• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Background information and survey...
 Recommendations
 Delegate directory
 Staff directory






Title: Florida's small farms, a big asset
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054842/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida's small farms, a big asset a report to the Florida Legislature
Physical Description: ii, 47 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McBee, Stephanie W
Foster, Barbara
McGinnis, Harry
Florida -- Office of the Governor
Conference: Governor's Conference on the Future of Small Farms, (1981
Publisher: Office of the Governor
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1982]
 Subjects
Subject: Farms, Small -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Stephanie W. McBee, Barbara Foster, Harry McGinnis.
General Note: "Analysis and recommendations of the Governor's Conference on the Future of Small Farms October 30, 1981-November 1, 1981; Ocala, Florida."--Cover.
General Note: "January 1982."
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054842
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000554264
oclc - 13378441
notis - ACX9098

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Preface
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Background information and survey profile of the delegates
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Recommendations
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Delegate directory
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Staff directory
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
Full Text





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Florida's Small Farms

A BIG ASSET



A Report to the Florida Legislature
January 1982






























Prepared by:

Stephanie W. McBee
Barbara Foster
Harry McGinnis


0 .






Florida's Small Farms 14
A BIG ASSET



Preface by
Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson
Conference Chairman


The title chosen for this report says it all Florida's small farms
are a big asset to our state! Although there are those who would
question the resiliency of Florida's small farms in these trying
economic times, there is no one who would dare deny the worth of small
and part-time farmers in upholding the quality of life in Florida.

The task before us as I see it is to manage public policy in ways that
will encourage our small farms to continue in profitable operation.
Indeed, if the Florida of tomorrow is to be what we hope, we must help
the small and part-time farmer today. This task is not an easy one,
but seldom are rewards great where challenge is small.

In Ocala we were reminded that Florida's small farmer is a tenacious,
independent person ready and willing to do more than his share to make
our state a better place in which to live. We found the existence of
a Governor's Conference on the Future of Small Farms was enough to
foster a new sense of hope among small farmers that their needs
would be scrutinized and addressed.

We learned the specific nature of the problems facing small farms in
Florida and the men and women who operate them. Through their eyes
we saw reflected ways state government might better operate to satisfy
their needs, ways our university system could strengthen its network
of service to them, ways the federal government could address their
concerns, and even ways private businesses could better accommodate
them.

Much was accomplished by the delegates at the Conference. It came as
no surprise that time and again they put aside individual needs in
search of solutions for the common good. Their recommendations which
are printed in this document prove my point. As you will see these
recommendations cover a broad range of problems facing Florida farms.

What we need in the days ahead is foresight and a renewal of aggressive
action by Florida's chief executive, Legislature, state agencies,
local officials, farm organizations and private businesses. Florida's
small and part-time farmers do not need special privilege, but they do
require the opportunity to compete in today's marketplace. Your help
is essential in this process.






I am convinced the 33,000 small farm families in Florida are a big
asset. We should remember what small farmers do for us all: their
lifestyle continues to provide a link to our moral heritage; the
product of their labor continues to feed Florida and, in some cases,
the world; they provide clean, wholesome employment; they support
much of our state's industry; they lessen the strain on our cities;
and, just as important, they are battling to conserve the quality
of our land and water for future generations of Floridians.

This document reflects the works of many hundreds of individuals who
care about the lives of Florida's small farmers. This work must not
stop with completion of this report.

Governor Graham and I thank the Legislature for its foresight, all
those who have worked so hard on this project and all who will work
to ensure continued success for one of our biggest assets: the small
farmer.








Comments of Delegates Concerning the Conference:

"I've been on the same small aam in Ftoilda Jo&
50 yeaus. I've made a good living and have put
my thtee children through college. Farming is
stiLl a pleasure 6o& me."

"To live on a farm you have to tove to wotk vety,
ve.y haid. Work Like you ae. going to make a
million! But don't plan on a penny until you get
it."

"It was tauly encouLaging to see such a ghoup o6
people with such a wide vaLiety of agLicultu.al
inte.e.t discussing common problems ae.ecting
them and their. solutions. These people we.e
telling the true stoty and it is my hope that the
Legistatoas, representative rtom otheh. fedetal
and state agencies, and the public will listen
and re.pond."

"Those oa us that went to Ocala with an open
mind and willing to learn came away with a bette.
understanding o6 others' problems and most o6 aUl
ou. own."
















TABLE OF CONTENTS


Preface Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson
Conference Chairman ................................... i

Acknowledgements ................................................ 1

Introduction .................................................... 5

Background Information and Survey Profile of the Delegates ...... 7

RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................. 25

State
Legislative
Federal
Local Government
Private Sector
Extension

Delegate Directory .............................................. 35

Staff Directory ................................................. 45





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


The success of a conference such as this depends on the efforts of

many people. It is not possible to mention everyone here, but there

are those without whom success would have been only a dream. Those

we would like to thank now.


Ours was a "listening" conference, designed as a forum for the dele-

gates to speak out and work together to find solutions to the problems

experienced by small farmers. The results of such a conference are

only as valuable as the effort exerted by the delegates. No group of

people could have worked harder or with more conviction. Above all

we thank them.


The Legislature in its wisdom passed the bill to authorize the

conference and appropriated money to fund it. That foresight

originated with the bill's sponsors. Senator Jack Gordon, joined by

Senators George Kirkpatrick and Pete Skinner, introduced the measure

in the Senate; and Representative Gene Hodges as Chairman of the

Agriculture Committee supported the proposal as a committee bill

in the House. The credit is theirs for making it all possible.


No conference dealing with Florida agriculture could be a success

without the input of Florida A&M University, the University of

Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the

Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Respectively,

Dr. Walter Johnson, Dr. John Woeste, and Mr. Ed Cox represented

these institutions admirably as advisors during the planning,





implementation, and follow-up stages of the conference. Our

appreciation goes to them for their indispensable assistance.


And what is an agricultural event without the agricultural associations.

We would like to thank all of them for their support of our efforts,

and especially Dairy Farmers, Incorporated; Florida Cattlemen's

Association; Florida Citrus Mutual; Florida Citrus Packers; Florida

Farm Bureau Federation; Florida Forestry Association; Florida Fruit

and Vegetable Association; Florida Sugar Cane League; and the Florida

Agricultural Research Institute for sponsoring the social functions

for the delegates. Their generosity made the conference as enjoyable

as it was productive.


Finally, location is important when planning any work session, and

ours was the wisest of all decisions when we decided to hold the

conference in Ocala. Many, many thanks go to the City of Ocala and

Mayor Wayne Rubinas; Marion County Chamber of Commerce; Edsel Rowan

and his staff of the County Extension Office; Marion County Commis-

sion, School Board and Sheriff's Department; and certainly the

Ramada Inn for rolling out the red carpet. Their hospitality and

cooperation made the weekend a pleasure.

























Thoughts or. the Small FarmeA

S sweat 6 sunbuAn
M marketing 9 mother nature
A affoad(?)
L Labor 9 Land
L Long houns 6 Lifestyle

F jood fugagal
A agricultu.e
R urtal
M money 9 management
E education, environment 6 ef.ort
R recoads S ned-necks (faces, too)
S 0soi, Asuvival 9 satisaaction

This equals hahd woatk happiness!


Hulda Roeach
Delegate





INTRODUCTION

Seventy-five percent of Florida's 44,000 farms are classified as

"small farms" by U.S. Department of Agriculture standards. Agricul-

ture is Florida's oldest and largest industry and the economic and

nutritional welfare of Floridians depends on the state's agribusiness.


The small farmer is experiencing difficulties because of the rising

costs of technology, marginal profits, land costs and the loss of

agricultural land to development in Florida. With these problem's in

mind, the 1981 Legislature enacted legislation establishing and

funding the Governor's Conference on the Future of Small Farms in

Florida. The purpose of the conference was to gather information,

from persons who operate small farms and from other agricultural

experts, to be used to develop recommendations which will lead to

the continuation and survival of small farms in Florida.


Lieutenant Governor Wayne Mixson was responsible for implementing

the legislative act calling for the conference. The task of

organizing, staffing, and conducting the conference was carried out

by the Rural Development Program staff under his direction. Valuable

assistance was rendered by the Commissioner of Agriculture, Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University, and the University of

Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.


After the conference program and participants were carefully selected,

a preconference survey was conducted in order to assess the type and

extent of problems encountered by the small farm delegates. The

survey information was used to ensure that the content of the con-

ference program would address directly the needs of the delegates.




Background Information and Survey
Profile of the Delegates


The 67 County Extension Agents of the Institute of Food and Agricultural

Sciences (IFAS) recommended potential delegates to the Lt. Governor's Office.

A staff from the Executive Office of the Governor and the House Agriculture

Committee reviewed these recommendations and selected delegates (and alternates)

for the conference so that: 1) counties were represented by their major

commodities and proportions of small farms, 2) there would be a diversity of

commodities across the state, and 3) there would )e representation from all

groups of age, sex and race. When the delegates were selected, they were

sent invitations and preconference surveys. Alternates were invited and sent

surveys when the first choice delegates were not able to attend the conference.


FIGURE 1
NUMBER AND PERCENT OF DELEGATES SURVEYED BY REGION





Of the 196 invited small farmers, 158 (81%) responded to the preconference

survey. Out of the 158 respondents, 142 small farm delegates attended the

conference. Figure 1 (page 7) shows the number and percent of small farm

delegates from each region of the state based on the preconference survey.

The regions correspond to IFAS regional extension districts.

Of the 67 counties, 61 (91%) are represented by at least one delegate.

The six (6) counties who did not send delegates are Gulf (Region 1), Gilchrist

(Region 2), Okeechobee, Pinellas (Region 4), Monroe and Glades (Region 5).

Hillsborough (Region 4) had the largest number of delegates with 12. Twenty-

five (25) counties were represented by one (1) delegate apiece. Table 1

indicates the relationship between representation of farm delegates and

counties.


REPRESENTATION

NUMBER OF
DELEGATES/COUNTY
1
2
3
5
6
7
12
TOTAL


TABLE 1

OF DELEGATES FROM COUNTIES

NUMBER OF PERCENT OF ALL
COUNTIES COUNTIES REPRESENTED
25 41
14 23
10 16
4 7
6 10
1 2
1 2
61 100





The Survey

The preconference survey consists of 21 question categories (See Appendix

A). The survey covered five (5) topics: demographic and personal information,

farm management, education (formal and informal), finance, and problems and

concerns. Each of these areas are discussed in this report. Most (85%) of the

respondents completed the survey without any assistance. Family and friends

account for most of the help given to the respondents. Only seven (7)

respondents received help in completing the survey from the County Extention

Agent.


WHO IS A FLORIDA SMALL FARMER?

Personal Information

Based on the results of the surveys received from 90% of the conference

delegates, the small farmer in Florida is, typically, a white male between 31

to 60 years old with at least a high school education. He has farmed field

crops for not more than 20 years on a farm of fewer than 100 acres.

The ages of the delegates to the conference ranged from 20 years to 77

years with an average age of nearly 47 years old. Nearly 60% of the small

farmers are 50 years old or younger.
1


AGE RANGES


FIGURE 2
PERCENT OF SMALL FARM
DELEGATES IN EACH AGE RANGE


PERCENT






The majority of the delegates are white males with a high school education.

Eighty-seven percent (87%) of the delegates are male and 85% are white. Over 90%

of the delegates completed high school. This is higher than the average for all

Floridians which is 65% (U.S. Statistical Abstract, 1980).

Land Acquisition and Use

The delegates farm between 1 to 2500 acres of land. The average delegate

farms under 80 acres. As shown in the graph below, 25% of the delegates farm 15

or fewer acres and 25% of the delegates farm 200 or more acres. The delegates

61 and older generally farm 50 acres or less. The majority of the delegates

under 61 farm under 100 acres.


The delegates have been involved in farming from 1 to 72 years. Almost

half (45%) of the delegates have farmed 10 years or less (See Figure 4). Less

than one-third (30%) of the delegates have farmed more than 20 years.


FIGURE 3
PERCENT OF DELEGATES BY NUMBER OF ACRES FARMED
PERCENT
30

25 2%

20

15 16% 18% 17% -
15%
10 ,----,
10
5

-16 16-50 51-100 101-200 200-500 500+
NUMBER OF ACRES FARMED





























Almost all of the delegates own part or all of their farmland (See Figure

5). Only 13% lease all of their farmland. Over 40% of the delegates have been

approached to sell their land for non-farm uses. A majority of the South Florida

(Region 5) and half of the Central Florida (Region 3) delegates indicate that

they have been approached about selling their land.


FIGURE 5
NUMBER AND PERCENT OF
SMALL FARM DELEGATES WHO
OWN AND/OR LEASE THEIR LAND


FIGURE 4

PERCENT OF DELEGATES BY NUMBER OF YEARS FARMING
PERCENT
50

40

30
26'.
20

10

-11 11-20 21-30 1-40 40+ I
NUMBER OF YEARS FARMING






Less than one-fourth (23%) of the delegates are able to live on their farm

without a supplemental income. As one farmer states, "It costs me too much to

pay myself." Over two-thirds (77%) of the farmers would farm full time if it

were affordable and feasible.

Commodity Areas

As shown in Figure 6, the small farmers represent a diversity of

agricultural commodities. Almost 60 percent (60%) of the delegates harvest

vegetables, fruits, field crops and other crops as their main commodities. The

largest delegate representations are field crops (22%) and beef (17%); the

smallest are bees (2%) and grapes (3%).


FIGURE 6
NUMBER AND PERCENT OF
DELEGATES BY MAIN COMMODITY


FIELD CROPS BEEF
n=35 n=27
22% 17%




CITRUS
n=20 DAIRY
13q n=20

FOLIAGE 13%
n=13
8%
VEGETABLES HOGS
n=11 n=8
55S
TOBACCO POULTRY
n=6 41 n=6
FRUIT n=5 3% I 4_
GRAPES n=4 3% BEES n=3 2%





"As a .farmer, you have to sell even if you lose money."

all of us must work at selling our product--farmers are

guilty of just growing a product, not looking far enough down the road

to sales. Processors and brokers are guilty of getting the farmers

down to one product so they can use it against them on supply and

demand marketing."

These are some of the thoughts of the delegates concerning

marketing and other farm management issues faced by the small farmer.


FARM MANAGEMENT

Six survey questions deal with such areas as farm management,

product sales problems, co-op membership, and farming assistance needs.

Product Sales Problems

Over half of the delegates (56%) state that they do not have

problems selling their products. The marketing problem mentioned by

41% of the delegates is the selling of commodities for less than

production costs. Lack of available markets and selling products

below market value are mentioned by 12% of the delegates with market-

ing problems. Small farmers who raised bees, foliage, grapes and

vegetables appear to have more problems selling their products than

do the other delegates. Region 2 delegates (57%) have the highest

response of product sales problems. Half of the Region 3 delegates

feel that they encounter product sales problems.

Cooperative Membership

Only 36% of the small farm delegates belong to a farm coopera-

tive. The Farmer's Mutual Exchange and various citrus co-ops have

the highest membership, and many take advantage of the co-op-type

services offered by the Farm Bureau. These co-ops account for 20%

of the delegates who are members of a cooperative. Of the co-op

members, over half (55%) do not have product sales problems.
13






Farming Assistance

Eighty percent of the delegates obtain farm assistance from others.

The major providers of farm assistance are the County Extension Agent, other

farmers and the U.S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS).

County agents provide assistance to 67 percent of the delegates. Other farmers

and ASCS provide assistance to 44 percent of the delegates.

FIGURE 7

PERCENT OF DELEGATES WHO USE FAaRM ASSISTANCE
FARM ASSISTANCE 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
COUNTY AGENT _____74%
OTHER FARMERS __49%
ASCS :_ ______
FAR!' SUPPLIERS 34% __
OTHER GOVEP'MENT AGENCIES 3T


Over three-fourths (78%) of the delegates have been visited by their

county agent and almost all (96%) of the delegates know where the county agent's

office is located. Most (94%) of the delegates have requested a wide variety of

assistance from their county agents. Problem analysis, soil checks and general

counseling are the most often requested assistance areas.


KEEPING CURRENT AS A SMALL FARMER

Farm Publications

Almost all (98%) of the delegates receive farm publications. Magazines,

extension bulletins and newsletters are received by more than 80 percent of the

delegates.

Farm Related School Courses

Almost two-thirds (65%) of the delegates have taken farm-related courses

and would take more if they were offered free. Half of those delegates have

taken high school vocational (FFA) courses. Extension courses have been taken

by 22 percent of the delegates. Only 10 percent have enrolled in adult education

courses.






One-third of the delegates (32%) might attend free farm-related school

courses. The most popular course topics are farm management, new technology and

crop varieties/seeds. Figure 8 lists possible course topics and the percent of

delegates who are interested in those topics.


FIGURE 8

PERCENT OF DELEGATES CHOOSING COUJ6E TOPICS
TOPICS OF COURSES OF iTERE 0 10 20 30 40 60 70
FARM MANAGEMENTT 5_;__,.i
NEW TECHNOLOGY 48% _
CROP VAR!iTIES/SEEDS 48 I_
LAND MANAGEMENT _____i40
TAXES 34__
NEW EQUIPMENT 32%
WATER MANAGEMENT 31
GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS 22%
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY __ 4
!NURSERY 21



FARM FINANCE

Four survey questions deal with such financial areas as agricultural tax

assessment (greenbelt), assistance with income tax returns and record keeping,

and farm loans.

Agricultural Tax Assessment (Greenbelt)

Only 85 percent of the delegates indicate that they qualify for

agricultural tax assessment. Over one-third (35%) of these delegates are

interested in tax courses. The same is true of delegates who say they do not

qualify for greenbelt. One-third of these delegates are interested in tax

courses. Only 19 (12%) of the delegates both qualified for greenbelt and

identified taxes as one of the major problem areas affecting the farm.

South Florida (Region 5) has the largest split in the percent of small

farmers qualified for greenbelt. Less than two-thirds (64%) of these delegates

qualify for greenbelt. In the other regions, the percent of farms under greenbelt

preferential assessment range from 79% to 93% (See Figure 9).








FIGURE 9

PERCENT OF DELEGATES WHO HAVE AGRICULTURE TAX ASSESSMENT

>-




/ ... _-.
R EG ""RO





:s~J ( ;
^ REGION










V .' -. -
XF-./


Assistance

Over two-thirds (69%) of the delegates use accountants to handle their

income tax returns. Almost a quarter (23%) of the delegates fill out their own

tax returns without assistance.

Financial record keeping is more of a personal chore to the small farmer

than income tax records. Over half (53%) of the delegates keep their own finan-

cial records and 17% rely upon a family member. Only 43 percent of the delegates

rely on an accountant for record keeping.





Farm Loans

Over two-thirds (68%) of the delegates have applied for a farm loan. Bank

loans are the most common type of loan applied for by small farmers (See Figure

10).

FIGURE 10

PERCENT OF DELEGATES WHO APPLIED FOR LOANS
TYPES OF LOANS 0 10 20 30 40 50 60
BANK _50%T
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION 37%
F, ,MER'S ,POE ADMINISTRATION 35%
SMA'Lt BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 6%
FLD ERAL LAND BANK 6y
'FAMILY 4L



As farm acreage increases, so does the likelihood that the delegate has

applied for bank loans. The majority of farmers with 50 acres or less tend not

to ask for bank loans while farmers with over 100 acres apply for bank loans.

Farmers with one to two hundred acres have a slightly higher incidence of bank

loan applications and apply for Production Credit Association and Farmer's

Home Administration loans.


PROBLEMS AND CONCERNS

In all, the small farm delegates identified 63 problems and concerns

shared by small farmers.

Most Important Problems

When asked to choose three problem areas that most affect them and their

farms, the delegates identified cost of supplies (88%), cost of equipment (51%),

interest rates (41%) and marketing (35%). These problems surface many times

in the survey as significant to the delegates. The top problem areas raised

by the delegates are shown on a regional basis in Figure 11.


















































The South Florida (Region V) region experiences the greatest agricultural

land and water problems. Making a profit, interest rates, and equipment costs

are serious problems faced by the delegates in the West Florida (Region I) and

Northwest Florida (Region II) areas. Making a profit is the top concern of the

North-Central (Region III) delegates, while production costs pose a problem to

small farm delegates in Central Florida (Region IV).

The 63 problems were aggregated into four major categories for the

conference: Economic Issues, Money Matter$, Managing the Farm, and Problems to

Cope With.


FIGURE 11
TOP PROBLEM AREAS BY REGION


...... i' "-7:

.-.. '-. -'- _-. akin. a Profit 13.
"-_:* '. /k --:' -'*Lo' Senling Price t
.~aKinq a Profit ]4 Labor C1
Ma k i n q profit 147, Selling Price ,,
Supplies Cost 9% W weather 6<
Interest Rates 9
Equipment Cost 7% --

.-. .. .
_,. -.-. '" .-; '-

Production Cost 11%
Interest Rates 9::." E G C
Making a Profit 5% -"
Loans 5% -
Disease 5% .

"' '" .t- \

Labor 13%. .
Equipirent Cost 7%
Land Availability 7%
Rezoning 7%
Flood 7: -


..'s- -f





Economic Issues

Economic issues include such areas as:

--availability of labor,
--planning (demand and outlet),
--making a living,
--need for more/unique markets,
--competition for land,
--marketing "middleman", and
--cost of production.

One delegate stated that he "Farmed full-time until this year; had to go to work

in town to help expenses." A delegate that does not own his farm stated that,

"Because I must rent most of my land, I've found by the time I get it in great

shape to farm, it's sold for houses." Marketing concerns were raised with

comments like "No outlet or packing house."

Money Matter$

Money matter$ include such areas as:

--cost of supplies, equipment, labor,
--inflation,
--interest rates/la-ck of capital,
--loans, and
--rising ENERGY costs.

Delegates state that government loans are "almost impossible to obtain," and

that "high interest rates are the #1 concern now for farmers." Others comment

that "Income is not enough to cover expenses; production costs are too high."

Managing the Farm

There are two major categories of farm management: the need for

specialized assistance and training in farm management. Some delegates comment

that they "have trouble knowing where to get the best information or advice. .

Others state that "they needed to know more about applications of farm management

practices in general and product information in specific."





Problems to Cope With

Many problems have been identified that do not have immediate or simple

solutions. These include:

--the future of greenbelt,
--government regulations,
--legal problems,
--taxes (property, inheritance, etc.),
--water, and
--weather.

Comments about water range from "water use is choking us out of business" to

"flood!" Many are worried that the agricultural tax assessment law is going

to be changed. Some delegates ask for fewer government regulations, while

others ask for more.


SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

The small farm delegate is typically a white male between 36 and 45 years

old with at least a high school education. He owns at least part of his farmland

and has been farming less than 20 years. His farm is probably less than 20 acres

and qualifies for agricultural tax assessment. He harvests crops as his main

commodity. Typically, he receives farm assistance from the County Extension Agent

and has applied for Bank, Production Credit Association and Farmer's Home Admin-

istration loans. Although an accountant usually completes his tax return, the

small farm delegate keeps his own financial records.

The small farm delegate is experiencing difficulties because of high costs

of supplies and equipment, high interest rates, and marketing problems. South

Florida has a different set of problems from North and Central Florida mainly due

to the difference in weather conditions and urban development. Regardless of

location, the small farm delegate in Florida is encountering difficulties that

span economic, financial, managerial and regulatory areas.






APPENDIX A

GOVERNOR'S CONFERENCE ON THE FUTURE OF SMALL FARMS
DELEGATE'S PRE-CONFERENCE SURVEY

COUNTY COMMODITY

We need for you to let us know if you can attend the conference. If you
cannot attend, please check "no" below and return this form as soon as
possible in the self-addressed stamped envelope.


I can attend the conference.


Yes


If yes:

I plan to stay in conference facilities in Ocala. Yes No
I will arrive in Ocala: Thursday night Friday morning


a delegate to the Governor's Conference on the
need some information about you and your farm.
used for planning a conference with your needs


Future of Small Farms,
The information will
in mind.


PLEASE PRINT your answers to the questions below. Check all of the
answers that apply. Please return this survey with the signed travel
forms as soon as possible. Thank you.


1. Number of years farming

2. Do you own or lease your farm?


Total Number of Acres


Own


Lease


If you own your farm, have you ever been asked to sell your land
for non-farm uses? Yes No


3. Is your farm the only source of income? Yes

If no, would you farm full time if you could?
Comments.


4. Do you belong to a farm co-op of any kind?

If yes, what kind?

5. Have you ever applied for a farm loan? Yes


Yes No


If yes, what kinds?

Farmer's Home
Production Credit
Family


Bank
Other


(specify)


6. Do you qualify for agricultural tax assessment (greenbelt)?
Yes No

7. Who fills out your financial records?


Yourself
SFamily


Accountant
SOther (specify)


8. Who filled out your income tax return last year?


Accountant
Other (specify)


Both


Yourself
Family







9. Do you get farm assistance from others? Yes No

If yes, who?


Other farmers County I
ASCS
Other government agencies Other (s
Farm suppliers

10. Has your county agent ever visited your farm? Yes

11. Do you know where the county agent's office is? Yes


gent

specify)


No

No


12. Have you ever asked your county agent for help with farm problems?
Yes No

If no, why not?

If yes, what for?

13. Do you receive farm publications? Yes No

If yes, which ones?

Newsletters Extension Bulletins
Magazines Other (specify)

14. Have you taken any farm related school courses? Yes No

If yes, what kinds?

High school vocational (FFA) Other (specify)
Adult education (veteran) __

15. Would you attend farm related school courses if they were offered
free? Yes No Maybe

If yes, what kinds?


Farm management
New technology
Taxes
New equipment
Crop varieties/seeds

16. What is your biggest problem as a farmer?


Land management
Water management
Government regulations
Other (specify)


17. Have you had problems selling your products? Yes No
Sometimes
Comments.








18. Below is a list of problem areas. Pick the 3 areas that most affect
you and your farm. Pick only 3.

Cost of supplies (feed, seed, fertilizer, fuel, etc.)
Cost of equipment
Cost and availability of land
Qualifying for loans
Interest rates
Marketing (selling) your product
Government regulations
Taxes
Residential development (theft, vandalism, complaints, etc.)
Cost and availability of water (irrigation)

19. Please describe any concerns that you want to share with the Governor's
Office.





20. Did you have any help filling out this survey? Yes No
If yes, who?

21. Name Phone

Address City Zip

Race Sex Age __ Last year of school


NOW, PLEASE SIGN THE ENCLOSED TRAVEL FORMS. RETURN THIS SURVEY AND THE TRAVEL
FORMS IN THE SELF-ADDRESSED, .STAMPED ENVELOPE BY SEPMBER 25, 1981. THANK YOU.





RECOMMENDATIONS


STATE

The following are recommendations from the conference affecting

executive, cabinet, departmental and university system policy:


1. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Review Chapters 504 and 500.11, Florida Statutes, labeling of
foreign produce for retail sale. Determine effectiveness of
the law and enforcement problems, and report to the legislature
recommendations based on the review.

2. Department of Education

Review and revise K-12 curriculum to include basic agriculture
education. Today's school child does not have a realistic
awareness of U.S. agriculture and its importance to society.

3. University of Florida, IFAS: Extension

Have county offices keep a current list of locally available
farm equipment for lease; especially low energy, i.e., no-till.
Support equipment co-ops.

4. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Develop a legal package for purchase from the department on how
to set up a basic co-op.

5. University of Florida, IFAS: Extension

Work with local beekeepers to map hives in the county. Coordi-
nate with farmers and local mosquito control boards to avoid
pesticide destruction of hives. (NOTE: Lost first place
national ranking in honey production due to this problem).

6. University of Florida, IFAS

Pursue in-state weather satellite tracking capabilities in order
to obtain up-to-the-minute forecasts. Link extension offices to
this valuable weather forecasting system for use by local farmers
in making critical decisions regarding crops.

7. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services; Department of
Environmental Regulation; and State University System

Continue research and implementations of waste water reuse
practices valuable to farmers. Devise plans for piping urban
waste water to the rural areas for cultivation.






State Recommendations (Continued)


8. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Initiate from the Commissioner a letter of encouragement to
newspapers to list as a public service locations of road-side
fruit and vegetable stands available to consumers in the area.
Explore feasibility of state community market system.

9. Attorney General; and Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services

Cooperate in developing a program to promote awareness by
state attorneys of the severe impact farm theft has on the
farm. Support and expand the Farm Bureau's current program
to mark farm equipment for identification. Coordinate with
sheriff departments a similar awareness program.

10, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Strengthen the current program to arrest the brucellosis
epidemic in the state. Marketing burdens on interstate sales
are critical. Work with federal agencies to implement indemnity
program for necessary stock loss to farmers.

11. University of Florida, IFAS: Extension

Encourage hiring of paraprofessionals to help lessen county
agent workload. Explore possibility of an internship program
for students to work in extension offices for credit hours.

12. University of Florida, IFAS: Extension

Have available map of existing farmers markets. Work with
DACS to explore possibility of a state community market system.

13. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Explore basis for farmer lack of confidence in state market
reports. Why aren't they credible?

14. Department of Transportation

Develop program for statewide contracting with farmers for
mowing of highway rights-of-way. Whenever possible, lease at
agricultural value rights-of-way for cultivation or harvesting
seed by local farmers.

15. University System

Encourage continuation of energy conservation research to
develop practices for use by farmers.





State Recommendations (Continued)


16. Cabinet-Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund

Where feasible, make available agricultural leases to cultivate
currently unused state land.

17. Department of Education

Develop a vocational education program in sound farm management
practices.

18. State Public Service Television Network

Flash across the screen as a public service forecasts during
critical freeze periods much like emergency bulletins or
election returns.

19. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Review regulations limiting movement of livestock across state
lines. Encourage cooperation with other states on a regional
basis for eradication of disease and control of pests.









LEGISLATIVE

The following are recommendations from the conference to the Florida

Legislature:


1. Review Chapters 601, 618, 719, Florida Statutes, which all
deal with cooperatives. Compare Florida's laws with those
of other states. Can ours be improved?

2. Appropriate money to develop a computer system for use in
county extension offices, programmed for farmer use. Potential
uses are boundless.

3. Reduce personal property tax on farm equipment.

4. If revenue is necessary, farmers would rather support raising
the sales tax than to have ad valorem taxes continue to rise.

5. Protect the agricultural assessment (Greenbelt) statute.

6. Review Section 823.14, Florida Statutes, regarding the nuisance
law. Is the law effective, or is it being abused to convert
agricultural lands to development?

7. Review University of Florida, IFAS: Extension program for
weaknesses and strengths.









FEDERAL

The following are recommendations from the conference that affect

the Congress and federal agencies:


1. Congress

Review import and export laws. Strengthen import restrictions,
especially on pesticides being used abroad. Consider measures
making it possible for U.S. growers to compete with the price
of imported produce. Enforce testing and inspection require-
ments.

2. Congress

Review Farmers Home Administration's loan programs. Is the
agency filling the purpose it was created for? Is the Small
farmer benefiting?

3. Department of Agriculture

Encourage continuation of energy conservation research to
develop practices for use by farmers.

4. U. S. Weather Service

Cooperate with the University of Florida to set up weather
satellite tracking capabilities for up-to-the-minute fore-
casting for farmers.

5. Environmental Protection Agency

Continue research and implementation of waste water reuse
practices valuable to farmers.

6. Congress

Explore the possibility of giving income tax credits for
water and soil conservation practices. Soil Conservation
Service could implement such a program with the Internal
Revenue Service.

7. U. S. Department of Agriculture

Cooperate with Florida Department of Agriculture to implement
indemnity program for stock loss due to brucellosis eradication.









LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The following are recommendations from the conference that affect

local government agencies:


1. County Commissions

Contract with local farmers for mowing of county road rights-
of-way and other county property. Make available leases for
cultivation of rights-of-way.

2. Mosquito Control Boards

Coordinate with extension offices spraying schedules to avoid
pesticide destruction of bee hives in the area. Cooperate
with mapping of hives project.

3. County Commissions and Planning Boards

The conversion of agricultural land to non-farm uses is a
serious situation in Florida. Only local governments can
make the appropriate decisions to protect the agricultural
land in their area.

4. Sheriffs Departments

Cooperate with state agencies in promoting awareness of the
impact farm theft has on the farm. Support and expand the
Farm Bureau's current program to mark farm equipment for
identification.

5. County Commissions

If revenue is necessary, farmers would rather support raising
the sales tax than to have ad valorem taxes continue to rise.

6. County School Boards

Review and revise K-12 curriculum to include basic agriculture
education. Today's school child does not have a realistic aware-
ness of U.S. agriculture and its importance to society.

7. County Commissions

Explore the possibility of supporting a community farmers
market.









PRIVATE SECTOR

The following recommendations from the conference affect private

industries, associations, and businesses:


1. Grocery Stores

Encourage that they buy direct from local growers.

2. Local Media

Encourage that they print or broadcast as a public service
locations of road-side fruit and vegetable stands available
to consumers in the area.

3. Farm Equipment Manufacturers

Encourage production of mechanically simple farm machinery,
that is easily maintained by the farmer.

4. All Industries

Encourage continuation of energy conservation research to
develop practices for use by farmers.

5. Television and Radio Stations

Flash across the screen or broadcast as a public service fore-
casts during critical freeze periods much like emergency bulletins
or election returns.

6. Florida Chamber of Commerce

Encourage agricultural industries such as feedlots; processing
and packaging plants; and canneries to settle in Florida.

7. Farm Organizations

Consider the small and part-time farmer when making program
or policy decisions.










EXTENSION

The following are recommendations from the conference of farmers to

each other. We are requesting that extension offices pass these

along to farmers in their areas.



1. Farmers need to become more politically vocal. Get involved
both locally and statewide. Take advantage of your associa-
tions in making your voice heard.

2. Pay by the job, not by the hour. Use your local FFA and 4-H
as sources of after-school labor.

3. Plan for a reliable market when deciding on a crop. "If
everyone's growing zucchini, don't grow zucchini."

4. Organize monthly meetings for farmers to get together to
discuss problems and share solutions.






DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS


BOVE, Dave
Polk County
Winter Haven


ANDERSON, Bee
Highlands County
Avon Park

ANDERSON, William C.
Suwannee County
Live Oak

ATKINSON, J. (Jimmy) J.
Brevard County
Cocoa

BANES, Howard B., Jr.
Hillsborough County
Tampa


BASS, Elda M.
Okeechobee County
Okeechobee

BATH, Charles L.
Polk County
Lakeland

BEAUVAIS, Daniel
Charlotte County
Punta Gorda

BENTLEY, Jim
Polk County
Lakeland

BERRY, L. J.
Lake County
Leesburg

BIRCH, Leo, Jr.
Volusia County
DeLand

BLAIR, Billy, Sr.
Hamilton County
Jennings

BLEDSOE, John B.
Orange County
Orlando

BOON VON OCHSSEE,
Alachua County
Gainesville


BRANDE, Donald A.
Washington County
Chipley

BROWN, Gary Mac
Osceola County
Kissimmee

BROWN, John F.
Wakulla County
Crawfordville

BUTTS, Leon T.
Hillsborough County
Tampa

BYRD, Hugh D.
Putnam County
Pomona Park

BYRD, Michael M.
Jackson County
Grand Ridge

CAMPBELL, Andrew D.
St. Johns County
St. Augustine

CEPURAN, Bruce
Seminole County
Sanford

CHRIST, John E.
DeSoto County
Arcadia

CLARK, Louis V.
Duval County
Jacksonville

COBB, Ben
Jefferson County
Monticello


COFFEY, John
Glades County
Moore Haven


Eddy






DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS (continued)


COLEMAN, Mark S.
Alachua County
Alachua


COLLIER, Wayne
Hardee County
Wauchula


CONWAY, Edwar-d J.
Hillsborough County
Tampa

COOPER, Don
Dade County
Hialeah

COWART, James
Hardee County
Wauchula

CRAFT, Nancy S.
Hardee County
Zolfo Springs

CREEL, B. D.
Volusia County
Seville

CRENSHAW, Wayne W.
Sumter County
Oxford

CREWS, Inez
Lafayette County
Mayo

CROUCH, Tim
Marion County
Summerfield

CUDE, Kathleen
Lee County
Fort Myers

CULBRETH, Carl H.
Franklin County
Apalachicola


DAVIS, Greg
Marion County
Citra

DAVIS, Robert B.
Walton County
Freeport

DEWAARD, Dirk
Jefferson County
Greenville

DIXON, Zeke
Seminole County
Sanford

DOLAN, Robert B.
Indian River County
Vero Beach

DRIGGERS, Louis E.
Manatee County
Myakka City

DUGGAN, Jeanne D.
Hernando County
Brooksville

DUKES, Mrs. Edwin
Gilchrist County
Trenton

EVERS, Lloyd
Hillsborough County
Plant City


FEAVER, Thomas
Citrus County
Dunnellon

GAINER, Leonard
Jackson County
Graceville

GAY, Milton A.
Volusia County
Pierson


DAVIS, Archie
Madison County
Lee


GEATHERS, Lemuel L.
Polk County
Winter Haven





DELEGATE DIRECTOR


FARMERS (continued)


GEIGER, Elwood E.
Duval County
Jacksonville

GERREN, Ann
Broward County
Parkland

GILBERT, James D.
Citrus County
Dunnellon

GILBERT, Lury
Jackson County
Campbellton

GIVENS, Kenneth H.
Holmes County
Bonifay

GLEE, Johnny, Jr.
Madison County
Greenville

GLISSON, Merrill E.
Clay County
Keystone Heights

GOODLAD, John
Hendry County
LaBelle

GOODSON, C. L.
Dixie County
Cross City

GOUGH, John Roy
Hardee County
Wauchula


GUILARTE, Julian Eduardi
Dade County
Miami


HALL, Jack
Polk County
Lake Wales


HARRINGTON, A. R.
Palm Beach County
Canal Point

HART, Olin G.
Hillsborough County
Dover

HARVEY, Peggy R.
Baker County
Glen St. Mary

HENRY, Marvin W.
Flagler County
Bunnell

HERBST, Richard
Sumter County
Bushnell

HERNANDEZ, Harold L
Sarasota County
Venice

HOENSTINE, Ronald W
Leon County
Tallahassee

HORN, William C.
Hillsborough County
Lutz

HOWELL, Leon W.
Escambia County
McDavid

IVEY, Pluetina, Jr.
Suwannee County
Live Oak

JENKINS, Colon D.
Levy County
Trenton


GRAHAM, Ozell
Columbia County
Lake City

GREEN, Lawrence
Escambia County
Pensacola


GRIFFITH, Louise P.
Alachua County
Gainesville






DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS (continued)


JOHNSON, Allen S.
Volusia County
DeLand

JOHNSON, Cecil R.
Santa Rosa County
Milton

JONES, Gerald F.
Gilchrist County
Trenton


LLEWELLYN, Richard V.
Orange County
Christmas


LONG, Pearl G.
Jackson County
Marianna

MANN, R. L.
Union County
Lake Butler

MANNING, Bob
Lake County
Yalaha


JONES, Sharon
Dade County
Homestead


MARTIN, Harold B.
Hillsborough County
Tampa


KENT, Mathew R.
Washington County
Cottondale

KNIGHT, Michael R.
Sumter County
Bushnell

KUMMER, James E.
Putnam County
Palatka

LAIRD, Robert W.
Walton County
DeFuniak Springs

LAMB, Jimmy
Suwannee County
Live Oak

LAWRENCE, Stephen
Dade County
Miami

LINTON, McArthur
Suwannee County
McAlpin


MAYS, Herbert
Lake County
Leesburg


MCBRIDE, James A.
Pasco County
Brooksville

MCCALL, Jim
Alachua County
Alachua

MCNEIL, Edgar L.
Lake County
Eustis

MCWICKER, Jack
Dade County
Goulds

MEADOWS, Terry
Holmes County
Bonifay

MILLER, Spencer B.
Levy County
Bronson


LANIER, Don
Gulf County
Wewahitchka


LINVILLE, Elbert L.
Lake County
Umatilla


MOLASSO, Criss
Orange County
Orlando





DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS (continued)


MONTS, Bobbie Lee
Volusia County
Seville

MOTLEY, Cecil G.
Holmes County
Westville

NICHOLSON, Joseph
Hillsborough County
Brandon

NISTENDIRK, Herbert
Leon County
Tallahassee

NOBLITT, Robert I.
Pasco County
Dade City

NOLES, George Jennings
Santa Rosa County
Milton

OBERT, William J.
Washington County
Chipley

O'NEAL, Henry
Highlands County
Sebring

O'NEAL, Mike M.
Hillsborough County
Plant City


OWENS, James
Marion County
Reddick


PEEBLES, Mrs. Edna W.
Marion County
Fort McCoy

PREIS, Jacqueline
Hillsborough County
Tampa


PRINE, Wesley
Lafayette County
Mayo


REAVES, David W.
Marion County
Ocala

REIMANN, James A.
Brevard County
Titusville

RESCIGNO, Carole
Dade County
Homestead

REWIS, Peggy R.
Baker County
Glen St. Mary

RICHARDS, Robert
Okaloosa County
Holt

RIGSBY, David G.
Volusia County
Seville

ROESCH, Hulda
Lee County
Fort Myers

ROGERS, Laverte
Okaloosa County
Laurel Hill


RYE, Harvey E.,
Madison County
Madison

SALADA, R. N.
Alachua County
Melrose

SALVINO, Tony
Broward County
Davie

SAXE, Richard
Pasco County
Zephyrhills

SCHAEFER, Allan
Martin County
Jensen Beach


Sr.






DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS (continued)


SHAW, Richard
Collier County
Immokalee

SHEFFIELD, Don
Taylor County
Greenville

SINGLETON, James
Putnam County
East Palatka

SOUTHWELL, Jerald S
DeSoto County
Arcadia

STEPHENS, Wilbur
Bradford County
Lawtey

STEVENS, Julius A.
Columbia County
Fort White


TEAL, W. M.
Orange County
Winter Garden


THOMAS, Leland
Hillsborough County
Dover

THOMPSON, M. Warren
Baker County
Glen St. Mary


THORP, John
Dade County
Princeton


TYUS, Steve
Jackson County
Sneads

VEAL, L. D.
Bay County
Panama City

WALTER, Joseph
Orange County
Christmas

WARD, Lena
Liberty County
Bristol

WATSON, Wayne S.
Manatee County
Parrish


WATTERSON, Mary Ella
Bradford County
Starke

WEST, William H.
St. Lucie County
Fort Pierce

WETHERINGTON, Arlen R.
Hillsborough County
Dover

WHEELOCK, Richard
Jackson County
Marianna

WHITFIELD, Stanley
Santa Rosa County
Milton


TICE, David H.
Polk County
Bartow

TOBY, Kenneth R.
Palm Beach County
Loxahatchee


WILDS, Harry
Lake County
Eustis

WILLIAMS, Ralph
Brevard County
Merritt Island


TUCKER, Mrs. Cecil, II
Seminole County
Sanford


M., Jr.


WOODBERRY, W. Potter
Gadsden County
Havana





DELEGATE DIRECTORY


FARMERS (continued)


WYNN, Benny
Suwannee County
Live Oak

YATES, James
Osceola County
Kissimmee


COOPER, Elwyn O'Neal
Soil Conservation Service
Lake City


DUGGAR, Chuck
FFA
Marianna


AGRICULTURAL PROFESSIONALS


BETHEA, John M.
Division of Forestry
Tallahassee


BLOWERS, Dr. Charles W.
Metro-Dade County Planning
Department
Miami

BOWERS, Herman
Soil and Water Conservation
Service
Gainesville

BOYD, Hines
Management Consultant
Tallahassee

BROWN, William H.
Southwest Florida Production
Credit Association
Sebring

BURGESS, Mark
Soil Conservation Service
Tavares

BURNEY, Louis C.
Department of Environmental
Regulation
Tallahassee

CARTER, Keith A.
IFAS
Gainesville

CARTER, Dr. Lawrence
Florida A&M University
Tallahassee


EASTWOOD, Ralph A.
IFAS
Gainesville

FRENCH, Dr. Edwin C.
IFAS
Gainesville

GALLO, Ted
Southeast National Bank
of Bradenton
Bradenton

GAY, Ray
Solar Energy
Lake Butler

GLADWIN, Dr. Christina H.
IFAS
Gainesville

GLISSON, Jim
Sun Bank of Ocala
Ocala

GORDON, Dr. John
IFAS
Gainesville

HARGRAVE, Robert H.
Ethanol Production
LaCrosse

HARRIS, Oscar L., Jr.
Department of Veteran and
Community Affairs
Tallahassee

HATCH, Randolph
Hatch Enterprises
Branford





DELEGATE DIRECTORY


AGRICULTURAL PROFESSIONALS (continued)


HEARN, Hallie H.
Marianna Panhandle Production
Credit Association
Marianna

HOLLAND, Jack
House Agriculture Committee
Tallahassee

HORNE, John
Florida Rural Electric
Cooperative Association
Tallahassee

HUTCHESON, Clayton E.
Palm Beach County Extension
Director
West Palm Beach

JORDAN, Lester
Marianna Tractor Company
Marianna

MEREDITH, Wade
Plant City Farmers Market
Plant City

MITCHELL, James W.
Soil Conservation Service
Gainesville

MORRIS, Bob
Southeast Bank of Tampa
Tampa

NEWSOME, James E.
IFAS
Gainesville

OSWALD, Doug
Sun Bank of Ocala
Ocala

REDMAN, Honorable James E.
Plant City

REESE, Larry Dale
Department of Education
Tallahassee


ROBINSON, Wilson
Florida State Association
of Cooperatives
Archer

ROWAN, Edsel W.
Marion County Extension
Director
Ocala

SAVOY, Dr. Clifton F.
Florida A&M University
Tallahassee

SHARPE, Larry J.
Soil Conservation Service
Okeechobee

SMITH, Wayne H.
IFAS
Gainesville

STEVENS, Albert C.
Farmers Home Administra-
tion
Gainesville

STILES, John
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
Tallahassee

SULLIVAN, Julius
Soil Conservation Service
Marianna

SUMNER, Amos
Senate Agriculture
Committee
Tallahassee

TAYLOR, Bobby
Bradford County Extension
Director
Starke

THOMAS, Jerry
Farm Credit Service
Alachua






DELEGATE DIRECTORY


AGRICULTURAL PROFESSIONALS (continued)


WHITTEN, Marvin R.
Florida State ASCS Office
Gainesville

WOOLLEY, Hugh H.
Fertilizer
Graceville

YINGST, Victor
Lee County Extension Office
Fort Myers





STAFF DIRECTORY


Conference Office Staff


Vickie Goins
Lieutenant Governor's Office
Tallahassee

Carlene Holleman
Lieutenant Governor's Office
Tallahassee

Patricia McGinnis
Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee

Howard Milchman
Lieutenant Governor's Office
Tallahassee

Patricia Rackley
Private Sector
Tallahassee


DISCUSSION GROUPS STAFF

Facilitators

Carolyn Dekle
Governor's Office of Planning
and Budgeting
Tallahassee

Barbara Foster
Governor's Office of Planning
and Budgeting
Tallahassee

Steve Foster
Governor's Office of Planning
and Budgeting
Tallahassee

Torre Grissom
Governor's Office of Planning
and Budgeting
Tallahassee

David Hallman
House Agriculture Committee
Tallahassee

Steve Liner
Lieutenant Governor's Office
Tallahassee


Facilitators (continued)


Mel Maguire
Lieutenant Governor's
Office
Tallahassee

Stephanie McBee
Lieutenant Governor's
Office
Tallahassee

Harry McGinnis
Governor's Office of
Planning and Budgeting
Tallahassee

Jack Osterholt
Governor's Office of
Planning and Budgeting
Tallahassee

John Pierce
Governor's Office of
Planning and Budgeting
Tallahassee

Listeners

Charles Brasher
Extension Agent-IFAS
Marianna

Stuart Christmas
House Agriculture
Committee
Tallahassee

Tim Crocker
IFAS
Gainesville

Albert Fuller
Extension Agent-IFAS
Monticello

Henry Grant
Extension Agent-IFAS
Quincy

Jim Harrell
Division of Forestry
Tallahassee






STAFF DIRECTORY


Listeners (continued)


Dewayne Ingram
IFAS
Gainesville

Jeff Miller
Florida FFA Foundation
Tallahassee

George Reinert
Division of Forestry
Tallahassee

Bill Sumner
Game and Freshwater Fish
Commission
Tallahassee















































This public document was promulgated by
the Florida Governor's Office at a cost of
$1,269.50, or $1.27 per copy, to provide
information as required by Chapter 81-203,
Laws of Florida.




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