTY-IN.-THE
GBACK-YARD -AND -WHO *WEPE &INVITED









III.

AS soon as his mother had gone to her work the
following morning, Alexander was anxious for
the Red Indian to commence.
The recital of these stories was an important event
in Alexander's monotonous little life. He took the
penny over near the stove.
The Red Indian shook the crown of feathers on
his head by way of introduction.
The next evening they were every one there
again," said the Red Indian; "and they were as gay
and merry as Santa Claus
"Tuesday informed the rest that her godfather was
Tyw, the Northern god of war; and that, she said,
was how she came to be called Tuesday.
"Then she related a story about a flock of snow-
birds, the manuscript of which, she told them, she had
received from the author, who was a nervous literary
old bachelor.
"This was Tuesday's story." -
64






















S'TUESDAY'S STORY.
TUESDAY'S STORY.
"1 Tuesday's child is full of grace."t
AM a lonely old bachelor.
I live by myself up two flights of stairs.
My window has a fine sweep of all the
back-yards in the block. I sit by it some-
times, after the trouble of the day is over,
and watch with interest the domestic economy of my
neighbors.
I can, if I choose, take a bird's-eye view of the
happy laundry-girls hanging up the clothes.
In summer-time I see corpulent gentlemen, with
their coats off, reading the news.
65






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


There is a dear old lady whom I have a great
fancy for. All through flower-time, evening and morn-


























ing, her broad straw hat neatly adjusted, and a basket
and scissors in her kind hands, I watch her pruning
and tying, watering and digging; lifting the faces of
66







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


the young buds as tenderly as if they were human
faces, so they may readily feel the touch of God's
holy dew.
I like this old lady. I once saw her give a ripe
peach from the garden fence to a little boy who had
climbed over to hunt for his cat.
Sometimes I catch this good soul's eye as she
glances up to see how the weather is, and then she
invariably smiles at me.
I have a name in my mind for every one of my
neighbors.
There is a small boy in the next house to me,
whom I call Samuel Todgers.
He is very prim: there is a round curl on the top
of his head that looks like a wave. He never smiles:
he is young, but takes life seriously.
He has just learned to walk: he walks constantly.
His mother is a stout lady, who escorts him every-
where.
I see them on the street occasionally, both in thin
muslin.
67







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Samuel balances himself upon the curbstone with

great credit to his family.





,f ,





Q 1 1
<, -j --






















There are two other children, however, more delight-
68







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


ful even than Samuel Todgers. They are brother and
sister, and are not in the least of his temperament,
for they are both born romps.
I call them little Annie Seed and Master Ben
Zine.
Miss Seed has brown curls and a pair of laugh-
ing eyes. Do you know, there are very few eyes in
this world that really laugh.
Master Ben Zine is strong and sturdy: his hands
are almost as brown as chestnuts. He is fond of
adventure.
One autumn he climbed up a steep arbor to secure
a bunch of sweet grapes for Miss Seed.
I never grow tired of watching them: I feel as
though a very little would make me go down into
the garden and become their big brother.
On occasions Master Ben Zine is rather naughty.
I shall never forget that spring morning that I went
to my window with a razor in one hand and a cup
of suds in the other.
Miss Seed was ignominiously seated on the ground,
69






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


sobbing. Master Ben Zine had wilfully chopped off
the head of her favorite zinnia with a stick.
He was unconsciously imitating the Emperor Tar-
quin.




,. 2 -.... ". .











About six months from that time, nearly a week
after Christmas, on a delightfully frosty afternoon, it
chanced that I rose from my easy-chair by the hearth,
and, going to the window, drew the curtain and looked
out.
The beautiful, gay flower-beds in the garden below
were nicely tucked under Jack Frost's snow-blankets.
70







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


The sun made the whole scene sparkle charmingly.
To be sure, the green leaves of the grape-vines had
all blown away; but the stems were well laden down
with long-pointed jewels of ice.
The windows of the opposite houses had patches.
of snow over them, which gave the appearance of
ever so many eyes under heavy gray eyebrows.
And there were the children, bundled up snugly in
fur and worsted, chasing about in the drifts, and
pelting each other with this delicious plaything sent
from heaven.
In the centre of the garden stood a tall, dark-
green something, half buried under the load of feathery
flakes. This was the deserted Christmas-tree.
Two huge, wooden shovels leaned against it. Oh,
what lazy shovels!
As soon as Miss Seed and Master Ben caught
sight of these, with a shout of joy they plunged across
what used to be the garden-plot.
I beheld them flourish the shovels, or try to, and
immediately fall to work making a path.
71






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Presently they both rushed for the Christmas-tree,
and, beating the snow off vigorously, with infinite labor
dragged it to the centre of the garden.
Their cheeks were as crimson as Master Ben's
mittens.


















Just then somebody called me away into the house.
When I returned to the window, the sky was rosy
with the sunset.
I threw up the sash, and leaned out on the slip-
pery stone window-sill.
72








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


A welcome breath of crisp, wintry air rushed over
my face, and pulled my beard. I heard the ringing
voices of my child friends still playing below.
Miss Seed declared that it was as cold as if they
had been eating peppermint-drops.
Then there was a momentary stillness. I looked
down.
What was my surprise to see, in the centre of the
garden-plot, a large flock of snow-birds, hovering over
a lighted Christmas-tree, heavy and loaded with innu-
merable little squares of bread.
There was a halo of light from the tiny, flickering
candles in the green branches, reflected on the glitter-
ing, crystal snow.
In the soft splendor of the light, their sweet faces
upward turned like the flowers in the old lady's gar-
den, they were standing side by side, breathless and
happy.
The sinking sun, slanting across the opposite panes,
struck into flaming fire. The red glow of the sky
clung to the pale stone walls and roofs of the houses.
73






THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Suddenly the bells from a distant tower broke
into a chime. Again I looked down. One of the
two the boy -caught sight of me. He smiled.
"We are giving the birds a Christmas party," he
said.
The flock of grateful snow-birds were still wheeling
through the air, and hovering about the tree.
I thought of young angels singing, somewhere in
-the bosom of that rosy sky, their carols to the sacred
season; I thought of Him who, standing in the
Eastern temple, said,-

Ye must become as little children."



S, i '"i '





.. *D.-..





































'' ,e **^* :" ^
.'- *k "y '




rg^d'-PI~JL, U pt: C .r< <<- Ci4



" EAEGVN TEBRSACRITA AT.



















I~:Q~PlAA~,O PZ
|^^I^H;^









IV.

O N Wednesday, just as the Red Indian was on
the point of entering upon his third story,
Alexander interrupted him.
"Won't you have some refreshments ?" said Alex-
ander, pointing to a tin plate on the table, on which
was a bit of chuck-steak and a morsel of potato.
No, I thank you. I am troubled with indiges-
tion," answered the Red Indian, "and I have to use
extreme caution in my diet.
But listen. Wednesday began by saying that he
was named after the great one-eyed Scandinavian god
Woden."
"You don't say so!" exclaimed Alexander.
And, by the way," proceeded the Red Indian, "it
is reported that Woden, by drinking from a delicious
fountain, became the wisest of gods and men; but
that he purchased this distinction at the cost of his
eye.
However that may be, here is Wednesday's story."
78



























WEDNESDAY'S STORY.
Wednesday's child is merrie and glad."

SEORGE TULIP was a rosy-
cheeked boy, with a pair of
dirty hands, and a very stupid
head for the nine parts of
speech. In fact, as far as his
knowledge of grammar went, he was a dunce; and
that is a very unpleasant thing to be, especially when
one gets a daily thrashing, you know.
79





THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Well, George Tulip was a dunce; and his teacher
knew it, all the school knew it, and he knew it.
He felt very sulky about it on this particular day;
for he had come out of school with a red, swollen



















hand, and a pair of red, swollen eyes: though he
would not cry about a thrashing, not he; no, no! he
was too brave for that.
George Tulip lived in a nice, little house, near a
nice, little village i-n which stood the schoolhouse; and,
8o








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

when he went home every day, he had to go through
an open field and then through a piece of woods.
It was about four o'clock on a summer afternoon.
He had been kept in again, and the heat had not yet
faded away. The sun looked hot and starey through
the mist in George Tulip's eyes; but its saucy, know-
ing look put him out, for it seemed to have too much
information for a well-balanced sun.
Presently he came to a fresh bit of grass, by a
noble, old tree: so he threw himself down, all breath-
less, and rosier than ever; and, folding his inky fingers
under his head, he fell to watching a domestic robin
up in the tree, and thinking about the detested les-
sons at the same time.
Now," said he, for he had a great habit of
talking to himself aloud, -" what good can there be
in a fellow's learning that horrible stuff?
I'll never have the faintest idea of what it all
means, I am sure, any more than that round robin
up above me."
Whereupon the round robin looked very wise, as
81







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


if it knew what it knew. But George Tulip did not
mind that, and went on talking to himself.
I was always very shaky on the subject of
fairies ; but I'm blest, if I wouldn't like to get a
glimpse of one this moment, for I don't believe any-
body else could help me."
And just then the robin looked down from his
nest, and called out, -
You're right, there!"
George Tulip glanced up, and, to his surprise, saw
that the old tree had grown into a ragged pair of
stairs; and the round robin nodded to him as if it
said as plainly as possible,-
Come up!"
So he began climbing up. But, as fast as he
climbed, it hopped on above him; and the stairs began
to grow and grow.
He kept bravely on, for he was sure that the
stairs and the round robin would stop sometime,
though he was rather astonished when he found the
stairs making directly for the sun, and still more so
82








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


when, as he came near the brilliant orb of day, he
saw its mouth open, like a great portcullis; and on its























huge upper lip was written, in long, black letters, -
THE GRAMMAR COURT."
Here the stairs stopped, and he saw the round
robin go in with a crowd of gay and festive people.
When he mounted to the top of the stairs, he went
83







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


in too. He found himself in a lofty chamber of
clouds.
Away up at one end, under an immense rainbow,
sat a haughty-looking king; and the gay and festive
people ranged themselves on either side of him.
By and by the King called out in a loud voice,-
Where is little Article, our page?"
Immediately a small boy, in a mighty pair of
slippers, who looked a very little article indeed, stood
trembling before the King.
Well," roared the King, don't stand loafing
about here, but run as fast as you can to the royal
presence of Queen Noun, and tell her we request her
attendance."
Whereat the little Article, trembling a great deal,
skipped backward to the door, and then ran off as
fast as he could.
For," said the King, trying to get off a poor
joke, how could King Verb be merry if the object
of his thoughts and the subject of his affections be
absent from his throne ?"
84























ra*Ar












ll.,j~


.i gr- -- _.- X~pdL






, ".,,







ofo
iN
















py










"'AWAY UP AT ONE END, UNDER AN IMMENSE RAINBOW, SAT A HAUGHTY-LOOKING KING; AND
THE GAY AND FESTIVE PEOPLE RANGED TrHEMSELVES ON EITHER SIDE OF HIM."











THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


This sally appeared to tickle all the gay and festive
people amazingly, for they giggled a great deal, and
were much annoyed because George Tulip did not





















giggle also, although he could not for the world tell
what they were having so much fun about.
One of them would have spoken to him had not
his Majesty just then called out lustily to the man
at the door,
87







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Admit them instantly, Sir Preposition !"
Sir Preposition obediently drew back the curtain,
and led forward a lady enveloped in a long, thick
veil.




















The King hopped down from his throne, he was
in such a hurry, exclaiming as he went, in a very
hoarse voice,
"Allow thy lord to rend the midnight cloud, and
behold the moon in all her glory."
88








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


At the same time he lifted up the cloud, as he
called it, and disclosed, not the slightest hint of a
beauty, but the withered face of a hideous, old woman.





i i'














Then the King, I am ashamed to say, turned around,

and shook his fist at the timid little Article.
How dare you, minion," shrieked he, point out
this ugly, old Aunt Pronoun, placing her instead of
the fairest princess living ? Soldiers, soldiers "
Here he turned almost blue in the face, and
89







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

motioned towards the puny little Article as though he
were a lion.
Seize the traitor!" hissed the King.
The soldiers were about to obey when a piercing
scream rung out through the apartment.









6 b










Everybody looked round to see what had hap-
pened; and, sure enough, almost next to where George
Tulip stood, a very spare court-lady had' fallen into
hysterics.
90








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Oh, alas!" cried she, gasping the while like a fish;
" ah me! alack! fiddle-dee-dee! How-can-he-be-
so-cruel "
Here she flung herself into somebody's arms, and
was dragged from the room.
Ho, ho !" said the King. "Who's that ?"
Lady Interjection," squeaked the little Article,
nervously touching his hat.
Lady Interjection, is it ? Well, she had better
stop if she knows what is good for her. However,
that won't hinder our making short work of Aunt
Pronoun. Soldiers "
Again the soldiers marched up most decorously,
when a handsome young courtier rushed forward, and
threw himself at the 'feet of the King.
My dear brother-in-law- I mean, your Majesty!"
- he exclaimed, can't you make up your royal mind
to spare this dear, old party, remembering her infirm-
ities ? Oh, do so, I beseech you! Spare also my
sister, Queen Noun! Call to mind her many pleasing
qualities.
9'







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


She is beautiful, charming, graceful, witty, loving,
gentle -
Stop, stop, Adjective !" shouted the King : "you
will drive us mad. Get up, and listen to my Lord
Adverb, and do not kneel there, chattering like a
magpie."
















.'a C .'

An aged and venerable man had approached King
Verb.
As Adjective departed, George Tulip heard him
whisper in the prime minister's ear, Do your best
to modify him."
92








THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


The old man nodded sagaciously, and then addressed
his sovereign in a low, clear voice.



















IVN












Your grace will pardon the rashness of an aged
93







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


man if I say you have acted somewhat hastily. The
advice I give you is, to think slowly, coolly, deliber-
ately, and wisely, and then act kingly."
Excellent !" said the testy monarch, for he had
cooled down considerably. Let us hear what Aunt
Pronoun can say for herself."
The old lady seemed very cross at the way she
had been abused. She drew herself up, and made the
King wince, she looked at him so hard.
I have nothing, sire, to say for myself," she said,
" save that the Queen, on receiving your message, bade
me come with the news that you have a young prince
born to you."
You cannot imagine how the people shouted for
joy at this announcement, and how the King smiled.
We thank you for this glorious news, Madam
Pronoun," said the King, and we beg you to pardon
our sudden displeasure.
In recompense, we will have to make you the
prince's godmother. What shall the name of his Royal
Highness be ? Speak."
94







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


Ladies of Pronoun's age are not so easy to make up
with: so she looked injured, but at length began smiling.
King Verb," said she, I was much grieved at
your anger, for it was entirely unmerited : but I re-





















joice at your kindness; and, in token of your having
taken the Queen and myself again into court favor
and your friendship, I will name the young prince -
Conjunction."
95







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


"Hurrah!" cried George Tulip, he was so mightily
pleased, "I see it all now!"


"I am glad you do," said his teacher's voice, close
beside him; but you had better get up now, else





'-"t~ U--:--- --













you will take cold. It is pretty near sunset, and you
have been sleeping on this grass nearly two hours."
George Tulip sat up, rubbed his eyes, and looked
about him. There he was, in the woods, as natural
as life. Could it have been a dream?
96







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.

Ha! what was that ? He happened to spy the
round robin looking over his nest, and winking at him.
He got up and followed his teacher, never speak-
ing a word.
But from that day to this he firmly believed that
what he saw was true, and from that day to this I
don't believe he ever missed a grammar lesson.






















* ?E*AUGHING-c GAS -BROWNIES S















V.

"I WOULD like to ask you a very impertinent
question," said Alexander, on Thursday morning.
"And that is?" inquired the Red Indian.
Whether your face is the likeness of one of our
first Presidents ?" replied Alexander.
"Oh, no!" answered the Red Indian. "My features
are those of a noble red man, and my name -I will
tell you privately is Aborigine.
But, in regard to Thursday," the Red Indian
went on, "the night after, it was his turn.
He said that he was named after Thor, the god
of thunder, who was the son of Woden.
"Then Thursday related his story."





ICO















THE LAuG^HINd&cA.A



THURSDAY'S STORY.
Thursday child is sour and sad."

__ACK ROSES was inclined to
be stout. His cheeks were
sleek and red, with a little
dent in each. He was contin-
ually whistling popular airs.
Last winter he wore a brown
velveteen suit and a broad
linen collar.
His tiny sugar teeth used to be as white and
sound as a mouse's; but the confectionery store, on
the next corner but one, did not improve them.
He got so that it was more becoming not to laugh.
101







THE CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


One night he was awake several hours, with a hot
pain in a right molar tooth.
The next morning his fat cheek was fatter and
rosier than ever. So his mother put on her wraps,
and took him around to Dr. Brown's.
Dr. Brown's pleasant smile showed a row of glit-
tering oval teeth.
Jack Roses thought he would like to have a big
straw-colored mustache himself, like Dr. Brown's, one
of these days.
The doctor lifted him up in a huge red-plush
chair with most of the nap worn off, and handed
him a long worsted pipe, at the end of which was a
nickel instrument, which Jack at first took for a
stereopticon.
He was trying to look through it, when Dr. Brown
told him to hold it to his mouth, and take a long
breath. Two or three more, and he found himself
growing awfully drowsy. Just as he was dropping
off to sleep, he thought he heard the distant sound
of ever so many pickaxes.
I02




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