• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: The old corner series
Title: The surprising adventures of Cinderella, or, The history of a glass slipper
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054520/00001
 Material Information
Title: The surprising adventures of Cinderella, or, The history of a glass slipper
Series Title: The old corner series
Uniform Title: Cinderella
Alternate Title: History of a glass slipper
Physical Description: 24 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gibbons, Will ( Illustrator )
Turnbull & Spears ( Printer )
Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh
Place of Publication: London
Sydney
Manufacturer: Turnbull & Spears
Publication Date:
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Australia -- Sydney
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: newly illustrated by Will Gibbons.
General Note: Includes one page of product advertising before and after text and on inside front and back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054520
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002336918
oclc - 38927709
notis - ALU0679

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Advertising
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Advertising
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Cover
Full Text


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NCE upon a time there lived
upon the borders of fairy-land
a gentleman and his wife who
had an only child, a little
daughter. When the baby
was christened, as the lady was a great
favourite with the fairies, a powerful fairy be-
came its God-mother. Poor little Ella (for
this was the name they gave her) was soon
left without a mother, but her father, a year
or two after his wife's death, thinking he
could not take proper care of his motherless
child, married again. His second wife
was a widow with two grown-up daughters,
and they, being proud and selfish, and




6 CINDERELLA.
jealous of their young and beautiful step-
sister, because everybody loved her, made
matters very unpleasant for her. They gave
poor Ella no nice clothes, nor toys, nor
books, but, as she grew older, made her do
the work of a servant for them; and because
when tired out she would sit in the chimney
corner amongst the cinders these cruel
sisters nick-named her Cinderella. Her
father now seemed to take little or no notice
of her, and she felt as if she had not a friend
in the world. While her step-sisters were
richly dressed, and went to balls and parties,
poor Cinderella was kept out of sight and
ordered to sweep the rooms, clean the grates,
or wash the dishes, and was seldom allowed
to go out to enjoy herself. Now one evening
when Cinderella was grown up, though still
very young; an invitation came for a grand
party to be given in honour of the Prince's
birthday; so, of course,







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8 CINDERELLA.
Whilst brushing their hair and helping
them to dress, the poor girl could not help
saying, "I wish I were going too;" but her
step-sisters laughed at the idea of a scullery
maid, as they called her, going to a royal ball.
Cinderella bore these cruel words patiently
until after they were gone, when she sat down
by the kitchen fire and cried bitterly. Just
as she was thinking of her dear kind mamma
who used to love her, she was surprised and
a little alarmed to hear a voice close beside
her say, Do not cry, Cinderella; I am come
to help you." Suddenly looking up, she saw
an old lady with a magic wand standing near
her.
"Cinderella," said her visitor, I am your
fairy God-mother, and I mean .you to go to
the ball to-night; obey me, and all will be
well. Just run into the garden and find me
a pumpkin." As it was a fine moonlight
night Cinderella soon found a large one, with




CINDERELLA. 9
which she hastened back. The fairy touched
it with her magic wand, and it instantly
turned into a grand coach.
"Now," said she, "go and find me six
mice." The trap happened to contain just
that number, and, after a touch with the
wand, the six mice at once became six fine
spirited cream-coloured horses.
Now," said the fairy, "look in the rat-
trap, and bring me a rat." The astonished
girl ran to the barn, and soon returned with a
fine one. A touch of the wand changed
this into a fat coachman in gorgeous livery.
"Now," said the fairy God-mother, "look
behind the watering pot in the garden, and
you will find two lizards." These, being
brought, changed at a touch into two tall
footmen, also in rich liveries, who mounted
behind the carriage. Her coach being now
drawn up at the door, (See the frontisziece)




o1 CINDERELLA
Cinderella was next touched with the magic
wand, and her working clothes instantly
became a splendid ball dress; while her worn
shoes turned into a beautiful pair of glass
slippers.
Now," said the fairy, "go to the palace
and enjoy yourself; but be sure you leave
the ball before the clock strikes twelve. If
you disobey me your fine dress will become a
ragged one again; your coach will again be-
come a pumpkin; your coachman a rat; your
footmen lizards; and your horses mice."
Cinderella gratefully thanked her God-
mother, promised obedience, and, stepping
into her carriage, drove off in high glee to the
palace. When her splendid coach dashed
up to the palace gates the attendants thought
it must be some great foreign Princess who
had arrived; therefore, receiving a special
message,









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12 CINDERELLA.
Feeling just a little shy, but very happy,
Cinderella passed up the grand staircase;
through the state chambers, adorned with
lovely statuary, splendid mirrors, costly pic-
tures, and tropical plants of rare grace and
beauty; until at length she found herself
pacing the polished floor of the gilded ball-
room. Her appearance at once caused a
flutter of curiosity amongst the brilliant
assemblage. Every one wondered who this
fair young stranger could be. Even amid
this dazzling scene her wonderful beauty,
and the richness of her dress, made her the
observed of all observers. Cinderella had
not been many minutes in the room before
she saw her two cross sisters, who had
of course arrived a little earlier; but they
did not know her in her fine dress.
Like all the other guests they regarded her
as some strange beautiful princess who
had come in state to the ball.
As soon as he became aware of her presence,






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14 CINDERELLA.
and would afterwards have no other partner.
Remembering what the fairy had told her, Cin-
derella had resolved not to stay for supper, but
managed to slip away just as the clock was striking
half-past eleven. She found her coach waiting at
the gate. When her sisters returned, she was
sitting in her usual place, and in her working
dress. They told her that a charming young
Princess had come in state to the Ball, and had
disappeared no one knew when; and how annoyed
the Prince was, and anxious to find out who she was.
Another ball was to be given, with the hope that
the lovely stranger would go to that also.
The next time Cinderella dressed her sisters for
the royal ball she was in good spirits, for she knew
that she would go too. And so it happened. The
fairy again appeared, and sent her God-daughter as
before; at the same time praising her obedience,
and saying, Mind you leave before twelve to-night
also." Again the Prince would scarcely leave her
side, and, as she was becoming a little spoiled by
all this admiration and flattery, she began to think
more of herself, and less of the promise to the fairy.





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16 CINDERELLA.
At that moment the clock struck twelve;
and, as the last stroke rang out on the clear
night air, she found herself again in her
working dress; and, rushing out into the
moonlight, she was just in time to see her
coach roll away as a pumpkin, the rat and
mice run squeaking away, followed by the
lizards, and she had to return home alone
and on foot. As soon as the Prince found
out she was gone, he sent down to ask the
guards if they had seen the beautiful Princess
leave; but they assured him that no one
had passed out of the palace, but a poor girl
who looked more like a beggar than a
Princess.
Then the Prince himself began to search
for her; and at last, on the ground staircase,
he found the brilliant little glass slipper
which he knew the Princess had worn.











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18 CINDERELLA.
For," said he, no other lady has such
a little foot; only my Princess could put
it on."
When the sisters came home they of course
told Cinderella this strange story of the
Princess's second disappearance, and also
that it was reported that the Prince loved
her so much that he declared he would
never marry any one else.
The proclamation caused much stir in the
province.
Of course the ladies of the court circle
all hastened to the palace to try the slipper
on, but without success; then the ladies
from the counties tried, but they could not
put it on; next the ladies from the towns
tried, but it was of no use. After many
amusing attempts they all had to give it
up.






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20 CINDERELLA.
But, in spite of all their efforts to get a foot
into it, to the intense amusement of the
attendants, and to their own disappointment,
it was of course absurdly too small for them.
When all attempts to find the owner seemed
fruitless, at the Prince's request, the enquiry
was made, "Is there anyone else amongst
those present who would like to try ?" In the
crowd of bystanders who had obtained
admission to the palace to watch the trial
was Cinderella. Modestly stepping forward,
she begged permission to try her fortune.
Her sisters laughed, and ridiculed the idea of
Cinderella being able to wear the slipper of a
beautiful Princess; but the Prince, who seemed
to think her eyes were familiar to him,
laughingly said, Oh let her try," and Cinder-
ella took her place in the chair for her trial.





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22 CINDERELLA.
The surprise and annoyance of her step-
sisters may be imagined. After joyfully
exclaiming, This must be my Princess," the
Prince desired the young girl to explain her
present disguise; and Cinderella told him her
story simply and prettily. As she ceased
speaking the fairy suddenly appeared, and
saying, My Prince, this fair girl is worthy
of your love," put Cinderella's hand in his,
and with a touch of her wand she was again
clothed in her enchanted garments. The
Prince reproached Cinderella's father with his
gross neglect of his child, and would have had
the cruel sisters severely punished had not
Cinderella begged that they might be for-
given. As they begged her pardon for their
past cruelty, the sweet young girl treated them
so kindly that they were made to feel quite
ashamed of their past conduct.
The Prince insisted upon Cinderella at
once becoming his bride, and his father and
mother-the King and Queen-were glad to
receive a new daughter who had so kind and
powerful a friend as the fairy God-mother.









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24 CINDERELLA.
It was a grand wedding, and everybody
was pleased; for the poor as well as the rich
had good reason to remember that day. The
people said, "Our Princess will always feel for
the poor; for she knows what work, and
sorrow, and trials are." And so it proved.
Her husband loved her very much; and,
in memory of her surprising story, kept
amongst the crown jewels her brilliant little
glass slipper.














Turnbull Spears, Printers, Edinburgh.
T'urnbll 6-f Spears, Printers, Edinburgh,




















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