• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The mischievous monkey
 How the ape got more cakes
 How the wasp cut the ham
 How Jack paid back ill with...
 How Jack did sham to be lame
 How the cat did save the life of...
 How the cat saves the house from...
 How Flo did watch for her...
 How the bird was set free
 How the owl came to see his...
 How a bear put out a fire
 How a dog bought a bun
 How the dog stole a peach
 How the snake did dance to...
 How Ned knew who was his frien...
 How the cats had a house safe from...
 How the dogs got home
 How the ape fell from the tree
 How Fan did bear her friend in...
 The first of May
 How a bird can love its young
 Back Cover






Title: The mischievous monkey
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054740/00001
 Material Information
Title: The mischievous monkey
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Burrows, E.
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh ( Publisher )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Morrison and Gibb ( Printer )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh
E.P. Dutton & Company
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Morrison and Gibb
Publication Date: [1886?]
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "Trottie's story book," "Tuppy," etc. etc.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations by H. Weir.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054740
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223150
notis - ALG3398
oclc - 67292657

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
    The mischievous monkey
        Page 1
        Page 2
    How the ape got more cakes
        Page 3
    How the wasp cut the ham
        Page 4
    How Jack paid back ill with good
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    How Jack did sham to be lame
        Page 9
    How the cat did save the life of a child
        Page 10
        Page 11
    How the cat saves the house from being burnt down
        Page 12
        Page 13
    How Flo did watch for her friends
        Page 14
        Page 15
    How the bird was set free
        Page 16
        Page 17
    How the owl came to see his friends
        Page 18
        Page 19
    How a bear put out a fire
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    How a dog bought a bun
        Page 25
        Page 26
    How the dog stole a peach
        Page 27
        Page 28
    How the snake did dance to a tune
        Page 29
    How Ned knew who was his friends
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    How the cats had a house safe from the dogs
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    How the dogs got home
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    How the ape fell from the tree
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    How Fan did bear her friend in mind
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The first of May
        Page 52
        Page 53
    How a bird can love its young
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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THE



MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY.




BY

THE AUTHOR OF 'TROTTIE'S STORY BOOK,'
'TUPPY,' ETc. ETC.













LONDON:
GRIFFITH, FARRAN, OKEDEN & WELSH,
(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS),
WEST CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.
NEW YORK: E. P. DUTTON & CO.



















































The Rights of Translation and of Reproduction are Reserved.
























THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY.

TELL me some more of what Ned did."
"Ned did like a nice sweet cake, and one
day he put his paw in a plate of cakes when I
was not by to say, 'No, no, Ned, those cakes
are not for you.' And he took a cake and ate
it up, and he said to him-self,






HOW THE APE ATE THE CAKES.

"' That cake is nice and good, I must take
one more cake.'
And he took one more cake, and one more
cake, and one more cake, till all the cakes in
the plate were gone; and when I came in from
my walk, there was not one cake left. So I said,
'Oh, oh, Mr. Ned, this will not do; if you eat
my cakes, I will not let you come in-to the
room at all.' So the ape was sent out of the
room.
"Now, Ned did not like to be sent out of
the room, for he said, If I may not come in-to
the room, how can I get any more cakes ?' So,
by and by, he made up his mind what he would
do. And you shall hear what he did."






HOW THE APE GOT MORE CAKES.






HOW THE APE GOT MORE CAKES.

"AT that time I had a young pet el-e-phant,
whose name was Tim, and Ned was fond of
Tim, and the two would have fine games of
play. Now Tim did like a sweet cake as much
as Ned did, and when Tim came in-to my room
I gave a cake to him. When Ned found that
he might not come in-to my room he said, in
his way, to Tim,
"' Tim, I may not come in-to the room; you
may go in. Go, and get me a sweet cake.'
"'How shall I do that?' said Tim.
"' Go in,' said Ned, 'and hold out your nose,
and she will put a cake on the tip of it; then
you may come out of the room and give the
cake to me.'
So Tim came in-to the room, and Ned was






HOW THE WASP CUT THE HAM.

on the lawn; and when Ned saw that I gave
Tim a cake, Ned made a move with his paw,
and Tim ran out on the lawn, and gave the
cake to his friend."
Oh, what a sly Ned, to get a cake like that!
and what a kind good Tim to give him up his
cake!"
Yes, was not Tim kind and good ? but Ned
was sly; too sly to be good and kind like Tim."





HOW THE WASP CUT THE HAM.

LOOK, here is a wasp."
"Oh! oh! oh! I will run from it."
"No, do not run from it. Look what the
wasp has come to do. See, he has come to cut
a bit of ham to give to his young wasps at
home. See, he sits on the ham and he cuts a
bit, such a nice bit. He cuts it out as well as I






HOW JACK PAID BACK ILL WITH GOOD.

can cut it, and then he hums, as much as to
say,
"' See, what a good ham. I have cut a nice
bit for my wasps at home.'
And he takes up the bit of ham and he flies
out of the room, and he flies, flies, flies, till he
gets to his nest, and he is so glad to give the
nice bit of ham to the wasps at home."
He was a kind good wasp then ?"
"Yes, a good kind wasp. We will be glad
he cut the bit of ham to give to his wasps at
home."




HOW JACK PAID BACK ILL WITH GOOD.

SHALL I tell you of my po-ny Jack ?"
"Yes, do tell me of Jack."
Jack was a nice, kind black po-ny; and so
tame, that when I went into the field and said,
"' Come, Jack, come; come to me,'--






HOW JACK PAID BACK ILL WITH GOOD.

Jack would run from the end of the field to
me, and rub his nose on my arm, and eat a bit
of bread out of my hand. One day a child
went into the field to see Jack, and she did
pull Jack's tail. She did not think that this
would hurt Jack, but Jack did not like that
she should pull his tail, and Jack said to
him-self,
"' How shall I make the child know that I
do not like that she should pull my tail ? If I
kick hard I shall kill the child. I do not want
to kill the child. What shall I do ?'
"And so Jack did lift up his foot, and did
but just put his foot on the lip of the child,
and he did not hurt the child at all; but the
child did cry out loud as if it was hurt, and
ran off, and did not pull Jack's tail any more."
What a kind good Jack!"
"Yes, he was a kind good Jack. If he had
not been a kind good Jack the poor child might
have had a bad kick, and have been much
hurt."













































SI~I








"4'
























JACK OUT FOR A DI11V.








HOW JACK DID SHAM TO BE LAME.






HOW JACK DID SHAM TO BE LAME.

TELL me more of Jack."
"Jack was a good po-ny; but he was a sly
po-ny too. One day I was out for a ride, and
Jack fell lame, and I said, 'Oh, poor, poor Jack;
how lame you are! You must not trot if you
are lame. You must go slow, and I will go
home as soon as I can.'
"And the sly Jack was glad when I said 1
must go home, and as soon as I did turn to go
home, Jack put up his ears, and he did trot,
oh, so fast-so fast. He was not lame at all;
but he had said to him-self,
"' If I go lame, then I shall go home, and I
do not want to trot on the road. I will go
home to play in my field. I will go lame, as
lame as can be.'





HOW THE CAT DID SAVE TIlE CHILD.

"Jack was sly, and he did what was not
true. So when I saw he was not lame at all,
and could trot fast, I would not let him go
home, but he had to trot on the road to the
town where I did want to go. So he .did not
go to his field, and he got no good from his
lie at all."
"It is not good to be sly."
"No, it is not good at all to be sly. It is
best to be true."





HOW THE CAT DID SAVE THE LIFE OF A CHILD.

WHAT do you think my cat did ? "
"I do not know. What did your cat do ?"
"It did save the life of my boy."
"The cat did save the life of your boy ?"
"Yes, the cat. The cat was fond of my
boy, and my boy was fond of the cat. The





HOW THE CAT DID SAVE THE CHILD.

cat did like to go out for a walk with my boy,
and my boy did like to take the cat out for
a walk.
One day my boy went to fish in the pond,
and the cat went with him. My poor boy was
ill, and fell down in a fit. The cat ran home
fast, oh, so fast, and said to me,
'Mew-mew-mew,' and ran back down
the lawn, and then said, 'Mew-mew-mew,'
once more, as much as to say,
"' Do come! Come fast, come fast!'
"And I ran with the cat, and I saw that my
poor boy was ill, and I took my boy home, and
I was in time to save the life of my boy; but
if the cat had not run home to say,
"' Come-come fast,'
"I should not have been in time to save the
life of my poor boy. Was not my cat a good
kind cat?"
It was a good kind cat. I love that good
kind cat."















m!I








=--`;'"s~'Y -i






HOW THE CAT SAVES THE HOUSE FROM BEING
BURNT DOWN.

"Do tell me some more of your good kind
cat."






HOW THE CAT SAVES THE HOUSE.

"One day my cat ran up the stairs to the
room where my maid was, and said,
"' Mew-mew-mew,' so loud; as loud as it
could.
'"~ What can the cat want?' said my maid;
'the cat does know that she must not run up
stairs. What can the cat want?'
"So the maid went to the door, and when
the cat saw the maid, it said,
"'Mew mew mew,' more and more
loud, and ran to the top of the stairs, and
said, 'Mew-mew-mew,' just as much as
to say,
"' Come. Come as fast as you can.'
And my maid went with the cat, and when
my maid came to the room down stairs, the
stand on which she had hung some caps to
dry lay on the fire, and the caps were all on
fire. So if the cat had not run fast-so fast,
to say to the maid,
"' Come-come as fast as you can,'
"The house would have been on fire as well
B





HOW FLO DID WATCH FOR HER FRIENDS.

as the caps. Was not that a good cat to run
so fast to tell the maid ? "
"That was a good cat. I am so glad that
the cat ran so fast to tell the maid."





HOW FLO DID WATCH FOR HER FRIENDS.

"WHEN I was young I had a dog whose
name was Flo. Flo and I were great friends.
Where I went, Flo would go too, and Flo would
play with me, and walk with me, and sit by
me. All day long Flo was with me, and at
night Flo would lie down at the door of my
room.
"The house where I did live was far from
town, and three days in the week I went to
town, and did sleep in town.
"Poor Flo did not like me to go to town,
and Flo would walk up and down the hall, and






HOW FLO DID WATCH FOR HER FRIENDS.

in and out of the rooms, and cry, and say in
her way,
Where is she gone ? I do not like that
she should go. Do tell her to come back.'
Now there was one place, and but one in
the house, from which you could see the road
in the park down which a coach would come.
Flo found out this place, and on the day when
I was to come home, Flo would take her seat
at this place, and no one could make Flo move
from her seat till she saw the coach come down
the road that led up the park to the house, and
then Flo would jump down from her seat and
bark for joy, and run in-to the hall, and to the
door, and wait till the coach came up to the
door, and jump and bark and frisk for joy.
Flo was so glad to see me come home once
more.
"Was it not wise of Flo to find out the one
seat by which she might see the coach come
in-to the park ? "






IOW THE BIRD WAS SET FREE.






IIOW THE BIRD WAS SET FREE.

I HAD a bird, and the bird was in a cage.
I did love to hear the bird sing, and I took
care of the bird. But one day I said to
myself,
"' Would my bird like to be out in the air,
and to sing his songs as he sits on a tree, or
does fly up in the sky ? 1 will try. I will let
my bird free, and let him sing his songs in the
air, if he does like to do so.'
So I set my bird free, and my bird flew off,
and did sing, and did say, in his way,
"' Oh the sweet air, how I do love the sweet
air! I am a free bird. I may fly all day long
if I like.'
"The next day I was at tea, and I heard,
"' Chirp-chirp-chirp.'






HOW THE BIRD WAS SET FREE.

"' Oh, that is my bird,' said I, and I went to
look, and I saw my bird, who sat on a tree
near to me, and he did hop down and sit on
my hand, and he sang a sweet glad song, as
much as to say,
"' I am a free bird-a free bird. I do love
to be a free bird. I do love you that you did
set me free. I do fly in the air, and I do say,
I am free, I am free, I am free.'
And then my bird flew up in the air, and
I did not see my bird till the next day; and
the next day, and the next day, my bird came
when I was at my tea, and my bird sang me
the same song, and then my bird flew up, and I
have not seen my bird more.
"But I am glad that my bird loves to be
free, and to sing his joy song up in the air."




























HOW THE OWL CAME TO SEE HIS FRIENDS.

ONCE I had an owl, a white owl, and the
owl was so tame he did love to be with me.
His home was in a tree not far from my house,
and each day he came to see me.






IIOW TIE OWL CAME TO SEE HIS FRIENDS.

"An owl does not love the sun, for the owl
goes out at night-he can see best in the dark;
but my owl was so fond of me that he came to
see me in the day. It was such fun to see him
come up the walk to my house, hop-hop-
hop-hop. He did not look to the right or to
the left, but he did hop right on till he came to
me, and I gave him bits of meat, and he did
like the bits of meat, and he did make a good
meal.
"And then he would come and sit on my
desk, and he would take up a pen, and peep in
at the ink, as if he too would like to write a
note; and then he would sit on the desk and
wink at me, wink-wink--wink, so fast. It
was fine fun to see the owl sit and wink. He
did look so wise, more wise than he was. And
when he had sat a long time, he would hop
down from the desk, and hop out on the lawn,
and then he would turn to wink at me once
more, as much as to say,
"' Good-bye for this once.'






HOW A BEAR PUT OUT A FIRE.

"And then he would hop-hop-hop all
down the walk till he came to the tree, and
then he would fly up in the tree, and sit in the
tree, where he could not see the sun, and shut
his eye and go to sleep.
"I did love my white owl, and my white owl
did love me."




HOW A BEAR PUT OUT A FIRE.

SHALL I tell you a tale of a bear?"
"Yes, do tell me a tale of a bear. Is it a
true tale?"
I think it is true. Two men went to a land
where bears live. They had a long way to go,
and night came on, and there was not a house
near to them. They had to lie on the ground.
But one man said to his friend,
"' We will not go to sleep till we have made
a fire. Bears do not like the fire, they will not






















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A TORMENTED BEAR,
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A TOTIMFINThD B~I








HOW A BEAR PUT OUT A FIRE.

come near the fire. You shall sit up to take
care that the fire burns clear, and I will sleep.
Then you shall sleep, and I will sit up and see
that the fire burs clear and bright.'
So the man made up the fire, and then he
laid down to sleep; and he soon fell a-sleep.
Now, his friend sat by the fire and made the
fire bur bright, but he did want-oh, so bad
he did want-to sleep. He did try not to go
to sleep. He did look at the fire, and he did
poke the fire, but at last his head sank down
on his breast, and he fell a-sleep quite fast,
oh, as fast as a top. He had not been long
a-sleep when a bear went by that way, and
the bear did look, and he saw the two men fast
a-sleep, and he said, in his way,
"' Ah! ah there is a good meal for me. If
I can put out that fire I can make a good
meal of those two men. But how can I put
out that fire ?'
And the bear did look round, and he did
spy the sea, and he said to him-self,





HOW A BEAR PUT OUT A FIRE.

"' If I wet my coat in the sea, and come and
roll on the fire, I shall put out the fire, and then
I can have my meal.'
So the bear ran to the sea, and he did roll
in the sea till he had made his coat all wet, and
then he came to the fire and did roll on the fire,
and put out the fire; and if the man had not
woke up just as the bear put out the fire, the
bear would have made a meal of the man; but
the man woke up, and the man took his gun,
and did fire at the bear, and the bear ran
a-way. But the man did not kill the bear, for
the fire was out, and the man could not see
which way the bear did run."
Oh, I am so glad the bear did not make a
meal of the man."
So am I. It would have been sad if the
bear had made a meal of the poor man."


























HOW THE DOG BOUGHT A BUN.

"SHALL I tell you of a dog I saw to-day ?"
"Yes, do. Was he a big dog?"
"Yes, a big brown dog. He came up to me
and said, 'Bow-wow-wow;' that is to say,
'Give me a pen-ny.'





HOW THE DOG BOUGHT A BUN.

"' What will you do with it ?' said I.
"'Bow-wow-wow,' said the dog; that is
to say, I will buy a bun with it.'
"So I gave the dog the pen-ny; and I saw
the dog run to a shop, and he put down the
pen-ny and took up a bun, and then he went
and dug a hole in the ground, and put the
bun in the hole, and then he came up to me,
and did wag his tail, and say, 'Bow-wow-
wow;' that is to say, 'Give me one more
pen-ny.
"'No, no, my sly dog,' said I, 'you have got
a bun: eat the bun you have got. If you
want a bun, go, dig it up, and eat it.'
So the dog dug up the bun and ate it."
What a sly dog! Can I see that sly dog ?"
"Yes, if you come with me, you can see that
sly dog."
"May I come with you ?"
Yes, you may come."





HOW THE DOG STOLE A PEACH.






HOW THE DOG STOLE A PEACH.

HAVE you seen my ape ? "
"Yes, I have seen your ape."
"Shall I tell you what my ape did ?"
"Yes; what did he do ?"
"My ape, whose name was Ned, stole a
peach off the wall, so we put a chain on his
neck and shut him up. Now, Ned did love a
peach, and he did not love to have a chain on
his neck and be shut up. And he said to him-
self, What shall I do to get a peach ?' So Ned
said to a dog with whom he did love to play
when he was not shut up, 'Get me a peach.'
"And the dog, in his way, did say, 'How
can I get you a peach?'
"' Run to the wall and pick me a peach,'
said Ned.





HOW THE DOG STOLE A PEACH.

"And the dog ran to the wall and he did
pick a peach, and he gave it to Ned, who was
shut up with a chain on his neck, and Ned ate
the peach, and he said, 'See, I have got a
peach; they shut me up that I should not get
a peach, but I did get a peach for all that, and
I did eat it up, too.'
And you may be sure Ned was glad when
the dog got the peach and gave it to him off
the wall."





HOW TIIE SNAKE DID DANCE TO A TUNE.






HOW THE SNAKE DID DANCE TO A TUNE,

"MY aunt had a snake."
"A snake! And did she love the snake ?"
"Yes, she did love the snake; it was a boa.
It slept by the fire in her room, and she fed the
snake, so that it was quite tame, and it did not
try to hurt her. The snake did love to hear a
tune; and when my aunt did play a tune, the
snake would pop up its head, and then it would
raise its head some feet from the floor of the
room, and beat time with its head. It was fun
to see the snake bow its head to the tune, and
it kept such good time. It would be well if you
could keep as good time when I play a tune."
"Did you like to see the snake? "
"Yes, I did like to see the snake; but a girl,
whom I knew, felt fear when she saw the snake
C






IIOW NED KNEW WHO WAS HIS FRIEND.

move its head to the tune, and she would but
just peep in at the door, and as soon as she
saw the snake move from side to side, she
would run from the snake as fast as she could
run.
I do not think I should have run from the
snake."
I hope you would not. I hope you would
have been a brave boy. It was not wise to
run from the snake."




IIOW NED KNEW WHO WAS HIS FRIEND.

"MAY I go for a ride on Ned? "
"Yes, you may go for a ride on Ned. You
must go slow, for Ned is old now, and must not
go fast. Shall I tell you a tale of Ned when
Ned was young? "
"Yes, do tell me of Ned."
Ned was born in our field. H-e was a
































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HOW NED KNEW WHO WAS HIS FRIEND.

fine young ass, and we were all fond of Ned.
When Ned was young I did play with Ned,
and I gave Ned bread and cake, and oats and
hay, and one day I gave Ned a cup of tea."
"Oh! did Ned like the tea?"
"Yes, Ned did like the tea. When Ned
was three years old I rode on Ned's back; I
was so fond of Ned, and Ned was so fond of
me. One day a bad man came and stole Ned
out of the field. How I did cry when the man
stole Ned out of the field! We did try to get
Ned back, but no one could tell us where Ned
was gone. Days went by, and days went by,
and we could not hear of Ned, and we thought
we should not hear of Ned any more.
Some years went by. One day I took a
walk in town, and I saw Ned stand, in a cart,
at the door of a shop in the town.
Oh! oh!' said I, there is Ned, my dear,
dear Ned.'
But though I knew Ned, I did not know
if Ned would know me, and I went up to Ned.





HOW NED KNEW WHO WAS IIIS FRIEND.

I said, quite low and soft,' Ned, Ned!' and Ned
did turn his head, and Ned did look in my face,
and Ned did rub his nose on my hand, and did
bray out, as plain as if he had said in words,
"' Oh! I am glad-I am glad! I know you.
I see you once more. I am glad-I am so
glad!'
Then I put a bit of cake in my hand, and
Ned ate the bit of cake out of my hand, just as
he did eat it in the days that had gone by.
When the man came out of the shop, he
did want to take Ned away, but I said,
"'No, no! Ned is my ass; Ned must go
with me!'
And the end of it was, Ned did go with
me, and I took Ned home, and Ned has been
with me since that day when I took him home.
Was he not a wise Ned, to know me when he
saw me? "
He was a wise Ned. I love that wise, good
Ned. I will ride Ned slow; he shall not trot
fast, now that he is old."






11OW THE CATS HAD A SAFE HOUSE.






HOW THE CATS HAD A HOUSE SAFE FROM
THE DOGS.

"I WILL tell you a tale of a friend of mine,
who is so fond of cats and dogs that she has
more cats and dogs than you can count."
"Oh, not more than I can count. I can
count to ten."
But she has more than ten."
More cats than ten ? "
"Yes, more cats than ten. It is such fun
to see the cats play on the lawn; grey cats,
white cats, black cats. The dogs do not like
the cats, so my friend has built the cats a
house on the lawn, and when the dogs run at
the cats and bark, as much as to say,
"' I will bite you! I will bite you!'
"The cats run from the dogs, oh! so fast,





HOW THE CATS HAD A HOUSE

and they run up the steep stairs of their house,
where the dogs can-not come to bite them; and
then they look at the dogs from out of their
house, and put up their backs, and do spit, and
say in their way,
"' Ah, ah! Mr. Dog, you may not come
here; here I am safe, and here you can-not
bite me !' And the dogs stand and look up at
the cats, and wag their tails, and bark, and
jump; but, for all that, they can-not hurt the
cats, for the cats are up in their house quite
safe."
"Are there more dogs than cats, or more
cats than dogs ? "
There are more cats than dogs. But I did
not mean to tell you of the cats; it was of the
dogs I meant to tell you. There is one old
dog whom the rest of the dogs love much, and
when the old dog says, in her way, Do this, or
do that!' the dogs do just what the old dog
tells them to do.
One day the old dog said, 'I will go and





SAFE FROM THE DOGS.

take a walk,' and eight of the dogs said,' Let
us go with the old dog, and take care that no
harm comes to her in her walk.'
So the old dog set out for her walk, and
the eight dogs went with her, and did walk
some on the right side, and some on the left
side, to see that no harm came to the old
dog.
"Now, no one in the house knew that the
old dog was gone for a walk, and by and by
my friend did miss the dogs.
"' Where are the dogs ?' said she.
"'Where are the dogs ? said the men.
Where are the dogs ?' said the maids.
"But no one had seen the dogs, no one could
say where the dogs were gone. Now, my friend
was so fond of her dogs that she did fear her
dogs were lost, and that she should not see her
dogs more; and she sent by this road, and by
that road, to see if her dogs could be found,
but no one could say where the dogs were
gone. And the day went by, and the night






HOW THE DOGS GOT HOME.

did come, and the dogs had not come
home."
"Where were the dogs ? "
"Wait, and you shall hear."





IHOW THE DOGS GOT HOME.

WHEN the old dog had gone some way
from home she must have said, in her way, to
the dogs, We will not go home yet, we will go
and see the land.'
And the dogs did bark and say, 'Yes, we
will not go home yet, we will go and see the
land.'
So the old dog did walk on, and the eight
dogs did walk slow by her side. And they
went, and they went, and they went, till they
had gone a long way from home, and still the
old dog did walk on first, and still the eight

















































IS~













5HFf MA* S.flWhOUN*flfl fy DOGS.


THE MAN SURROUNDED BY DOG3.








HOW THE DOGS GOT HOME.

dogs did walk slow by her side, some on the
right hand, and some on the left.
At last the old dog could walk no more, so
the old dog sat down and said,
Oh, my dear dogs! I must sit still. I can
walk no more. Why did I come so far from
my home? Oh, my dogs! what shall I do?'
And the eight dogs sat down by the old
dog, and said in their way,
Oh, what shall we do ? Oh, what shall
we do?' And the dogs sat a long, long
time; but the old dog did not move, and the
dogs by her side.
"Now there came by that way a man with
a cart, and when he saw the old dog sit by the
road side, with the eight dogs that sat by her,
he said to him-self,
"' I do know that dog. How did that dog
get here? I will take that dog home in my
cart.'
"And the kind man got out of his cart, and
he put the old dog in the cart, and the eight





HOW TIE DOGS GOT HOME.

dogs ran by the cart, and did jump and bark
for joy to see the old dog ride in the cart, and
said, in their way,
Now we shall go home. Now the old dog
will see home once more. Oh, we are so glad
that the good kind man has put our old dog
in the cart!'
And so they went by the road, and the old
dog went in the cart, and the eight dogs ran
by the cart, some on the right side and some
on the left, and it was late at night when they
g"Ot home. And when my friend heard that
her dogs had come home, and when she heard
the eight dogs bark for joy, my friend was glad,
as glad as was the old dog to find that she was
at home once more; and the old dog said,
Ah, my dear dogs, now we will stay at
home. We will not go to see the land more.' "





HOW THE APE FELL FROM THE TREE.






IHOW THE APE FELL FROM THE TREE.

IF you will come and sit by me, I will tell
you a tale of what a friend of mine saw when
he was in a land far, far from his own."
Oh, do I shall like to hear that tale."
When he was a young man, my friend did
live in In-di-a. At one time he was sent to a
place a long, long way off. On his way he
did rest in a small hut by the way side; on
each side of the hut there were trees, on the
leaves of which were sharp thorns thorns
which prick and hurt much. As my friend sat
still in the hut, he heard the apes at play on
the trees, and they did seem full of fun. As
they did talk in their way, all at once he heard
a cry, a loud cry, as if some one was in pain.
He did look out of the hut, and he saw that





HOW THE APE FELL FROM THE TREE.

one of the apes had had a fall from the tree on
which he had been at play, and that he did
lie on the thorns, and that the thorns ran in-to
his skin and hurt the ape much.
"My friend did not like to touch the ape,
lest the apes with whom the ape had been at
play should think he meant to hurt the ape,
and then they would have come to bite my
friend. So he stood quite still, and did look
to see what they would do.
By and by he saw five or six apes come
and look at the ape who did lie and cry in
the thorns, and they said, in their way,
"' Lie still, lie still. We will see what we
can do to help you to get out of this mess.'
So the apes got on a branch of the tree,
and more and more apes came and sat on the
branch of the tree, till the branch of the tree
bent down so low that the ape in the thorns
could take hold of it; and then all the apes,
with a great jump, did jump off the branch
of the tree, and as the apes did jump off the





HOW THE APE FELL FROM TIlE TREE.

branch, the branch went up so fast in the ail
that it did pull the poor ape out of the
thorns, and the ape kept fast hold of the
branch, so that he might once more get on to
the tree. And when the apes saw that the
ape was safe on the tree, the apes came and
did pull the thorns out of his skin, and the
ape was glad to get rid of the thorns out of
his skin.
"But when the apes had got the thorns out
of the skin of the poor hurt ape, they did beat
the poor ape, oh, so hard, so hard, and said, in
their way,
We beat you so hard that you may know
that you must take care and not fall from
the tree. You must look where you leap. If
you do not take care, and do fall once more in
the thorns, you shall stay in the thorns. We
will not help you out at all.'
"And the poor ape did cry when he was
beat, and said in his way,
I will take care. I will take care. I will
D






HOW THE APE FELL FROM THE TREE.

look where I leap. I will not fall in the thorns
more.
Were they not wise apes to know how to
help the poor hurt ape out of the thorns ? "
"Yes, they were wise apes; but I do not
think they were kind apes to beat the poor
hurt ape who fell in the thorns."
"Yes, they were kind as well as wise apes.
They did beat the ape that he -might learn to
take care, and so not fall once more in the
thorns and be hurt."





























HOW FAN DID BEAR HER FRIEND IN MIND.

WHEN I was at the sea-side last year, I
went out in a chair which an ass did draw. It
was a nice grey ass. It went so fast. I was





IIOW FAN DID BEAR HER FRIEND IN MIND

fond of the ass, and the ass did like me. This
year, when I went to stay at the same place, I
did look out for my ass and the chair. The
chair was there, but the ass was gone.
Where is the ass gone ?' I said to the man
who drove the chair. I did wish to see my
good grey ass once more; and I miss my grey
ass now that it is not here.'
Ah,' said the man,' and I miss the good
grey ass as much as you do. I was not wise,
for I sold poor Fan.'
'Sold her! Why did you sell Fan? '
"'Why, you see, there came one, just as
you may be, who rode in my chair, and did
like Fan as much as you did like her, and
she said to me,
"' I have a chair at home, and I should like
to have this good grey ass to draw me in my
chair. Will you sell Fan to me ?'
"' And I did not know what to say. I did
not want to sell Fan, and yet the young girl
did want to buy Fan; and she was a kind























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4rIL wLD GREYJA








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THE OLD 11EVASS








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HOW FAN DID BEAR HER FRIEND IN MIND.

good girl, and I felt sure she would take care
of Fan, and she said she would give me ten
pounds for Fan. She did want to have Fan so
much, that in the end I sold her the ass.
"' More than six months went by, and I
heard no more of Fan, when I got a note to say,
Fan was ill. Fan would not eat. Would
I come and see Fan ? if I saw Fan I might say
why Fan was ill, and I might give Fan what
would make her well.'
"' When I got the note I made up my mind
I would go and see Fan, for I was so fond of
Fan that I did wish to give Fan what would
make her well. And I had a long way to go,
but I did not mind that; and when I got to the
place where Fan did live, the man who took
care of Fan did show me the shed in which Fan
was to be found, and as soon as I got near to
the shed, Fan heard the sound of my step, and
Fan did bray; and when I got to the shed Fan
did look round, and she knew me at once, and
she came up to me, and did rub her nose on






THE FIRST OF MAY.

my coat, and she was so glad to see me that
she did eat, and got well.'
"'And it was more than six months since
you had seen Fan ?'
'Yes, more than six months.'
"' Oh, what a wise Fan to know you when
six months had gone by, and Fan had not seen
you! And is Fan well now?'
Yes, Fan is well now.'
"' Then if Fan does not keep well, you will
go and see her once more ?'
"' Yes, if Fan does not keep well, I shall be
sure to go and see her once more.' "





TIHE FIRST OF MAY.

Now I will tell you a tale which was told
to me by a dear friend of mine.
In a Innd which is far, far from this, there






THE FIRST OF MAY.

is one day in the month of May when those
who live in the land see a strange sight-flocks,
and flocks, and flocks of white but-ter-flies,
who all fly to one high hill in the land. And
they fly, and they fly, and they fly, and no one
can turn them to the right hand nor to the left,
but on, on, on, still they fly, and no man can
stay nor stop them; and then at the top of the
hill they all meet, and when they meet at the
top of the hill, they say, in their way,
"' This is the hill that we did wish so much to
see, and now that we see it we are glad. And
now that we have seen the hill we must go our
way once more. We have no time more to live,
but we must fly, fly, fly, till we come to the sea,
and then we must drop in the sea and die.'
"And so all the white but-ter-flies rise on
the wing, and they fly, fly, fly, in one great
flock, and no man can stay them nor turn
them, but on, on, on they fly till they come to
the sea, and they fly, fly, fly, till no one can
see them more."





HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

"And do they die in the sea? "
No one knows that, but they come to the
land no more; and so those who see them fly
to the sea think that they must drop in the sea
and die."




HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

SHALL I tell you a tale of a bird, that will
show you what love a poor bird may have in
its heart, though it can-not say in words, I
love my wife and my young ones? "
Yes, do tell me. I should like to hear that
tale."
I had a dear friend once, who was a kind,
good man. He did love birds and beasts, and
was good and kind to them. One cold, cold
day, when the snow was on the ground, and
the frost was so hard it was fit to nip you to
bits, my friend went to a room at the top of his





HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

house, in which no one slept. Whilst he was in
the room he thought he heard a flap, flap, flop,
flop, out-side the pane of glass. He did look
up, and he saw a poor bird which did seem in
sad pain, and did beat its wings on the pane ot
glass, and did seem to say,
"' Oh, let me in, let me in; pray, pray, let
me come in.'
"And my friend let the bird in; and as soon
as the bird came in, it flew to a far part of the
room, and it made a cry, like a cry of pain ; and
my friend went to that part of the room, and
did look, and he saw a nest, and on the nest
sat a hen bird, who had spread her wings out
on the four young birds, to try and keep them
warm and snug; but it was all in vain, the poor
hen bird was dead, and the four young birds
were dead too.
"And my friend said it was a sad sight to
see the pain of the poor bird whom he had let
come in-to the room, when the poor bird flew
to the nest and found that the hen bird and






HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

the young birds did not look up, nor move,
nor seem to see him at all. He flew round and
round and round the nest, and he made such a
sad, sad cry, and he beat with his wings, and
did seem to say,
"' I am come, I am come, I am come home
at last. Oh, look at me! sing to me! I am
come, I am come!'
"But there was no sound, nor did the hen
bird nor the young birds move; and the poor
cock bird, worn out with pain, fell down
by the nest, and laid still, as if he too was
dead.
"And my friend took him up in his hand
and took him into a nice warm room, and gave
him some bits of bread, made soft with milk,
and took all the care of him that he could; but
it would not do, the poor bird had felt too much
pain. He did not want to eat, he did not want
to sing. He could not so much as hold up his
head, and hop, and fly, as of old. He did pine,
pine, pine, and in spite of all that my kind



















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HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

friend could do, in a few days the poor bird
was dead."
"Oh, how sad! How that poor bird did
love his wife and his young ones, did he not? "
"Yes, he did. He did love them with his
whole heart."
"And can you tell me how it was that the
poor hen bird did die? "
"The room in which the bird was found was
a room which no one in the house did use; the
birds had found this out, and had made their
nest in the room; and whilst the hen bird sat on
the nest to take care of her young ones, the
cock bird had gone out to find her some food.
Whilst the cock bird was gone a maid had
"come in-to the room, and as she did not know
that a nest of birds was in the room, she shut
down the glass; and so, when the poor bird flew
home with the food for his wife, the glass was
shut down, and he could not come in. Poor
bird! he did the best he could, for day and
night he did stay and try to get in. It is sad






HOW A BIRD CAN LOVE ITS YOUNG.

to think what pain he must have felt; and it is
sad to think that all his pain, and all his care,
and all his love, were in vain; and yet not
quite in vain if it does but teach us this-that
if a poor bird could so love its wife and its
young ones, how much more should we love
those with whom we live, and try, and try, and
try, to do all we can to save them from pain "

















MORRISON AND GIBB, EDINBURGH,
PRINTERS TO HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE.
5 M-4/85-V.






























































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