• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Advertising
 Title Page
 The little ducks
 History of the fallen pears
 The pigs
 The wooden shoes
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Violet stories
Title: The ducks and pigs
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054767/00001
 Material Information
Title: The ducks and pigs
Series Title: Violet stories
Alternate Title: Little Rosy's travels
Physical Description: 61 p., 2 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miller, Thomas, 1807-1874 ( Attributed name )
Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher: Sheldon and Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date: 1870, c1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction -- France   ( lcsh )
Domestic animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Attributed to Thomas Miller ... et al.. Cf. NUC pre-1956, v. 336, p. 287.
General Note: Added engraved series t.p.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054767
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225564
notis - ALG5839
oclc - 56970021

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Advertising
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    The little ducks
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    History of the fallen pears
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The pigs
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The wooden shoes
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Advertising
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








































The Baldwn Library
SUrTvcT
J ondi
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" No Rosy, they won't hurt; you need not fret
about them."
(2)















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'3H ELDO NrCOMP
M"l' D 0r S it, a.l*-l a-! ..ra4















LITTLE ROSY'S TRAVELS.

SIX VOLUMES.

ON THE JOURNEY.
A WALK AND A DRIVE.
THE DUCKS AND PIGS.
THE WOUNDED BIRD.
A SAD ADVENTURE.
THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.






Mttle Rosy's Travels.




THE DUCKS AND PIGS.




ILL USTRA TED.






SHELDON AND COMPANY.
1870.
























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868,
BY SHELDON AND COMPANY,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern
District of New York.













Eleetrotyped at the
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY,
No. 19 Spring Lane.









The Z ktcs-li Plg% &a.


THE LITTLE DUCKS.

HALL we go out this way
and take a little walk, or
go back again to the house
and have our reading-les-
son, Rosy?" asked her mamma,
when they had seen enough of the
poultry-yard.
Ah, for a walk, please, dear
mamma," said the little girl, who
did not feel much inclined for les-
sons at that moment.
(7)





8 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

Very well, Rosy," answered
mamma; and I suppose my little
girl will prefer to have holidays all
the while she stays at Cannes, and
would not mind going back to tell
grandmamma that she cannot read
one bit better than when she left
England."
0, yes, mamma; but I should
mind a great deal," said Rosy,
quickly, 'cause "
Because of what, Rosy ?" asked
her mamma.
"'Cause Rosy promised to learn
much, much," said the child, giving
two or three little jumps ; but
please, a walk now, dear mamma."
So mamma and Rosy went out at





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 9

the back gate, and came into a field
which had a little stream running at
the end of it. There was a hen,
too, near the edge of this stream,
making such a loud cackling and
screaming that Rosy said she thought
she must be crying.
She ran a little way and came, on
back in a great hurry, to say that
some of the good little chickens had
tumbled in, and to beg her mamma
to come quick and get them out."
Mamma went on as fast as she
could walk, but she said, -
I think you are mistaken, dar-
ling; I don't think that what you
see are chickens."
0, yes, mamma, they are; they





10 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

are, indeed Look at the poor old
hen !"
Rosy got to the edge of the stream
first. She did not go very near be-
cause her mamma called to her to
stop, and she remembered how the
little chickens had done as their
mother told them at the very first
cluck. Perhaps if Rosy had for-
gotten this, and had gone a little
farther, she might have tumbled in,
and that would have been a sad
thing indeed.
But she stopped just behind the
poor hen, who was in a terrible
fright, and before her mamma could
come up Rosy had begun to cry.
0, mamma, what can we do?





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 11

what shall we do ? sobbed the little
one. "They'll all die! they'll all
be drowned they will, they will! "
No, Rosy, they won't be hurt;
you need not fret about them," said
her mamma, sitting down on a bank
beside her. These are not chickens
at all, but young ducks. If we wait
a minute we shall see that they will
swim nicely, and then the poor hen
won't be frightened at all."
Rosy's mamma was quite right,
for the young ducks soon began to
swim about bravely, and as if they
had been used to the water all their
lives; and when the old hen saw
that, though she looked very much
surprised at first, yet she soon left





12 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

off calling them, and became tolera-
bly quiet.
Then Rosy's mamma put her arm
round her little girl, and said, -
"Shall I tell you, Rosy, how this
came about?"
"Yes, do, please, mamma; tell
Rosy a story."
Well, then, Rosy, I suppose this
good hen had some eggs of her own,
for see, here are some little chickens
that never tried to go into the water.
And then there must have been a
duck which had some eggs too.
Perhaps the hen and the duck were
friends; and I fear the poor duck
must have got ill and died. But
the farmer's wife wanted some young





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 13

ducks as well as some young chick-
ens, so she did not let the eggs be
eaten up, -as we ate ours this
morning, but put them all into a
nest, and set the hen to sit on them.
I don't know what the hen thought
about the little ducks, I'm sure;
perhaps she may have thought them
a rough sort of chicken, and hoped
that they, would get better, like
other chickens, as they grew older,
but I suppose she loved them very
much indeed, and took great care of
them. They can never have seen
water, we may be sure, before to-
day ;, and now somebody must have
left the gate open for a little while,
and so the old hen got out with all





14 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

her little brood. Perhaps she was
very pleased to get so much lib-
erty; but I think she must soon
have wished that she had staid at
home, for no doubt as soon as the
ducklings saw the water they knew
that it was just the thing for them;
so in they tumbled, in spite of all the
old hen's clucks, and now see how
they are enjoying themselves !"
But it was very naughty of
them," cried Rosy. They are
bad little ducks, and I don't love
them at all."
Her mamma smiled, and said, -
The old hen wasn't really their
mother, you see; she was more like
your good nurse. It would be





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 15

very wrong to do what nursey told
you not to do, wouldn't it, Rosy?
and I hope you will never give her
such a fright."
Rosy was sure she never could
be so unkind; and they both began
to scramble up a hill, till they came
to some trees that looked something
like willow trees, only that there
were lots of green fruit upon them,
such as Rosy had never seen before.
The fruit was about the size of a
small nut; and there were men un-
derneath beating the trees to make
it fall down.
"See, Rosy," said her mamma,
"these are olive trees Do you re-
member ever hearing of such trees
before?"





16 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

0, yes, in the Bible, mamma,"
cried Rosy. "You did read to me
one Sunday about the Mount of
Olives, and Jesus going out there
when he was going'up to heaven.
And I saw a picture, too, of the
garden where the olives grew. That
was in my new Bible stories, you
know. Will you read me the story
about that picture some day, mam-
ma?"
Yes, Rosy, this evening at bed-
time, if you like. But that garden
was not in this country, you know.
It was near Jerusalem, where the
temple was, and where Jesus used
to go to teach the people."
"I didn't think we should see





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 17

'es here, mamma. Are they
d to eat?"
"0, yes, some people like them
very much; but I don't think my
little girl would like them, because
they are so bitter. The people
grow them here for the sake of.the
oil which they get out of them."
"I don't like oil," said Rosy,
making a great face.
0, but this is not like castor oil.
Some of the poor people like it very
much. Shall we go and see what
those people are doing who are sit-
ing down under that wall?"
The' people whom they saw were
some men and womenwho had been
working in the fields, and now they
2





18 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

were having their dinners, as Rosy's
mamma guessed.'
So she went up to them, and asked
them if they would like to have
some pretty little books which she
took out of her pocket. They looked
as if they would, but spoke in such
a funny way that Rosy's mamma
could hardly understand anything
they said, though she knew French
quite well. She made out at last
that there was a girl at home who
could read quite well, so some of
the little books were sent for her to
read to the others.
"Will she like them ?" asked
Rosy, after they had.got out of hear-
ing.






THE LITTLE DUCKS. 19

"Yes; I think so, Rosy," said
her mamma, "for I dare say she
does not often get new books. Some
little girls and boys, you see, are
never taught to read at all, and no
one reads to them either the stories
that you like to hear me read, about
Moses and David, or even about-
Jesus Christ, and how he came
down from heaven to save sinners."'
"Did they like me to see them
having their dinner ?" said Rosy.
"I don't think they-mindedaat all.
French people are very fond, of
having a little chat. Did you see
what they were having for dinner-?"'
"I saw some bread, great large
pieces," said Rosy, "and something





20 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

in a dish. That was that, mam-
ma; was it gravy?"
"No, not gravy; that was. oil,
Rosy. Didn't you see how they
dipped their bread into it, and how
they seemed to like it ?"
"I shouldn't," said Rosy, giving
a great shudder. "How horrid!
They had got a bottle and a mug,
too, only one mug for all of them.
What was in the bottle?"
Wine," answered her mamma.
Rosy opened her eyes again very
wide, and said, -
Wine, mamma But papa said,
one day, that poor people couldn't
have wine, 'cause it costs such lots
of money."





THE LITTLE DUCKS. 21
"That was in England. This
wine does not cost much, Rosy, and
it does not make people tipsy. I
wonder if nursey will like it instead
of her beer."
And they had no meat and no
potatoes," said Rosy, with a sigh.
" Shall we go home, and tell papa
about the poor people? "
"Yes if you're tired, dear."
And so mamma and her little
girl went home, to talk of what they
had seen.


A-





22 TIE DUCKS AND PIGS.



HISTORY OF THE FALLEN..
PEARS.

HE garden belonging to
the house where Rosy
staid was a nice large
one; and it had lots of
beautiful flowers, and lots of bushes
with flowers on them, growing in
different parts of it, and some trees
too, besides the orange-trees which
I told you about before.
There were almond-trees and fig-
trees, a few olive-trees, and two
pear-trees.
Rosy liked pears very much, but





THE FALLEN PEARS. 23

these were a very late sort, and
were not yet ripe.
A great wind blew for two nights
and days, and then came some rain;
and after that Rosy went out again
to play in the garden.
She went, first of all, to see
whether the oranges were getting
ripe, and then she went on to the
pear-trees, and what do you think
she saw? O, such a number of
them lying on the ground !
Did Rosy want to eat them ? Not
at first. But she thought of some
little pigs that Cecile, the housemaid,
had told her about, and how much
they liked to have the pears which
fell off the trees; and then she ran





24 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

in to ask if she might pick up some,
and carry them in her pinafore to
their little house.
Her papa saw her coming, and
went out to hear what she wanted.
And he said, -
"Yes, Rosy, you may ; but,
mind, they are only ripe enough for
pigs."
So Rosy went back, and had
great fun for a little while in picking
them up, and thinking how the pigs
would like them. She had a basket
with her, for her papa had given
her one to put them in; and soon it
was nearly full of small green pears,
which did not look so very tempting
as to make her wish to eat them.





THE FALLEN PEARS. 25

But just when she had got it nearly
full, she spied a large pear, which
looked as if it must be quite ripe.
She did not put that into her basket
at once, but looked at it all round
and round, squeezed it, and patted
it, and at last smelt it.
That was a very dangerous thing
to do, because, of course, it smelt
very nice. And then Rosy thought
to herself, It must be ripe, I'm
sure. It wouldn't have that rosy
cheek if it weren't. I wish papa
would come, and say I might eat it.
He would if he were here, I know."
And when she had thought all
these things, the little girl, all on a
sudden, took a great bite, and said





26 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

to herself that when it was all gone
she would tell her papa just how it
was, and that if he knew it was
ripe, he wouldn't mind; she was
quite sure of that.
But when she had taken two bites,
Posy began to think that it was
rather hard, and something seemed
to say, "It isn't ripe, you know."
She didn't listen, though, but took
some more bites, until, all at once,
just in the middle of the fruit, what
should she spy but a great cater-
pillar, with a lot of brown stuff
all round him!
0, she let it fall so quickly, and
was so sorry then that ever she had
tasted it. It made her feel quite






































sudden she took a great bite."
(27)































i





THE FALLEN PEARS. 29

sick to think that she might have
gone on, and bitten that caterpillar
in half!
She was half inclined to cry, and
stood for some time looking at the
bitten pear which she had let fall.
Then it came into her head that those
great unripe pieces which she had
swallowed would certainly make her
ill; and then she thought that what
she had done would all be found out,
and every one would be angry with
her.
When she began to bite the pear
she had quite intended to tell, and
to say that she knew she might, be-
cause it was so ripe; but now she
had found out that it was not ripe,





30 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

and besides she began to remember
how often before her mamma had
said that she must not taste any fruit
without leave.
0, Rosy, Rosy! How glad she
would have been then if she had
minded what her mamma said to her.
She couldn't bear having this bad
secret to keep, she had never had
such a one before, and yet she was
afraid to tell it.
At last she took up her basket-
load, which was almost too heavy
for her to manage, and began to
walk slowly towards the kitchen-
door, that she might ask Cecile to
show her where the little pigs lived.
But the pears would not stay in the





THE FALLEN PEARS. 31

basket; it was too full, and first
one and then another tumbled out.
She picked them up and picked them
up, and at last sat down on the
ground and began to cry.
The little girl had thought herself
quite alone all this time; but she
was not. Her papa was quite near
to her, walking behind some bushes.
He could see her, though she could
not see him; and he wanted to see
whether she would remember to be
good when no one was by; so he
kept out of her sight till he saw her
sit down sobbing.
When Rosy saw him come from
behind the bushes, she let go her
basket, which tumbled over and up-





32 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

set, and began to cry and sob more
than ever.
She did not know that he had
seen everything, and she wanted
him to know, yet was afraid to tell.
So, though he asked a great many
times, -
"What is the matter, Rosy?" he
got no answer except sobs.
Her papa had been sitting by his
little girl, and had put his arm
round her while he asked her this
question; but at last he said that if
Rosy would not tell him, he must go
away and leave her by herself.
Rosy could not bear this; so she
seized hold of his coat, and whis-
pered something which no one else





THE FALLEN PEARS. 33

could hear, even if any one had been
by.
Then papa looked very grave, and
said, -
Ah, Rosy, I saw, though you
did not know it."
And Rosy said, -
"I so sorry. Rosy 'll never do
so again. Please kiss Rosy."
And papa gave her a kiss, and
took her up in his arms to carry her
into the house; but he said, -
The poor little pigs must go
without their pears to-day, because
Rosy has not been good enough to
feed them."
3





34 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.



THE PIGS.

F course mamma won-
dered when she saw Rosy
come in crying, and nurse
wondered too; and when
they heard all about it, and said that
they thought they could have
trusted their little girl," it made her
more sorry than ever. It was very
sad, too, to think of the little piggies
losing their treat. Rosy thought
that she would much rather have
gone without her own tea; but she
was afraid to say so.
To tell the truth, she had thought





THE PIGS. 35

a great deal about this visit to the
pigsty ever, since Cecile had told
her about the great sow with her
fifteen little ones. And she thought
about them all the afternoon, though
she did not say anything, and she
wondered whether she had told them
of the treat they were to have, and
whether they would be very much
disappointed.
Mamma and nurse had quite for-
given her after she had said she was
sorry, and then they did not talk
any more about what she had done,
until it came to her bed-time.
Rosy's mamma often came and
sat by her bed for a little while after
she had been tucked up. Some-





36 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

times she said hymns to her, and
sometimes she talked a little about
God, who was her great Father up
in heaven, who took care of her all
night long, and who was always by
her side.
She did not come in smiling, as
she often did, on this evening, but
she looked rather grave and sad;
and she told her little girl that she
had come to teach her just one little
text out of the Bible.
"Thou, God, seest me:" that
was the text.
It was only four words long; and
Rosy had to say them over until she
knew them quite well.
Her mamma did not tell her why





THE PIGS. 37

she made her learn this; but Rosy
knew very well; and when she had
said it several times, she put her
arms round her neck, and said
again, -
"I so sorry."
Can you guess what her kind
mamma did then? I will tell you.
First, she gave her little girl a
kiss, and then she taught her to say
to her great Father in heaven how
very sorry she was for having for-
gotten that he saw her, and for
doing such a bad thing, and ask
him to forgive her for the sake of
her dear Saviour, who had died that
she might have her sins forgiven.
Rosy did not feel so sad after that,






38 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

and before she went to sleep she
asked,-
"May I go and feed the pigs to-
morrow? "
Her mamma said she might if it
were fine, and soon afterwards Rosy
fell asleep, thinking what dear, pret-
ty creatures those piggies would be.
It was a splendid day; and as
she had promised, Cecile came to
take her to the pigsty about ten
o'clock. When she got to the gate
of the yard round the sty, Rosy
said, -
"Now let me go all by myself."
So Cecile let go her hand, and
Rosy went on, feeling as if she were
a very great girl, because she had





THE PIGS. 39

such a large present for the little
animals.
She did not much like the place
that she had to walk over; for the
stones were very large and rough,
and not at all clean. She wondered
that some one did not sweep them
or wash them very often; for this
little girl was rather particular about
having things clean. She did not
like dirty hands and dirty pinafores,
as some small people of her age
seem to do.
When she got a little nearer she
found another thing that she did
not like'one bit, and that was a very
bad smell.
If it had not been that she saw





40 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

the pigs just in front, and was sure
that they were in a great hurry for
their pears,, I think she would have
run back again, she disliked it so
much.
As it was, she said to herself a
great many times, O, what a hor-
rid, nasty smell! and put her pina-
fore up to her nose.
When she got quite close she saw
such a number of snouts sticking
up, and then she heard Cecile call
to her, -
"Don't go too close, missy.
Don't put them into their mouths
with your fingers, for fear they
should bite you and make you dirty.
Throw them in just like balls."






































"She did not much like the place she had to walk
over."
(41)









THE PIGS. 43

Rosy was not sorry to do that,
for now she wanted to get back as
quickly as she could, away from
that dirty place and out of that hor-
rid smell.
Besides, she was very much dis-
appointed to find that the pigs were
not at all the pretty creatures that
she had fancied them. She did not
like their long snouts, but thought
them like very ugly noses. They
grunted too, and pushed one another
about, and rolled in the mud till
they made themselves quite dirty.
And then one had little eyes, and
another long flapping ears, and an-
other put his feet into the place
where his food was kept; and, be-





.44 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

sides, Rosy could not persuade them
to divide their pears at all fairly; so
she called to Cecile to come and
help her: but Cecile could not man-
age much better than she had done;
for when she threw a pear right
across to one small piggie who had
come badly off, another would come
and take it from him; so they were
obliged to go and leave them
scrambling.
Rosy was not sorry to have some
one to lead her back over those slip-
pery stones, and she told Cecile
that the only things that she liked
were those funny little curling tails,
and that she thought it was a good
thing that pigs didn't come into the
houses like pussies and dogs.





THE PIGS. 45

But Cecile said that some people
thought differently, for nurse told
her that in Ireland she had seen a
great pig who lived in a cottage
amongst a lot of children as if he
had been one of them, and that all
the children petted him, and were
very fond of him indeed.
O," said Rosy, putting her hand
over her nose, I'm glad I didn't
live with them. What are pigs for ?"
she added. "I wish there were no
pigs."
You see that this little woman
changed her mind rather quickly.
"What are they for?" returned
Cecile. Why, to make bacon and
ham and pork of, to be sure. Don't
you like ham?"





46 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

0, yes, I do, much, much,"
said Rosy, rubbing her hands to-
gether, and looking up at Cecile as
if her mouth watered at the thought.
" Will papa have ham for breakfast
to-morrow ?"
"That's more than I can say;
but now you know what pigs are
like, of course you won't eat any
if he offers you a taste."
"0, yes, I shall; I like ham;
but how do they make the pigs clean
enough? Do they wash them very,
very often? "
I've seen the hams hung up in
a chimney to get a nice smoky
taste," returned Cecile, "but I
never saw them washed. They may
be, though, for aught I know."





THE PIGS. 47

"In a chimney, Cecile! O,
you're only teasing, I know. I'll
ask my papa," replied Rosy, in a
positive little way that she some-
times used when she had an idea
that people were imposing on her.
And do you think that your
papa knows how to cure hams, my
little lady? asked Cecile, laughing.
"Of course he does," said Rosy
again; "papa knows everything."





48 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.



THE WOODEN SHOES.

S SOSY'S mamma sometimes
went shopping, and took
her little girl with her.
Little girls, and boys too,
you know, are apt to wear out their
clothes in the country, and particu-
larly their shoes. When they are
at the sea-side, I dare say you know
how often they want new ones.
Well, Rosy was very fond of going
on to the beach to play in the sand
and to pick up shells. She found
some very pretty ones, and her dear
nurse made a very pretty little card-





THE WOODEN SHOES. 49

basket, which she lined with pink,
and stuck all round with these shells.
It was intended for her dear grand-
mamma; and if Rosy could find
some more shells they were to be
made into pretty things for presents
for her cousins. So, you see, she
wanted to find a great many; and.
when she was looking, sometimes
her feet would get wet with the
waves, which did not do the shoes
any good.
I don't know that Rosy exactly
minded the shoes being wet. In
her heart, I rather fancy that she
thought it very good fun when the
waves caught her; but there was
one thing which she did not like. It
4





50 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

was being told that she ought not to
wear out her shoes and boots so fast,
because they cost a great deal of
money.
Now Rosy was a child that was
rather fond of getting up little plans
of her own; and I am going to tell
you of one for saving her shoes,
which she thought such a very grand
one that it kept her awake a whole
half hour one evening after she had
been put to bed.
I told you before that she some-
times went shopping with her mam-
ma. Well, often when they had
done with the shops, they used to
go and sit on a bench near the
market stalls, which are between the
shops and the sea.






THE WOODEN SHOES. 51

This was Rosy's favorite spot,
because there was always so much
to see. Such numbers of curious
people came there, and such funny
things were sold to eat.
There were lots of olives, and
lots of grapes; and there were be-
sides the berries of some jujube-
trees, which grow in some parts of
the town. Rosy loved jujubes with
all her heart; but she never knew
before what they were made of.
However, she did not think the ber-
ries half as nice as the jujubes,
which she had often eaten.
Well, one daywvhile she was sit-
ting by her mamma, watching the
men and women selling, and the





52 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

funny little children of her own age
playing about in their funny baby
caps, there came by a big girl riding
on a donkey, between two very
large panniers.
The girl had come out of the
country with things to sell, and she
had on a pair of shoes which took
Rosy's fancy immensely. They
were made of wood, and not a bit
like what the other girls or women
wore.
The girl got down off her donkey
and talked a great deal to it, just as
if it could understand, and were an
old friend. Then she fastened it to
a tree, and came up to: a stall ne:arto
where Rosy and hei mamma %Mere





THE WOODEN SHOES. 53

sitting, and as she walked along her
shoes, which were made of wood,
went plock, plock."
The little girl thought it was a
nice noise, and she got down and
tried to do the same with her own
little shoes, but they would only go
" pitter-patter, pitter-patter."
Rosy's mamma began to talk to
the girl, and to ask her what she had
to sell and where she lived; but the
girl spoke a funny language, not
like French at all, but like what the
peasants spoke whom they had seen
dining, and Rosy's mamma could
not make her understand much that
she said.
All the while she was talking





54 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

Rosy was thinking of her shoes,
and wondering whether she might
have a pair just like them. And
when the girl had gone away to buy
something at a stall farther on,
Rosy only talked of her shoes. She
did not ask for a pair like them
then; but when she went home she
thought about it a great deal, and
when she was lying on her little bed
that night she made up her plan,
that she would coax mamma to go
again on the next day that the
girl was to come, and then coax
again to have a pair of shoes just
like hers.
Rosy's mamma was rather amused
at her little girl's fancy, but she
said, -





THE WOODEN SHOES. 55

"If they do not cost too much
you may have them instead of the
cart which I was going to buy you,
if you like."
Now Rosy had wanted this cart
very much, but she wanted the shoes
much more. She told her mamma
they would be so strong, and she
thought of the nice noise, and made
up her mind at once.
So the girl was asked to bring a
pair the size of Rosy's foot; and
Rosy went home full of joy to tell
her nursey.
She always told her everything,
or very nearly everything, and nurse
was always pleased when Rosy came
home happy and good, but she
said, -




56 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

What a. funny plaything to
choose If I had been a little girl I
would have chosen the pretty cart
to draw about the nursery."
0, but," cried Rosy, the shoes
will be so useful. They are so
high, so high as that, -nurse,"
putting her hand a good way from
the ground. "I shall look like a
big girl; and they make such a
beautiful noise."
And Rosy clapped her hands, and
ran all round the nursery because
she was so glad and happy.
Well, the shoes came in good
time, and Rosy went out into the
garden to try them.
She had seen the market girl run





































"At first she felt afraid of falling, and was obliged
to go slowly and carefully."
(57)








THE WOODEN SHOES. 59

quite fast in them, and she meant
to set off in the same way herself;
but they were heavier than she had
thought before she tried them on.
At first she felt afraid of falling,
and she was obliged to go slowly
and carefully, so that no one would
have taken her for the little merry
skipping girl whom they had known
before. Cecile came to look at her,
as she tried to walk about in the
heavy, clumsy shoes; and even' the
cat seemed as if it could not make
it out.
But Rosy did not like to confess
that mamma and nurse had been in
the right when they said her own
shoes were better; so she tried hard





60 THE DUCKS AND PIGS.

to manage them, and said she should
get used to them in a little while.
They made her ankles ache, it was
true; but she bore that for a good
while without saying anything about
it, and could not be persuaded to
have them taken off until it was
time to go down after her papa and
mamma's dinner. She wanted to
be able to wear them on the beach,
where they might get wet without
being hurt; and when she had taken
a thing into her" little head it took
a good deal to drive it out again.
So nurse said nothing; for though
she was sorry to see her darling
bearing so much pain, she liked to
see her persevere, that is, try hard,
to do a thing.





THE WOODEN SHOES. 61

But when Rosy had got them off,
and her own nice little shoes on in-
stead, she could not help saying
that the thin ones were better for
in doors.
You see it was not easy for her
to keep any of her feelings in her
own little heart.





:("~~?~i;;~q9


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