• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The little white-mice boy
 The first snow-storm
 Bertha and the frost-fairies
 The two friends
 Little Alice
 Roses
 The seamstress
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Little white mice boy and other stories
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054759/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little white mice boy and other stories
Physical Description: 62, 2 p., 9 leaves of plates : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Clark, Mary Latham, 1831-1911 ( Author, Primary )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1870   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Latham Clarke i.e. M.L. Clark.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054759
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224379
notis - ALG4643
oclc - 03308340

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The little white-mice boy
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The first snow-storm
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bertha and the frost-fairies
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The two friends
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Little Alice
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Roses
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The seamstress
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Advertising
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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LITTLE WHITE MICE BOY

AND

OTIIER STORIES.


BY
MARY LATHAM CLARKE.











o o 1 ,/ p
33. orITHRoP & Go.
38 & -0. CORHAI/LL.
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by
D. LOTHROP & CO.,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washingtos.








THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY.












... .






N the (ei-;lv p1 rt ot'
the wi$te". .v':er:'l
years ago," si:id Un-
cle Wallace, begin-





6 THE LITTLE WIITE-MICE BOY.

ning the story for which his little nieces
and nephews had been coaxing him, "I
had occasion, in the course of my travels,
to cross from Switzerland into Italy.
"Take down your maps, pussies, and
see where those countries are, and how I
was to make the journey."
"Oh, we know without going to the
map," said Susie, looking very wise;
standd you had to cross the Alps to get
there."
"Right," said Uncle Wallace, quite
right, my dear; and it makes me shiver,
even here by this bright fire, to think of
that dreary journey over the moun-
tains.
"A small party of us started from a
Swiss village at the foot of the mountain
in a carriage drawn by mules. I wish I
could describe to you, dear children, the





TIE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY. 7

splea;iiA scenery through which we
passed.
"Above, towered the snowy mountain-
peaks, glittering in the sunshine, while
beneath us were deep chasms, looking as
if the rocks had been rent by a mighty
earthquake.
"Not the leaSt among the objects of
interest which we saw were the little
Swiss villages, perched here and there
upon the sides of the mountains, looking
as if they must fall at the least jostle. I
found myself wondering how the Swiss
mothers dared to let their children play
out of doors, lest in their gambols they
should slip down some of the steep preci-
pices and be dashed to pieces.
"I saw, however, many of the sturdy
little mountain children, and they skipped
about as nimbly and fearlessly as the





8 THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY.

sure-footed goats and kids with which they
played.
"After a while the road grew so steep
and winding that we could not go any
farther in the carriage, so we left it at a
little inn where we took dinner, and,
mounting our mules, we followed our
trusty guide up the famous road that
leads through the St. Bernard pass.
"The faithful animals were accustomed
to the rough path, and they picked their
way slowly and carefully, leaving us noth-
ing to think of but ourselves and how to
keep warm. Plenty of need there was of
our thinking of that, for toward evening
the snow began to fall and the wind to
blow, and it was with difficulty that we
could keep our seats.
Still up, up climbed the mules, follow-
ing the voice of thte guide, who, as it grew





THE LITTLE WhITE-MICE BOY. 9

darker, often spoke to them in a cheerful
tone, which was certainly a welcome
sound to us as well as to the poor
animals.
"Although I believe I am generally
quite courageous, I found myself thinking,
now and then, how slight a misstep might
send both mule and rider to the bottom
of one of the frightful precipices. Stories
that I had heard, of such accidents, came
crowding into my mind, and I cannot tell
you how rejoiced I was when I saw a light
glimmering through the blinding snow,
and heard the guide say that the Convent
of St. Bernard was in sight.
"Happy and thankful were we all when
we reached the door of this most hospi-
table place, and found ourselves warmly
welcomed by the good monks who lived
there.





10 THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY.

"After a comfortable supper we sat by
a blazing fire, and warmed and rested our
benumbed and weary limbs. We found
quite a number of strangers there,, who,
like ourselves, had been overtaken by the
storm, and were glad and grateful for such
a good resting-place.
"While looking around the pleasant
room I saw a handsome, dark-eyed boy
sitting in a corner, and near him were a
little hurdy-gurdy and a cage of white
mice.
"One of the good monks, seeing me
look at him with some curiosity, told me
that this little lad, mere child as he was,
had undertaken a few days before to
climb the mountain alone from the Italian
side, and had lost his way, and, would
have perished in the snow if he had not





THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY. 11

been found just then by one of their
faithful dogs.
"As I could speak his language, I
went to him and asked him some ques-
tions. He told me that he had a little
sister, and that they were orphans.
Formerly they earned their bread in go-
ing about from place to place singing and
playing on their hurdy-gurdy. 'Then,
said he, 'I took more money than I do
now.'
Why does not your little sister go
with you now ?' I asked.
"' Ah, sir,' said he, with a flash of his
dark eye and a manly look upon his face,
'she was too young and pretty for such a
hard life, and I wanted her to be a lady;
so I found a good place for her to live,
and now I go about alone to get money to
take care of her.





12 TIRE LITTLE WnITL-JMICE BOY.

"'That was why,' continued he, 'I was
trying to cross the mountain; for I
thought if I should go to a new place I
should get more money.'
"'What did you think of?' asked I,
'when you found that you had lost your
way?'
"The dear little fellow dropped his
eyes a moment, and when he again raised
them to my face they were full of tears,
and he answered softly: -
I asked the good God to take care of
my little sister, if I should never see her
again, and then I said my prayers and
went to sleep.'
"'It came near being the sleep of
death,' said the good monk,, solemnly.
"All present seemed touched with the
simple story of the little Italian boy, and
when he finished, more money than he





THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY. 13

had seen for a long time before, if one
could judge by his delighted face, was
pressed into his little palm.
"' Now, sir,' said he, after thanking us
and dashing the tears from his eyes, 'shall
I show you what my little white mice can
do?'
Of course we assented, and he struck
up a lively air upon his hurdy-gurdy, at
the first sound of which the little pink-
eyed creatures stood upon their hind feet
and danced, keeping perfect time to the
music.
"It was such a pretty and curious sight
that all in the room came crowding around
to see it.
After a while he sang, at our request,
several songs in a voice of rare sweetness
and power.
The next morning he started, in com-





14 THE LITTLE WHITE-MICE BOY.

pany with several others, down the Swit-
zerland side of the mountain, followed
by our good wishes, and bearing many
charges from the good monks never again
to attempt such a perilous journey alone.
"Dear, brave little fellow! I have
thought of him many times since, wonder-
ing what fate had befallen him and the
dear little sister whom he loved so much.
Of one thing I am quite sure, wher-
ever they may be, the good Father loves
them and holds them safe in his most ten-
der keeping."

































I'












THE FIRST SNOW-STORM.



OCK-A-DOODLE- -
DO.!" screamed
old Chanticleer at
the top of his
voice, as he flew
up to the roof of
the shed bythe
nursery window,
and flapped his glossy wings.
Cock-a-doodle-do Wake up, children,
and see what has been going on while we
have all been sleeping! Fine times we
of the barnyard shall have now, scratching
2 17.





18 TRE FIRST SNOW-STORM.

for our breakfasts through all this snow !
Wake up, children, and see what you
think of it Cock-a-doodle-do-o-o !"
The children heard only the' last word
of this fine speech, and out of her trundle-
bed jumped Minnie, and down from his
crib clambered Charlie, while both ran to
the window to seewhat their pet rooster
was making such a noise about.
A beautiful sight burst upon their view.
In the east the clouds were of the loveliest
crimson and gold, and the earth and trees,
which were bare and brown when they
were tucked into their little beds the
evening before, were now covered with a
pure white mantle of snow. The chil-
dren clapped their hands with delight as
they saw this, for it was the first snow of
the season.
"Now, Charlie," said Minnie, who





THE FIRST SsNOW-STORM. 19

always thought of her little brother's
pleasure before her own, "I can draw
you to school on my sled, and you can
wear youi' little red mittens and make
snow-balls; and some time we will go out
and make a snow image, that perhaps will
turn to a little live girl and play with us,
as the one did in the story that mamma
read to us."
That would be splendid," said Char-
lie; "only we wouldn't let her come into
the warm parlor, for fear she would melt
away."
"See !" said Minnie, "the apple-trees,
loaded with snow, make me think.of the
way they looked last spring when they
were covered with blossoms. How white
and beautiful they were then Don't you
remember how we picked some of the
pink and white flowers from the lower





20 THE FIRST SNOW-STORM.

limbs, and put them with our blue violets
to carry to the teacher?"
"Yes, I remember," said Charlie; "but
what will become of the dear little violets
now, and the buttercups, and all the flow-
ers which you said had gone to sleep in
the ground to wait till spring? This cold
snow will freeze them, so that they will
never wake up and grow again."
"No, indeed !" said the pleasant voice
of their mother, who from the next room
had heard her little chatterboxes, and had
now come to dress them for breakfast.
'"No, indeed! This pure white snow
will not freeze the roots of the pretty
flowers that are fast asleep in the brown
earth beneath it. It will cover them as
with a white fleecy blanket, keeping out
the cold frost and winds, and they will




THE FIRST SNOW-STORM. 21

sleep snug and warm as you do in your
little beds, my darlings.
"I-ow good and kind in our heavenly
Father to send this beautiful white snow
to cover the sleeping plants and flowers,
that they may rest. securely until the warm
spring sun awakes them!"
"Bu.t come,, my little ones," continued
the kind mother, "we must get ready for
our breakfast; and after it is over we will
go out and feed the hens, and the old
rooster that has been crowing so loudly
all the time we have been talking. They
would have a hard time of it to scratch
for their breakfast through all this snow."
"Cock-a-doodle-do That's just what
I was saying!" said Chanticleer, turning
his head this way and that with a very
knowing look.
Then, flapping his glossy wings again,





22 TIIE FIRST SNOW-STORM.

he flew down to tell his family that, not-
withstanding the snow that covered every-
thing, they were soon to have their break-
fast.




































4





















, l ,











BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES.



SLL day long the
feathery show-
flakes had been
falling; and al-
though little Ber-
tha was not al-
lowed to go out
of doors, she anticipated rare sport on the
next day, when, for the first time in the
season, she might take her little green sled,
"Dasher," and have a good frolic in the
yard..
Towards night, however, a drizzling





26 BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES.

rain set in, and she began to fear that the
snow-drifts would all be melted away be-
fore morning. The* last question that she
asked her mother, when she was tucked
into her little bed that night, was, "Do
you suppose the snow will all go away
before to-morrow ? "
"Perhaps so, darling," answered the
kind mother, as she gave her little daugh-
ter the good-night kiss; but plenty of
snow will come by and by that will not
melt away in one night; so try and not be
too sorry for this disappointment."
Bertha kissed her motherland tried to
smile, but there were tears in her eyes as
she closed them.
Click click! What was that little
noise? It" was not exactly like the nib-
bling of a mouse, although, when Bertha
heard it, she opened her eyes and looked





BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES. 27

to see if the mice, that she sometimes
heard in the walls, were running over the
floor. At first she saw only the moon-
light as it streamed brightly into the
room; but, looking a little more closely
towards the place where the clicking
sound seemed to be, she saw what would
have made her clap her hands with de-
light, if she had not been afraid of causing
the beautiful vision to disappear.
Over the window-frames there hovered
a great number of the sweetest little
creatures ever seen. What they were
doing, Bertha could not make out; but
they were so lovely, and their movements
were so light and graceful, that the child
almost held her breath for very ecstasy.
Fairies! said she softly to herself.
"They are fairies, I know; but what can
they be doing?"





28 BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES.

Softly as she had spoken, they seemed
to hear her; for one of them turned.her
little bright face towards Bertha, and said
to her companions, "The little girl is
awake. Shall we fly away?"
"Oh, no," was the answer; "she loves
us; so let us stay and finish our work,
and then have a dance upon the bright
flowers of the carpet."
"Yes," said another, "and we will ask
her to dance with us."
Then they all clapped their hands, with
a sound that reminded Bertha of the pat-
ter of tiny hailstones against the win-,
dow.
She watched them awhile in silence,
and then ventured to speak: -
"I wish I could know what you are
doing," said she, timidly, half afraid lest





BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES. 29

the sound of her voice should frighten
them away.
"Come and see," said one who wore a
crown which sparkled as if made of the
tiniest of stars.
"Yes, come and see," said many other
voices, while the pretty little creatures
still kept on with their work, with its con-
tinual accompaniment of "click, click,
click," that Bertha had first heard.
So the little girl slipped out of bed and
stepped softly across the floor. "Ugh "
said she, shivering, "how cold it is!"
At that the little workers all laughed
and clapped their hands again.
"See we are painting your windows !"
said the one with the starry crown.
"Did you ever see anything more beau-
tiful?"
Bertha looked and saw roses and lilies,




30 BERTHA AND THE FROST- FAIRIES.

cnstlcs and towers, and more things than I
can tell you, painted in the purest white
upon the window-panes.
"That looks like frost," said she,
softly.















"So it is," answered the little being;
"for we are frost-fairies. We come when
people are asleep, and paint the windows,
and do many other things. We do not




BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES. 31

often show ourselves, but we love you,
because you are not afraid of the cold.
When we pinch your cheeks and fingers,
just to make them rosy and pretty, you
never cry. We do not like children who
sit by the fire all day long, afraid to go
out into the clear, cold air to frolic iu the
snow, or to run on errands for their
mother."
"Once you took off your new, warm
tippet," said another fairy, "and put it
around the neck of a poor little shivering
child. We saw you "
And once you stopped in your play, and
drew little lame Johnny to school on your
sled, although he was heavy, and it was
hard work," said another, smiling brightly
upon the little girl.
"And many a time," said another of the
little frost-fairies, "when you have been




32 BERTHA AND THE PEOST-FAIR1ES.

out playing, we have seen you let poor
little children, who had no sleds, take
yours and slide down the hill, while you
ran beside them to keep warm."
Now," said the little one with the
crown, who- seemed to be the queen,
"look from the window, this one that
we have not painted, and see what we
have been doing to-night."
Bertha looked as she was bidden, and
saw a sight that made her clap her hands
with joy. The snow had not melted
away, but it was covered with a clear
coating of ice, that glittered brightly in
the moonlight.
"For you to slide upon to-morrow,"
said the fairy, nodding and smiling.
"See the trees!" said another; "we
have covered them with frost-gems and
crystal."




BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES. 33

As she spoke, Bertha looked and saw
that every branch and twig sparkled at if
covered with a shower of diamonds.
"Oh, how beautiful exclaimed she.
We knew you would like it," said the
queen. Now come and dance with us
before we go."
So saying, she reached out her tiny
hand, and, though it was as cold as an
icicle, Bertha grasped it bravely, and
away, they all went, fairies and child,
dancing over the floor, while the moon-
beams, shining in at the windows, quiv-
ered and glanced about them as if joining
in the frolic.
Farewell, dear Bertha! at length
said the queen of the fairies. Think of
us to-morrow, when you are out sliding.
We shall be near you, although you may
not see us."





34 BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES.

"Farewell !" said another and another;
- and as they spoke they vanished.
Bertha stood awhile as if bewildered,
and then crept into her little bed and
snuggled down amongst the fleecy blank-
ets. Her hands and feet were cold, but
her heart was warm.
"Those beautiful, good little frost-
fairies!" said she to herself. "How
strange that they should think that those
little things that I did were worth notic-
ing, and should love me for them !"
The next thing the little girl knew, it
was broad daylight, and her mother was
standing by her bedside with a very
bright smile upon her face.
"The snow has not gone, darling,"
said she; "it is only coated with ice, so
that you can slide all the better. Jump
up and see how beautiful the frost-work





BERTHA AND THE FROST-FAIRIES. 35

is upon your windows; the garden looks
as if the fairies had been at wprk cover-
ing everything with a casing of crystal! "
"So they have! exclaimed Bertha;
and, while her mother was helping her
dress, she told her about the visit of the
frost-fairies.
A beautiful dream !" said the mother;
and, kissing the rosy lips of her darling,
they went, hand in hand, down into the
warm, pleasant breakfhst-room. 'There
the pretty frost-pictures had already melted
from the windows, making, however, the
beautiful vision beyond more clearly visi-
ble to the admiring eyes of Bertha and
her mother.
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THE TWO FRIENDS.-


OTHER !" exclaimed
little Katie, burst-
ing into the parlor,
and coloring with ex-
citement. "-See what
I've got in my apron !
It's a bird, -a dar-
---.-.. ling little bird; but
there's sonicthing the matter with it, for it
can't st;md a bitI"
"Poor little thing!" said the mother,
as she examined the bird. "I think its
leg must be hurt in some way; perhaps it
is broken."
37





38 THE TWO FRIENDS.

"I shouldn't wonder if it had been
shot," said Katie, for I found ever so
many feathers on the grass where the
robin was lying, and there were drops of
blood on them.
"How cruel continued she, smoothing
the ruffled plumage of the wounded bird
caressingly. How very cruel and wicked
to try to kill such a beautiful creature as
a bird! But, mother, what can we do
with the dear birdie now? ,Don't you
suppose its little leg can be mended in
some way ?"
I will see," said the kind mother, smil-
ing.
So she took several little pieces of
wood and tied them carefully around the
injured leg.
"What is that for?" asked Katie.
"To keep the parts of the broken leg in





















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THE TWO FRIENDS. 41

place, so that they will have a chance to
become joined," said the mother.
Katie watched all her movements with
great interest.
"I think its wing must be hurt," said
the mother, "for it does not attempt to
fly; so we will make it a soft bed of cotton,
and let it lie still until it has quite re-
covered."
And may I take my pretty little
Indian basket to put the birdie in?" said
Katie, eagerly.
"Yes," answered the mother, "it will
make a charming little nest for the poor
robin."
Katie ran to get her little basket, and,
after lining it with soft cotton, she put the
robin tenderly into it.
Just then, Pinkie, Katie's little pet
kitten, came into the room, and jumped





42 THE TWO FRIENDS.

up into the lap of her little mistress, to see
what she was doing.
"Take care, Katie," said the mother;
"Pinkie may take it into her head to run
off with your poor bird, before you think
of it."
"I hope not," said Katie, "for I am
going to teach them to be good friends."
See here, Pinkie," continued she, hold-
ing the kitten tightly in her arms, how-
ever, as she spoke, "see this darling little
robin."
Pinkie gave a little purr of satisfaction.
"Poor robin said the little girl.
"Pinkie must not touch the robin, no,
no! "
Pinkie looked up into the face of ier
mistress and winked, as much as, to
say:-























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THE TWO FRIENDS. 45

"Never fear I'll not hurt the birdie, -
not I."
Pinkie and the robin grew to be the
best of friends. At first Katie did not
dare to trust them together alone; but as
day after day passed on, and she saw that
the kitty did not offer to touch the bird,
she began to have less fear.
When the robin was able to hop about
the room, they seemed to be fond of being.
near each other. They would pick up.
crumbs together and even drink from the
same dish.
Many of Katie's little mates used to
come in to see these two good friends,
who seemed to take so much comfort in
each other's society.
It was the funniest sight of all to see
the robin hop upon the kitty's back, and
keep in her place while she walked around





46 THE TWO FRIENDS.

the room. Then Katie would clap her
hands and call every one in the house to
come and see the birdie "riding horse-
back."
At last the robin became so well that
it could fly all about the house; and one
day, after singing a sweet song, it flew
away and Katie never saw it again.
She could not help shedding tears at the
loss of her favorite ; but when her mother
told her how much happier the bird would
be in the open air and sunshine, she tried
to be comforted.
SDon't you suppose the dear robin was
thanking us for our care and love, when
it sang so sweetly? asked she.
"I have no doubt of it," said the
mother, "and that it was, in its own sweet
way, saying good-by."







-Icii


)`


~















LITTLE ALICE.




UNTIE has
I brought little Nel-
i lie into the par-
lor to look at the
d tiny form of her
baby sister Alice,
Slaying in the rose-
wood casket, "Downy-cushioned, satin-
lined," with sweet flowers heaped upon
it.
The child does not understand why the
baby is there instead of in her little
4 49





50 LITTLE ALICE.

cradle. She asks why she is so white,
and why she does not move her little
hands, or open her eyes.
Auntie tells her that only the baby's
little form is there, but that the real baby
that they loved has gone to live with the
good Father who had lent her to them a
little while.
Nellie cannot understand this, for she
is yet too young to know the meaning of
all her kind auntie's words; but the sun-
shine streaming in at the window, the
flowers, the pretty casket, and the sweet
little baby forta in its dainty white, dress,
all make a very pleasant impression upon
her mind.
She does not know why the tears drop
from her auntie's eyes as she 'presses her
to her heart, and still less can she under-
stand why the pale lips of the dear mother





LITTLE ALICE. 51

in the next room tremble as they try to
say, Thy will be done. "
Soon her auntie takes her into her
mother's room, and, holding the child in
her lap, she reads from the Songs for
the Little Ones at Home," this sweet poem,
which seems as if made on purpose for
them :-

"LITTLE ALICE.

"Dear little babe, she has gone to rest,
Where never a sin shall stain her breast,
No trouble disturb her, no fear annoy,
No cloud o'ershadow her innocent joy.
She has gone home to heaven, that land of love,
Of light and gladness and blessing above:
Her head is pillowed on Jesus' breast;
Dear little babe, she is sweetly at rest.

"She lived on earth but a little while,-
She died before we had seen her smile;
But she was our sister, and is so still;
Sweet Alice we called her, and always will.






52 LITTLE ALICE.

We think we are glad she has gone away
Where her life will be all one pleasant day,
Where an unkind word she will ne'er receive,
Nor speak one herself our kind hearts to grieve.

"If she were here, she would often cry,
And then she'd be sick, and suffer, and die;
But now death is over, and all the while
Her cherub face may'wear a smile;
For she never will know or do what is wrong,
And the loving angels will teach her their song:
Dear sister, we wish we could be there too,-
Oh, when shall we come and live with you?"












ROSES.




HOSE blessed
little rose-spir-
its How they
flew about as
soon as bright
;' summer came,
awakening the
buds, and filling their hearts with fra-
grance
The first to come was a band of cheerful
little things, who flitted around clapping
their hards so loudly that the rose-buds
53





54 ROSES.

waked up and peeped out to see what the
matter was.
In the morning the little children 'came
out to play, but they paused in wonder,
and then danced about right merrily,
exclaiming: -
"Look! look the cinnamon roses have
come! "
Who that saw them could mistake
those timid ones, the rose-hue of whose
cheeks deepened with every new emotion,
for others than the spirits of the blush
roses?
Some awakened the buds by a laugh,
and when the red roses saw the dimpled
cheeks of their guardians, they too laughed
by the road-sides and in the gardens.
Ah! who could help, knowing that the
coming little burgundies and Scotch roses









If







r. -.











I, _-_
E~I~f~--I -..~-'

~~; -.1








4 B ?'








ROSES. 57

had been kissed open by the little sylphs
who loved them so well?
Then, too, there were dignified ones
among them, and the queen of the prairie
and the damask rose reared their forms
most proudly beneath their teachings.
Some, with wavy, golden tresses, called
forth the yellow roses, while others fled
far away into the dim woods and among
the green meadows; and, while they
smiled, myriads of wild roses burst forth.
There were spirits who wept. Their
tears fell upon the buds as they sadly
called them forth, and the "mourning
ro3es" slowly unfolded, with gloomy
shadows over them.
One band of little darlings, with hearts
of love, were so very grateful, because
they were happy, that they sought out
some poor, little, thorny bushes and




58 oses.

poured a shower of blessings all over
them, so that beautiful little roses peeped
out with breath so sweet that every one
who passed-blessed the sweet briar.
Very beautiful were the spirits of the
moss roses; some with glowing cheeks,
and others so fair and delicate,, and the
flowers that they called into blossom with
their simple adorning of fairy-like moss
were fairest of the fair."
But the tenderest and holiest of all
were the spirits of the white roses, who
laid their hand gently upon the buds, and
'gazed lovingly upon the delicate blossoms
slowly unfolding beneath their smiles.
How earnestly those spirits of love and
beauty tried to do good That is why
they flew around so busily, leaving a
vision of beauty wherever they went, un-





ROSES. 59

til earth seemed like one vast flower-gar-
den.
Let us, too, try to call into life sweet
flowers of love, truth, and purity; so that
wherever we go all things shall be bright-
er and better that our steps have passed
that way.


























---- y I I l II
"I II I '1'


2 ._____I:









8': ~ i I,-~ 'J~L















THE LITTLE SEAMSTRESS.





OW I must sit still like a good
little girl,
And not mind the kitten at
all,
Although she is frisking so
gayly around,
And rolling my new rubber
ball.


I'll pay no attention to Fido, who stands
Close by-me, as if he would say,
" Come, come, little mistress, put down that
dull work,
Let us run in the garden and play."
61





62 THE LITTLE SEAMSTRESS.

Not even my birdie, the dear little thing,
Shall make me leave off to look up,
Although 'tis so cunning to see him hop round,
And drink from his new china cup.


I'm going to sit still and sewyup this long seam,
And thus please my darling mamma;
For to earn a sweet kiss, and a story besides,
Is better than playing, by far.

So, Fido and kittie, have patience, my dears:
To tempt me to play do not try;
Let us all be as quiet and good as we can,
And a frolic we'll have by and by.





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