• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 In the tens
 The queen of the May
 Sympathy
 Under the mistletoe
 Rest
 The flying Dutchman
 A great undertaking
 Mother's kiss
 Three little fishers
 Prisoners
 The night is coming
 The tinies
 Lillies
 The way to get pears down
 A lesson in manners
 Daisy
 What they say
 Out in the meadows
 The evening prayer
 You
 Back Cover






Title: Under the mistletoe
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055010/00001
 Material Information
Title: Under the mistletoe
Physical Description: 40 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lawson, Lizzie
Mack, Robert Ellice ( Author )
Nister, Ernest ( Lithographer , Printer )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: E.P. Dutton & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Lithographed and printed by Ernest Nister
Publication Date: [1886]
 Subjects
Subject: Picture-books for children   ( lcshac )
Children's poetry   ( lcshac )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Nuremberg
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Lizzie Lawson and Robert Ellice Mack.
General Note: Illustrated t.-p.
General Note: Date from inscription in UCLA copy.
General Note: Cf. Osborne Coll., p. 651, which dates as 1887 a copy with inscription on flyleaf dated Christmas 1886.
General Note: Full-page chromolithographed illustrations, included in pagination.
General Note: Text printed on pages with double tinted lithographed illustrations.
General Note: Double tinted lithographed half-title on recto of frontispiece.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055010
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223987
notis - ALG4244
oclc - 01654907

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    In the tens
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The queen of the May
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Sympathy
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Under the mistletoe
        Page 12
    Rest
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The flying Dutchman
        Page 15
    A great undertaking
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Mother's kiss
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Three little fishers
        Page 20
    Prisoners
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The night is coming
        Page 23
    The tinies
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Lillies
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The way to get pears down
        Page 28
    A lesson in manners
        Page 29
    Daisy
        Page 30
        Page 31
    What they say
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Out in the meadows
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The evening prayer
        Page 38
        Page 39
    You
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
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; :7TE.1 LITTLE PIGGY WIGS pa 6.

THE QUEEN OF THE MAY fage 8.

SYMPATHY Yage ro.
UNDER THE MISTLETOE page 12.
REST page r3.
THE FL YING D UTCHMAN fage 5s.

A GREAT UNDERTAKINdG ag-e 7.
MOTHER'S KISS page rs.
THREE LITTLE FISHERS fage 2o.
PRISONERS age 2r.
THE GOOD SHEPHERD .age 23.
THE TINIES page 24.
LILLIES fge 26.
HOlW TO GET PEARS DOWN Page 2Q. ykid ,perm issio, of
A LESSON IN MANNERS page 30. Messrs Cassell e Co., from Lite Folks
DAISY gage 3r.
WHAT THEY SAY page 33.
OUT IN THE MEAD 0 WS gas 35.
THREE LITTLE FOLK page 36.
THE EVENING PRAYER page 38.
GOOD BYE page 4o.
















IN THE TENS.

T EN little tiny toes all trotting in a row,
Ten little piggy wigs to market you must go.

. Ten great big elephants with tusks because they need 'em,
TTen trunks already packed with buns by boys who feed 'em.

' Ten little girls and boys who know their lessons well,
Ten little boys and girls who haven't learnt to spell.

Ten burly brown bears, I hope you'll never meet 'em,
Ten well-made walking sticks for any one who'll beat 'em.

Ten little babies too, with twice five tiny toes,
Ten little dear mammas to mind them I suppose,

Ten big papas to buy the jam and bread and butter,
Ten naughty boys to make the mud pies in the gutter.

Ten little lilies sweet who leant upon a stalk,
Ten baby fairies who haven't learnt to talk.

Ten pretty picture books with colored pictures through them,
Ten little poets wiho will write the verses to them.

Ten little times you say these verses o'er and o'er,
Ten little dances you dance all round the floor.

Ten little tiny toesall trotting in a'row,
Ten little piggy-wigs, and so on don't you know I





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THE QUEEN OF THE MAY.

i J LEASE can you tell me my pretty maid,
P my pretty maid,
my pretty maid,
Please can you tell me my pretty maid,
Who is the 'Queen of the May'" I said.

"MAfy name is May kind sir" she said,
sir she said,
sir she said,
"My name is May, kind sir" she said,
"And mother she calls me Queenie" she said.

"Then you are the May Queen my pretty maid,
my pretty maid,
my pretty maid,
Then you are the May Queen my pretty maid,
A dear little 'Queen of the May'" I said.

And the soft little baby buds whisper and say,
whisper and say,
whisper and say,
And the soft little baby buds whisper and say,
We know who is the 'Queen of the May.'

And the birdies are singing the 1;\cll:r. day,
the livelong day,
the livelong day,
And the birdie- aie iniri. t1!c li n cl ai ". d,
That mni .lcutt) rinaid i tl- uc el I l ithe N I. '








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THE QUEEN O THE MAY
TIIE QUEET OF THE MAY.,













SI JIPATHY.


T I'-Ca-tick. tic-a-tic, tick-a-tick, TOCK,
S Al)' poor little man" said the kind little' clock,
S" I fe.ar v ou have broken your toy.
There's a liole in y.:,ur drum, and your heart's full of pain,
..- \'ou say yoIu % ill never be happy again,
SThe tears ale falling as fast as the rain,
I am sorry for you, little boy."
.` And more than one tear trickled over it's face,
For the clock keeps a very soft heart in its case.


"Bow-wow-wow, bow-wow-wow, bow-wow-wow, Wow,"
Said the dog, "little Master I can't tell you how
Unhappy I feel at your sorrow.
There's a hole in the drum that was perfectly new,
And your heart, I am sure, must be broken in two,
But I am your doggie so faithful and true,
I think you'll be better to morrow;"
He finally added, "and as for the drum,
Perhaps we can manage to mend it with gum."


Tick a tick, tic-a-tic, tick-a-tick, TOCK,
I fancy the hands of this kind little clock,
Are pointing a moral to-day.
With a hole in your drum, and your heart full of pain,
You may feel that you'll never be happy again,
But you'll soon find that sunshine will follow the rain,
At least that's the usual way.
And sympathy this is the finest of gum,
To mend up a hole in your heart or your drum.
Tick a tick, tic a tic, tock.




10


















































THE BROKEN DRUM.


















UNDER THE MISTLETOE.


U NDER the Mistletoe:
What happened there?


Under the Mistletoe,
This happened there,
In the d.irk ': .l e,
Cloc: b\ the st.ii.,
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REST.



SNL Y a mossy pillow,
Whereon to lay one's head.
Only a weeping willow,
Only a Daisied Bed.

Only a sigh of sorrow,
Only a tear-drop's start,
Only a sad to morrow,
Only a breaking heart.

Dear heart, you must not sorrow,
Your loved one lives again,
Beyond the reach of sadness,
Of sorrow, or of pain.

And God Himself has taken her,
Who doeth all things best,
Where the the ici:ked cijse fim troubling.
And the weary are at rest.















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ON THE RocKs.




















THE FL YING DUTCHMAN.


THINK we'll get aboard her,
You and me,"
Said Willie to his sister,
Who was three.

"I must be the captain,
'Of course, you know,
You can be the cook
And go below.

We will stand the roughest tossing,
Both together,
And the ship will ride so bravely,
Wind or weather."

Then a daring little breeze,
Wicked rover,
Caught the Flying Dutchman,'
Blew her over.

Sank with her that morning,
* All in sight of shore
Willie's fond ambitions,
Never rising more.








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A GREAT UNDERTAKING.
A DEAR little boy in the garden below,
Has begged for a broom to sweep up the snow,
Through with cold his fingers are aching;
I hope he is able to do it, although
I think with the Robin, and he ought to know,
That it is a great undertaking.

But there are other folk much bigger than he,
Not a hundred miles off, who are trying to see
If they cannot be overtaking,
Some task in a day that will take them a year;
I hope they may do it, I must say I fear
They will find it a great undertakitig.

There's the de~vr 'old woman who thinks that she'll try,
To brush off the cobwebs she's found in the sky,
That some wicked spider's been making;
She's bought a big broom and a new one to do it,
I only remark that she's likely to rue it,
She'll find it a great undertaking.

The folk on the shore who have carefully planned,
To keep back the tide with their spadefuls of sand;
Or planted an acorn expecting to see
It grow in a night to"a great big oak tree,
(A mistake we are all of us making;)
That they may succeed in their plan, I am sure,
I fervently hope, but as I said before,
There's no doubt it's a great undertaking.











.- ./* :
MOTHER'S KISS.

7 T HE stars that light
"' The sky at night,
The dew drops-in the grass,
The violets blue
And daisies too,
SThat curtsey when you pass,
And flutter when you meet,
And shyly kiss your-feet;
Stars and dew drops, violets, daisies,
Who can ever sing your praises?
'Tis you that make life sweet;
But sweeter than the sweets yotu bring,
Summer, autumn, winter, spring,
Sweeter this,
Mother's Kiss!

The birds that fly,
By sea and sky,
Their young ones in-the nest,
The mother sheep,
The lambs that leap,
And near their mother's breast
Seek rest with piteous bleat
Through summer nights so fleet,
Lambs and lambkins, birds and birdies,
For you sweet enough no word is;
'Tis you that make life sweet;
But sweeter than the sweets you bring
Summer, autumn, winter, spring,
Sweeter this,
Mother's Kiss!












































MOTHER'S KIss.











THREE LITTLE FISHERS.

HIS is the way we catch the fish, we catch the fish,
J we catch the fish,
We know quite well how to catch the fish,
We three of a sunny morning.
This is the way we cast the line, we cast the line,
we cast the line,
A stick and a pin and a piece of twine,
We've each got a line this morning.
And when we've caught 'em, we cook the fish, we cook the fish,
we cook the fish,
We cook all the fish in a china dish,
But we haven't a dish this morning.
We don't catch as many as we could wish,
But we think it's all the fault, the fish,
Or it may be for want of a pr r dish,
But we Iaven't aught any this in,:rrning:




















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20





























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PRISONERS.

,W HEN the summer sun is shining through the window where I lie,
I can only see the tree tops that reach up to the sky,
I cannot see the flowers that bloom when I am in my bed,
And I cannot see the robins or the rabbits in my shed.

But through the latticed window I can see from where I lie
A thousand little sheep and lambs that flock across the sky;
All night the great black bears come out, and they would eat the sheep,
Unless the moon and stars a very careful watch did keep.

And I've a little cage bird in the window where I lie,
That hops about and sings to me, and often tries to fly;
I give him sugar every day, he pecks it from my hands,
And sometimes when I talk to him I think he understands.
How happy, little birdie, if we could only fly
Together to the meadows through the window where I liel



21














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THE GOOD SHEPHERD.













THE NIGHT IS COMING.


O VER the hills the night is coming, coming,
Homewards the busy bees are humming, humming,
Yes homewards and heavenwards lammie.

Over the dales the darkness is falling, falling,
Over the tree-tops the rooks are calling, calling,
Their little ones nestwards, lammie.

Over the fold night-winds are sighing, sighing,
Close to the sheep the lambs are lying, lying,
Yes closer and closer my lammie.

Low in the sky the sun is sleeping, sleeping,
High in heaven the stars are peeping, peeping,
Yes peeping at you my lammie.

Through all the night, angels are keeping, keeping,
Over the motherless children, sleeping, sleeping,
Guard from every harm my lammie.

Day and night a shepherd is taking, taking,
Whether the sheep are. sleeping or waking, waking,
Care of his sheep, little lammie,
He's the Good Shepherd, lammie.








Day ad nigt a.sepher i, taking t




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THA TINIES.


TINY mermaid suits a tiny merman,
SA tiny MdAdchen suits a tiny German,
A tiny text will suit my tiny sermon,

A tiny pew best fits a tiny pair,
A tiny seat these little tinies share,
Aund tiny clothes of course these tinies wear.

On tiny shoulders tiny capes do sit,
And tiny bonnets tiny heads do fit,
As tin), heads do cover tiliy wit.

And tiny shoes best cover tiny feet,
For tiny shoes are tin), gaiters meet,
Whilst tiny muffs these tinies make complete.

A tiny hymn-book fits a tiny' song,
A tiny sermon n-.ust not be too long,
A tiny church-bell rings ding dong, ding dong.






24


















































































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LILIES.

-.- ...' t ITTLE, laughing, loving Lillie,
SDo you love me, willy nilly,
Love you.as you love your Lily,
-Little laughing loving Lillie?

Rose is proud, and May is dead,
Marguerite will never wed,
Brokenhearted, she, 'tis said;
Violet, she shakes her head,

Maidenhair's a gay coquette,
So is mincing Mignonette,
Daffodils they pout and fret,
Buttercup's a baby yet.

Little Sweet Forget-me-Not,
She's engaged to wed, I wot
Heart's Ease too a lover's got,
Heaps of lovers, such a lot!

Standing at your garden gate,
Cap in hand I come to state;
Little laughing loving Lillie,
I do love you willy nilly.
Love you as you love your Lily,
Little, laughing, loving, Lillie.




26

















































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LILLIES.















THE VWAY TO GEl PEARS DOWN.

IGH up in the tree, by the old garden wall,
Hung two rosy pears that seemed ready to fall.
SLow down in the path, by the old garden wall,
Wait two little boys' neath the pear-tree so tall.

And waiting, and waiting, and waiting, they stop,
Just hoping those two little pears p'r'aps may drop.

When suddenly out of the branches came pop,
A dear little bird with a quick little hop.

And he wisely remarked (it was perfectly true),
"You must go to the pears, they won't come to you."

And then, when he'd said it, he hopped and he flew
To call on another small bird that he knew.


On the top of the wall, by the old pear-tree,
Sit two little boys who, it's easy to see,

Are as happy as two little urchins can be,
Who've found out the way to get pears from the tree.

Down low in the valley, by every hedge side,
The sweet flowers are nestling, and violets hide.

They never will come to your call, though you cried
To the earth, and the sea, and the wind, and the tide.

It is so with all things that are under the dew,
The moral I make here is not even new:

As the birdie observed, it is perfectly true, ,
"You must go to the pears, they won't come to you."



28












-A LESSON IN MANNERS.


-OOD morning, Hen," said Mary;
'f Good morning, Hen," said she,
"Why don't you say 'Good morning,
Good morning, miss,' to me."

'How d' you do?" said Mary;
"How d' you do?" said she.
"When I say 'How d' you do?' to you,
Say 'How d' you do?' to me."

"You 'want an apple' do you?
r Well, I don't wish to tease,
"But 'want' is not "ood mniiner--
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DAISY.













DAISY.

L '. IXTY little Daisy I do know,
I. tlink her age is seven,
Her dimpled face is full of grace,
Her eyes are blue as heaven,
Yes blue
And true,
Her eyes,
Like skies,
Are just as blue as heaven,
And like a Daisy, pink and white, and gold,
My Daisy came from heaven, one night, I'm told.


This dainty dimpled Daisy I do know,
'.. I said her age was seven,
S. Her heart I'm told is made of gold,
-t The gold that comes from heaven,
It's pure,
I'm sure.
Pure gold,
Not sold,

SAnd like a Daisy. pink and white, and gold,
My Daisy came from heaven, one night, I'm told.


I ze wonder if the Daisies know they have a sister
Sent from heaven,
SWhose age is seven.






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-WTHAT THEY SAY.

4. 'I.\ r HERES a certain curious person whom every one calls they,
"- Who can tell you all the gossip and the scandal of the day,
At least that's what they say, I'm told that's what they say;
They assure me that the well-known song of Froggie who would go
A Wooing, is supposed to be by what's his name, you know,
And say that all reports about young Masteryou know who
S And sweet Miss Mary So-and-So are perfectly untrue;
They insist that in Society it's now the usual way,
S To dye your hair a deep sky blue, at least that's what they say.

They say that A. B. C. is wrong, and C. B. A. is right,
, I don't know C. B. A., but that's just what they say,
S They say that in the morning, it's the other way at night,
At least that's what they say, I think that's what they say;
They're going to tax the Dollies' Houses, and they say you'll see
There' 11 be a Revolution in the children's Nursery,
They say that they've discovered the way to make pigs fly,
I don't know how they '11 do it but I dare say they will try,
They've started a new company for making bricks of hay,
And that they'll make their fortune at least that's what they say.

The children know him very well this person who's called they,
And these two little Gossips, they know him I dare say,
He often comes their way, at least that's what they say,
They say that Santa Claus climbs down the chimney long and steep,
They say my ship's a sailing home o'er waters wide and deep,
They say you catch a Robin with salt spread upon his tail,
And though I've never tried it I am told it cannot fail,
They say that there's a little Bird who listens all the day,
To every word we say, at least that's what they say,
At least that's what they say, I hear that's what they say.





33

















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OUT ;NT-* MEADOWS.



















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Out in the meadows this fine summer's day
The dickey-bird told me two somebodies lay,
And in dickey-bird language politely did say,
That if I should wish it he'd show me the way.



There in the meadows that fine summer's day,
By flowers and ferns safely hidden away,
Two little dear little somebodies lay
Sleeping quite soundly that fine summer's day.






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'T HE.SE three little folk live down by the sea,
SThey are'nt really here though they may seem to be,
Their mother said she couldn't spare them to me.

(I had said to myself how well it will look,
To get a real live child to put in my book
I will try to get one by hook or by crook.)

Might I then have the baby? She at once said that he,
Was the dearest of all this dear little three,
And the two that where left were as dear as he;

But she said I might paint them this dear little three.
In my book for all other good children to see.
So they are'nt really here though they may seem to be
But they live with their mother quite close to the sea.


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THE .EVENING PRAYER.


W HEN the birds have ceased their singing,
When the sun has sunk to rest,
When the flowers have drooped their faces.
And the stars have lit the west,

Then the white-robed children kneeling,
By the bedside reverently,
SFolded hands and bended faces,
Whisper low and tenderly:

Gentle Jesus, now we pray thee,
Guard us through the coming night,
Grant that we may s/hmber safely,
Till we see the morning light. "

Now from care, and want and sorrow,
Keep their happy spirits free,
Let their lives be bright and peaceful
As a silent summer sea.









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