• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Introduction
 Caribbean collections at the University...
 British imperialism in the Caribbean,...
 The Haitian revolution, 1791-1...
 The Cuban wars of independence,...
 U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean,...
 Back Cover














Title: Caribbean collage
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054556/00001
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean collage archival collections and the construction of history
Physical Description: 24 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 x 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George A. Smathers Libraries -- Dept. of Special and Area Studies Collections
Historical Museum of Southern Florida (Miami, Fla.)
Publisher: Historical Museum of Southern Florida
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Publication Date: 2006
 Subjects
Subject: History -- Exhibitions -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Civilization -- Exhibitions -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Library resources -- Exhibitions -- Caribbean Area -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: catalog   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: organized in collaboration with The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries and the Historical Museum of Southern Florida, Miami, Florida..
General Note: "Caribbean collage features unique documents, rare books, maps and other materials from the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries, which hold one of the largest Caribbean collections in the world"--P. 5.
General Note: Exhibition catalog for exhibition on display February 24-June 4, 2006, Historical Museum of Southern Florida, Miami, Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054556
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70136023

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    Caribbean collections at the University of Florida
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
    British imperialism in the Caribbean, 1756-1834
        Page 8-9
        Page 10-11
    The Haitian revolution, 1791-1804
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
    The Cuban wars of independence, 1868-1898
        Page 16-17
        Page 18-19
    U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean, 1898-1934
        Page 20-21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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CARIBBEAN CO L L A G E
Archival Collections AND THE Construction of History

Organized in collaboration with The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries



ON DISPLAY February 24 -June 4, 2006


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Miami, Florida
































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CARIBBEAN COLLAGE

Archival Collections AND THE Construction of History


The intersection of Native American, European, African and Asian peoples in the Caribbean
since 1492 has generated countless stories of conflict, degradation and achievement.
Though the voices of the vast majority of the participants in the region's dramas are lost
forever, some people created written records of their experiences and observations. Today,
careful study of these records allows us to discover diverse accounts of the Caribbean past,
ranging from passing comments on daily occurrences to reports on major events that changed
the course of world history.

Caribbean Collage features unique documents, rare books, maps and other materials from the
University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries, which hold one of the largest Caribbean
collections in the world. Highlighted in the exhibition are several archival collections recently
acquired by the Libraries.

The collections on display focus on the histories of the English-speaking Caribbean, Haiti and Cuba
from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Massive social change occurred during this period:
imperial powers fought over various islands, slavery ended throughout the region, new forms of
plantation and small-scale agriculture developed, and independent nation-states, with distinct
creole cultures, emerged. This exhibition explores these large-scale transformations through documents
of specific events in people's lives: letters, diaries, ledger entries, business records, scrapbook clippings,
photographs, drawings and similar items. Books and maps provide additional perspectives.

Caribbean Collage provides no single narrative or interpretation of the Caribbean past. The
documents and images presented here offer viewers the opportunity to piece together their own
Caribbean histories. Through the examination of archival collections, it is possible to (re)construct
many collages or assembled pictures of the Caribbean.


Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville, 1697-1792.
A new and complete map of the West Indies comprehending
all the coasts and islands known by that name.
From Thomas Kitchin, 1718-1784.
A general atlas, describing the whole universe.
London: Laurie and Whittle, 1794.
D'Anville was a French royal geographer and cartographer.
This map was published shortly after the French and
Haitian revolutions, a time of intense European rivalry in
the Caribbean.


















Caribbean Collections


at the University of Florida


The University of Florida's Smathers Libraries are home to one of the
world's most comprehensive collections of Caribbean materials. These
collections, first developed in the late 1920s, now include books, periodicals,
government documents, microforms and electronic resources. The
Libraries maintain exchange agreements with many institutions worldwide,
including the University of the West Indies and Cuba's Biblioteca
Nacional Jose Marti. In addition, the Libraries have conducted ambitious
microfilming and acquisitions projects in the Caribbean.
Rare books and other scarce printed works, manuscripts and archival
records, antique maps, photographs and ephemera add distinction to the
Smathers Libraries' Caribbean collections. These unique materials are
divided primarily among the Libraries' very extensive Latin American
Collection, the Map and Imagery Library, and Special Collections.
These diverse holdings reflect the University of Florida's broad-based
interest in the Caribbean. Many university departments, from
Agriculture and 7,'.'lut to Fine Art, History and Anthropology, have
research and/or teaching programs devoted to the region. University
theses and dissertations reveal wide coverage of Caribbean topics.
However, the main strength of the Smathers Libraries' Caribbean
collections lies in history and the social sciences, with particularly
extensive representation of Cuba, Haiti and the British West Indies.
This section of Caribbean Collage provides a small sampling of the
Smathers Libraries' Caribbean collections, ranging from books and maps
of European exploration of the region, published during the sixteenth
century, to accounts of the plantation system during the eighteenth
century and documents of political figures from the twentieth century.


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LONDON, .
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Bernard Picart, 1673-1733.
Christophle Colomb.
From Pierre Frangois Xavier de Charlevoix, 1682-1761.
Histoire de Hisle Espagnole ou de S. Domingue.
Amsterdam: F. Honore, 1733.
This illustration by French artist Bernard Picart depicts

Guanahani (San Salvador) in the Bahamas in 1492.
Gomranni Bat ta Ram wio, 1485-1557.
Isola SpageuoSI-
Venim, 1551.
Giovanni Battista Ramusio was a Venetian historian and
geographer who compiled travel accounts in his
three-volume Delle naigatio et viugi (1550-1559). This
map ofHispaniola clearly shows the town of Santo
Domingo (S. Dominico) on the south coast of theisland.
Sir Walter Raleigh, 1552?-1618.
Sir Walter Rawleigh his apologize for his voyage to Guiana.
London: Printed by T.W. for Hum. Moseley, 1650.
Soldier, adventurer and author Sir Walter Raleigh directed
missions up the Orinoco River in 1595 and 1616-17 in
search of gold in the legendary city of El Dorado. Before
his execution for treason, he defended his explorations and
loyalty to the British Crown.
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LETTER


01. \ A uiposrgraluscaf Deact IA,31,s" 11
ureiiienl otdie \L\N1J fo
B\RBADOS imi tke'-eA NDU\AES'
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SOC SC.4*5flS I 955 SXC,


ON THE SUBJECT OF THE


ABUSE OF THE FiAG OF THE UNITED STATES


IN THE


ISLAND OF CUBA,


AND THE


ADVANTAGE TAKEN OF ITS PROTECTION


IN PROMOTING THE


SLAVE TRADE.




BY R. R; MADDEN,
Author of "Travels in the West Indies,' and Infirmities of Men ofGeinus."




BOSTON,
WILLIAM D. TICKNOR,
Corner of Washington and School Streets.
1839.


[Africans preparing tobacco.]
From Jean Baptiste Labat, 1663-1738.
Nouveau voyage aux isles de l'Amerique, vol. 6.
Paris: T. Le Gras, 1742.
French priest Jean Baptiste Labat served as a missionary in
the French Caribbean between 1693 and 1706. Though
sugar dominated the eighteenth-century Caribbean economy,
tobacco was also produced by slave labor in some islands.

A topographicall description and admeasurement of the
yland of Barbados.
From Richard Ligon.
A true & exact history of the island of Barbadoes.
London: P. Parker, and T. Guy, 1673.
Richard Ligon lived in Barbados from 1647 to 1650. His map
shows numerous plantations along the coast of the island.

R. R. Madden, 1798-1886.
A letter toW. E. Channing, D.D., on the subject of
the abuse of the flag of the United States in the island of
Cuba, and the advantage taken of its protection in
promoting the slave trade.
Boston: W. D. Ticknor, 1839.
In a treaty signed with Britain in 1818, Spain agreed to abolish
its slave trade. Nonetheless, enslaved Africans continued to
be brought to Cuba, whose sugar economy was rapidly
expanding. In this booklet, R. R. Madden, an abolitionist
based at the British consulate in Havana, described how U.S.
ships were employed in the illegal slave trade.
Letter from Parido Dominicano to El Triame. June 21, 1933.
Rafael Trujiullo's 35-year dictatorship (1930-1965) of the
Dominican Republic involved tight control of the press.
This letter from the directorate of his Dominican Party
requested a copy of El Triunfo, a newspaper published by
businessman Francisco Anfbal Roldan.


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British Imperialism

in the Caribbean, 1756-1834


In 1624 Britain established its first permanent Caribbean colony on the
island of St. Kitts. It claimed Barbados in 1625, several Leeward Islands
during the following years and Jamaica in 1655. During the next 160
years, Britain engaged in numerous battles with France, Spain and the
Netherlands in efforts to further expand its Caribbean empire.
By the time of the global Seven Years' War (1756-1763), Jamaica,
Barbados and the Leeward Islands were highly profitable sites for sugar
cultivation, and the West Indian Lobby (a group of planters and
merchants) was one of the most important pressure groups in the British
Parliament. Trade in enslaved Africans represented for the British a
profitable business that complemented trade in Caribbean sugar, most of
which was consumed in Britain. A protected market in Britain helped to
assure the profitability of sugar to planters and merchants.
Sugar production, however, came at a high cost for the Africans, whose
life expectancy amounted to seven years after arriving on Caribbean
plantations. Africans resisted slavery through a variety of means,
including sabotage of plantations and organized rebellions. They also
escaped from bondage and, in some territories, established autonomous
"maroon" settlements. Powerful maroon communities in Jamaica, for
example, fought two wars with the British government.
By the early nineteenth century, industrialization in Britain, free trade
and new sources of sugar were decreasing the importance of Caribbean
colonies to the British Empire. Meanwhile, there was a growing
abolitionist movement. Parliament abolished the slave trade in 1807. The
abolition of slavery itself went into effect in 1834, and a temporary
"apprenticeship" system ended in 1838. The colonies began to achieve
independence during the 1960s.


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Isle of St. Christophe ou St. Kitts.
Paris, 1779.
This map of St. Kitts derives from one published by
Thomas Jeffreys in 1775. The British permanently settled
the island in 1624, formally partitioned it with France in
1627 and regained it entirely in 1713.
Letter from William Matthew Burt (Government House,
Antigua) to Lord George Germain (British secretary for
the colonies). September 27, 1779.
This letter discusses the establishment of a "Collector of
His Majesty's Customs, agreeable to the Acts of
Parliament" to secure ships that have wrecked on the
island of Barbuda, near Antigua.
L. Bonnor.
A view of the King's house and public offices.
From Edward Long, 1734-1813.
The history of Jamaica, vol. 2.
London: T. Lownudes, 1774.
These government buildings are located in the square
of Spanish Town, which remained the capital of Jamaica
until 1872.


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THIIE

WEST I N 1) IES

1837;

JOURNAL OF A VISITr T ANTIGUA.
TMO. LU SERDRA, Ou JIAICA.
.ST. LUCIA. HRBAIOS, AD JAMAIWCA;


JOUEPII .1,u. ,ir AND TlIOMAU ILRVCI .



nIAMILTON. A (DAiSW. CO. PATIHS cI'Et UIUW.




Abr. Raimbach.
Leonard Parkinson, a captain of maroons.
From [Bryan Edwards, ed.] Jamaica Assembly.
The proceedings of the governor and assembly of
Jamaica, in regard to the maroon Negroes.
London: J. Stockdale, 1796.
The maroons were Africans who escaped from slavery
into the interior of Jamaica. Though the British
government signed treaties with the maroons in 1739, a
second war broke out in 1795.

Thomas Bowen, d. 1790.
Plan of St. Lucia, in the West Indies: shewing the
positions of the English & French forces with the attacks
made at its reduction in Dec. 1778.
From The Gentleman's Magazine.
London, 1779.
The British captured French St. Lucia on December 12, 1778,
and fought off a much larger French fleet during the next few
days. Possession of the island, however, passed back and forth
until 1814, when the Treaty of Paris ceded it to Britain.

Letter from Ann Duckworth (Baker, England) to Rear
Admiral John Thomas Duckworth (in the Caribbean).
March 31, 1801.
British naval officer John Thomas Duckworth first served in
the Caribbean in 1770 and achieved many victories against
French forces in the region through 1806. In this letter, Ann
Duckworth writes to her father that she is "quite low" and
has not "had the comfort of seeing" him for four years.

Joseph Sturge, 1793-1859, and Thomas Harvey.
The West Indies in 1837.
London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co., 1838.
Emancipation in the British Caribbean in 1834 was
followed by a planned six-year "apprenticeship" period.
Joseph Sturge, a prominent Quaker abolitionist in
England, traveled to the West Indies to assess this system
first-hand. His damning report contributed to the end of
the apprenticeship period in 1838.









4'tal Pc, 'Wa'tan;rion, de,7 m7r7 nlam e ocAt


The Haitian Revolution,


I791-1804



Before the Haitian Revolution, the labor of approximately 400,000
enslaved Africans made the French colony of Saint-Domingue the most
lucrative European possession in the New World. This wealth was built
on plantations employing as many as 200 workers each in the production
of coffee, cotton, indigo but especially sugar for the world market. The
prosperity of the colony ended in August 1791, when blacks staged a
massive rebellion that intensified the revolution that had swept the
French Empire for two years. Previously, the revolution in
Saint-Domingue had been limited to struggles between white royalists
and republicans, and appeals by free people of color for the same civil
rights enjoyed by whites.
During the 1'-'II,, Spain and Britain intervened in the revolution in
Saint-Domingue, each hoping to claim the rich French colony for itself.
A decisive moment occurred in 1794, when Toussaint Louverture, then
a local general in the service of Spain, shifted his allegiance to the French
Republic, which had recently abolished slavery. Toussaint, who had been
born a slave, received widespread support from the black population and
became the supreme authority in the colony. In 1802 Napoleon
Bonaparte sent a military force to take control of Saint-D)omingue.
While 'loussaint died in a French prison, the French army massacred
rebels, sometimes hundreds in a day. Continued 'IJ.rini,. however,
forced the French invaders to withdraw in late 1803.
Black generals signed a constitution that established the new nation of
Haiti on January 1, 1 sNii Haiti became the second independent state in
the Americas and, as a black republic, helped to inspire further resistance
among enslaved populations throughout the hemisphere.


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individuals participated in the Haitian Revolution, given
included Rocheblave.

Letter from Alleon-Dulac (manager of the Rocheblave
plantation) to Dupre de SCaint-Maur (Intendant of
Bordeaux). September 8, 178.1







In an effort to sell the Rocheblavdame estate in
Saint-Domingue, Alleon-Dulac notes in this and other
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who were Roc"well-to-do and healthy." Twelve years later,
50,000 or more Africans from the colony Norfther





Province destroyed hundreds of area plantations,
includingRocheblave.
plantarionl to Dupre dF Sane-Manee (Ineendanr of
BouPeaux). September 8, 1781.
In an effort to sell the Rocheblave estate in
Saint-Domingue, A1eon-Dulac notes in this and other
letters that the plantation held 101 enslaved Africans
who were "well-to-do and healthy." Twelve years later,
50,000 or more Africans from the colons Northern
Province destroyed hundreds of arca plantations,
including Rocheblave.















LIBERTY. RiPUBLIQUE FRANCHISE. AGALITE.




PROCLAMATION.

TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE,

General en Chef de I'arm6e de Saint-Domingue.


AUX ADMINISTRATIONS MUNICIPALS DE LA COLONIES ET A SES
CONCITOYENS.


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POR D. M. G. C. Aio de 1805.
REI MRIlblESE POR DON JUAN LOPEZ CANCELADA
EDITOR
DE LA GAZETA DE ESTA N. E.






CON SUPERIOR PERMISO.

MtXICO:
En la Oficina de D. Mariano de Zdfiiga y Ontiveros,
afio de 1806.


Proclamation by Toussaint Louverture. Ca. 1801?
In this proclamation, General Toussaint Louverure announces
that he has taken military control of Saint-Domingue and calls
for the creation of a parliament made up of two members
from each of the nine major sections of the colony.

A map of the island of St. Domingo.
London: J. Stockdale, 1800.
This 1800 map delineates the 1776 boundary between the
French and Spanish sections of Hispaniola, though Spain
ceded its territory to France in 1795. The map shows such
features as towns, roads and waterways as they existed
during the revolutionary wars.

Letter from Jean-Jacques Dessalines (Gendral de Division)
to General Quantin (in Petite Riviere). October 24, 1802.
In this letter local revolutionary general Jean-Jacques
Dessalines expresses horror over an order by C.V.E. Leclerc
(commander of the Napoleonic forces) against blacks and
mulattoes. He states he will defend himself as "a true
soldier, a friend of Liberty and his country."

Jean-Louis Dubroca, 1757-ca. 1835.
Vida de J. J. Dessalines, gefe de los negros de Santo Domingo.
Translated from the French and reprinted by
Juan L6pez Cancelada.
Mexia: La ofcina de D. Mariano de Zfiiigay Ontivers, 1806.
The Haitian Revolution alarmed colonial rulers and
planters throughout the hemisphere. This book, published
in Mexico in 1806, is a translation of Jean-Louis
Dubroca's condemnation of the revolution, which was
published in Paris in 1805.


cos NOTAS MUY CIRCUNtETANCtADAS SOIRE EL ORTIGN, CARAC-
TER Y ATROcDAnDES Da jLOS PRNCIPAtR5 GEFRS OD EAQUELLOS
REBLCrES DSD05 EL RPAsCINo rDELA INSUtRECCIOs N 1795 t
TRADUCIDA DEL FRANCES


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The Cuban Wars of

Independence, 1868-1898



In the aftermath of the Haitian Revolution, Cuba came to replace
Saint-Domingue as the world's foremost sugar producer. The expansion
of the sugar industry on the island coincided with extensive trade in
enslaved Africans. People of color in Cuba faced progressively harsher
racial discrimination, as whites feared that the island would become a
black republic similar to Haiti. It was in this context that, in October
1868, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes issued his Grito de Yara, a cry that
began the first wide-scale armed struggle by Cubans for their
independence. The war ended in February 1878, with Cuba remaining a
Spanish colony. However, Antonio Maceo and some other generals
central to the independence struggle fought on in what became known as
La Guerra Chiquita.
Following the Ten Years' War, poet, politician and philosopher Jose
Martf, in exile in New York, mobilized further support for Cuban
independence. In 1895 a second great war for independence began.
American public support for a free Cuba increased as U.S. newspapers
portrayed wretched conditions in the relocation camps established
throughout the island by Spanish Captain-General Valeriano Weyler.
The U.S. intervened in the conflict in April 1898, following the famous
but still mysterious explosion of the USS Maine in Havana's harbor. In
addition to public outcry, the U.S. was concerned with protecting its
business interests on the island. After the U.S. sent troops, the war lasted
an additional ten weeks. Cuba became an American protectorate at the
end of 1898 and a republic in 1902, though the U.S. remained involved
in the country's political affairs.


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Mapa historic pintoresco modern de la isla de Cuba.
From Bernardo May.
Album pintoresco de la isla de Cuba.
Havana: B. May & Compania, 1853.
This map shows cities, roads and railroads in Cuba, along
with local scenes and historic events. The map and
illustrations together reflect the wealth of mid-nineteenth-
century Cuba.
Muster roll of the Primer Batallon de Libertos,
First Company. Spanish Army in Cuba. 1878.
The enlisted men in this companywere all libertos, enslaved
Africans earning their personal liberty through military service
to the Spanish government. They fought against insurgents
during Cuba's first war of independence (1868-1878).
Letter from Perfecto de Rojas (Baltimore, Md.) to U.S.
Secretary of State William M. Evarts. May 7, 1877.
Rojas relates that, while a U.S. resident seeking citizenship,
the Spanish government in Cuba confiscated his property,
"consisting of some lands and other real estate, and a
mortgage of 50,000 dollars." He asks the State
Department to assist him in recovering his property.


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S.S, MARTI.







VERSOS



SENCILLOS











N VW YORK
1.01:IS WKi:S & CO., tir-ro.u

1891




La ilustracidn cubana.
Barcelona and Havana, 1885.
This bound volume contains issues of the periodical
La ilutracidn cubana. The periodical featured articles on
a variety of topics, poetry, fiction and engravings.

Charles Graham, 1852-1911.
Bird's-eye view of Santiago and surrounding country.
From Harper Brothers Weekly Supplement.
NewYork, ca.1899.
During the Spanish-Cuban-American War of 1898, U.S.
forces blockaded and then occupied the city of Santiago in
the eastern part of the island.

Josh MartI, 1853-1895.
Versos sencillos.
New York: Louis Weiss, 1891.
Cuban patriot Jose Martfs Versos sencillos is one of his
well-known collections of poetry. Marti inscribed this copy
of the book to his friend Carmen Mantilla. The phrase is
ambiguous and could be translated: "To Carmita, so you never
feel pain. Your bald friend, Jose Martf. NY, Oct. [18]91."




















U.S. Imperialism in


the Caribbean, 1898-1934



U.S. imperialistic activity in the Caribbean escalated with the
Spanish-Cuban-American War. In 1898 American forces intervened in
Cuba's final war for independence from Spain. As a result, the U.S.
acquired all of Spain's overseas empire, including Puerto Rico, Guam and
the Philippines, as well as Cuba. In 1901 the Platt Amendment to the
new Cuban constitution allowed the U.S. to intervene in local politics
whenever it saw fit, established a perpetual loan of GuantAnamo Bay as a
U.S. naval base and necessitated U.S. oversight of Cuba's international
agreements. Meanwhile, American investors achieved increasing control
of Cuba's economy, particularly its sugar industry.
A second major U.S. intervention in the Caribbean began in 1915,
when American marines occupied Haiti, in an effort to achieve political
stability and favorable economic and strategic conditions. From the
Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince, the occupying force spread into the
countryside to engage with rural guerrillas. Until 1934 the U.S.
controlled the country in collaboration with a Haitian political elite and
national guard. In response to the racism of the American occupiers,
Haitians increasingly affirmed African-derived cultural traditions as a
foundation for their national identity. For intellectuals and peasants alike,
the U.S. occupation resurrected images of the French expeditionary force
driven out more than a century before.
U.S. military and economic involvement in the Caribbean during the
late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was accompanied by the
development of organized tourism in the region. Perceptions of the
Caribbean as a leisure destination continue to shape American images of
the region up to the present.


DICKINSON & DICKINSON
CoUNarLORs AT LAW
C.a. --. .L..t
.........t3 5.........
wBarON 2ept. 23,1911:
Thomas J. Hamnond, Esq.,
Counsellor at Law,
Northampton,Mass.
Dear Tom;--
Replying to your favor of the 226 have to say that during
the last week I received a letter from the Bethlehem Steel Co. in
reply to a letter I wrote them informing them that they were tree-
passing upon our property at Taco Bay, and I have also had a per-
sonal interview with Mr. Rand of New York, who is President of the
Spanish-American Iron Co. These were some of the concerns that
Mr. Corbett informed us were busily engaged stealing our pro-
perty. The Bethlehem Steel Co. denies the soft impeachment and
states emphatically that they have no interest in our property,
and are not trespassing,except that they have taken preliminary
steps, as I understand it, to condemn some of the iron ore pro-
perty on a slight portion of our lands and that it they complete
this, of-course they expect to have to pay for it.
Mr. RBand of the Spanish-Amerioan Iron Co. says that they are
in no way interested in this matter and that they are not encroach-
ing upon our property in any way. He showed,and left with me, a
blue print which seems to clearly indicate that their company is
not over on our property,as I understand its boundaries.
I have written to Dr. Heredia, the counsel whom xr.Corbett
engaged in Cuba, asking him for information,but have received no re-
ply whatever from him and as far as I am concerned I certainly think
it prudent and wise to wait a few days longer until we hear from
Dr. Heredla, before we embark in this mortgage business, which,as


Letter fiom Charles Dickinson (Boston, Mass.) to Thomas
J. Hammond (Northampton, Mass.). September 23, 1911.
The Taco Bay Commercial Company was an American-
owned agricultural enterprise with extensive property
holdings in Oriente Province, Cuba, from 1903 to 1920.
This letter addresses concerns that the Bethlehem Steel
Company and the Spanish-American Iron Company were
attempting to steal land from Taco Bay.

Plan of the Manati Sugar Company. 1919-1921.
The Manari Sugar Company, incorporated in New York
in 1912, owned Central Manati (a central factory) in
northwestern Oriente Province. This plan shows company
buildings, including worker housing (at the top in yellow)
and the mill itself (in the center in gray).

President's palace, Havana.
Photograph album. Images of Florida and Cuba. 1910.
This photograph is from an album whose creator is
unknown. With U.S. intervention in Cuba at the turn of
the century, the island attracted an increasing number of
American tourists.

















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TI MEMENNE, QUEEN OF LA GONAVE
Enthroned i'lr sceptre and regal standard, next to Faustin
white king of her black kingdom.


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Letter from U.S. President Woodrow Wilson to the
President of Haiti. June 15, 1914.
In this letter, President Wilson announces his appointment
of Arthur Bailly-Blanchard as a special U.S. envoy to Haiti
to "cultivate to the fullest extent the friendship which has
so long subsisted" between the two countries. (The letter
is signed by Wilson and William Jennings Bryan, Secretary
of State.) One year later, the U.S. occupied Haiti.
Ti Memenne, Queen of La Gonave.
From Faustin Wirkus, 1896-1945, and Taney Dudley.
The white king of La Gonave.
Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday, Doran and Company, 1931.
Shown here is U.S. marine sergeant Faustin Wirkus with the
"Queen" of La Gonave, an island off the west coast of Haiti.
In his book on his experience during the American occupation
of Haiti, Wirkus relates how the people of La Gonave
crowned him Faustin II. The story reflects the patronizing
attitude of the U.S. military during the occupation.
Photograph: Frank R. Crumbie and M. Carrie, Haiti. 1930s.
Frank R. Crumble served in several government positions
in Haiti during the period of the U.S. occupation. Unlike
most American officials or military personnel, he had a
deep respect for the Haitian people and became a life-long
student of their history and culture.
Frank R. Crumble Notebook 1. 1934.
Frank Crumble assembled several notebooks with
documentation of Haitian life. Shown here are symbols
of loa (spirits) associated with Vodou, a religion that
combines West and Central African, Catholic and
indigenous Haitian traditions.


II, newly crowned





































1,w .: ee a
\ f.r"i Re/Nhlti *<



Caribbean Collage: Archival Collections and the
Construction of -istory was organized by the Historical
Museum of Southern Florida in collaboration with The
University of Florida George A. Smathecs Libraries. The
exhibition features more than 2'11 original documents,
rare books, maps and other items from the collections of
the Smathers Libraries.
Assistance was received from the Smathers Libraries
Special Collections and the Latin American Collection of
the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections,
the Map and Imagery Library, the Digital Library Center
and the Department of Preservation.


'VUE DU CAP FR..l; ('OIS,

A. P o; .



This booklet includes material selected from the
following collections of the Department of Special and
Area Studies Collections: West Indies Papers; Sir John
Thomas Duckworth, Papers, 1801-1807; Slavery and
Plantations in Saint Domingue Collection; Rochambeau
Papers; Haitiana Collection; Frank R. Crumble Papers,
1922-1955; Military Papers of the Spanish Army in
Cuba; Jose Ignacio Rodriguez Papers; Taco Bay
Commercial Company Records; Braga Brothers
Collection; Francisco Anibal and Ramon Anibal Roldin
Collection; and Rare Book Collection. Maps were
selected from the Map and Imagery Library.


I) C11- '4
/fl,".4 a/ V~rl-c


2006 The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
and Historical Museum of Southern Florida




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