• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Tiny Tab and her cousins
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054751/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tiny Tab and her cousins
Physical Description: I v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Beard, James Carter, 1837-1913 ( Illustrator )
Francis, J. G ( Joseph Greene ), 1849-1930 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Co.,
D. Lothrop Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1886
Copyright Date: 1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations by J. Carter Beard and J. G. Francis.
General Note: Includes prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054751
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALG5313
alephbibnum - 002225041
oclc - 67293132

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Page 53
Full Text






















The ways of amusing baby are numberless; but the
best of them all is the old one-mother-talk.
What shall she talk about? The pictures and stories
of Babyland. Look at these pictures, for instance.
'.B "* f They have got to be explained, of course; but that is
what they are for, to give the mother something to
0 talk about.
o But, remember, baby hasn't got used to the pace of
this quick world. Give him time. He couldn't find
out for himself what a story there is in one of these
Simple pictures. There is the mother cat in her rock-
S ing-chair with her steaming cup of tea and the kittens
1P playing blind-fold. How happy they are!
L---- Send five cents to D. Lothrop Company, Boston,
S- for a copy-of Babyland.




--,





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The Baldwin Library

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An Oyster Catcher.

These are some of the pictures in MiI! Land and and there is nothing in it that isn't borne out by
Water Friends, a book of which the author says: it the learning of learned men.
-was written with tilhe hope of interesting boys and 1). Lothrop Company, Boston, publish it; book-
girls in the wonderful little neighbors around them; sellers have it, of course.











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___________ '* il lB Snapping Turtle.
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TINY TAB AND HER FRIENDS



























BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS

















































COPYRIGHT, 1886,
BY
D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.








































































--71








J7 ~



THY IR- U-AV!- TETH LOE









WHERE TI-NY TAB WAS FOUND.

Jan-et was go-ing home from dar-ling," said Jan-et, stoop-ing,
grand-pa's. It was cold, and Such a lit-tle ti-ny Tab !"
she went with a hop-skip and a Two soft, pink eyes looked
trip. It was just a mile from up, a lit-tle white back arched
the red house on grand-pa's to meet her hand, and then,
hill to the white house on pa- what do you think ? Why,
pa's hill, and half-way there that kit-ty jumped right up-on
was a piece of woods, where Jan-et's muff and stood there;
Jan-et knew ev-er-y leaf-y hol- and when Jan-et rose up to
low, and where there were go on she stayed right on the
al-ways man-y squir-rels. It muff.
was grow-ing dark fast, but she "Oh, you dear lit-tle Tab,"
stopped and called: Gone to said Jan-et to her ; some boy
bed in there, squir-ries ?" has brought you here and
No squir-rel called back. thrown you a-way But you
In-stead, some-bod-y or some- shall go home with me."
thing an-swer-ed: Kit-ty seemed to know. She
Mew! mew-mew!" sat down on the muff and rode
"Why!" said Jan-et, "that's a-long, pur-ring sweet thanks.
a kit-ty!" And yes," purred she, it
So it was; a soft, white lit- was a boy! No girl ev-er car-
tie crea-ture came press-ing ried a kit-ty off and threw her
through the fence and out to away-now, did she?"
the road. "Why, you lit-tle "No," said Jan-et, "nev-er!"


































































































TI-NY TAB RIDES HOME ON THE MUFF.








THE SPOT-TED KIT-TENS.

I went to grand-pa's barn to hunt for eggs the oth-er day,
And what do you guess I found ly-ing cud-dled in the hay'
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens -such ti-ny, dar-ling kit-tens!
The dear-est lit-tle kit-tens that you ev-er saw at play.

They scampered and they capered, rolled and rolled a-round!
They pulled each other's tails and they tumbled on the ground
Oh! the jol-ly, jol-ly kit-tens- the mer-ry mites of kit-tens-
Such rol-lick-ing and frol-ick-ing! the like was nev-er found

I laughed, and I laughed a-gain, and still I laughed with glee
For grand-pa said: "I don't know what to do, with three
So you shall have a kit-ten, which-ev-er lit-tle kit-ten
You choose, when they are big e-nough to take a-way, you see'

Which would you choose ? There's one as shi-ny black as je
With his rogu-ish lit-tle eyes, and spots of buff -a pret-ty pe:
He's a fris-ky lit-tle kit-ten--a sau-cy, cun-ning kit-ten,
I like the black-buff kit-ten-but I haven't cho-sen yet.

For there's a lit-tle gray thing with soft and silk-y fur,
I hugged her in my arms and she nev-er tried to stir,
And she is spot-ty too-a beau-ty of a kit-ten,
Such a co-sey lit-tle kit-ten and you ought to hear her purr!





















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HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.
But when you see the third one you can-not help but know
How hard it is to choose when I love the oth-ers so,
She's the sweet-est lit-tle kit-ten--the down-i-est of kit-tens,
And her dain-ty tor-toise fur is flaked with soft-est snow,

What shall I do a-bout it? I can-not choose, you see!
Which-ev-er one I take I can-not let the oth-ers be!
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens, the bon-ny, bon-ny kit-tens!
Oh! grand-pa dear, now couldn't you give them all to me?





HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

Jet has had a good din- squash pie. Up he jumps,
ner, chick-en and tur-key both, and-ah! slip! splash! Is
and gra-vy. But Jet is a bad this scared, wet, white lit-tie
lit-tie peep-cat. He wish-es ob-ject, spring-ing for thb
he could know what is in cel-lar-door is this Jet
that dish. He hopes it is Yes, this is Jet.





JET'S AD-YVEN-TUKE 1N THE PAN-T'IY.








N EL-LIE'S CATS.

Nel-lie loves cats. She has ers how to scratch at the
eight. She is a-wak-ened each win-dow.
morn-ing by a gen-tle scratch- James is the high-mind-ed cat.
ing at the win-dow, that grows He sits on the dic-tion-a-ry on
to be a big scratch and a
loud me-ow if she doesn't an-
swer.
It is fun-ny to see four of
.-.7 77' :..:,, *. 7 7 -77
them sit-ting on the win-dow- .* '-I
sill, and four on the rail-
ing of the porch a-wait-ing a '-
re-ply to that scratch.
When Nel-lie o-pens the k
win-dow they all bounce in --- .
pell-mell, and race o-ver the
bed and play hide-and-seek be- -1
hind the pil-lows. I '
These cats are named Eliz-
a-beth, Liz-zie, Bet-sey and
AT NEL-LIE'S WVIN-DOW.
Bess, James, Jim-mie, Jam-sie
and Jim, aft-er Nel-lie's pa-pa top of the book-rack and some-
and mam-ma. times on the man-tel. But he is
Eliz-a-beth is the lead-er in care-ful not to whisk his tail
mis-chief. She taught the oth- and break the or-na-ments.









PAINT-ER PE-TER-KIN'S CATS.

Great beau-ties, great rogues door a-jar and the five rogues
too, are Paint-er Pe-ter-kin's stepped in, and the mam-ma-
five cats. Paint-er Pe-ter-kin cat rogue sat down and saw
tries to keep them out of his four kit-ten rogues climb and



















GREAT BEAU-TIES AND GREAT ROGUES.

stu-dio, where he has a great whisk, and claw, and do things
ma-ny things that tip o-ver six-teen naugh-ty paws -
ea-sy and run out and spoil. do-ing things, with brush-es
But one day he left the and bot-tles and paints.



N








PINK-IE SUP-POS-ES.

When I run out in the snow,
: S'po-sin' I should have to go
'Out no shoes,
'Out no hat,
Like my lit-tle pus-sy-cat!
TITS IB PINK-IE'S CAT.

S'pos-in' I should say meow,
'Stead of talk-ing 's I do now,
'Out no play-things
'Cept a ball,
'Cept a spool, or-that's all.

S'pose my dress was on-ly fur,
And I al-ways had to purr,
And had claws
To catch mice-
I don't think wouldd be real
nice!
THIS IS PINK-IE.

S'pose I was a tru-ly cat
Ly-ing on the kitch-en mat,
'Out no crib
White and pret-ty,
Who d' you s'pose would feed that kit-ty?








THREE DREAMS.

Oft-en when Cat Silk-y-soft like mam-ma's dreams, they
and her daugh-ter-cats woke are al-ways fun-ny."
So mam-ma told
first, and it was
fun-ny, as us-u-al.
"I dreamed," said
she, "that I was
a great com-mon
black cat, and that
I lived up in an
at-tic, and that e




CAT SILK-Y-SOFT AN: -T'i .

in the morn-inim thcvy \OUl
tell each oth-er their dr eaIms
for cats are great dream- ,
ers. So the oth-elr morn- -
ing, Let's tell dreams," said
Pet.
Let's," said Prink, "and er-y day at noon I put on a
mam-ma shall tell first, for I blue cra-vat and gave amn ice-
for ats re ,_.,ent drea "












































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THE KIT-TEN THAT SAT UP To SUP-PER.






THREE DREAMS.

cream lunch to You vain
eight rats!" puss! /iat' Il
T/'a'/ nev- nev-er come to
er come to pass, pass, aid
mam-ma, said mam-ma.
Prink. And "And I,"said
"Prink went V Pet, gig-gling
on, I dream- right out, "w
ed I was grown dream-e I wa
up, and was a an old danc-ing
great beau-ty, mas-ter, and the
and a paint-er chil-dren here
paint-ed me, PRINK'S DREAM. had to take les-
and I was hung in the pict-ure sons of me and did-n't I
store in a most el-e-gant frame, pay them out for mak-ing
with the most el-e-gant rib- me stand on my hind paws
bons and gold-en tas-sels." yes-ter-day-yes, I did!"












PET'S DREAM.























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GRAND-PA'S VAL-EN-TINE.

Grand-pa's ver-y least lit-tle room on St. Val-en-tine's morn-
grand-daugh-ter was a ver-y ing, and she said: "There is
pret-ty child, but she was a a love-ly val-en-tine for you
ver-y self-ish one, too. Her down-stairs, dear. If you are
nurs-es did not like her, and good, and dress quick-ly, you
her mam-ma did not know may see it be-fore break-fast;
what to do with her. Grand- but not if you are naugh-ty."
pa said it was be-cause she Nel-ly did not wrig-gle or
was the on-ly pet-ted creat-ure kick e-ven once while Ma-ry
in the house; be-cause ev-er-y- but-toned her boots, did not run
thing dain-ty and pret-ty was off e-ven once when the lit-tle
giv-en to her. She had all skirts went o-ver her head, held
the can-dy, all the bon-bons, all her face up sweet and qui-et
the love and kiss-es. Grand- to be washed, stood still to be
pa said she ought to have some brushed, and have her col-lar
pets, some-thing small-er than pinned, and then a-way she
her-self to care for, and to be tripped down-stairs.
kind to. Mam-ma o-pened the par-lor
On St. Val-en-tine's Day, door.
grand-pa sent Nel-ly a fun-ny "Run in," she said, "and
val-en-tine, and she was to have see your val-en-tine."
it for hers just as long as she Nel-ly looked all a-round,
took good care of it. So mam- but she saw noth-ing new.
ma came up in-to Nel-ly's "Why," said mam-ma, "I






GRAND-PA S VAL-EN-TINE.

left her here-where is she?" ad-vice-not to catch birds,
She?" said Nel-ly. And and not to growl and spit at
then she laughed and ran to oth-er cats, but to share her
the big chair in the cor-ner, and sau-cer of cream and her chick-
mam-ma ran af-ter her, laugh-
ing too. There was grand-
pa's val-en-tine a trick-sy lit- --
tie pus-sy-cat; and she had crept -
in-to mam-ma's muff, and there
she sat, her soft lit-tle head .
peep-ing out, and pur-ring '
sweet-ly. <..
And did this kit-ty make :
Nel-ly a good lit-tle girl?
Well, I think her in-flu-ence
was what grand-pa ex-pect-ed,
for Nel-ly was ver-y kind and
po-lite to her cat, brushed her,
and fed her, and let her in
and out, and spoke soft-ly EL-LY AD-VIS-E~ HER CAT.
and kind-ly, and kit-ty went en bones with those oth-er cats,
ev-ei -y-where with her, e-ven and nev-er, nev-er to mew to be
to church one day, and in-to served first at ta-ble-and this
the coun-try when the fam-i-ly ad-vice could have come on-ly
weni; and Nel-ly has been from a good, thought-ful lit-
hear I to give her much good tie girl.








THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

One time Fan and Fay a-bout as loud as a pin.
al-most did-n't have a-ny They harked a min-ute.
Christ-mas. They did be-fore
night, though; but they would-. S-
n't if it had-n't been for a
lit-tle stray kit-ty. You see
San-ta Claus was to send
pres-ents by pa-pa, and pa-pa's -:- : 9
train was snowed in, and there WORK-BASK-ET PLAY.
would-n't have been any-thing Then they heard it a-gain,
but just as wee and fine as if a fair-y
rai-sins if were there. They looked at
.i. t had-n't each oth-er there was some.
been for thing so live in the sound they
,' .,, ;l that kit- did-n't dare go to the door.
,. ty-cat. Mew!" said a small voice;
It was and this time there was a
Sa- b o u t great deal of scratch-ing, at
noon,and least two lit-tle feet. They
P--R-THINS P. they were ran to the door, and in
look-ing out at the storm, pranced a jet-black kit-ten.
big, cold tears.run-ning down She shook the snow off with
their nos-es, when they a jerk, sneezed, looked all
heard a scratch on the door, a-round with two great, bright,


















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THAT/ JO, L i' 'MAR C S'HAS N FR ''T O HU E


THAT JOL-LY KCIT MA~DE CHRIST-MIAS E-NOUGHI FOR TWO HOUS-ES.






THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.

gold-green eyes for a sau-cer she was no com-mon kit, bu
of milk, purred, and then rub- a true Christ-mas-pres-enj
bed her head a-gainst Fay. cat, left there a-pur-pose whe'
No more big cold tears! San-ta Claus drove by witi
that jol-ly kit made Christ- the rein-deer sleigh; but, C
mas e-nough for two houses she was too sweet to de-scri'
She knew all a-bout work- at all when by-and-by in tl.
bask-et play, and spool-of- soft, snowy, fire-lit twi-light sh
thread play, and tip-o-ver- crept up in-to their laps, au
things play, and chase-her-tail purred and went to slee
play, and roll-a-ball play-- while Fan and Fay sang 10o
there could be no doubt that kit-ty-bye-lows.





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ATEPTUR TAKNG K TYS PICTURE.-


SLATE PICT-URE.-TAK-ING KIT-TY'S PICT-URE.








THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.

It was Peg-gy's came in with a kit-ten in her
work to hunt the mouth; soon she came a-gain
eggs. But the with an-oth-er; then with an-
WhiteHenwould oth-er; but she seemed un-eas-y
al-ways have her and Peg-gy saw her go un-der
nest un-der the the porch, and heard her mew.
porch, and that .
made it hard for
PrG-GY. her, for she had
to lie down flat and crawl in.
One night af-ter school, she
found the White Hen on the
nest, and ver-y cross in-deed.
She tried to shoo her off, but
she would not move. So she
pushed her a lit-tle and then she
saw-not a plump white egg,
but the soft, fur-ry heads of two
lit-tie black kit-tens; and they
both said Mew! to Peg-gy.
But the White Hen was cross HOW FUN-NY SHE LOOKED!
and pecked, and Peg-gy had to The next morn-ing, Peg-gy
come out and leave her. took a stick and crept un-der
That same night Tab-by the porch. She made the White





THE WHITE HEN AND HER 'ETTS.
Hen step off her nest, and there crumbs with her bill and
were two more kit-tens. called the kit-tens to eat, as
Peg-gy gave Tab-by a nice if they were chick-ens, and if
box on the porch, but in a few Tab-by tried to come near
min-utes the White Hen came she made her-self as big as
up, cluck-ing as loud as she two hens and drove her a-way;I
could, and sat down by the and when she nes-tled the kit-
box, and when the kit-tens tens up in her feath-ers, howl
mewed she would cluck. fun-ny she did look! Then
Peg-gy put some crumbs on Peg-gy had to car-ry them?
the floor to see what she where the White Hen could!
would do; and she broke the not come.















CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-THE FIRST LES-SON.









A THANKS-GIV-ING GIFT.

giv-ing gift
from Grand-
ma ? You nev-
er could guess.
It was a bas-ket
of French kit-
tens. T h e y
reached the lit-
tle Greys' home
just in time for
-" ,the great din-
ner.
"French
.cats!" said
_4 _Dick, "we can
nev-er un-der-
stand them or
they us!"
But they
found their
What think you came to pret-ty pet kit-ties mewed in
,the lit-tie Greys all the way A-mer-i-can, and knew ev-er-y
o-ver the o-cean as a thanks- trick A-mer-ican cats play.








HOW DAI-SY GOT HER WISH.
Dai-sy had three kit-tens its black-and-green striped
Puff, who was cream-col-ored, dam-ask cov-er, and the dia.
Beau-ty, drab, and Midge mond-shaped ti-dy on the back,
gold-col-ored -three new, lit- made in crim-son-and-white
tie, sleep-y, hap-py kit-tens. checks.
I wish my kit-ties had And what do you think?
some stock-ings!" Dai-sy said There were the kit-tens, all
to her aunt-ie the day be-fore three, in new sat-in neck-rib-
Christ-mas. bons tied in beau-ti-ful bows
"Their feet are not cold," on the back!
said aunt-ie. "They are all Lit-tle cream-col-ored Puff's
cov-ered with soft fur." was scar-let; drab Beau-ty's
But to hang up, you was pink; and gold-col-ored
know," said Dai-sy. "San-ta Midge's was blue 0, so
Claus might bring them some ver-y be-com-ing!
neck-rib-bons." "San-ta Claus must have
Dai-sy's own stock-ing was been ver-y near when I wished
brim-ful of pres-ents the next that wish to aunt-ie," thought;
morn-ing, and they were so Dai-sy. "And O, what good
very pret-ty, that she nev-er taste he has !" she ad-ded
thought of her kit-tens till as she looked a-gain at the
near noon. gay lit-tle pus-sies. "I shouliJ
She found them all a-sleep like to have him pick out .i,
in grand-ma's easy-chair with next new dress, I think."

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DAI-SY'S KIT-TENS AND T EIR, HR ,IST-MAS ( ;1FTS .
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SNOW-BALL'S EX-PE-RI-ENCE.
Snow-ball is a ver-y young more on her lit-tle soft paw.
kit-ten in-deed. She has lived Be-fore she could find out what
just one sum-mer. She is fond it was, ex-cept that it was white
of the sun-shine. She curls and cold, it was gone, and her
her-self up on the pi-az-za fur was wet where it had been,
where the sun shines warm Then she looked up and saw
and sleeps for hours. She that the air was full of these
likes rain-y days, too, for then queer lit-tle things which were
she climbs up to the top of so cold and wet and white, and
the wood-pile un-der the shed, that they were fall-ing ev-er-y.
where it is warm and dry, where. So she grew ver-y
and sleeps for hours more. much fright-ened and ran home
But the oth-er day some- as fast as she could.
thing hap-pened to Snow-ball. "Mew! mew! dear moth.
She was out walk-ing and er," she cried, what is it that
found it ver-y cold. She was is com-ing down from the sky
think-ing that she had bet-ter and that makes me so cold?"
run home, when she felt some- Why, you fool-ish kit-ten,"
thing cold hit her on the nose. said the wise old moth-er-cat,
She lift-ed her head quick-ly, tak-ing off her spec-ta-cles,
to see what it was, and some- "don't you know thatit is sow ?"
thing else, ver-y cold, flew Snow-ball looked out of tlli
right in-to her eye. When she win-dow. I don't think I
winked that off she found one like SNOW," she said.






















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WHAT'S THIS SO COLD ON MY PA\V? SAID SNOW BALL.








OUT-WIT-TED.
Three lit-tle tab-by-coats all in a row,
Moth-er Puss loves them, this I know;
Pet nam-ed them Pearl-y, Fred and Dick--
Nice lit-tle tab-by-coats, so smooth and slick!
"You can't keep them," broth-er Ned said,
Fold-ing his arms, and shak-ing his head;
SOur fish they'd catch, our birds they'd kill,
I'll find them a place by the old red mill!"
In-to his lap, lit-tle Pet climbed,
Round his neck her chub-by arms twined,
But coax-ing was vain, though a close em-brace
Drew the ro-sy mouth to her broth-er's face.
Ned was gone, on-ly Pet and Puss,
To guard the dar-lings, but now, for-sooth!
Where should they go, to be safe from harm -
Up-stairs, down-stairs, or in the big barn ?
No trace of tab-by-coats, in-doors or out;
Moth-er Puss stares at this bust-ling a-bout;
Pet smiles de-mure-ly when none can see,
Whis-pers No-bod-y knows, Tab, but you and me!"
Mam-ma found in her hat-box three fun-ny things,
All curled up in soft, wool-ly rings;
Called, "Pet, Pet! Oh look! oh do!"
Laugh-ing, she said: "Tab lugged one, and I lugged two!"














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AB LUGGED ON, AND I LUGGED TWO.""
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JUMPER'S STRANGE FISH.

Jumper is Willie Watson's little for rats and mice, as cats usually
white cat. do.
The house where Willie and Jum- When she is hungry Jumper goes
per live is near a large stream of to the stream to catch a fish.
water. Jumper takes her seat among some
Cats do not like to wet their stones near a still place in the stream,
feet. where a great many little fish swim
They will ever step in the water by.
if they can help it. When one comes near, Jumper
For this reason, you might doubt snatches it out of the water with her
what I am going to tell you about paw.
Jumper. Then she takes it in her teeth and
But every word of this story is runs into the house with it.
true. But one day Jumper made a mis-
Little white Jumper does not hunt take in her fishing.
Catsdo ot:lik to et:ther sonesnea a til plae i th stea;
feet whee agrea may litlefishsw/






JUMPER S STRANGE FISH.

A man had left a basket on the Oh! how mad Jumper was then!
stones and gone away. She jumped, and she mewed.
She tried hard to shake off the
ugly creature.
.. But she could not get away from
it until Willie came and helped
.- : her.
."- He opened the close-shut claws
S ' of the crab.
Then how fast little white Jumper
-, ran off !
-1 Her paw was hurt so badly that
she was quite lame for many days.
. *" Still Jumper often goes fishing.


JUMPER.

There were crabs in the basket. \ -'
Jumper looked at the crabs.
She thought they were very ..'
strange fish. L
But they looked good.
They smelled good.
At last she pulled one out of the
basket.
Jumper felt very proud of such
a large fish.
She dragged the crab to the house JUMPER AND THE STRANGE FISH.
to show to Willie. But she never looks for fish in
But, as she was playing with it, baskets now.
the crab caught hold of her paw.






A LES-SON IN MAN-NERS.
S' THE moth-er-cat rose up out of her
S '. '' sleep;
,'. '. She called to her kit-tens, so shrill and
S deep
-'- That in they pranced, all three in a heap.
^,T '. '" Kit-tens!" said she, in a tone so grave
That each lit-tle tail for-got to wave,
\. "" It's time I taught you how to be-have.
S-; All el-e-gant cats mind cer-tain laws-
--- -- Know va-ri-ous styles of hold-ing paws,
.- 4 And dain-ty ways to man-age claws.
S~ "'' I Nice well-bred kit-tens walk side by
side
Be-hind their moth-er, with gen-tle
glide -
S, Not scam-per and roll and hop and
,hide.
'", I wish you to learn to give a paw
"- : With a soft and el-e-gant me-aw z
And the sweet-est smile one ev-er saw.
t"" And a bow-a real-ly grace-ful bow
SIs what few cats ev-er learn how
S '_, To make- I'll train you my-self. See
8 now-
S Not a nod -but slow and deep-th/is
way-
Bra-vo, my beau-ti-ful dears! Go play !"
Three whisks and a whirl! off and a-way!
No mrre Be-hav-ing hur-rah! to-day !














































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AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

BY E. F. P.

GRAND-PA and Grand-ma this lit-tle brown mouse had
Hall lived all a-lone. nev-er ev-en heard of a cat!
They had chick nor child, But one day the lit-tk grand.
not ev-en a cat; and they didn't daugh-ter, Beth, came to live
know there was e-ven so much with Grand-pa and Grand-
as a mouse in the house. ma Hall. She brought all
But there was one, a lit-tle her birds and her dols, and,
fel-low with the lov-li-est brown a-las, all her cats; and the ver-y
fur, that lived all by him-self first night the cats there were
be-hind the win-dow cur-tain in four of them -came trbop-img
the par-lor. He al-ways had had in-to the par-lor, and be-'ore he
good time and al-ways ex-pect- could wink or think or ev-en
ed to; for you must know that hold up his lit-tle pink aws in


/






AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.
as-ton-ish-ment, they had Mr. qui-et-ly. Not so her three
Mouse stand-ing up be-fore bois-ter-ous sons.
them. All he could do was to "0 please not to!" said the
hold up his paws and say, lit-tle brown mouse a-gain.
"Please, lease not to !" "Shall!" said Mid-night.
Old Mis-tress Cat looked on "Will!" said Spot-ty.



















0, PLEASE NOT TO!
Must!" said Snow-flake. as it was her mouse it wouldn't
"That's what mice are for!" be po-lite. Be that as may,
And then well bless her Mous-ie ran out the o-pen door
heart! grand-ma ap-peared, and was nev-er seen or heard
and the cats looked a-round of a-gain-not by lit-tle Beth's
nd fer-hats they thought that cats at least.










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THE ..RAT L H-^ I. TE. T.. TH CAT CAC-. T i .
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TAK-ING THE FAM-I-LY OUT TO RIDE.













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THE RAT SKETCH-ING THE CATS. THE CATS CATCH-ING THE RAT.








THE HIS-TO-RY OF NAN-CY LEE.

BY A. W. A.

One time there was a lit-tie own lit-tie coat be-fore, for her
black kit-ten named Nan-cy moth-er had al-ways done it for
Lee. Nan-cy was-n't want-ed her; but she was do-ing the
where she lived, best she could, when a-long
The cook was a big cross came a big dog. And what do
wom-an, who said she "did-n't you think he did ?
want that good-for-noth-ing kit- Just as Nan-cy was go-ing up
ten a-round un-der her feet." to him to ask him to let her
So she picked up a broom warm her-self by him, he
and scat-ted Nan-cy Lee out o-pened his big mouth and said,
doors. B-r-r-r-r! bow wow!"
The poor kit-ten cried a-loud Oh! how Nan-cy Lee did
" Me-A-ow! But that did-n't run !
dry her soft fur. She was so Next she saw a large red
fright-ened that she hid a-mong cow. This cow was walk-ing
the bush-es for a long time. a-long the road eat-ing grass.
Af-ter a while she raised her The cow looked so nice and
head and looked a-round for a kind that Nan-cy ran and sat
friend. But she saw on-ly a big down right un-der her.
black bee-tle. The cow did-n't drive her
Then she jumped into the a-way, nor say "scat! nor
road, and sat down on the grass "bow! wow!" but still she was
to smooth out her wet fur. walk-ing a-long a lit-tle bit at a
She had nev-er washed her time, and the kit-ten sat so close





THE HIS-TO-RY OF NAN-CY LEE.
to her feet that she was in lit-tie pan, just big e-nough for
dan-ger. her. Nancy drank just as fast
Just then a lit-tle girl with as she could, and then had a
long yel-low hair looked out of lit-tle bit of Char-lotte Russe
the house near by. that the lit-tle girl was eat-ing.
"Oh, mam-ma!" said she, Was-n't that a fun-ny din-ner
" out there's a lit-tle black kit- for Nan-cy?
ten, sit-ting un-der a big cow. Then Miss Lee be-gan to
She looks so cold, poor thing! sing for the girl-ie. Did you
I'm afraidd the cow will step on know kit-tens could sing?
her! Look, mam-ma." She sang P-r-r-r-r" so soft-
So the la-dy looked too, and ly! The lit-tle girl laughed,
saw them. She liked kit-tens and Nan-cy stopped.
as well as her lit-tle girl, but Then the lit-tle girl said,
she did-n't want a-ny more, as Mam-ma, she looks just as if
they had three al-read-y. her name was Nan-cy Lee.
Still the lit-tle girl begged Now, kit-tie, if that's your
hard to have the kit-ten brought name, sing more, but if 'tisn't,
in, and at last the la-dy went keep still."
out and got her. The lit-tie Then the kit-ten began a-gain,
girl took her lit-tle broom and and purred and purred like
brushed her, and then she sat ev-er-y-thing, and so they called
by the warm stove and washed her Nan-cy Lee.
her rough dir-ty coat, while the Nan-cy Lee still lives in her
la-dy went out and warmed new home, and has all the new
some milk. She gave it to milk she can drink out of the
N an-cy Lee in a teen-ty, ween-ty teen-ty, ween-ty lit-tle pan.














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NAN-CY LEE SEES THE BIG BLACK BEE-TLE.










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A Moth-er's Lul-la-by.





HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!
LIT-TLE Mar-ger-y Daw, Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
who us-u-al-ly sang see-saw The mice ran up the clock!"
when she sat in her rock-ing-
chair, one day took it in-to She sang it o-ver and o-ver,
her cur-ly head to sing a new un-til, all at once, Puss, who
song. Hick-o-ry, Dick-o-ry, lay doz-ing on the win-dow-
Dock," she sang as she rocked sill, found her-self purr-ing it
to and fro; too:





HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!

" Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock! sleep-y, and Mar-ger-y's song
The mice ran up the clock!" be-gan to hum it-self in her
ears.
Well, the next thing Puss The mice-the mice-
knew she was rub-bing her mice the clock the clock
vel-vet paws in her eyes, and clock!"
wak-ing up from a nap, and All at once she sat up
Mar-ger-y gone, and noth-ing straight and rubbed her eyes.
stir-ring in the room but the Yes, they did!" she said,
rest-less sun-beams and the "they ran up the clock! I'll
tick-ing clock. She jumped have 'em I'll have 'em for
down and walked a-round the my dinner! I'll run up the
table, and mewed, and felt clock my-self!"
ver-y hun-gry. But there was She sprang light-ly on one
noth-ing on the ta-ble but the of the long weights, and-
vin-e-gar cru-et and a knife, well, look at the pict-ure, my
and so she sat down and dears, and you can see just
wait-ed. She was still rath-er what hap-pened:


WAT riAPPENED.







WHAT fAPEND

WHAT HAP-PENED,








PUT-TING KIT-TY TO BED.

BY M. E. S.

KIT-TY, Kit-ty, go to sleep, And while I rock you in my
Shut your eyes, and don't you chair,
peep, You must purr your lit-tie
Sing with me your lit-tie song, prayer.
We will not make it ver-y long. Al-tho' you say it soft and low,
'Twill all be just the same you
..-- 9 know.

-- .. .- Mam-ma makes me bend my
knee,
-. But Kit-ty dear, you can't, you
'. see,
''.-' '..For you're too lit-tie yet to try-
4.. ..;^ -;: See! I'm so big, and tall, and
S high.
;.: .'^ " . .. :

And then you can't say any
Hur-ry Kit-ty, for you see words,
Mam-ma soon will come for No more than chicks, or lit-tie
me, birds,
And I must see you safe in bed But I have heard the Bible tell
All cov-ered up ex-cept your That e-ven birds are cared for
head. well.
































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NOLL.
NOLL owns a dear pus-sy. first time Noll saw her, and
Noll is sure she is one of has nev-er worn a-ny since.
the fa-mous Three lit-tle kit- And af-ter los-ing her mit-
tens she must have lost her-self
S- for Noll found her one
spring twi-light down by the
hedge, all a-lone, cry-ing for
Usher sup-per-- that's what Noll
said the me-ows meant.
And Noll, hap-py, ten-der-
heart-ed Noll, has the gift of
know-ing what the "me-ows,"
i the "ba-ba-as," the "lmoo-oos,"
the bow-wows and the bird.
it chirps mean; and pus-sies,
.- lamb-kins, cows, dogs, bird-ies,
and e-ven wee down-y chick-ies,
Seem ver-y hap-py when she
pats them with a ten-der coo.
Noll says she has taught
pus-sy to tell her A B C's-
not as you do, but by pat-ting
i them soft-ly with her vel-vet
,aw, one at a time, as Noll
names them o-ver.
But I think Noll's chub-by
tens who lost their mit-tens "- hand must help the vel-vet
at least she had none on the paw don't you ?






















PUSSY'S CHOICE.

Pussy slept in the barn with her thought the kittens would like better.
three kittens. This place was a little girl's trun-
They had a nice hay nest. This die-bed.
hay nest was warm and soft. Do you know what a trundle-bed
is ?
Perhaps you never have seen one.
STrundle-beds are not much used
now. Long ago they were common.
Then the bedsteads for grown peo-
ple were higher than they are now.
:-/ A trundle-bedstead was like a low
: square box, with four feet.
''" It had casters fitted into its four
; feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun-
dled, under the large bed.
MARY'S pET. It staid under the large bed in the
The kittens were comfortable. daytime.
But mother Pussy was not satis- It was pulled out at night.
field. The little children slept in this
She knew about a place which she trundle-bed.






PUSSY'S CHOICE.

Mary's trundle-bed was soft. It After she had gone, something said,
had a white pillow. Mi-ew, mi-ew !"
It had a silk bed-quilt, made from That was what Mary heard. 0,
one of mamma's dresses. such a little mi-ew!
This silk bed-quilt was quilted in Mice don't mew.
little squares, like a checker-board. So it was not a mouse.
In every square there was a blue The mi-ew came from under the
flower. big bed.
Little Mary liked this silk bed- Mary pulled out the trundle-bed.
quilt very much. She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty
It was so soft and so pretty. silk quilt.
Pussy liked it too. She was al- It was a lovely white kitty, with
lowed to lie on it sometimes. black spots.
One day Pussy ran into the house. Mary ran back to the window.
She came from the barn. She had She saw pussy going straight back
something in her mouth, to the barn to get her other little
She went through the kitchen so kitties.
fast that the cook did not see what But mamma said that this couldn't
she had in her mouth, be allowed.
The cook thought pussy had caught This is what mamma sang to her
a mouse. little girl:
Pussy ran right through the kitch- Puss and her kittens
en, into the hall, and up-stairs. Must sleep in the hay;
She crept under the big bed. And the bed be kept tidy
She jumped up into the trundle- For my little May !"
bed.
She put something down on the But the first little kitty staid in
soft, silk quiltthe house. Mary tied a blue ribbon
soft, silk quilt.
around its neck, and it always was
Then she jumped out and ran Mary's pet.
down-staiMarys pet.
down-stairs.














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A CATASTROPHE.














One little black cat one little gray
rDown tumbs B rigt un hr















Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;
There go.... the kitten-cats scrambling for the door;
,,T-7 ... F*'. L _* '" "











nn little black cat, n ny little gray -





How they let the brown mouse try to run away!
Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;






Off goes the brown mouse, in among the pails!
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails!
~- ", i -. . .,

=- :~ i .. _1 -__-- :- -_-


















Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails !











KITTY IN THE CRADLE.

" I want a live baby," said Jenny one I'll fasten a pretty lace cap on your
day; head;
" A baby that knows how to frolic I'll rock you to sleep in my dolly's
and play; soft bed."



S-Then kitty purred gently, as if she
,,"1: ,'1: I would say,
.., -.,' 'I think'twould be nice to be treated
I that way;
S" --' And she tried very hard to be patient
and good,
-And let Jenny do with her just as she
S- would.
"ROCK-A-BY, BABY, OHI! ROCK-A-YBY-."

My doll can do nothing but just She lay in the cradle dressed up in
wink her eyes, a cap;
And all the day long in the drawer She soon went to sleep and had a
she lies. long nap;
While Jenny like any small mother
Come here, little kitty, I'll feed you sat nigh,
with milk; And sung, "Rock-a-by, baby, ol
I'll wrap you in dolly's best blanket rock-a-by-by."
of silk;







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