• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Under blue skies
 Table of Contents
 Little neighbors
 Study-hour
 The letter
 Daffy Dil and Jonny Quil
 Camping song
 The family drive
 Silent voices I: Daisies
 Silent voices II: Blue-eyed...
 Silent voices III: Closing...
 Dandelion
 Sweet grass
 The mullein patch
 "Tossed up in a blanket"
 The sand-man
 The lily pond
 Lunch time
 "Whirl the boat"
 Kindergarten
 The oriole's nest
 The June-bug
 Chocolate drop
 Back Cover






Group Title: Under blue skies : verses and pictures
Title: Under blue skies
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055005/00001
 Material Information
Title: Under blue skies verses and pictures
Physical Description: 48 p. : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brigham, Sarah Jeannette Lathbury, 1835-
Worthington Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Worthington Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. S.J. Brigham.
General Note: Title page illustrated in colors.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055005
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222880
notis - ALG3126
oclc - 02726890

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Under blue skies
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Little neighbors
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Study-hour
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The letter
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Daffy Dil and Jonny Quil
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Camping song
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The family drive
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Silent voices I: Daisies
        Page 21
    Silent voices II: Blue-eyed grass
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Silent voices III: Closing flowers
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Dandelion
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Sweet grass
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The mullein patch
        Page 30
        Page 31
    "Tossed up in a blanket"
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The sand-man
        Page 34
    The lily pond
        Page 35
    Lunch time
        Page 36
        Page 37
    "Whirl the boat"
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Kindergarten
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The oriole's nest
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The June-bug
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Chocolate drop
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text


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.-" : ..'' ',UNDER BLUE SKIES.
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UNDER blue skies
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*'' : Daffodils dance, and the Oriole flies,
.s ," ? Bright, golden butterflies float on the
.. .." '' .-" .- : breeze
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Over the clover with brown honey-bees;
,,' ""-- f Daisies and buttercups, slender and tall,
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...-. Nod to the roses that cover the wall,
:-- .s.-.it ...". U. Under blue skies.


EIvery day brings us
a sweeter surprise,
Blooming of flowers and
singing of birds, '
Words without song, w .n.y
and song without words, .s l ,
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A world of bright children, tt v hw
all happy and gay, .

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UNDER BLUE SKIES.
LITTLE NEIGHBORS.
STUDY HOUR.
THE LETTER.
DAFFY DIL AND JOHNNY Q UIL.
CAMPING SONG.
THE FAMILY DRIVE.
SILENT VOICES. I DAISIES.
SILENT VOICES. II. BLUE-EYED GRASS.
SILENT VOICES. III. CLOSING FLOWERS.
DANDELION.
SWEET GRASS.
THE MULLEIN PA TCH.
TOSSED UP IN A BLANKET."
THE S.4.VD-MA.'.
- THE LIL I" PO.D.
L UNCH TINE
I "H/RL THE BOA T."
KA'.VDERG.-R TEN.
THE ORIOLE'S NEST.
THE jCNE BCG.
CHOCOLA. TE. DROP.


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LITTLE NEIGHBORS.


BIRDS a-singing in the trees,
Marigolds a-blowing;
Bees a-humming what they please, l
Coming and a-going;
Hiding in the hollyhocks,
Swinging on the clover,
Climbing up the Lily-stalks,
Honey running over.

Breath of roses in the air,
SRoses are in hiding;
SBreezes will not tell us where,-
.. .', Winds are not confiding;
Down the walks the children wind,
. ,..., Through the fence a-peeping;
Like the bees and birds they find
-" Treasures for the seeking.

Little neighbors, like the birds,
Sing and talk at pleasure;
Like the bees, with honeyed words,
lChoose their time and measure;
Like sweet peas they cling and climb,
Here and there and yonder;
All the pleasant summer-time
,;,l, I, =They visit and they wander.













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7 ;' STUDY-HOUR.


0 HUSH! you Robin, you sing and swing
in the lilac tree,
4 And my lessons seem long when I hear yoursong
So happy and free.

If only the hours had wings, I know
They would flutter away,
Like the bird on the tree, or the velvet bee,
/ Or the butterfly gay.

But then I know that a maid like me
Has a life to live, [find
Aud my heart and my mind has something to
Before it can give.


O rest you, Robin, a little while
Your voice and your wing!
And then by-and-by dear Robin and I
Will both sing and swing.


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THE LETTER.


S 0 WAIT, little maiden,
SWith hand letter-laden !
.: I'll take it one minute,
And please tell me who
You have written it to,
And all that is in it."



t "Ah, no!" said the maiden,
With love it is laden,
No stranger can take it:
I will just tell you this,
It is sealed with a kiss,
And Mamma will break it."


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DAFFY DIL
AND
JONNY QUIL.

S'SAID Jonny Quil
to Daffy Dil,
His pretty country cousin:
"Now is our chance
to have a dance,
Your sisters, full a dozen,
Are here in golden
cap and frill;
What say you,
Cousin Daffy Dil?"






Said Daffy- Dil
to Jonny Quil,
"To dance would give
us pleasure:
But, then, you know,
the wind must blow.
To beat our time .":
and measure. -.
Young April Wind
will be here soon, '" --
And he will whistle ., 9
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CAMPING SONG.

0 WHO would live in a cottage close,
Shut in like a captive bird?
I would sooner have a tent like mine,
Within the shade of a fragrant pine,
Where the breaking waves are heard,-
Are heard,
The breaking waves are heard.


The song of winds in the sweet pine tree,
The waters that kiss the shore,
The white-winged sea-bird's mellow cry,
Mingled in one sweet melody,
Steals softly in at my door,-
My door,
Steals in at my open door.


All da\ I sing and read and sew,
*Beneath this sheltering pine,
Kissed by cool breezes from the sea,
And people passing envy me, c
And wish for a tent like mine,-
,ike mine,
For a cosy tent like mine.




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/ \THE FAMILY DRIVE.


"HEIGH, ho !"
Like the wind we go,
For a family drive to Jericho;
The horses dance
And prink and prance,
,But who is afraid of the horses, 0?


S"Heigh, ho !"
0, the daisies grow
Along the wayside to Jericho;
But the horses run
And spoil our fun,
And we cannot pick us a daisy, 0.

S "Whoa! whoa!!"
Won't you please go slow?
SWe are going home from Jericho;
S All danger past,
We are home at last,
Without a tip or a tumble, 0.



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S'. SILENT VOICES.


/ DAISIES.
SHOSTS of little daisies white
Stand among the grasses, ,
Greeting with a girlish grace '
" Every breeze that passes.
Quaint white caps and golden hair,
Tresses green and slender;
'' With my heart I heard them say
Something very tender-
Saying something to the grass, '
Very sweet and tender.


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SILENT VOICES.
II.
BLUE-EYED GRASS.
HUSH-O hush you wanton winds,
Hush you, while I listen!
In the blue eyes of the grass
Tear-drops seem to glisten.
A shy Daisy leaned that way,
When the winds were blowing;
With my heart I heard him say
Something worth the knowing-
SFondly, to the Daisy say,
Soniething worth the knowing.






















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SILENT VOICES.

III.
CLOSING FLOWERS.
WHEN the sun, in red and gold,
Down the West was creeping;
When the bird beneath its wing
Tucked its head for sleeping,
Silently the silken doors
Of the flowers were closing;
Poppies each, with drooping head,
Slowly fell a-dozing.
With my heart, I heard them say,
"Good-night till the morrow:
Here's good-night to all the world
Till the happy morrow."












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i DANDELION.

-4'- MODEST little Dandelion, -1,m N
Standing in the grass, -
Offering. her plate of gold
STo people as they pass.
. ''If you slight her, soon her tresses
Will be growing gray, .
And some antic, frantic wind ,
Will blow them all away !






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( SWEET GRASS. --


THE sweet grass grows' -
Where the Daisy blows,
But how sweet grass with its tender grace.
And the Daisy with its winsome face, .,
Came to live in the same sweet place,






Nobody knows.
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The sweet grass grows --.
Where the Daisy blows, "
And under the shade of th its tender gracess
S And the Daisy with its winsome face,




Came to idre in the sme swericket place,ss;

But why they were all in black, alas !
Nobody knows.
The sweet grass grows
Where the Daisy blows,
A n d under the shade oftill their tender grassed
The grasshoppers shoo k with fear and fled;
But why they were all in black, alas!aid,
Nobody knows.
The sweet, grass grows
Where the Daisy blows;
The children pulled till their hands were red;
The grasshoppers shook with fear and fled;
But what Sweet Grass to the Daisy said,
Nobody knows.
















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THE MULLEIN PATCH, 7 '


0 MULLEIN, whisper in my ear 's
And tell me how you grow,"
I was the taller of the two
But one short week ago,
And now, as I on tiptoe stand,
Can scarcely reach you with my hand.




You're growing very lovely,
too,
In your pale-green velvet gown
And golden as a daffodil
Are the flowers in your crown.
So tall and stately: Is it true
S That all your neighbors envy you?



The Thistle flushed as the maiden
spoke.
And thrust out even' thorn;
The Wormwood very bitter grew:
And tossed her head in scorn;
I, ,' The Teazle and the Burdock tried
S--r To pull the maiden's dress aside. /'




The Mullein kept the secret well,
And the maiden never knew
.i7 That she the only object was
Of envy. And 'tis true
m That when she left and said Good-bye'
S For sadness they made no reply.

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"TOSSED UP IN A BLANKET."

TOSS away, toss away,
Low away, high,
Up in a blanket
To visit the sky;
Lightly she'll swing
In the silver moon,
And bring to her sisters
A star pretty soon. --.

SToss away, toss away, ',
High away, low,
Rock her to sleep
In the silver bow; 1Z -
Toss up a kiss to
The man in the moon,
And bring back another
To us very soon.





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HAVE you ever seen the sand-man, old,
Who comes to us every one, I'm told,
With his countless bags of silver sand,
And drcps it down with an unseen hand,
And our eyelids very heavy grow,
As off to the land of dreams we go?


He is very shy. I have often tried
To keep my eyelids open wide
And watch for him. But he cheats me so,
And puts me to sleep before I know.
Is he like the wind, do you suppose,
Which is never seen when it comes and goes?


Oh, ho! The sand-man's fun is past,
He has gone to sleep himself at last;
We'll build a fort beside the sea,
And he our prisoner shall be.
He is not the wind with an unseen hand,
But a giant made of silver sand.






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TH
LILY
POND.

THE wind is fair,
Shall we take a row,
Down to the cove
Where the lilies grow ?
Their petals white
To the sun unfold,
Their trembling hearts A fleet of lilies,
Are yellow as gold. So fresh and fair,
My boat is as safe Like fairy ships,
As a boat can be; Are anchored there.
You need not fear They rock and dip
To go with me. With every breeze,
Like real ships
On real seas.
My boat is as safe
As a boat can be;
Vou need not fear
To go with me

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LUNCH TIME.

THE Bees are coming,
I hear them humming
Their pleasant Summer song.
You are late to-day;
Did you lose your way?
We have been waiting long.




My cream-white Clover
Is running over
With honey clear and sweet;
And my Brier-Rose,
-- /As a bee well knows,
\/ (".' Holds something nice
to eat.



Come, take your honey,
'" It costs no money,
The little gift is free;
S'' ". Come every noon
Through merry June,
.-.. And take your lunch
with me.






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"WHIRL THE BOAT."


WHIRI, whirl,
Each little girl,
Like a gay butterfly over the grass;
Light as a feather,
Whirl they together,
Scaring the little brown birds as they pass.








Spin, spin,
See them begin,
Like two tops gliding over the ground;
Light as a feather,
Spin they together,
Whirling the boat around and around.






























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KINDERGARTEN.




THIS is my class, And never once
I am teacher, you see; Have I seen them try
They stand in a row To whisper or laugh-
And listen to me; They are very shy.



I sometimes fear
They will never do
The nice little games
When I ask them to:


To keep good time, But, then, I know
To march and to sing, They will always do
And to whirl about Whatever they can
In a pretty ring. When I ask them to








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THE ORIOLE'S NEST.
SWING, little hammock, swing high and swing low!
Birdies are sleeping while soft breezes blow;
Papa-bird fastened it well on the bough,
No harm can come to the baby-birds now.

Mother-bird comes with sweet food to the nest,
All the bright feathers aflame on her breast;
Swing, little birdies, be happy to-day,
Soon, I suppose, you will all fly away.

Rock, little hammock, the birdies to sleep,
Then I'll give Dolly a sly little peep;
She will not touch them, the dear little things,
With down on their heads and down on their wings.

Very soon, Dolly, their feathers will grow,
And out of their cradle the birdies will go;
Jqf High away, low away, out of our sight,
Off to the wood in a family flight!

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SBUZZ, buzz, blundering bug. '
Why do you come in June ?
The roses arc here,
And I greatly fear
You will put them out of tune.




SBuzz, buzz, blundering bug, /
hy do you come at night,
With your big black wings ,
j \1 CWe are timid things-
Vou will put us both in a fright."












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CHOCOLATE DROP.




THERE lived beside a certain sea
A humpy, dumpy, brown ba-bee,
Whose length and breadth were just the same,
And what is more, this ba-bee's name
Was Chocolate Drop.



This bumpy, dumpy, brown ba-bee
Had a Mamma as brown as she,
Who thought no ba-bee, dark or light,
Was ever half so sweet and bright
As Chocolate Drop.



They say (as strange as it may seem)
That she was made of country cream,
And rolled in something brown and sweet,
Which made this ba-bee so complete
A Chocolate Drop.




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OUT on the end of an apple-tree bough
A birdie was singing a song just now,
And when it was ended
The birdie pretended
To say Good-bye,
but he did not
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