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Florida mirror
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054505/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida mirror
Uniform Title: Florida mirror (Fernandina, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: A.B. Campbell, Geo. Burnside
Place of Publication: Fernandina Fla
Creation Date: October 16, 1886
Publication Date: 1878-
Frequency: semiweekly[<1894-1899>]
weekly[ former 1878-<1886>]
triweekly[ former <1890-1891>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 30, 1878)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1901.
General Note: "Democratic" <1880>.
General Note: Editor: Geo. R. Fairbanks, <1887>.
General Note: Publishers: George R. Fairbanks, <1885-1886>; Moore & Manucy, <1887-1891>; The Mirror Pub. Co., <1894-1898>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002057832
oclc - 33834378
notis - AKP5868
lccn - sn 95047336
System ID: UF00054505:00010
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Nassau County star

Full Text







fl~rift-9


S'rror,


VOL. VIII. FERNANDINA, FLA., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1886. NO. 47.


THE LABOR MOVEMENT.
The strikes which disturbed the
business interests of Chicago have
again begun with the withdrawal of
20,000 men from the beef and pork
packing establishments. The cause
of this renewal is the determination
of the packers to resume the ten-
hour labor system, which had been
reduced to eight by the great strike
last spring. The packers now declare,
it is said, that they cannot carry on
their business on the eight-hour sys-
tem with any profit to' themselves.
They require ten hours' work for ten
hours' wages. One of the leading
packers said to a reporter of the
Chicago Tribune that the resumption
of the ten-hour system meant $12,500
per week to Armour & Co., and an
almost equally large sum to other
houses; that a return to the ten-
hour system was their ultimatum,
and that they would live up to it
absolutely. The cost of a long
strike is a heavy one for the laborers
to bear when 20,000 men are con-
cerned. It is evident that it cannot
be long-continued.
The Labor Convention of the
United States is now in session at
Richmond, and as 283 resolutions
had been presented, it is evident that
they entertain very diverse views of
the scope of their work. Itlooks as
though the organization was, at sea
in their line of action and somewhat
divided between the moderates \and
the extremists. The latter ,4re
anxious to try their power in co\-
trolling parties and public measure's,
on a kind of balance of power party,
'"tao- extort concessions" by holding
their votes in terrorem over the ex-
isting political parties. This they
will find it difficult to do, and they
are more likely to create disruption
among themselves, than to break
down the lines of political parties,
which are generally managed by
much shrewder men than the labor
organization. The great difficulty of
concentration of the labor organiza-
tion has been shown to be in the
jealousies of leaders and the strife
for leadership. The organization, if
it could be composted on certain
definite lines of action, would be a
powerful factor in regulating the
policy and legislation of the country
in reference to the subjects of immi-
gration, such as Chinese and pauper,
convict labor, education in common
schools, land grants, etc. But it is
not likely that they can be so organ-
ized. Abstract questions cannot
bring men to an agreement unless
*coupled with a sentiment such as
the slavery question, prohibition, etc.
The labor organizations will spend
their force in contests with employers
as to wages and hours of labor.
They will be obliged to agree to a
ten-hour system, because it is the
natural and general agreement as tc
the portion of twenty-four hours
which, in all departments of labors
can be given to it without too great
demand upon the strength of the
ordinary individual man. Children
should not be allowed to he em-


played continuously for such a length
of time, nor below a certain age
'The question of wages is more im
portant, to the laborer than that o.
hours of work. He has a right tc
full wages for full work, and a dis-
tinction should be made between th(
pay of a skilled workman and ar
unskilled workman-between an ex
p3rt, brisk laborer and a dull anr
lazy one. There should be increasE
of pay for increase of work, anc
men should not be treated as mer
machines.


cese. From Florida, Bishop Weec
sits in the House of Bishops, and
Messrs. Scott, Carter, Carpenter an
Weller are the clerical deputies press
ent, and Messrs. Dotterer, Benedic
f and Fairbanks the lay delegates
in attendance.
ITEMS OF INTEREST.
t, A CALF was killed in Zionville
- Pa., one morning, the skin was a
the tannery by noon, was tanned
and turned over to a shoemaker tha
e evening, and by the next morning
was made into a palr of boots whici


d worship of Bohwanee, the religion
d of the Thugs.
t THE extent to which celluloid i
now utilized as a substitute in th
arts and industries is something re
markable. The material is produce'
in rods, tubing, sheet and rolls, am
, among its various manufactured
t forms are brushes, combs, mirror
d and toilet articles in imitation c
t ivory, coral and amber; collars an
g cuffs, jewelry, cork screws, card cases
h soap cases, powder boxes, pape


n


THE GREAT CITY OF THE WEST.
ITS DESTRUCTION AND REBUILDING.
CHICAGO, October 11.
There is no more striking instance
of the power of recuperation than is
shown in the recovery of Chicago
from the great devastation. Fifteen
years ago on October 8th the great
fire occurred which destroyed many
thousands of buildings, both private
and public, the homes of 70,000 peo-
ple, and entailed an estimatedloss of
nearly two hundred millions of dol-
lars. To-day there is scarcely a
trace of this great devastation to be
found. The streets of Chicago emu-
late, if they do not surpass, the
streets of New York in their splendid
buildings and everything which the
great metropolis presents in the way
of luxury, wealth and display is
duplicated in Chicago. Its great
hotels, the Palmer House and the
Grand Pacific, have hardly their
equals in grandeur and capacity in
the great metropolis. What is want-
ing in the commerce upon the water
is equalled by the immensity of the
interior commerce by rail. The
great railways extending for hund-
reds, and even thousands, of miles
north, south, east and west, pour into
the lap of this great city millions of
bushels of grain, millions of pounds
of beef and pork, millions of feet of
lumber, and millions of everything
which seeks a market. A great city
of 700,000 inhabitants has grown up
on the lake shore at the mouth of a
petty stream, which promises to
keepp pace in its development with
tbe great city of New York. Twenty
thoiisadir mHenf let their employment
a day or two ago, but it made but a
ripple on the surface of the life of
this great city. The business houses
engaged in the retail trade strike the
eye of strangers with astonishment.
Everything seems to be on the largest
scale. The dry goods house of
Marshall, Field & Co. has no equal in
Philadelphia and no superior in Bos-
ton, and numerous other great houses
-indicate the enterprise of the merch-
ant princes of Chicago. The public
buildings, notably the court-house,
throws Eastern cities into the shade,
while the Adams Express building,
the custom-house and the Board of
Trade building are splendid speci-
mens of architecture. The cable
cars are in use on two of the princi-
pal avenues, and the facilities for
reaching any part of the city are per-
fect. The rush, the throng, the push
of daily life here is the most striking
feature of Chicago.
The great Triennial Convention oi
the Episcopal Church, now in session
here, is 'attracting much interest. II
is the first time in forty years that it
Shas been held in the West, and now
Chicago is in the central portion o0
the great territory represented. Ir
K this body every State and Territory
is represented. Sixty bishops repre
, sent as many dioceses and mission
t ary jurisdiction. Four clergymen
and four laymen represent each dio


were worn by the man who ,wned
the calf that had worn the skin the
day before.
A new alloy is announced, which
is specially adapted to variuQs im-
portant uses in the arts. It melts at
the low temperature of 1160F., the
temperature of moderateTf hot
water, and considerably bel(w that
at which the magic spoons of long
ago melted in a cup of tea. Its
composition is: Bismuth, 4"; cad-
mium 13; lead, 19; tin 20; and it is
said the alloy will withstand quitee a
severe pressure.
THE Lutheran Observer joins with
other newspapers in advocating
changing the time for the national
Thanksgiving Day from blak No-
vember to golden October." '.It says
that November was chosen'by the
Puritans to bring the day iiear the
Christmas time that it might take
the place of that festival, to i'hich
they were opposed. But now that
all Christians observe Christmas
there is no reason for appointing
Thanksgiving Day so late iin the
year.
THE use of the Suez Canal in
moving the tea crop from China to
America is rapidly being albai(loned
for the swifter means affordled by
our trans-continental railways. In
1884 the bulk of the shipments were
via the Suez Canal. In 1885 the
shipments by that route to America
were but 9,254,197- pounds; ,while
San Francisco received 12`496,187
pounds. This year the imi)o-'ts by
way of San Francisco have reached
20,525,280 pounds, while e. via
the Suez Canal have fallen off to
7,592,049 pounds. From Yokdhamina
to New York by the canal takes sixty
days, by San Francisco forty-nine
days. Insurance and freight charges
are diminished, and the tea, being
fresher, is said to be better when
brought by the latter route.

RussIA is peculiarly rich in sur-
Sprising sects and associations, but
the most astounding is one lately
brought to light bearing the ominous
title of "The Red Death." Its
members affect to believe that he
who consciously permits another to
suffer prolonged pain commits a
mortal sin. In order to abbreviate
the sufferings of humanity it is' a
matter of conscience with them to
kill the sick, that they may be put
out of their pain' *quickly. The as-
sociation takes its name from the
fact that its executioners, dressed in
Sred for the occasion, strangle their
victims with a red cord, placing
them for the purpose upon a redcat-
afalque, beneath the dull reddisih
Slight of an oil lamp. This strange
and horrible association was brought
to light by the energetic opposition
f interposed by a man in Sarato
When his mother and sister endeav
Scored to strangle his sick wife. Hi
- called in the authorities, who hayv
- already arrested some forty member
Sof the murderous sect. Their or
- ganization seems to be a transference
from India to Muscovite soil of th


5:istently begging for alms, shall be subject


si


box with brick, laid and plastered as afore-
said, before the grave is filled-in with earth,
so as to render the same air tight and ia-
pervious tq water; and in no case shall the
Mayor give permission of burial within the
city limits, except at burial grounds know
as St. Peter's, and then only in compliance
with the provisions of within Ordinance.
Any person violating this provision shall
forfeit and pay a fine not exceeding one
hundred dollars.
Passed Council October 7, 1886.
G. F. AVERY,
President of Counci


Approved :
JAME8 McGIFFIN,
Mayor.
Attest:
[SEAL] GEORGE E. WOLFF,
City Clerk.
Fernandina, Fla., October 9,1886.


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knives, thimbles, restaurant checks,
shoe hooks and horns, napkin rings,
mouth pieces for pipes, parasol, um-
brella and cane handles, etc., in imi-
tation of coral, ivory, malachite, tor-
toise shell, amber, lapis lazuli, agate,
carnelion etc., piano keys and organ
stop knobs, in imitation of ivory;
white and colored letters for signs,
monograms and trade marks; stereo-
type plates and type and wood cuts,
mouldings and veneers for picture
frames, showcases, cornices, panels,
etc., in white and colors ;' mountings
for spectacles, eyeglasses, opera
glasses, etc., substituting and imita-
tating hard rubber, horn, tortoise
shell, etc.; handles for table cutlery,
plates for artificial teeth, trimmings,
whip handles and pencil cases, statu-
ettes, rollers for skates, spoons and
forks, etc. This list might be indefi-
nitely extended in the line of things
alike useful and ornamental, the
claim being also made that the sub-
stitute is better adapted \for these
purposes than is the original ma-
terial.
Query?
To the Editor of the Mirror :
"Subscriber wishes to inquire if bicycles
come under the head of Section 1 of the
code of laws published in last week's
Mirror-" vehicles ridden on the sidewalk."
If not, they should come under the head of
nuisance, at least in the business part of the
city, as well for the comfort as the safety of
ladies and children. For the credit of our
city we hope this code will be carried
out without partiality, and from beginning
to end, for it is just what is needed.
List of Letters
Remaining in the post-office at Fernandina,
Nassau county, Florida, October 16th, 1886.
Persons calling for these letters must say
advertised:


Armstrong, Luvina Magou, Sam n
Bing, Marrha -M-ira, John-J
Bywant, G B McKnight, W C
Baster, H T Mitchell, Eddie
Brooks, R C Pendarvis, Martha
Constantine, J E Readman, Susie
Dunns, Jim Roberson, Willis
Evans, W H Read, Isiah
Griffin, WW oss, R G
Hudson, Benj Screveri, T E
Hnbbard, Jeremiah Skipper, George
Hazzard, James 2 Williams, R W
Harper, Wilcox, Laurence
Jacobson, K W Williams, James
King, P N Lake, Tom
Litesey, A
S. T. RIDDELL, P. M.

AN ORDINANCE
Regulating the Penal Code of
the City of Fernandina.
E IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY
Council of the City of Fernandina that
from the date of the passage of this Ordi-
nance and after:
SECTION 1. No person shall ride or drive
any animal or vehicle on or along any side-
walk in the city of Fernandina, and any
person offending against this section shall
be fined not exceeding five dollars, in the
discretion of the Mayor.
Sec. 2. No person shall erect a steam en-
gine for any purpoee whatsoever within the
corporate limits of the city of Fernandina.
without first having obtained permission
from City Council. Any person violating
this section shall be fined not exceeding
twenty-five dollars for every days continu-
ance of such violation.
Sec. 3. No person shall keep a disorderly
house or house of ill fame, and every owner
or owners of a house or houses, or other
person who may rent or cause to be rented
any house to be used as a house of ill fine,
shall be fined not exceeding twenty-five
dollars for every day the house is so kept;
and all adult persons inhabiting or living in
such houses shall be considered the keepers
thereof and subject to the, penalties of this
section.
Sec. 4. No person shall drive a vehicle of.
any description, or run, or drive a horse dr
other animal in a disorderly manner through
the streets. Any person violating this sec-
tion shall be fined not exceeding ten dol-
lars, at the discretion of the Mayor.
Sec. 5. No person shall knowingly and
wilfully bring, or cause to be brought or in-
troduced into the city of Fernandina, any
pauper or other person not having property
to support him or herself and who is unable
or unwilling to work or otherwise support
himself or herself in a respectable manner,
which intends to make such pauper charge-
able upon the charity of the city or citizens.
Any person offending against this section
shall be fined not exceeding twenty-five dol-
lars, at the discretion of the Mayor.
Sec. 6. It shall not be lawful for any per-
sons to assemble or engage at any place
within the city limits for the purpose of
tinpanning or for other acts which may dis-
turb the good order and tranquility of the
citizens. Any persons violating this section
shall be fined not exceeding five dollars, at
the discretion of the Mayor.
Sec. 7. Any person or persons found
within the city limits annoying the inhabi-
tants by entering their houses or enclosures,
entering unoccupied buildings or lots with-
out permission, to the endangerment or an-
noyance of its owners or neighbors thereof,
or who shall be found or reported as per-


istently begging for alms, shall be subject
o arrest, and upon conviction be fined in
he sum not exceeding three dollars for each
)ffence.
Sec. 7. No person shall butcher or keep a -
laughter-pen or slaughter-house within the
limits of this city, under a penalty not ex-
eeding fifty dollars.
Sec. 9. No person shall shoot or throw
missiles of any description from slings or
ling-shots in any street, lane, alley, or from
ne lot to another not owned by the party,
within the corporate limits of the city of
Pernandina. Every person violating this
section shall be fined not exceeding five
dollars for each offence, at the discretion of
he Mayor.
Sec. 10. Any person, except clergymen,
between the ages of twenty-one and fifty
'ears who, being called on by the Mayor or
police, or other officer of the city for as-
istance to suppress any affray, breach of
he peace or other outrage, or make an ar-
est, and shall refuse such assistance, shall
>e fined in the sum not exceeding twenty
dollars, at the discretion of the Mayor, un-
ess a sufficient excuse is given for such re-
us 1.
Sec. 11. No person shall keep on his or her
premises any nuisance to the annoyance of
his or her neighbors or injurious to the pub-
ic health. Any person so annoyed may
complain to the Mayor or any member of
Council, who shall require an abatement of
he nuisance within twenty-four hours,
under penalty not exceeding twenty dollars
per day for every day such nuisance exists
after notice is given to remove it. And if
anything be found in any lot which is a
nuisance or injurious to the public health,
n the judgment of the Mayor, Sanitary
Committee or City Marshal, the occupant of
said lot shall be notified by any of said par-
ties to remove the same, and if the nuisance'
s not abated within twenty-four hours after
such notice, for every day following it the
person or persons owning, occupying or
having control of the premises upon which
it remains shall, upon conviction before the
Mayor, be fined not exceeding ($25) twenty-
ive dollars.
Sec. 12. No engineer or person in charge
of a locomotive or train of cars shall run
the same at a greater rate of speed than five
miles an hour through any of the streets of
the city. The bells of the locomotive, while
in motion, shall be kept continuously ring-
ing, and distinct taps or signals shall be
given before starting a train. Any person
violating this section shall, upon conviction,
be fined not exceeding ten dollars, at the
discretion of the Mayor.
Sec. 13. No street crossing shall be ob-
structed by any train of cars or locomotive
bo prevent free traffic across the same longer
than five minutes ,at any one time. Any
party or person in charge of such trains of
oars or loeomiotkve-- 4olat-iag- t s ton-
shall, upon conviction before the Mayor, be
fined in the sum not-.exceeding ten dollars,
at the discretion of 'the Mayor, for each
offence. ', I
Sec. 14. No person shall place in any
street or any sidewalk in this city any
empty boxes, casks, bales, or anything
which will impede the free passage in and
along such streets or sidewalks. Any per-
son violating, or permitting the violation, of
this section shall be fined not exceeding
($10) ten dollars, in the discretion of the
Mayor, and not exceeding ($5) dollars for
each day such obstruction shall remain
after being required to remove the same.
Sec. 15.' No person shall, without per-'
mission of the Mayor first obtained, deposit
any quantity of building material or earth
in any street in this city. The Mayor shall
give such permission when any person ap-
plying for such permission intends early 'to
remove such articles and cannot conve-
niently place them elsewhere. And in such
cases the Mayor shall prescribe the mode of
piling and arranging the 'same. Persons
violating this section shall be fined not ex-
ceeding ($10) ten dollars, at the discretion'of
the Mayor, and be required immediately to
remove the obstruction, and shall be fined
in the discretion of the Mayor for each day
such articles remain after such requirement.
Sec. 16. No horse, or mule attached to a
dray or other vehicle shall be left by ,the,
driver in a careless manner on the streets,
and no horse or mule attached to a dray or
other vehicle shall be allowed to roam with-
out a driver through,tg the streets. Any per-
son violating this section shall be fined not
exceeding ($10) ten dollars, in the discretion
of the Mayor. *.-
Sec. 17. Any person who shall burye.r
cause'to beburied,any deceased person or per-
sons in any other place within th, corporate
limits of the city than the public cemetery
at Old Town without permission of the
Mayor, shall forfeit arid pay not exceeding
one hundred dollars for each offence. In
all cases where special permission is given
by the Mayor for interments within the lim-
its of' the'city other than the public cemne-
tery aforesai I, the grave shall be dug at least
six feet deep, and shall be vaulted as fol-
lows, that is: There shall be 'at least two
thicknesses of brick laid at the bottom.of
the grave-in hydraulic cement, and plastered
over with the same material to a thickness
,0,f at least one-half inch ;. the grave shall be
then walled with brick and cement on all
sides'to the height of the' box containing
the casket and thoroughly plastered wijh
cement on the inside with cement one-half
inch in thickness, and be arched over the







THE FLORIDA


MIRROR:


OCTOBER


16, 1886.


MARIAR IN HEAVEN.

The pa'son's ben preachin' 'bout heaven
To us who're outen the fold,
'Bout gates made of jasper and pearl,
And streets paved with nuggets of gold;
Says the folks there are saints, or else angels,
Some playing' on harps with gold strings-
(I allow it's a sort of accomp-ment
To the tunes which th' rest of 'em sings.)
And I wonder and think of Mariar,
Who left me a year ago May,
How she tackles to all them fine flxin's-
For she didn't set much by display.
She were humble and shy-like a livin',
As any with who I'm aquaint;
I reckon she don't feel to hum yet
When she talks with an angel or saint.
When she looks out at the amethyst fences
And walks on the streets paved with gold,
Don't you s'pose there are times when she long@
fur
The lane in which me and her strolled?-
The old grassy lane through the medder,
And the stile where my coming' she'd wait--
Don't you think she'd as lief have the stile there
As the beautifulest pearly-hinged gate?
And the pond on the farm by the willers,
Where she used to pick cat-tails and flowers,
Ruther have than the big crystal ocean?-
'Cause she did love this old farm of ours.
Set me thinking' in this way this morning .
When I looked at her pansies and roses,
And I couldn't help wishin' her with me,
'Stead stayin' up there long 'ith Moses.
As fur me, it's lonesome withoutt 'er-
So solemn-like round the old place,
That I'm longin' to die and go to 'er,
Tho' I reckon I'm lackin' of grace.
But if I should be sent down to-t'other,
And could sit down 'ith her by the fire-
Why, what could be nicer in heaven
Than sitting' alongsidee of Mariar?
'Taint orthydox, this way of talking ,
Sez the pa'son to me t'other day,
And he fetched me to his way o' thinking ,
Which wuz jest like Mariar's old way.
So I'm trying' to live jest as she did-
Go to meeting' as she use ter do-
And her spirit hangs round me and whispers:
"Josiah, I guess you'll pull through 1"
-Mather D. Kimball in The Current.

A MONTH OF PROBATION.

"No, my lad! Old heads are wiser than
young ones. You mustn't have your way all
at once, though it's a way I confess I like
well enough myself. It would look as though
we took advantage of your good luck and
'nailed' you before you knew your own mind.
So do as I say. Pack up and be off to South-
wick. See if you prefer a city practice to a
village one, and a city love-ah, well, well! I
won't say anything of that-but keep away
long enough to make sure of what you really
wish, and then if you come back, why, I'll
bid you welcome and-h'm-some one else
perhaps won't be sorry !"
Thus bluntly spake Dr. Moore to his assist-
ant of three years, and though his ultimatumm
was not altogether agreeable it haj to be ac-
cepted. Common, sense, of which ;the young
man had his share, bade Mr. Ge ald Dalby
yield, though he chafed at this first check to
his fond hope of bursting suddenly from
chrysalis to butterfly existence, and resented
the implied doubt cast on the fixity of his in-
tentions.
"I'll take a month then, if you insist," he
said, rather ruefully.
"Three would be better," quoth the doctor,
brutally judicious.
"One will be as long as three to me, sir,"
was the reproachfully pathetic reply, "so it
will answer the same purpose." (The doctor
coughed dubiously.) "Then I may speak to
Miss Hester as soon as I return?"
"If you're still of the same way of think-
ing," answered Dr. Moore, sitting down to
his writing table, and Mr. Dalby quitted the
surgery, bestowing a glance of injured dignity
at his own reflection in the little mirror he
kept hung up over the medicine bottles.
He felt it hard, this young man just come
into a large slice of property, not to be al-
lowed a whole cake at a time. A week ago,
if told that he would by now possess a snug
two hundred and fifty a year, the legacy of a
distant relative, he would have declared him-
self content for long to come. Now here he
was, quite used to feeling himself a man of
means, and ready to grumble because
sensible Dr. Moore would not take him
for a partner and gave him his pretty
niece Hester to wife at four-and-twenty
hours' notice I The callous selfishness,
the stony hearted worldly wisdom of elderly
people were incredible Mr. Gerald Dalby
pitied himself as he packed his portmanteau,
and prepared to journey from this Lincoln-
shire village towards the Midland city where,
under the auspices of Dr. Moore's friend, Mr.
Earunshaw, he was to see something of town
practice before binding himself to the country.
This move was supeirfluously prudent. It;
would puzzle Hester-pretty, brown eyed!
Hester, who had been first so openly, then a
trifle timidly delighted at his new prosperity
-his Hester, as during the last few days he
had all but called her, who such a little
while before had seemed out of his reach. In.


the first flush of independence he :had felt
himself-rather a fine fellow to lay his newly-
acquired thousands at dear little Hetty's dis-
posal so promptly, and now to have the
doctor cold shouldering him down to proba-
tion in this excessively cautious way! "Oh,
hang it!" thought Mr. Dalby, cramming his
clothes together in reckless confusion-"It
would serve him right if I never came back
from Southwick at all!"
. This being his frame of mind, our gentle-
man was ill at ease through his 'last evening
at Crouleby. Mrs. Moore, good soul, could
never keep a secret in her life, and so had not
been trusted with this one concerning the
young people. For three years she had been
on the alert to repress the impecunious assist-
ant's evident admiration of Hetty. Now she
felt aggrieved that, the impediment of pov-
erty removed, he should make no further ad-
vances. Hietty was wistful, pale, shy, avoid-
ing. direct glance at Mr. Gerald. But when
for good night and good-by her little, soft,
clever hand lay trembling in his (longer than
it had any need to do) the young fellow could
have gnashed his teeth over his promise to
her uncle, and was fain to whisper: "I shall
be writing to you soon, Miss Hetty," as he re-
linquished the small nervous fingers. So the
brown eyes shot up one trusting beam, and
the owner, innocent-hearted and unsl--


picious maiden that she was, comforted her-
self with that farewell, and lived hopefully
through dreary weeks in expectation of that
promised letter.
But she waited in vain. Day after day
went by: no letter came. Three weeks, then
arrived a brief missive for Dr. Moore. He
read it with a curt "Dalby's all right," and
though Hetty was almost crying with hun-
ger for more news she dared ask no questions.
Her uncle was kindness itself to her, but he
was frowning over something else.
"Ah, Mr. Dalby has got quite above us
hum-drum folks, I expect," complained Mrs.
Moore when another fortnight went by with-
out bringing fuller tidings of their late assist-
ant. "I really had a better opinion of him.
I never thought he would forget old friends
like this!"
Some one else had thought he never would
--some one who could have waited patiently,
bravely, for years, once sure of his love, but
who paled sadly under this most strange neg-
lect.
"Is Aunt Pleasance right? Oh! has he for-
gotten me?" thought poor little heart-sore
Hetty, and to answer this we must do what
our disconsolate lassie could not-follow our
hero.
It was late afternoon when he reached
Southwick-he lost his luggage at one junc-
tion, his train at another, his attention being
less given to his journey than to a six-and-a-
quarter kid glove that he carried about in his
breast coat pocket.
"My round is over to-day," said Mr. Earn-
shaw at the dinner table, "but if you're not
tired I'll take you to Landon Oaks this eve-
ning. The Chevrons' place, you know-Sir
Marmaduke Chevrons. Family been there
from Tudor times. Not very wealthy, but
real old stock. "My lady has weak nerves. I
take her a tonic and all the news I can collect
about three times a week. Calling on her is
my prerogative. You won't step into that,
young gentleman, even if we do knock up a
partnership. Still I'm above jealousy! I
told Moore that whoever he recommended to
me should see the whole of my circle, so you
may come to Landon and welcome."
Acquiescing in which, not without a covert
smile at what his host evidently considered a
magnanimous offer, and an inclination to an-
nounce that even immediate attendance on
Sir Marmaduke's family would not bribe
him to stop at Southwick, Mr. Gerald put on
a brand new coat and tall professional hat,
and was soon spinning along the high road
towards the dwelling of this aristocratic pa-
tient. (Oh, that he had been sitting down to
tea with Hetty opposite instead!) Up a splen-
did avenue-down a broad drive-through
massive gates on a wide graveled space-by
a stately brick mansion they pulled up. A
hearty voice from a deep mullioned casement
greeted them. A fine elderly figure came
forth on to the lawn.
"Here at last, Earnshaw? My lady's ready
for a gossip. Let's hear what you have to
, say, then I have to take my little girl to a
party at the Lennoxes'. She doesn't want to
go, but we won't let her mope-not stop with
her mother too much, eh? Who's this?" with
a nod at our young doctor; got a new gr---"
"Mr. Gerald Dalby-Sir Marmaduke," in-
terposed Mr. Earnshaw. "A gentleman who
may possibly take part of my practice."
"Oh, I beg his pardon," said Sir Marma.
duke courteously (Gerald didn't exactly see
what for); "come in, sir, while Earnshaw
and I go up to my lady," and as the two elder
gentlemen stepped up the flight of dark oak
stairs, the junior medicus was ushered into a
drawing room unique in his modest experi-
ence. It was a -room costly yet sober in
adornment; big enough to hold half Dr.
Moore's whole house; wealth in every detail
compared to what he was used to; a scent
floating throughout, sweet, refined, delicious.
Mr. Gerald drew a deep breath and fell un-
der this new charm. With a shudder he re-
called the powerful aroma of furniture paste
pervading the Moore's home, where spring
cleaning was just over. For the first time
that odious smell, those simple solid mahog-
anies, struck him as vulgar. Towards the
satin-draped windows he moved admiringly
and saw-something that cast over his fool-
ish brain yet another spell.
Just outside, on a broad balcony, a beauti-
ful untidy rose climbed up a lattice. Over its
branches, full in his view, stooped a slender
figure, clad in pale-tinted silk and lace. An
exquisite outstretched arm, a most shapely
hand, hovered over a blossom; plucked it;
lifted it a moment to the lips of a lovely
girlish face, then fastened it, to the music of
a faint sigh, in the front of her dress.
Mute, entranced stood our young doctor,
having but one thought. Oh! to exchange
but one word with that vision! The aspira-
tion evoked a gasp. The enchantress without
heard it, looked up, and instantly, veiled with
a certain gracious dignity the like of which
Mr. Dalby had never seen before, advanced
composedly.
"Excuse me, I did not hear you announced.
You are wishing to see Sir Marmaduke?"
Never since his first hobbledehoy hour at


the hospitals had our hero felt so utterly
gauche as now. He had an agreeable idea
that his general deportment was excellent.
,10ow he felt as clumsy as a fortnight-old
puppy; nearly broke a window with his
elbow, and all but tri p!ied over a stool, as he
stood back to leb this pearls creature pass
in. With the sharp self-reminder (very rarely
required by Mr. Geraldl that he must collect
his wits and put his best foot forward if he
would not seem quite a fool, he stammered
out:
"Oh, thank you. I am merely wait-
ing for Mr. Earnshaw. I'm--er-look-
ing round with him. Perhaps-er-
I may become his partner." But this
position, which would have sounded rather
superb to-well, Lincolnshire friends for in-
stance-seemed to shrivel into insignificance
at Landon Oaks; Mr. Dalby's voice sounded
apologetic as he explained it, and he grew
deferentially, unbecomingly red.
Patricia Chevron's instincts were all kind.
The stranger was an intrusion on minutes
that she would rather ha-e spent alone, but
he must not be permitted to feel himself so.
"Mr. Earnshaw's profession is yours then,"
she said: "it is a noble one" (Mr. Gerald
glowed with returning courage), "we are so
dependent on it everywhere." How thankful
he felt he was a doctor! He would make the
most of that compliment.


"Yes, indeed," he said complacently, "I sup-
pose all people are. And it's a profession
that's not exactly easy-er-and--sometimes
it's dangerous!"
"Ah, yes, even at home it must be that,"
agreed Miss Chevron, "while abroad-oh,
there it must be ten times worse."
Her voice betokened sympathy with expa-
triated practitioners. He wished he had been
one, only then he could not have been here!
Women all liked courage. He would lay
claim to it himself, the more boldly the bet-
ter.
"Yes, there's dangerous work abroad," said
he, "but I should like to be there for that very
reason." She looked at him kindly. "With
our army, for instance." (Oh, Mr. Gerald!
and :god-natured as all the old people of
Crouleby confess you over common physic,
you know you never yet dressed a cut
without feeling sick!) "I've a schoolfel-
low who's gone in for that sort of thing,
and I'm always wishing-at least I wish
now-I could step into his shoes! He's in the
thick of the fighting in Egypt."
This ruse of bloodthirstiness had its reward.
Miss Chevron kindled at the spirited words.
Her eyes darkened and glowed.
"You wish you were in those terrible
scenes! Oh, that is very good of you! Your
friend is safe, unhurt, I hope?"
"Right as a trivet," responded Mr. Dalby,
charmed at her interest; "he had a run for it
lately, though. An English officer was
within an ace of.being stabbed by a beast of
an Arab when Brereton made a dash forward
from his ambulance, broke the fellow's arm
to splinters and saved Maj. St. James in the
very nick of time. But I beg your pardon"-
Miss Chevron had grown suddenly.pale--"I
ought not to tell such tales to a lady; they're
only fit for men; only"-seeing her eyes begin
to sparkle again-"what I should like if I had
the chance;" and finding this topic seemed to
hold her interest, Mr. Dalby launched into
fluent talk of the then current campaign,
praised the courage of his friend, the splendid
deeds of the rescued officer, and keeping him-
self and his burning desire to share these dan-
gers well to the fore, made such good use of
fifteen minutes that beautiful Patricia Chev-
ron actually looked sorry when a servant, en-
tering with carriage wraps, announced that
Sir Marmaduke was waiting without.
Sorry, was she? Sorry at the interruption?
Mr. Gerald's heart gave a great thump at the
flattering suspicion, and he flung as much
suppressed feeling as he dared into his formal
farewell when she left him-reluctantly, he
could have sworn!
"Good night," she said softly with a most
seraphic smile, "and," she added, with what
to his excited fancy seemed eloquent con-
fusion, "you will be coming again, I hope. I
like to hear you talk-of Egypt."
How those words floated about him! and
how the whole foreground of that night's
restless slumbers was filled, not by the pretty
form of absent Hetty, but by the fair and
fascinating gentlewoman who had that day
crossed his path! "She liked to hear him
talk!" He'd always an idea he talked well.
Now he exulted- in his power. At her bid-
diog bauld talk forever. And she would re-
quite hifnT-well, our young gentleman went
fairly offihis head and indulged in calculations
which, published in Southwick, would have
gained him the general verdict of hopeless
insanity!
I In the glamour of his hot, but well-con-
cealed adoration, Mr. Dalby worked for
three weeks with Mr. Earnshaw, showing
Skill enough professionally to make him an
acceptable partner if he would have it so.
Mr. Earnshaw said as much one day.
"Decision does not rest with myself en-
tirely," returned Mr. Gerald, rather loftily,
and he left his slightly amused senior, to go
and speculate in seclusion on whether 250
a year, part of an old established practice,
and a handsome person--"he knew he'd that!"
whether these and a most pungently passion-
ate affection would induce the baronet to give
him his daughter-would induce the charm-
ing girl to take him. And vanity whispered
"yes" to the whole scheme!
So for three mortal weeks the young doctor
missed no chance of visiting Landon Oaks,
gathered up every scrap of converse on that
topic which she had as good as told him he
handled so well, and intoxicated by every
fresh minute of Patricia Chevron's presence,
strayed daily farther into a fool's paradise.
And meanwhile what of his three years'
love, what of Hetty Moore?
Why, the thought of her made him uncom-
fortable, so, lightly be it written, he thought
of her as rarely as he could. Ifow wise Dr.
Moore had been though, to refuse to close
with those precipitate proposals made in the
first flush of fortune's arrival! How very
wise! He could never be grateful enough.
He wrote, with a hint to that effect, the letter
which Dr. Moore looked black over. As to a
letter to Hester!-well, he'd not exactly
promised it. Perhaps she had forgotten
what. he said (he knew she had not)! He
pould write her a friendly sort of a note by
and by; when Sir Marmaduke-if Miss
Chevron-oh, when he was certain of any-


thing! So presently he got his experimental
visit to Southwick prolonged; Dr. Moore
screwed up his face over the letter which
Sore the information, Hetty vanished to her
room to cry over it; and then came an even-
ing when Mr. Dalby, walking in the Landon
-gardens beside Miss Cshevron, daringly
begged flower from that trellis by which he
had first seen her. And this beautiful
princess, this queen of roses, bestowed a bud
upon him with a sweet half-reluctant shyness
that sent him away in a species of delirium!
Next day he wrote to Crouleby, saying he
had almost determined to remain at South-
wick, and this done, an officious sense of
honor that bade him be off with the old love
before he was on with the new, impelled him
to write to Hetty. So spoiling, six sheets of
paper and six pens over it, he compiled a cold,
studiously friendly note to her; thanked her
for her sisterly care for his comfort while he
had been at her uncle's, and hoped they might
possibly meet at some future time. He did
not at all enjoy writing that epistle, but he
felt he had done his duty as a gentleman
when it was completed, and he thrust it in his
pocket when he had to start for Landon Oaks,
resolving to post it on his return.
As usual now, he waited for Mr. Earnshaw
in the house, but in a different room, next the
small drawing room. Its open window over-
looked the balcony and the clustering rose,


and-gracious powers-what did it overlook
as well!
Two individuals: one, Patricia Chevron,
radiantly lovely; one, a handsome, soldierly
man, who bent toward her with devotion un-
mistakable. She spoke-our luckless friend,
mute as a mouse and rigid as a stone, heard
every syllable.
"They even kept the papers from me,
Graham. I had only stray tidings of you to
live off. I used to watch these roses you were
so fond of, till my heart ached with wonder-
ing if you would ever come to them and me
again. I called them yours always-the dear
things. But once I gave one away. Our
doctor brought an assistant or something of
that kind here, and, strange to say, he knew
that brave fellow who saved your life. He
told me so much about you, dearest, I even
let him have a flower to pay him! He was
a harmless, respectable sort of young man,
and--"
The harmless, respectable sort of young man
nearly choked with a stifled groan, then
turned and fled.
Out of the house and half way home he'd
got before Mr. Earnshaw picked him up with
"Air of the room disagreed with you? Ah,
it's sultry to-night. And they kept me a
long while too. Deal to talk about. Col.
St. James just back from the Soudan, the
man they tried to stop their daughter being
engaged to before he went out. She might
have been a countess, but the cornet kicked
the beam when weighed against her colonel,
so now he's covered himself with glory they're
to be allowed to marry in August. You'll
see something of the wedding if you stop with
me."
But Mr. Dalby did not stop with Mr.
Earnshaw. He had a gruesome attack of--
indigestion; found out Southwick disagreed
with him; took himself to the coast for a week,
and by the sad sea waves meditated on what
an ass he had been. Then he got himself back
to Crouleby, and, with a humility that has
much improved him, courted the healing of
his wounds by brown-eyed Hetty.
They, too, were on their September wed-
ding tour when the bride, foraging for a
fusee-case in an overcoat her husband said he
had not worn for months, brought out a let-
ter addressed to her own maiden name.
"Why, what is this, Gerald?" questioned
she; "did you write to me after all from
Southwick, and forget to post the letter?
And may I have it now?"
To which he made answer: "Why, -yes, I
wrote, but now you've got me, pet, you want
nothing else, do you? There!"-tearing the
paper into shreds and casting them into
Windermere's waters-"we won't talk of the
time I was away from you. This is a hun-
dred times happier!"
Acknowledging which, Hetty never sus-
pects or asks aught anent what her husband
determinately consigns to oblivion-that
month of midsummer madness!-Cassell's
Magazine.
An Infallible Indication.
When Mr. Cammack got ready to be
married there were few of his friends that
placed much faith in the stories of his inten-
tions, and one day up at Saratoga some of tlhe
chief men of Wall street were on ihe piazza
of the United States hotel discussing the
gossip about Mr. Cammack, when of a sudden
the bear leader loomed up in person before
them. He wasn't alone. A handsome lady
was by his side. But even that innovation ini
Mr. Cammack's promenading habits didn't
go far toward convincing anybody that Ad-
dison was on the verge of being a Benedict
till William H. Vanderbilt, bringing his easy
chair's legs down with a thump, said this:
"Cammack is going to be married. I'll
wager 100 to 1 on it. Do you notice that he
is carrying the lady's shawl on his arm. That
is a sure sign, an unerring sign. When a
man gets that far he's gone. I've noticed it a
hundred times. It never fails-never!"' -
William H. Vanderbilt was an observer
and a philosopher.-New York Times.

The Homely, Humble Burro.
I have spoken about the burro and his mu-
sical voice, but he should be seen as well as
heard. Small, homely, and so humble in his
appearance, he presents a ludicrous sight, yet
at the same time one has a feeling almost of
pity for him, for it seems as if he did the most of
the labor in the country, as far as the car-
rying of loads is concerned. He can climb up
and down the steepest hills, where you would
expect to see only a goat go successfully.
It looks very funny to see a Mexican, with
long legs, riding a burro. The burro wears a
patient look, with his long ears high in the
air, while at the extreme rear end of him, a
the upper end of the burro'stail, sits the i-ider,
his feet almost touching the ground;
The quality of the burro's voice is )tenor,
and resembles the creaking of a pump handle
which very much needs greasing. When he
sings, his mouth curves almost to his ears,
and his jaws look as if he had the lockjaw.--
Mexico Cor. Boston Transcript.

Norway's World-Famous Whirlpool
The far-famed Maelstrom or "grinding


stream," of which so much has been written
and so many stories are told, is better known
than ever before, and its :destructive whirl-
pool and fearful current are proved a myth;
A steamer navigates it now with entire safety.
There are many such "stroms" in the Lofoten
group, and several of them surpass the Mael-
strom in violence. They all are formed by
the tide water passing from a fjord through a
narrow strait into the sea.-Foreign Cor,
Boston Herald.

The last Royal academy dinner cost the
British artists 60 000.
The Professor's Memory.
James Syme, the eminent Scotch surgeon
and professor in the University ot Edinburgh,
was once consulted by a well known public
character about some affection of the lung's.
Years afterward the patient returned on the
same errand. On being announced he was
nettled to observe that Mr. Syme had
neither any recollection of his face nor-
which was still more galling-acquaintance
with his name. He thereupon mentioned the
fact of his former visit. Still Symo failed to
remember him. But when the professor put
his ear to the patient's chest and heard the
peculiar sound which the old ailment had
made chronic, he at once exclaimed: "Ah, I
remember you now! I know you by your
lunp, l"-New York Home Journal.


IN TAMIL FASHION.


A LITTLE FOLKS' DINNER EATEN
IN THE CEYLON STYLE.

Tropical Leaves Made to Serve as Plates.
An Exemplar in Table Etiquette-Plan-
tain Plate in Neat Condition-Expert
Manipulation.
Yesterday our two little girls were dressed
in the Tamil fashion and had a little dinner
party, at which, with formal state, they ate
as the Tamils do, without forks, knives or
plates. They sat meanwhile upon a carpet
strip of new matting, and they sat cross-
legged. Their Tamil costume was complete.
They looked pretty in red calico jackets-vir-
tually a short underwaist, which is tied by
its corners in fronc. It supports thus the
adult's woman's figure. Except the short
sleeves and one shoulder little of the jacket
appears. It is hidden by six or seven yards
of cloth, which is uncut and without a stitch;
and it is so draped as to form both a skirt
and waist covering. Aya (nurse) prepared
the repast, just what she would have had for
her own family dinner when she had rather
an extra good dinner.
When they were properly seated all in a
row upon the mat, she slipped out of the
room, and at one fetching she brought a
whole dinner and utensils for four persons.
They were Henrietta, Anna, Mary Spooner
and Aya's little daughter "Tressia," who, al-
though she lives in a house just behind the
kitchen wing, very seldom comes into the
bungalo. "Tressia" is for St. Theresa. It
was an orderly, silent, stately dinner, yet
such a simple affair, such all-sufficient table
furniture, and such a rich meal.
Aya began by laying before each diner a
broad piece of plantain leaf. They often use
as plates the large leaves of the teak tree-well
known for its superior timber-whose leaves
are not lobed, and are of good size for table
plates.
A leaf, to serve as a plate, should be of firm
fiber and sufficient thickness, and its surface
more soft, smooth and shining than a var-
nished board. Tropical leafage is well ad-
apted to the needs of the social table, while a
clean, dry cocoanut shell is a wholesome bowl
that does not leak. A plantain leaf, the leaf
of a banana tree, is ten or twelve feet long.
A stout mid rib divides the leaf longitudin-
ally. The winds often tear this giant leaf
into short ribbons on each side of the strong
rib. Aya's plates were each a square-cut
piece of one of these segments-a fresh, pure,
green, clean plate.
TABLE ETIQUETTE.
.Then Aya gave to each guest a liberal por-
tion of, boiled rice, with two sorts of richest
curry, and, as an additional appetizer, a bit
of some kind of dried fish, slightly fried, salty,
crispy. It was an extraordinary dinner, be-
cause they had more than one curry.
Little Tamil Tressia was now the exemplar
in table etiquette. The others were not to
this manner born. Tressia kept on her lap
her left hand clear to take hold-of a drinking-
cup or for any other emergency. Into her
right hand she daintily scooped a suitable
portion of rice for one mouthful. She
worked it in her closed hand until it was suffi-
ciently compact; then, slightly bending, she
placed it in her mouth, and so son in repeti-
tion. After a while she took daintily from
the curries to give her palate a flavor, about
in the same drift as we taste one food and
then another in harmonious succession.
Throughout the feast she kept her plantain
plate in the neatest condition-4 years old
and a gentle lady in her manners. Not a
crumb of the rice or a drop of the curries fell
outside of her verdant and vivid, glossy and
strong plate of nature's providing. Her hand
was not submerged in food, nor did the grains
of rice cleave to her fingers. The back of
her half-closed hand and the manipulating
finger forks seemed no otherwise than clean.
Nor was the food upon her plate in a slov-
enly state. Her finger ends, the deftest of
table implements upon occasion, brought
every grain of rice to its own compartment.
The eaten curries left only a richer polish
upon the plantain leaf. And when she had
chewed her crisp little morsel of dried fish as
a finisher the little Tressia, following without
thought her home habits and excellent table
manners, turned together the two corners, of
her leaf and quietly got up, slipped out and
threw her plate away. Then she came back
and resumed her seat. A moistened towel
was passed around and the Tamil dinner ex-
traordinary was finished.-Anna Ballard's
Ceylon Letter in Chicago News.

Glasgow and its Harbor.
The Clyde forms Glasgow's entrance to tlid
sea and Glasgow has made it .one .of the fine
harbor views of the world. Originally it was
a sluggish anid tinaviglble stream, but by
the dredging of forty years it now admits tie
largest ocean vessels, and at -the: wharves of
Glasgow you w(ill fid ships from' all parts of
the world. The harbor of Glasgow is two


and one-half miles long, tnd below it ship
building yards line the Clyde for many miles
on its way to the sea. Glasgow is the ship-
building center for the world and she builds
ships for every nation of note.
Great Britain has'55 per cent. of the carry-
.ing trade., of the worlj and her sam vessels
have increased in tonnage oyer 200 per cent.
within the past-ten years. She pays her seak
men less than half the wages of the sailors of
the United States and gets more out of them.
The average wages of English, sailors are $18
per annum; those of American sailors $475
per annum. So that the American sailor
gets $260 more a year than his British
brother.-Frank G. Carpenter in Cleveland
Leader.
A Scene in Halifax.
Across the street, in an open space, the ne-
groes and Jndians congregate. There are
many negroes here-quiet, honest people. On
market day they evidently put on all they
have to come to town. I saw one old Africap
lady with three or four skirts on, two sacqu4e
and as many shawls. Their wares are viei'
tables, berries and eggs, but they seem to ek-
cel in rustic baskets filled with ferns. The
Indians squat a little farther off, and their
wares are artistically carved canoes, tobog-







THE FLORIDA MIRROR: OCTOBER 16, 1886.


THE FLORIDA- MIRROR.


GEORGE R. FAIRBANKS, EDITOR.


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I etters simply to THE FLORIDA MIRROR.


SA TURDA Y, OCTOBER 16, 1886.


THE DEATH OF ifR. YULEE.
We were startled on Monday last
by the telegraphic announcement of
the death of the Hon. DAVID L.
YULEE, so long identified with Flor-
ida as its representative in the halls
of Congress as its Territorial Dele-
gate and then as its First Senator;
the originator and founder of its
railway enterprises; and it is not too
much to say that Florida owes more
to Mr. YULEE than to any other
citizen of the State. His wonderful
sagacity, clearness of apprehension,
tact and judgment in forwarding the
great enterprises in which he was
engaged, and to which Florida so
largely owes the great measure of
prosperity to which she has attained,
can hardly be overestimated.
His public life dates back more
than half a century. Born in 1811,
the worthy son of one of the most
remarkable menassociated with the
settlement of Florida after its cession
to the United. States-Moses E. Levy
-he was educated in Virginia at an
early age, began his official life in
Florida as Deputy Clerk of the Su-
perior Court in Alachua county.
Before he was of age he was one of
the clerks of the Legislature of Flor-
ida, and very soon after became a
member of that body. His intelli-
gence and industry soon attracted
public attention, and he was placed
-in the field asDelegate to Congress
against one of the most popular and
brilliant men of the day, and was
elected by a handsome majority.
In 1845 he succeeded in having
Florida admitted as a State with
Iowa, thus preserving the sectional
balance of power. Elected to the
Senate by the first Legislatuire, he
devoted all his powers to the fuirther-
ance of the interests of the State and
secured beneficial legislation in every
department, established postoffices
and postroads, land districts, the
armed occupation law, by which 160
acres was given t.o every actual set-
tier who would go on to the lands
on the frontier from which the
Indians had been driven out. He
secured appropriations for light-
houses, collection districts and new
roads, etc.
Mr. YULEE acquired a remarkable
influence in the Senate and in the
administration. His name and po-
sition were national in their extent,
and he was recognized as one of the
ablest statesmen in Washington. No
one has ever equalled him in the at-
tention and courtesy shown his con-
stituents, no letter ever remained


system of railways now known as


unanswered, no request was ever
neglected.
In 1861, in common with other
Southern Senators, he made a stand
for his section, and when the crisis
came left the halls of Congress to re-
turn to share the fate of his people.
At the close of the war he was sin-
gled out as a victim to the animosity
of parties in power, arrested and
placed a close prisoner in Fort Pu-
laski, near Savannah. "After twelve
months of imprisonment he was re'-
leased and returned to Florida.
His first work was to gather up
the fragments of the great railroad
enterprise he had inaugurated, and
which had been wrecked during the
four years of war. Without capital,
without credit, by the sheer force of
his intellect and will, he placed the
railroad in order, opened up the in
terror to settlement and business, ex-
tricated the railway from overwhelm-
ing embarassments and brought it to
a condition where its value was
recognized and the necessary capital
furnished to make it what it now
is, the leading and most extensive
and well-equipped railway system in
the State.
Realizing how necessary was re-
pose at his advanced age, he gave,
a few years since, into other hands
the great interests he had so long
managed and was enjoying the com-
fort of retirement in his new and ele-
gant home in the city of'Washington.
Full of years and full of honors,
DAVID L. YULEE has passed away,
to be long remembered as one of the
ablest, most energetic and successful
of the citizens of Florida.
Our own city was his selection and
his creation. He saw the great ad-
vantages of this location as a termi-
nus of his great railway system, and
he had implicit faith in the future of
Fernandina as the great commercial
port of Florida. We believe the fu-
ture will demonstrate the wisdom of
his selection and justify all. his an-
ticipations. As the asperities of po-
litical or business antagonisms have
passed ,away, the people of Florida
have realized more and more how
much they owed to Mr. YULEE, and
now that he has passed away his
memory will be long honored and
respected.







.- DISTINGUISHED FLORIDIAN.
Hon. DAVID LEVY YULEE, whose
death was yesterday announced in
this paper, was the most distin-
guished and the ablest citizen of


the financial agencies necessary to our far-
ther more rapid improvement.
Let us prepare to use the wealth which
will thus come to us in advancing our moral
and social condition as a community by
building up colleges and providing a gener-
ous system of-public schools.
"Let us resolve to progress.
" For one, I am enlisted to do yeoman's
duty in all that can promote the moral and
material growth of the State.
" I'am for completing the. system of im-
provements now begun by whatever aids may
be necessary,
"I am for dedicating the magnificent
fund which a wise administration of the
Internal Improvement Fund will create to
Education; and, in the meanwhile, I am for
generous system of public schools at pub-
ic cost.
" I am for advancing, by an active positive
policy, the social and industrial condition of
the State.
"I am for progress, and will join efforts
with all who are laboring in the same di-
rection.


the Florida Railway & Navigation
Company's roads is his monument,
and it is one of which he is every
way worthy.
In 1859 Senator YULEE, in reply
to an address from citizens at Waca-
hootee, wrote the following letter,
which deserves a place entire in his
biography and the history of the
State:.
The noblest emulation in which we may
all engage is to do most to advance the
moral and material greatness of our State,
to adorn our borders, and to elevate her
name.
Never did a State more need combined
and harmonious effort in her service. Ca-
pable, by every natural advantage, to be
among the first in power, usefulness and
influence, she has been among the last in
all these respects.
"Who of us, with one spark of State
pride, or of just feeling, could review the re-
sults of the statistical tables collected in 1850
under the census act without mortification,
and without also resolving, as a first duty of
all true sons of the State, to devote every
energy to improve her condition. Sadly
impressed with the picture it revealed, I
have since then turned my chief attention
to State development, and am anxious to
join hands with all who can go with me in
a devoted effort to raise our noble mother
State to the dignity of her rightful rank.
The area of Florida is near sixty thous-
and square miles, which is exceeded in ex-
tent by only four other States, namely,
California, Texas, Virginia and Missouri.
"Of the whole sea-coast of the eastern
shore of the United States, we have within
our limits more than one-third. The whole
coast line of the United States on the Atlan-
tic and Gulf of Mexico is 3,020 miles of
continental line, of which Florida has 1,146
miles.
In point of health Florida stood at the
head of all Southern States, only surpassed
(that, too, very slightly,) by three Northern
States.
Ia woods, the most valuable cover its
whole extent. The live oak, the cedar, the
white and red oak, the cabinet woods (red
bay, magnolia, etc.), and the best yellow
pine for lumber and naval stores, abound in
almost inexhaustible quantities, conve-
niently placed for commerce.
,' -fire va riety and value of our agricultu-
ral capabilities, as a State, is altogether un-
-u rp:tsed in the Union. In suitableness for
uplalnedl ottui,, equal to any other, and sur-
1,-i-.g immeasurably all others in adapted-
ness to the richest of all staples, the sea
island cotton, the sugar, the tropical fruits
and early market vegetables.
Around' the shores of the State passes
the largest commerce of the continent, es-
timated to exceed five hundred millions'of
dollars annually.
It is the only State in the Union which
has-a shore upon the Gulf of Mexico as well
as Atlantic, and we control the useful access
of other Atlantic States to the Gulf. We
possess innumerable harbors upon both
shores, of various capacity, and equal to the
requirements of any amount of commerce.
With all these great elements, we
should be among the first in commerce and
wealth, in agriculture and the mechanic
arts, in population and social development.
How is it with us? Alas! I am almost
ashamed to draw the picture of our compar-
ative inferiority.
Organized as a Territory in 1821, during
that long period of thirty years which inter-
vened to 1850, the white population of the
State had reached only to forty-seven thous-
and, being only twenty-nine thousand
more than we had in the census of 1830.
Of that forty-seven thousand, about twenty
thousand were born in the State, showing
an immigration in thirty years from 1821 to
1550 of only about twenty-seven thousand.
With an area of about 60,000 square miles,
we had t wenty-four thousand fewer inhaibi-
tants "than Delaware, which has an area of
only 2,120) square miiles, and ninety-six
thousand less than Rhode Island, which has


lowest. In the value of church property
lowest but one (Arkansas). In the number
of churches compared with white popula-
tion the lowest of all.
"In the number of public and private
schools, to the square mile, we were greatly
the lowest; and in the percentage of children
at school, as compared with population, we
were much below every other.
Nearly one-fifth of the white population
of the State over twenty years of age were
unable to read and write.
In colleges, theological, medical and
law schools, so utterly were we deficient
that Florida was altogether omitted from
any place in the table.
"In the number of libraries and of vol-
umes of books we were greatly below every
other State.
It is no pleasant task to array the re-
sults exhibited in that year; but it is the
part of wisdom to look fairly in the face our
true condition, that we may better appreci-
ate the task before us.
We can pla e our State among the first
in power and influence, and we ought to do
it.
I trace the whole of our then compara-
tive inferiority in public prosperity to the
lack of that public spirit and enterprise
which was necessary to keep us up with the
spirit of the age. While other States had
been generously and courageously at work
to develop all their resources and to foster
their natural advantages, we, abounding in
the elements of wealth, had rested supine.
Other States, seizing at once upon the in-
strumentalities of progress which modern
science has furnished, had made useful to
their people all the advantages of their po-
sition. With the best position for com-
merce, we had no commerce. With the
best soil and climate for profitable agricul-
ture, we had fewer inhabitants to the square
mile than any other State. With a geo-
graphical relation to the Union which en-
titled us to be central in the intercourse be-
tween the seaboard States, we have been
isolated and obscure.
"There is in proportion to numbers an
unusual amount of intellect and energy in
the population of the State; but we had
failed to cultivate that public spirit and
State pride which would direct it in the
channels of State progress. This may be
well excused, and is fully accounted for by
the effects of the harassing and protracted
Indian hostilities that devastated and dis-
quieted the State, and by the diversified na-
tivities of our population, which has re-
quired time for coalescence.
Now, however, within a few years past.,
a change has been working, which it is our
true policy to cherish, and which will place
us in the next census upon a prouder foot-
ing. The State has started upon a new
career, and the noise of what she is doing is
already beginning to be heard abroad.
What has already been achieved may well
encourage us to go on.
The electric wires have penetrated to us
in the west and east, and soon may meet to-
gether across the length of the State.
"Roads are progressing in various direc-
tions, which will connect all the best har-
bors of the Gulf with those of the Atlantic,
and furnish avenues for every various need
of commerce.
Agriculture has caught the spark of im-
provement, and the products of our fields
are daily increasing.
Our cities are advancing in their im
provements, and new towns are springing
rito existence with an elasticity that evi-
dences the progress we are making.
"And in all social respects the advance-
ment is equally evident.
"Let us proceed, with courage and anima-
tion, to force through our own territory the
tide of intercourse between the Gulf and
Atlantic States by furnishing it with better
channels than any other now employed
upon the land or upon the water.
Let us enable our planters to combine
easy access to the cheapest provision mar-
kets on the one hand and the best cotton
andl sugar markets on the other, and thus
induce occupation of our soil.
Let us build up our own seaports, to
furnish the convenience and protection of a
home market for our produce, and to supply


Absolutely Pure.
HIS POWDER NEVER VARIES. A
marvel of purity, strength and whole-
someness. More economical than the ordi-
nary kinds, and. cannot be sold in competi-
tion with the multitude of low-test, short-
weight alum or phosphate powders.
Sold only in cans.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO,.,
48 106 Wall Street, New York


0. S. OAKES & CO.

Have opened a fresh stock of



FAMILY GROCERIES


-AT THE -

OLD STAND OF B. F. WAAS,

ON CENTRE STREET.


In connection with the Store is a



FIRSI-CLASS BHKRY

pli FRESH BREAD AND PASTRY can
be had every morning during the week at 6
o'clock am.; on Sundays, from 7 to 9 a.m.
,A Particular attention paid to supplies
for vessels; give us a call and satisfy your-
selves before purchasing elsewhere.


Corn, Oats, Hay, Bran,


MIXED FEED, RICE FLOUR, ETC,.

AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.

FRED W. HOYT & CO.


SAHJ,.


DOORS


p


A .-, HO-AND-

SB.LINDS,

AT FRED W. HOYT & Cox's.


WILLIAI B. C. DURY*E,
COMMISSION MERCHANT
-AND-
Manufacturer of Southern Pine Lumber,
BY THE CARGO,
For Domestic or Export Trade,
FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.


I


I






1-


I beg leave to repeat, and to beg you to
repeat with me over and over and over
again Let us resolve to Progress.
"Tour respectful servant,
"D. L. YULEE."
Thus spoke Florida's pioneer of
progress and improvement in 1859.
To-day Florida vies with many of
the most favored of her sister States
in schools, church privileges, intelli-
gence, immigration and business
prosperity, and instead of no rail-
ways at all, as there were none in
1856, we have rtow 2,000 miles of
railroad within the State and new
miles building every day.-Jackson-
ville Morning News.


0


only one thousand three hundredd and six
Si uare miles / 1
In the table of relative rank of popula-
tion Florida stood least, and so low that,
having fewer than the ratio established by a
law, we suffered the mortification to become 1
entitled to a representative in Congress only
by the forecast, of the Constitution, which
provided that each State should be entitled
to one representative 'without regard to (
population.
"There was not a city in the State which
reached a population of twenty-five hun- t
dred. ,.
There was not one canal in the State,
nor one mile of railroad upon which a lo- f
comotive could be run. I
We were the lowest but one (Arkansas)
in manufactures, etc.
We were the lowest but one (Delaware) 1
in aggregate wealth, even including the
value of slaves, and were the lowest in State p
revenue. t
In moral and social condition, the con-
trast with other States was equally sad.
" In the number of churches greatly the r


Florida of his .day and generation.
It has been asserted that he was not,
in a large sense, a statesman, and
this may be true. He was a man of
business, possessing the clearest per-
ceptions, the most untiring energy, a
steady nerve, unlimited confidence'
in his own judgment and great cour-
age.
The State of Florida is under'
greater obligation to him than many
of her citizens would now willingly
confess. But with the lapse of time
it is safe to prophesy that Mr. YULEE
will grow in fame in this State and
in the estimation of its people.
Mr. YULEE was Florida's territorial
delegate to Congress, its first United
States Senator, and the father of its
railway systems and other internal t
improvements. The grand Florida


(
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]


I ^
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rl






THE FLORIDA MIRROR: OCTOBER 16, 1886.


GENERAL DIRECTORY.
United States Officers.
LAND OFFICE, GAINESVILLE.
Register-L. A. Barnes, Gainesville.
Receiver-John F. Rollins, Gainesville
Surveyor-General-J. F. McClellan.
DISTRICT COURT.
Judge-Thomas Settle, Jacksonville.
Marshal-J. H. Durkee, Jacksonville.
Clerk-Philip Walter, Jacksonville.
INTERNAL REVENUE.
Collector-S. C. Thompson, Jacksonville.
COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS.
Wm. A. Mahoney, Fernandina.
Edwin Higgins, Jacksonville.
John F. House, St. Augustine.

State Offecers.
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.
Governor-Edward A. Perry, Tallahassee.
Lieutenant- Governor- Milton H. Mabry,
Leesburg.
Secretary of State-John L. Crawford, Tal-
lahassee.
Comptroller-W. D. Barnes, Tallahassee.
Preasurer-E. S. Crill.
Attorney-General---C. M. Cooper, Tallhaas-
see.
Commissioner of Lands-C. L. Mitchell.
Superintendent of Public Instruction-A. J.
Russell, Jacksonville.
Adjutant- General-David Lang.
SUPREME COURT.
Chief Justice--Geo. G. McWhorter.
Associate Justice-George P. Raney, Talla-
hassee.
Associate Justice-R. B. Van Valkenburgh,
Jacksonville.
Clerk-D. C. Wilson, Tallahassee.
CIRCUIT JUDGES.
First Circuit--Augustus E. Maxwell, Pen-
sacola.
Second Circuit-David S. Walker, Tallahas-
see.
Third Circuit-E. J. Vann, Madison.
Fourth Circuit-James M. Baker, Jackson-
ville.
Fifth Circuit-Thomas F. King, Gaines-
ville.
Sixth Circuit--H. L. Mitchell, Tampa.
Seventh Circuit-E. K. Foster, Sanford.

CO urt Calendar.
FIRST CIRCUIT.
Fall Term-
Santa Rosa, 2d Monday in October.
Walton, 4th Monday in October.
Holmes, 2d Wednesday after 4th Monday
in October.
Washington, 2d Monday after 4th Monday
in October.
Jackson, 3d Monday after 4th Monday in
October.
Escambia, 1st Monday in December.
This act amended section 2 of act of Feb-
ruary 10, 1879, and does not change the
Spring Term.
THIRD CIRCUIT.


Spring Term-
Taylor,. 1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in
April.
Madison, 2d Monday in April..
Hamilton, 4th Monday in April.
Suwanee, 1st Monday after 4th Monday
I- April.
Golumbia, 3d Monday after 4th Monday
i April.
Lafayette, 6th Tuesday after 4th Monday
in April.
Fall Termr-
Taylor, 1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in
October.
Madison, 2d Monday in October.
Hamilton, 4th Monday in October.
Suwannee, 1st Monday after 4th Monday
:in October.
Columbia, 3d Monday after 4th Monday in
'October.
Lafayette, 6th Tuesday after 4th Monday
_in October.


FOURTH CIRCUIT


,Spring Term-
St. John's, 2d Tuesday in March.
Clay, 4th Tuesday in March.
Bradford, 1st Tuesday in April.
Baker, 2d-Tuesday in April.
Nassau, 3d Tuesday in April.
Duval, 1st Tuesday in: May.
Fall Term-
St. John's 2d Tuesday in September.
Clay, 4th Tuesday in September. .
Bradford,-.st Tuesday in October.
Baker, 2d Tuesday in-October.
Nassau, 3d Tuesday in October.
Duval, 1st Tuesday in November.
FIFTH CIRCcUIT.
SSpring Tem-- .
Suimter, 3d Tuesday in March.
Marion, 4th Tuesday in, March.
SPutjam,' 2d Tuesday after 4th Tuesday in
March. ,.
Levy, 4tli Tuesday after 4th Tuesday in
March.
Alachaa, 4th Tuesday after: 4th Tuesday
in April. "
:Fall Term- : '
Sumter, 1st Tliesday in October.
Marion, 3d, Tuesday in October.
Putram, 2d Tuesd.ay in November.
Levy, 4th Tuesday in Novelmber.
Alachua, 1st Tuesday after 4th Tuesday
in November.
SEVENTH, CIRCUIT.
Spring Term-
Orange, 4th Monday in January.
Volusia, 3d Mo%)day in February.
Brevard., st Monday in. March.
Dade, 3.1 Monday in April.
..Fall Term-
Orange, 2d Monday in August.
Volusta, 2d MIonda in September.
Brevard, 4th Monday in September-
Dade, 2d Monday in November.

oun .y ers
ALACHUA.. ,. .
"County.,TJudge--Juni's,,. Gardner. Gaines-

CIer2-J. A. darlisle, Viainesville;.'
,t'er;fr-S-C. C Tucker, Arredondo. '
Collector of R.e'eue-H-F C. Denton, Gaines-
wille. "
.Stp.rin'ter.ent of Schools--W. N. Sheats,
BAKER COUNTY.
County Ji,-T ..B. Smithi, Sanderson.
(Oer?-,F. J. Pons, Sr., Sanderson.'
,. ,>.-r-.T. W. V;&inhuipl;cirlz, Sanderson.
C.!/or t'f Revene-J. W. Burnsed, San-
'.rson.
gmeri'ntf.ndent of Schools-Win. Lessene,
nderson.
BR.kDFORD COUNTY.
C',n'ty .Judtie-J. F. Richard. Lake Butler.
Clerk-Henry R. York, Lake Butter.


Sheriff-G. W.:Epperson, Lake Butler.
Collector of Revenue-Bun berry Haynes
Starke.
Superintendent of Schools-J. L. Hill, Lak
Butler.
BREVARD COUNTY.
County Judge-James A. McCrory, Cit
Point.
Clerk-A. A. Stewart, Titusville.
Sheriff-M. E. English, Titusville.
Collector of Revenue-J. F. Reed, Titusville
Superintendent of Schools-John H. Laws
City Point.
CALHOUN.
County Judge-William Clark.
Clerk-James S. Fannin.
Sheriff-Joseph S. Stone.
Treasurer-J. P. Richards.
Collector of Revenue-Joel P. Atkins.
Superintendent of Schools-W. G. Cox well
CLAY COUNTY.
County Judge-J. T. Copeland, Orangi
Park.
Clerk-G. N. Bardin, Green Cove Spring.
Sheriff-James W. DeWitt, Green Cove
Springs.
Collector of Revenue-W. J. Wilson, Green
Superintendent of Schools- Geo. W. Hall
McRae.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.
County Judge-W. M. Ives, Jr., Lake City
Clerk-John Vinzant, Jr., Lake City.
Sheriff-C. P. Farwell, Lake City.
Collector of Taxes-W. Payne, Lake City.
Superintendent of Schools-W. A. Sheffield,
Lake City.
DADE.
County Judge- Allen E. Heyser.
Clerk-T. W. Faulkner.
Sheriff-Win. M. Mettaur.
Treasurer-J. Wm. Ewan.
Collector of Revenue-Charles Peacock.
DUVAL COUNTY.
County Judge-William A. McLean, Jack-
sonville.
Clerk-Thomas E. Buckman, Jacksonville.
Sheriff-Henry D. Holland, Jacksonville.
Assessor of Taxes-Daniel P. Smith, Jack-
sonville.
Collector of Revenue- Moses J. Brown,
Jacksonville.
Superintendent of Schools-William H. Bab-
cock, Jacksonville.
ESCAMBIA.
County Judge-Walter Tate.
Clerk-F. E. de la Rua.
Sheriff-Joseph Wilkins.
Treasurer-J. S. Leonard.
Collector of Revenue-Manuel Palmds.
Superintendent of Schools-N. B. Cook.
FRANKLIN.
Countg Judge-Robert-G. Baker.
Clerk-J. A. Atkins.
Sheriff-S. A. Floyd.
Treasurer-R. H. Porter.
Collector of Revenne-George A. Patton.
Superintendent of Schools-Henry C. Hicks.
GADSDEN.
Countg Judge-J. R. Hams.
Clerk-Augustus Nicholson.
Sheriff-Thomas Mitchell.
Treasurer-A. W. Smith.
Collector of Revenue-R. M. Morgan.
'Superintendent of Schools-C. E. L. Allison.
HAMILTON COUNTY.
County Judge-Samuel Mclnnis, Jasper.
Clerk-J. M. Caldwell, Jasper.
Sheriff-Sampson TaVel, Jasper.
Collector of Revenue-John H. Lee.
Superintendent of Schools J. N. Reid,
Jasper.
HERNANDO COUNTY.
County Judge-G. V. Ramsey, Brooksville.
Clerk-John C. Law, Brooksville.
Sheriff-J. A. Jennings, Brooksville.
Collector of Revenue-Jno,E. King, Lecanto.
Assessor of Taxes--J. F. Shands, Brooks-
xille.
Superintendent of Schools-W. C. Zimmer-
man, Floral City.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY.
County Judge-T. A. Carruth.
Clerk--W. A. Givens, Tampa.
Sheriff-J. P. Martin, Tampa.
Collector of Revenue-W. J. Martin.
HOLMES.
County Judge-A. H. Brownell.
Clerk-T. H. Pitman.
Sheriff-Thomas N. Ellis.
Treasurer-Daniel D. Gillis. ':':
Collector of Revenue-William Tucker. .
S.p riuthu, l de, t of Schoolsi-Whitnell Curry.
S ....... "; *' -:JACK'SoN.:< :'.
County Judge-George F. Baltzell.
Clerk-Frank PhilipS. :
Sheriff--An.lren Scott,. C
Treasurer-James E. Heam.
Collector of Rc ,,e --Johin B. Ander on.
.q,ej,'rif,,,hit' t ,ft,'tcl, i, l.m--S.at uel J. Erwin.
.. JEFFERSON. ; : :
County Judge-W. B. Lamar, Monticello.
.Wle,.;-WTD. Bird, Monticello.
SM.',,i',u'iit'ie'ed of .Schools-J. A. Walker,
Monticello.
County Trea.wurer-W. M. Girardeau, Mon-
tihcllt-t"r of Receue-J. H. Tucker, Mon-
ticello.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY.


County Judge-T. T. (Ciessen, New Troy.
S heriff-C. S. WVeathersby.
(Clek--Neal A. McAlpin, New Troy.
Super;itenidet ofSchools-J.C. Ramsey,New
Troy. .. ,
Cwtroyt Treasurer A. L. Morgan, New
Troy.
Collector of Rerenve-J. T. Gates, Old Town.
As.sess'r of Taxes- C. C. Burch.
-LEON COUNTY.
0(ma',,,y, Jidge-E. M. West., Ta.llahassee.
,'1.'r;f--J)ohIn A. Pearce, Tallahassee.,
('lerk-C. A. Bryan, Tallahassee.
Superi' teindent iif Schools-Henry N. Felkel,
Tallaha'ssee.
Treasure r-J. L.Deinilly Tallahassee.
Collector of Revenue-C. C.' Pearce, Talla-
hassee.
LEVY COUNTY.

Clerk-3. M. Barco, Bronson.
Sheriff-W. H. Bigham, Bronson.
Collector of Revenue- W. H. Anderson,
Cedar Key.
Superintendent of Schools-Jas. P. DePass,
Bronson.
LIBERTY.
County Judge-R. F. Hosford.
Clerk-A. J. Wooldridge.
Sheriff--D. G. Harrell.
Treasurer-J. E. Roberts.
Collector of Revenue--L. G. Wilder.
Superintendent of Schools-Dr. T. J. Gregory.


KE

'y


e.









;e

:e


.Sl ciff-Crl S. Alli,;,. iCw fordville.
Cl'rk--Nat. R. Walker, C'rawfordville.
Superintendent 'of Schools--E. Y. Watts,
Crawf'ordville. ,
Co(lty Treasurer-W. W. Walker, Craw-
ford vill Ie.
Collector qif Revenue-J. J. Pearce, Craw-
fordville.
WALTON.
County Judge-Daniel McLeod, Sr.
Clerk-D. G. McLeod.
.Sherff--Jo'hn C. Mc.Sween.,
Trenitirer-Janies E. Bowers.
Collector of Revenue-W. B. McLeod.
Superintendent of Schools-C. C. Gunn.
WASHINGTON.
County ,Jl,'--W Jones.
Clerk-D. D. Melvin.
Sheriff-S. W. Davis.
Treasurer-Thomas J. Miller.
Collector of Revenue-John Roche.
Superintendent of Schools-Henry Bush.

SUCY COTTAGE,
Seventh-St., near Egmont Hotel,
FERNANDINA. FLORIDA.
Offers pleasant rooms. well furnished, with
or without board. Table Boarders will be
accommodated ; also transient.
2 Miss LUCY 0. THOMPSON.


SEA-ISLAND ROUTE.


THE KEY LINE STEAMER,


MAPISON COUNTY.
s' County Judge-R. M. Witherspoon, Madi
e son.
Sheriff-S. A. Parramore, Madison.
Clerk-John M. Beggs, Madison
y Superintendent of Schools-Samuel J. Perry
Madison.
County Treasurer-S. S. Smith, Madison.
Collector of Revenue- B. V. Wadsworth,
. Madison.
, MANATEE COUNTY.
County Judge-John G. Webb, Manatee.
Clerk-Robert S. Griffith, Manatee.
Sheriff-A. S. Watson, Pine Level.
Collector of Revenue-Henry E. Carlton,
Fon.
Superintendent of Schools-Felix J. Seward,
Pine Level.
MARION COUNTY.
County Judge-J. H. Williams, Ocala.
Clerk-Robert Bullock Oeala.
e heriff--E. T. Williams, Ocala.
Collecor of Revenue- W. P. Trantham,
e Ocala.
Superintendent of Schools-M. L. Payne,
Fort McCoy.
MONROE COUNTY.
County Judge-Chas. S. Baron, Key West.
Clerk-Peter T. Knight, Key West.
Sheriff-George A. Demerritt, Key West.
Collector of Revenue- Mason S. Moreno,
Key West.
Superintendent ofSchools--J. V. Harris, Key
West.
NASSAU COUNTY.
County Judge-Hinton J. Baker, Fernan-
dmina.
Clerk-J. A. Edwards, Fernandina.
Sheriff-John A. Ellermann, Fernandina.
Assessor of Taxes-Wm. H. Garland, Fer-
nandina.
Collector of Revenue-Warren F. Scott, Fer-
nandina.
Superintendent of Schools-- John Owens,
Evergreen.
County Treasuree- Gustav Stark, Fernan-
dina.
ORANGE COUNTY.
County Judge-J. L. Bryan, Orlando.
Clerk-Thos. J. Shine, Orlando.
Collector of Revenue--F. T. Hardeman, Or-
lando.
Superintendent of Schools-John T. Beeks,
Orlando.
Suveyor-J: 0. Fries, Orlando.
Treasurer-C. W. Jacobs, Wilcox.
POLK.
County Judge-J. A. Fortner.
Clerk-S. J. Pearce.
Sheriff-W. H. Jonson.
Treasurer-F. F. Beville.
Collector of Revenue-J. D. Tillis.
Superintendent of Schools-John Snoddy.
PUTNAM COUNTY.
Judge of Probate-T. S. Hough ton, Palatka.
Clerk-W. F. Forward, Palatka.
Sheriff-Geo. J. Zehnbar, Jr., Palatka.
Collector of Revenue-Joseph Price.
Superintendent Public Schools-A. J. Wood,
Palatka.
TAYLOR COUNTY.
County Judge-John R. Kimbrew, Perry.
Sheriff-B. A. Tucker,'Perry.
Clerk-John C. Calhoun, Perry.
Superintendent of Schools-T. J. Faulkner,
Perry.
County Treasurer--D. S. Sutton, Perry.
County Surveyor-D. N. Cox, Perry.
Collector of Revenue-J. B. Hardee, Perry.
SANTA ROSA.
County Judge-John Chain.
Clerk-R. R. Shepard.
Treasurer--Robert Robinson.
Collector of Revenue-W. J. Williams.
Superintendent of Schools-David Tinner.
ST. JOHN'S COUNTY.
County Judge-M. ,R. Cooper, St. Augus-
tine.
Clerk-Bartolo F. Oliveros, St. Augustine.
Sheriff-Ramon Hernandez, St. Augustine
Collector of Revenue-Joseph F. Llambias,
St. Augustine.
S,,jrl,, r, ,d'nt ,,f Schools-Peter S. Arnau,
St. Augustine.
SUMTER COUNTY.
County Judge-J. R. Steele, Leesburg,
Clerk-C. M. Knott, Sumterville.
Sheriff-J. F. Galloway, Sumterville.
Collector of Rer-iiie--. N. Withers, Lees-
burg. .
Superintendent '/ .Sl il,,,--0. F. Veriable,
Sumterville. .
SUWANEE COUNTY.
County Judge-M. W. Phillips, Live Oak.
;Clerk-J. W. Newman, Live Oak.
Sheriff-John R. Sessions, Live Oak.
SCollector of R t.,n ie-Wilson H. Sessions,
Live Oak.
.S",eri,'ic W clborn. .. ,
VOLUSIA COUNTY. : '
(rontI Judvle-James 1-i. Chandler, Enter-
pri'-e. J *
('leek-H. J. Faulkner, Enterllri.-e.
.'I/erif- Barton F. Brooke, Enterl)rise.
C llet,or oif Revenue-T.F. Drud.', Emporia.
Superintendent of Schools-B. F. Fox, New
Sruyrna.
WAKULLA COUNTY.
C(,i,,/i, J-dge--R. S. Smith.


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SEWING MACHINES,

ALL LATE IMPROVED MAKES,

For Sale at Manufacturers' Prices
-ALSO-
.AN.,,, Aof every description, and
AtACHME for any Sewing Machine,
for sale.
T Old Machines repaired at .moderate
prices.


8


HENRY HOBEIN,
Corner Third and Ash Streets,
Fernandina, Fla.


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AGE OF


WOOLSET'S






KALSOMINE.




Ai&USE NO OTiai. a




FOR SALE BY



GEO. F. LEWIS,
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C. A. WOOLSEYS9


JERSEY CITY




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PAINT BIRUJSIHES,









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age of' Five Pounds.





GEO. F. LE WIS,


No. 45 CENTRE STREET,


FERNANDINA, FLORIDA


\


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D. E. MAXWELL,
General Superintendent,
Fernandina,


ST. I ICH i-OLAS
CAPTAIN M. USINA, MASTER.


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THE ABOVE CUT IS ON EVERY PACK-


RECENTLY FITTED UP IN APPLE-PIE ORDER.

PLYING regularly between Fernandina
and Savannah upon the following
schedule
LEAVE FERNANDINA every Wednes-
day and Saturday, upon arrival of morning
train from Jacksonville, arriving at Savan-
nah the following mornings.
LEAVE SAVANNAH every Tuesday and
Friday evenings, reaching Fernandina the
following mornings.
Connections at Savannah with all rail
lines, and with Ocean Steamship and Boston
& Savannah vessels to and from New York
and Boston, and at Fernandina with trains
for all Florida points.
A. 0. MAcDONELL,
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt.,
Fernandina, Fla.






MIRROR: OCTOBER 16, 1886.


gans, bows and arrows, so joined with toma-
hawks and snow-shoes as to form frames and
wall pockets. Tea cups and saucers, big
baskets and little ones woven of sweet smell-
ing hay compose the rest of their stock in
trade. Quite a little colony these Indians
make on the sidewalk on market day. Each
man brings his squaw-man-like and particu-
larly Indian-like-to carry the pack, and of
course each squaw brings her papoose.-Cor.
New Orleans Picayune.
A Joss Factory In Canton.
Anon, we came upon a joss factory, where
the men were carving gods and goddesses out
of wood, and polishing, painting and gilding
them most gloriously. The figure that
seemed to be the piece de resistance was an
immense and very hideous joss about eleven
feet high. After that we came to a place
where they were making coffins, huge loggish
things like a backwoods horse trough or a
half-finished dugout canoe with a lid to it.
But, seriously, a Chinese coffin is something
no one can make light of, especially when
there is a fleshy occupant within. Perhaps
the coffin alone will weigh less than half a
ton, but how much less I cannot say.-W. T.
Hornaday in Cosmopolitan.


NOTICE OF ELECTIONi


TO ALL AND SINGULAR THIE SHER-
IFFS OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
KNOW YE, THAT I, JNO. L. CRAW-
FORD, Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, do hereby notify all and singular
the Sheriffs of the several Counties of the
State of Florida, that

A GENERAL ELECTION
WILL BE HELD IN
EACH COUNTY IN FLORIDA,
-ON -
TUESDAY NEXT SUCCEEDING THE
FIRST MONDAY IN NOVEMBER,
A. D. 1886, THE SAID TUES-
DAY BEING THE SECOND
DAY OF NOVEMBER,
For one Representative of the First Con-
gressional District of Florida in the Fiftieth
Congress of the United States;
For one Representative of the Second Con-
gressional District of Florida in the Fiftieth
congress of the United States.
And on the same day a General Election
will be held
In the county of Santa Rosa, for a Senator
from the Second Senatorial District;
In the counties of Washington and
Holmes, for a Senator from the Fourth
Senatorial District;
In the county of Ga.dsden, for a Senator
from the Sixth Senatorial District;
In the county of Leon, for a Senator from
the Eighth Senatorial District;
- In the county of Madison, for a Senator
rom the Tenth Senatorial District;
In the counties of Taylor and Lafayette,
for a Senator from the Twelfth Senatorial
District;
In the county of Columbia, for a Senator
from the Fourteenth Senatorial District;
In the county of Nassau, for a Senator
from the Sixteenth, Senatorial District;
In. the county of Duval, for a Senator
from the Eighteenth Senatorial District;
In the county of Orange, for a Senator
from the Twentieth Senatorial District;
In the county of Hernando, for a Sen-
ator from the Twenty-second Senatorial
'District;
In the county of Monroe, for a Senator
from the Twenty-fourth Senatorial District;
In the county of Suwanee, for a Senator
from the Twenty-sixth Senatorial District ;
In the counties of Clay and Baker, for a
Senator Irom the Twenty-eighth Senatorial
District;
In the county of Hillsborough, for a Sen-
ator from the Thirtieth Senatorial District;
In the couii ty of Levy, fbr-a Senator from
the Thirty-second Senatorial District.
On the same day an election will be held
in the. county of Putnani, constituting the
Seventeenth Senatorial District, for a Sena-
tor to fill the vacancy occasioned by the res-
ignation of E. S. Crill, who was elected Sen-
ator for the term of four years at the General
Election held on the first Tuesday after the
first Monday of November, A. D., 1884..
, In the county of St. Johns, constituting
the Thirty-first Senatorial District, for a Sen-
ator to fill the vacancy occasioned by the
resignation of C. M. Cooper, who was elected
Senator for the term of four years at the
General Election held on the first Tuesday
after the first Monday of November, A. D.
1 8 8 4 "' .
And in each of the respective counties of
the'State aGeneral Election foriites Consti-
tutional'niiYinber of members of the Genernal
Assembly, to-wit:
Escambia county, three;
Santa Rosa county. two;
Walton county, two;
Holmes county, one; ,
Washington county, one,;
Franklin county, one;
Calhoun county, one;
Jackson county, three :
Liberty county, one;
Wakulla county, one;
Gadsden county, three;
Leon county, four;
Jefferson county, four;
Madison county, three';
Taylor county, one;
Hamilton county, two;,
Suwanee county, t.wo;
Lafayette county, one ;
Columbia county, three;
Alachua county, four;
Levy county, two;
Bradford county, two;
Clay county, one;
Baker county, one;
Nassau county, two;
Duval county, four;
St. Johns county, two
Volusia county, one;
Orange county, two;
Putnam county, two;
Marion county, two;
Summer county, two;
Hernando county, two;
Hillsborough county, two;
Polk county, one;
Manatee county, one;
Dade county, one;
Brevard county, one;
Monroe county, two.


And on the same day there will be helh
in each county of the State a General Elec
tion for Constables, each county being al
lowed and entitled to one Constable fo:
every two hundred registered voters in the
county ; provided, however, that no county
shall have more than twelve Constables
yet that each county shall be entitled to at
least two Constables regardless of the nuni
ber of registered voters.
WHEREAS, A Convention, called and helix
as provided by law, of duly elected Dele-
gates, to make an entire revision of the Con-
stitution of the State of Florida, and tc
provide for the submission of the same toc
the electors of the State for ratification, did,
at Tallahassee, on the Third of August, A.
D. Eighteen Hundred and Eighty-five,
make and adopt an entire revision of said
Constitution, and did ordain, by Ordinance
No. 1 thereof, that the Constitution so re-
vised and adopted be submitted to the peo-
ple of the State of Florida for ratification,
on the First Tuesday after the First Monday
in November, A. D. 1886, to be voted upon
as hereinafter specified; and, where, said
Convention did further ordain by Ordinance
No. 2 thereof, that Article XIX, of said re-
vised Constitution, shall be submitted to the
people when said Constitution is submitted
for ratification, to be voted upon as herein-
after specified ;
Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that
at said General Election, said Constitution,
so revised and adopted by said Convention,
will be submitted to the people of the State
of Florida for ratification ; and the follow-
ing instructions are hereby given as to the
mode of compliance with said Ordinance
No. 1: At such election each qualified elec-
tor shall express his assent or dissent to the
ratification of said revised Constitution by
having written or printed on the ticket
which he shall vote, the words, "For the
Constitution," or Against the Constitu-
tion."
And notice is also given that at said Gen-
eral Election said Article XIX of said re-
vised Constitution will be submitted to the
people ; and the ballots of those voting on
this Article shall have written or printed on
them the words, For Article XIX," or
Against Article XIX."
The votes cast in compliance with said
Ordinances, and the canvass, declaration
and return thereof, shall be subject to the
same regulations and restrictions as are pro-
vided by law for General Elections in this
State.
The attention of the Sheriffs is called to
the law requiring them to cause a notice of
said election to be published in a newspaper
printed in the county, if there be a paper
printed in the county, and if there be no
paper published in the county, they shall
cause at least five copies of this notice to be
posted in the most public places in the
county. 1
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and affixed
[L. s.] the Great Seal of the State of

Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capi-
tal, this, the twentieth day of
August, A. D. 1886.
JNO. L. CRAWFORD,
Secretary of State.
JOHN A. ELLERMANN, Sheriff Nassau County
Florida -
Fernandina, Fla., September 3, 1886. 8w
GENERAL CITY DIRECTORY
CITY GOVERNMENT.
Mayor-James McGiffin. Office on Third
street, between Alachna and Broome.
Marshal-Stephen Morris.
Clerk-George E. Wolff. Office at Whit-
ner & Schuyler's.
Assessor-John Stays.
Collector-Oliver S. Oakes. Office at E. 0.
Friend's store, northwest corner of Centre
and Third streets.
Treasurer-Thomas Kydd. Office north-
east corner of Centre and Third streets.
Board of Aldermen-G. F. Avery, Presi-
dent; G. Stark, R. E. Robinson, W. Dorsey,
Reuben Walker, P. MacDonald, R. Wilker-
son, P. Kelly, Charles H. Berg.
Standing committees of the Council:
On Finance; on Laws and Ordinances ; on
Rules; on Printing; on Taxes and Licenses:
G. Stark, Chairman, Aldermen Berg and
,Robinson.
On Streets and Drains; on Public Im-
provements ; on Lamps and Lighting
Streets; on City Property; on Scavenger
Work: P. Kelly, Chairman, Aldermen
Stark and Robinson.
On Fire Department; on Police: Charles
H. Berg, Chairman, Aldermen Walker and
Wilkerson.
On Poor; on Cemetery; on Wharves and
Slips:' R. E. Robinson, Chairman, and Al-
dermen Berg and Dorsey.
City;Council meets first and third Wednes-
day in every month.
.: : BOARD OF TRADE.
President-Wmin. B. C. Duryee.
Vice-President-J. H. Prescott.
SSecietary-W. J. Wood ward.
.Treasurer-John Hedges.
Board of Governors-Fred W. Hoyt, Thos.
Kydd, Sam'l A. Swann, and the President
and yice-President.
Rooms over Dotterer's store, southwest
corner of Centre and Second streets.
The Board meets every Monday afternoon.
COUNTY OFFICERS.


County Commissioners---Chas. W. Lewis,
chairman; Fernandina; Phineas Johnson,
Italia; J. J. Upchurch, Callahan; T. J. Hig-
ginbotham, King's Ferry.
The Commissioners meet the first Wednes-
day in every month.
County Judge-Hinton J. Baker.'
County Clerk-J. A. Edwards.
Sheriff-John A. Ellermann.
Assessor-W. H. Garland.
Collector-Warren F. Scott. Office at E. 0.
Friend's store, northwest corner of Centre
and Third streets.
Treasurer-Gustav Stark. Office at store,:
southeast corner of Centre and Second.
The s ces of the County Commissioners,
County Judge, County Clerk, and Sheriff,
are over Whitner & Schuyler's store, on
Center street.
SCHOOL BOARD.
Superintendent of Public Instruction-
John Owens, Evergreen.
Board-G. Stark, J. A. Edwards, Hinton
J. Baker, Fernandina; Noah Hicks, Brandy
Branch; George W. Hodges, Callahan.
BOARD OF HEALTH.
President-H. E. Dotterer.
Board-Dr. T. Starbuck, G. Stark, H. J
Baker, Dr. J. L. Horsey.
Port Physician-Dr. Th. Starbuck,
Quaratitine Inspector-Henry W. King.
Sanitary Inspector-John A. Ellermnann.


UNITkD STATES OFFICERS.
CUSTOM-HOUSE.
Northwest corner Centre and Third streets.
Collector--W. A. Mahoney.
Deputy Collector-T. L. Stewart.
Inspector-P. L. Cone.
Office hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. in. daily,
except Sunday.


POST-OFFICE.


South side of Centre street, between Second
and Third.
Postmaster-Samuel T. Riddell.
Money Order Clerk-Leopold Beugnet.
Post-office open daily except Sunday from
8 a m. to 6.30 p. m.; Sundays, from 10.30 to
11 o'clock.
Northern and Western mails close at 9.30
a. m.; arrives at 4 p. m.
Southern mail for F. R. & N. road closes
at 9.30 a. m.; arrives at 4 p. m.
Southern mail for Jacksonville and the
St. John's river closes at 6.30 a. m. and 2 p.
m.; arrives at 11 a. m. and 6.10 p. m.


SOCIETIES.
Amelia Lodge No. 47, F. & A. M., meets
Monday on or before full moon. Lodge
room southeast corner Broome and Second
streets, second floor.
Nassau Chapter, R. A. M., meets Thurs-
day following the regular communications
of Amelia Lodge.
Weeapopka Lodge, No. 2565, K. of H.,
meets at their rooms, on Third street, first
and third Tuesday nights in each month.
Ponce de Leon Council, No. 922, A. L. of
H., meets at their rooms, on Third street,
second and fourth Friday nights in each
month.
G. U. 0. 0. F. (colored)-Regular commu-
nication first Friday in each month. Lec-
tur and Degree meeting third Friday in
every month, at Good Templar's Hall.
Young Benevolent Society (colored), Tem-
perance Hall, Centre street, near Tenth-
Meets second Wednesday night in every
month.
CHURCHES.
Baptist Church, Sixth street, between Ala-
chua and Broome-Sunday School at 9.30
a. m.; services at 11 a. nm.
St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Centre street,
corner Eighth-Services on Sundays at 11
a. m.; Sunday-school at 3 p. m.
First Presbyterian Church, Sixth street,
between Centre and Alachua-No services
at present. Sunday-school at 9 a. m.; prayer
meeting Thursday evening, 7.30 o'clock.
Southern M. E. Church, Broome street
corner of Sixth-Sunday services at 11 a. m
and 7.30 p. m.; Sunday-school at 3 p. m.;
prayer meeting Wednesday evening, 7.30.
Catholic Church, corner of Broome and
Fourth streets-Sundays, mass at 10 a. m.
and vespers and benediction of thee Blessed
Sacrament, at 7.30 p. m.; during the week,
mass at 6.30 a. m.
First Baptist Church (colored), Ninth
street, near Centre-Sabbath School every
Sunday at 10.30 a. m.; preaching at 3 p. m.
and 8 p.. .
Zion Baptist Church (colored), corner of
Centre and Tenth streets-Services every
Sunday at 11 a. m. and 3 p. m. .
African Methodist Church (colored), Beech
street, near Seventh-Services every Sunday
at 11 a. m. and 3 p. m.
Northern M. E. Church (colored), Ash
street, near Seventh--Services every Sunday
at 11 a. m. and 3 p. m.

HOTELS.
IN THE CITY.
Egmont Hotel, Seventh and Beech streets
-Open from December 1st to May 1st.
Mansion House, corner Third and Broome
streets-Open all the year.
Tourist Hotel, Broome street, between
Fourth and Fifth-Open all the year.
Florida House, Third street, between Cen-
tre and Ash-Open all the year.
BEACH RESORTS.
The Strathmore-Open from June 1st to
November 1st.
Atlantic Pavilion-Open all the year.
Ocean House--Open all the year.

LIVERY STABLES.
Egmont Livery and Sale Stables, corner
Beech and Fourth streets-G. F. Avery, pro-
prietor.
City Livery, Sale and Boarding Stables
corner Fourth and Alachua streets-P. I.
Courter, proprietor.

EXPRESS AND TELEGRAPH.
Southern Express Company, W. R. Ste-
phens, agent. Ortfie in Duryee's building,
foot of Centre street. Open, from 8.15a. m.
to 1 p. m, and from 2.30 to 6 p. m.
Telegraph office, railroad building, foot of
Beech street. Open daily, except. Sunday
from 8 a. m. to 1 p.m., and from 2 to 6 p. m.;
on Sunday, from 8 i6 10 a. ni., and from 7 to ,
8 p. m.
TRAVELER'S GUIDE.
Beach trains leave Centre street depot,
daily except Sunday, at 6.80 and 11.10 a. m.,
2, 4.10, 6.20 and 7.30 p. m: *Returning, leave
Beach at 6.40 and 11.20 a. m., 2.15, 4.30, 6.30
and 9 p. m.
Sunday trains leave at 6.30 a. m., 10.10a.
mn.,.12m n., 2, 3, 4.10, 5 and 7.30 p. m. Re-
turning, leave Beach at 645 a. mn., 10.20 a.
rm., :12.30, 2.10, 3.30, 4.29, ,6'and 9 p. m.
All trains stop at Seventh street, opposite
Egmont Hotel.
Trains for all points North and West, Mid-
dle Florida, and all Southern points, daily
at 10.10 a. m. and 4.10 p. n= arrive daily at
11.10 a. m. and 4 p. m.
Trains for Jacksonville daily, except Sun-
day, at 7 a. m. and 2.45 p. m ; arrive Fer-
nandina at 11 a. m. and 6.10 p. nm.
Sunday trains for Jacksonville leave at 7
a. m. and 4 p. m.; arrive Fernandina 10.10
a. m. and 6.45 p. m.
Mallory Line steamers for New York leave
steamship wharf, foot of Beech street, every
Thursday. Office foot of Beech street.
Steamer Thomas Col lyer, for Brunswick,


leave Centre street dock'daily.
Steamer St. Nicholas, for Savannah, leaves
Centre street dock every Wednesday and
Saturday. Office at the depot.
Steamer Martha for all points on the St.
Mary's river Monday and Thursday, and for
St. Mary's daily.


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Of the Latest and Most Approved Patterns,
COOKING UTENSILS OF ALL KINDS,
LIFT AND FORCE PUMPS,
WROUGHT-IRON PIPES.
DRIVEN WELLS A SPECIALTY
T IN AND IRON ROOFS PUT ON.
Orders for Tin Gutters promptly filled
Wind Mills for pumping water or running
light machinery promptly erected on order.
Church, Factory and School Bells for sale
at a bargain.
Stoves at Wholesale Prices.
All goods delivered at the various trans-
portation stations within the city free of
charge. All sales for cash.
CORNER BROOME AND SECOND STS.
Fernandina, Fla., July.12, 1884.


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I I
1 I


THE FLORIDA


TOWN


IMPROVEMENT COMPANY


Fernandina,
Towns on R. R. Line,
And Cedar Key.


Offers to Lessees and Purchasers a large
number of the most eligible and desirable
Lots, suitable for Business Purposes, or for
City or Suburban Residences,
UPON EASY TERMS.
Liberal Discounts on Values allowed to
parties engaged in manufacturing or indus-
rial enterprises, who will erect on the prop-
erty purchased substantial improvements
for residence, or in which to conduct their
business.
INDUCEMENTS TO MANUFACTUR-
ERS, by exemption for a term of year. from
taxation, offered by the several cities and


towns. Apply to


CHAS. W. LEWIS,
Fernandina.


,* Office, Duryte building
corner Centre and :Eirst stre


(up stairs)


FER NANDINA BEACH.


THE NEW AND SPACIOUS

:PAX 31 3X'4(:> IST


adjoining the Strathmore Hotel, on Arselia
Beach, is now completed and

W8@lOPEN TO iHIE PUBLIC. t

Commodious Bath House Attached
-AND-
BATHING SUITS TO LET.

Refreshments Served at the Stand

A,- Parties desiring to engage the.Pvil-
ion for 4HOPS, PICNICS, or EXCURSIONS,
can make arrangements by addressing
M',eT. d:I aT('3-,
Fernandina, Fla


THE FLORIDA


l=.- T.STI ,
MANUFACTURER OF
Tin i Sheet-Iron Ware
AND DEALER IN

P fALM, 7 1Ni ME Mh,






./ .


I
I


F-Fi 1


I


I I


' ; .* *' *' "ifr


. a-Jt


HV








THE FLORIDA MIRROR: OCTOBER .16, 1886.


I


Fresh Garden Seeds,
ja-CROP OF '85 -
In papers or in bulk, at
FRED W. HOYT & CO'S


*


SPECIAL BARGAINS
AT


Dry Goods Emporium.


THE ALMIGHTY DOLLAR The
Many Have Too Few and
the Few Too Many.


W E HAVE THE PLEASURE TO AN-
nounce a new departure-the location
of an agency in New York City for the pur-
chase and selection of our stock in order to
enable us to quote lower prices than others
who buy on long time and ask big prices in
these days of panic and hard times.
Our Agent has instructions to watch
every sale and every failure; to look after
every house on the verge of bankruptcy
and ruin, and with cash in hand to buy the
lump or in the lot, every class of merchan-
dise that we can get at less than its value, so
that we can mark in plain figures on our
bargains prices that have not been named
or quoted in this market or any other.
Not by favor, but by merit alone, will we
maintain and increase our unrivalled repu-
tation.
SBig prices will ot do in these times when
even the wealthy cannot affod to waste
their money and the poor require double
duty of every dollar and every penny.
As our prices change with every sale, it
will be impossible to give quotations, but it
will be our aim to name figures that will
compel you in self-defence to buy of us.
We deal in good goods and not trash, and
believe the masses will patronize that house
that sells the best goods for the least money.
Among our daily arrivals\we shall place
before our people some landslides that are
positively beyond the whisper of competi-
tion, comparison or monopoly-prices that
will teach you in the silent logic of truth
the difference between dealing with live and
with dead men-between the cash and the
credit systemi-between the right and the
wrong way.
Hence we throw outi among the masses
these specialties-these matchless goods and
matchless prices, to check the insane and
criminal practice of wasting money for the
paltry consideration of a little credit.
Who can tell the waste of money when
you get yo ir goods of houses that buy and
sell on long time?
Gold is a good thing-but give us genius
and ambition, and then an energy that
never tires, a nind that never wanders, an
eye that never sleeps and a nerve that never
quivers, and we will ride rough shod all
over the world !
New advanced ideas crowding out the old
-pluck instead of luck-cash instead of
credit-brains in the place of cheek-and
science and ability beating back and crush-
ing into oblivion these moonshine mer-
chants with -their tough and tremendous
long time prices.
What is the use of wasting a dollar when
you may save it?
TUpon our counters will be thrown, day
after day, new arrivals, at panic prices, from
houses tlat have collapsed, others that will
go down to-iiiorrow, and, still uther.s who
thrown out these sacrifices in vain hope to
Soutlive, the .storm. From such sources as
these we buy our goods, and the house that
wants the trade of the people must go
beyond this advanced line-must beat these
prices or go down-for if there is honor in
man, or virtue in good goods at low prices,
we mean to be masters of the situation-the
live pioneers who dive down to rock bottom.
We shall offer such unanswerable argu-
ments as no house can minatch-ledders and
specialties at quotations that no other man
can offedr-stern anld stubborn facts that
will level your head on tlhe subject of genu-
ine bargains.
Hard luck and harder times pinch some
high-toned old credit con cerns--they must
have money to meet the inevitable upon to-
morrow-they all know we have the cash-
the hard and solid cash-and a thousand
will buy double its value,,and we can offer
goods at figures away below the regular
wholesale jobbers of Broadway, New York.
We wish to right the wrong, and believe
the god of battles is ever with the right.
When bankruptcy and ruin overtakes the
victim we are always there with the Ameri-
can Dollar.
When the hammer of the auctioneer falls
upon some grand and gigantic" windshake
lItten for Our Name .
Thus-we are fighting against tile old rot-
ten credit'system for money, for reputation,
and for the people!
This is the music and these the prices that,
crowd our store whilst other nierchlants
sleep on their counters, idly dreaming of
the day of disaster and: ruin .awaiting all
who buy on long time and sell on longer-
who pay big prices and sell at figures that
no people can afford to pay.
We invite an early and repeated visit and
inspection. Our stock will be replenished
.every few days; and to merchants we offer
some special leaders fully 15 to 20 per cent.
less than current prices in New York City.
Respectfully submitted to the Cash Trade
only by
Corner Sixth and Ash Streets,
FERNANDINA, FLA.
Fernandina, Sept. 18, 1886. 3m


MODE BROTHERS,


WHOLESALEE AND RETAILER

Invite attention to the large stock of CHOICE GOODS they now have on
sale, and to the large inducements they are offering in every department.
At present they are offering the following extraordinary bargains:

50 pieces Superior Quality Checked Summer Silks at 38 cents
per yard; worth 50 cents.
50 pieces Assorted Colors, Fancy Pattern Satines, at 18 cents
per yard; worth 25 cents.
5 cases Standard Light Prints at 5 cents.
50 Patterns of Crinkled Seersucker at 18 cents; worth 25.
100 dozen Damask Towels at $1.00 per dozen; worth $1.50.
300 Assorted Parasols, ranging in price from 50 cents to $5.
sW A Line of Bathing Suits from $1 up.
Cashmere and Zephyr Shawls in all grades and shades, at pop-
ular prices.
100 pieces Fancy Mattings, from 17 cents a yard to 40 cents.
100 dozen Ladies' Lisle-Thread Hose at 30 cents a pair; worth
50 cents.
A small lot of Ladies' Fancy-Bordered Handkerchiefs at 15
cents each; worth 25 cents.
. 100 pairs Ladies' Glove-Kid Button Shoes at $1.85; worth $3.50.
100 pairs Ladies' French Kid Button Shoes at $.285; worth $4.
300 Gents' Seersucker Coats at $1.25; worth $2.



IN GENTLEMEN'N CLOTHING

We can show the largest, most complete, and by far THE FINEST
STOCK ever offered in the State of Florida.
sA Orders by mail receive prompt and careful attention.


1OVD BIEO


:S


Nos. 30 & 31 Centre St., Fernandina.


W. J. LOAN


DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, BOOTS AND SHOES,l


Corner of Sixth and Ash Streets.
TOCKS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS LARGE AND COMPLETE,
SELECTED FOR SPRING AND, SUMMER TRADE
Victoria Lawns, Persian Lawns, India Linens, Swiss Muslin, Figured
Swiss, Plain and Plaid Nainsook, Satin Flowered and Corded
Piques, White Goods of all kinds, Laces and Trimmings,
MILLINERY (Straw and Felt of all grades), Hosiery in large Variety,
Ladies' and Gents' Furnishing Goods, Cassimeres, Jeans, Doe-
Skins, Cottonades, Cashmeres and Dress Goods.
STAT 10 TE ER.Y-


,r CASH is a diamond of the purest water. For CASH ALONE I underbuy and
undersell, and absolutely endeavor to BEAT THE RECORD IN LOW PRICES. Call
and convince yourself.
W. J. IO-:1M[A3N,
Corner of Sixth and Ash Streets.


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.


S. '-- .
- V ilj :- -


A. B.


.1.


- ... .... ...
.q { .. .......................


N OYES


-DEALER IN


'FAMILY GROCERIES, HEAVY SUPPLIES,

Hay and Grain, Ship Stores,

FURNITURE, SOSY, PAINTS A GROCERY,

HARDWARE, WILLOW-WARE, ETC.


PRICES


AS LOW AS THE


LOWEST.


J


S 4&


T


DD


Are now receiving weeKly large shipments of


NEW FALL AND WINTER GOODS

LATEST NOVELTIES IN DRESS GOODS.
A large and varied stock of IMPORTED FABRICS, IN BLACK AND COL-
ORED DRESS GOODS, of the most desirable shades and styles,
at very low prices. New styles in


GINGHAMS,


PRINTS,


CHECKS, Etc.,


FROM FIVE CENTS PER YARD AND UPWARDS.


A splendid line of Men's, Youths' and Boys'
just received, of elegant cut and workman-
ship. We sell Clothing at NEW YORK
PRICES. Foll samples of BROWNING,
KING & CO. now on hand. Suits made
to order, and fit guaranteed.


CLOTHING


BLEACHED AND BROWN COTTONS,
SHIRTINGS, SHEETINGS, DOMESTIC GOODS,
AT WHOLESALE PRICES.
Latest styles in HATS--a large line of new goods just received.
HOSIERY AND GLOVES, and Novelties in Gents' Furnishing Goods.
New Stock of Blankets, Flannels and Comfortables, Table Linens, Tow-
els and Toweling.


ri fli Q E QVl\ IS REPLENISHED WITH
OUR SHOE STOCK I ---o
1UlUATU P'OPUTLA


R PRICES.


SOrders by mail will receive prompt attention. Orders amounting to $10.00, and
over, will be sent free by Express.
m J r, 1 ii --i


NEW YORK OFFICE-83 Walker St.


I-I. E.


northeast corner. Centre and Third Sts.,
FERNANDINA, FLA.


DOTTERER


INVITES ATTENTION TO HIS LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT OF


* *


* *


* *


-,. 4-


FINE FAMILY GROCERIES


*


*-i


}


{


EMBRACING NEARLY EVERYTHING IN THIS LINE, ALSO IN THAT OF

FANCY IMPORTED GROCERIES.
ONLY SUCH GOODS KEPT IN STOCK AS CAN BE RECOMMENDED AS
PURE AND OF GOOD QUALITY
ESPECIAL, ATTENTION GIVEN TO SELECTIONS OF

T-FINE TEAS AND COFFEES -
-t -*tt-t* -
THE BEST GOODS OF THIS DESCRIPTION THAT CAN BE PROCUBED.
NEW GOODS Received by Every Steamer.


Cor. Second and Centre Sts.,


FERNANDINA, FLA,


* GENERAL INSURANCE REAL ESTATE*
_- AGEN y -


CHARLES


V.


HILLYER,


FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.


B OFFICE, S.W. CORNER OF CENTRE AND SECOND STREETS.


M A LLORY'S STEAMSHIP LINE


Weekly Sailings
and from


from Fernandina Every Thursday
New York Every Friday.


N .j j ,. Cabin, 231 50
Si "Excurdsloin, Good6r 6 months, 39 00
I Steerage, 11 00
This Line, having no Transfers between Fernandina and New
York, offers the BEST AND QUICKEST TRANSPORTATION TO SHIPPERS OF
FRUITS, VEGETABLES, and others.
The traveling public are offered the advantages of a DIRECT LINE and UNSUR-
PASSED ACCOMMODATIONS TO FLORIDA, WITHOUT CHANGE; -making close
connections at FERNANDINA with FERNANDINA & JACKSONVILLE RAIL.
ROAD for JACKSONVILLE, and thence by Steamers to all points on the ST.
JOHNS, OCKLAWAHA and INDIAN RIVERS: and with the FLORIDA TRANSIT
RAILROAD for ALL STATIONS and GULF PORTS OF FLORIDA; and with the
PENINSULAR RAILROAD for OCALA, and with FLORIDA TROPICAL RAILROAD
or LAKE WEIR. '
THROUGH BILLS OF LADING TO ALL POINTS.
For freight, passage rates, and schedules, or further information, apply to
R. W. SOUTHWICK, Agent,
FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.


C. H. MALLORY & CO.,
Pier 20 East River. New York.


N. E. corner Centre and Second Sts., Fernandina. Fla.


.%A jrpjrUJLAiwx


I


*i -,C *3C


51-


.- __. 'r'"'Ar m







THE FLORIDA MIRROR:


OCTOBER


REGISTRATION NOTICE.

THE REGISTRATION BOOKS of the
several Election Districts of Nassau
County will be opened in each of said dis-
tricts on Saturday, October 9th, 1885, and
will be opened on each Wednesday and Sat-
urday thereafter until Saturday the 23d day
of said month, inclusive, from 9 o'clock a.
im. to 2 o'clock p. in., and on such other
days as the registration officers may deem
necessary, between said dates, for the pur-
pose of registering all qualified unregistered
electors in said districts:
The law requires that electors shall regis-
ter in the district in which they reside, and
in no other.
The names of the deputy registration offi-
cers, the districts to which they are appoint-
ed, the place of registration and the bound-
aries of the districts are as follows:


Place of
Registration.


Name of
Registering Officer.


4^
u
C-


Clerk's office........... J. A. Edwards......... 1
Amelia.................. WV. F. Scott............. 2
O'Ncil's Residence... Isidore S. O'Neill..... 3
School House No.12 N. Priest................. 4
Hart's Road............ W. W. Farmer........ 5
Residence J. Owens.. John Owens............ 6
King's Ferry........... T. J. Higginbothamn 7
Hilliard's ............... Geo. W. Hodges...... 8
Callahan................. Samuel Jones.......... 9
Higginbotham's....... L.W. Higginbothamn 10
Public School No. 28 Noah A. Hicks........ 11
BOUNDARIES OF ELECTION DIS-
TRICTS.


District No. 1-Includes all that portion of
Amelia Island laying north of township line
number two, commencing at the Atlantic
Ocean and running west on township line
number two, until the Transit Railroad is
reached, thence along the line of the railroad
to the drawbridge over Amelia river.
District No. 2-To include that portion of
Amelia Island lying south of the southern
boundary line of District No. 1.
District No. 3-To commence at Amelia
river, at the mouth of Clark's or O'NeilI's
creek ; thence up Clark's or O'Neill's creek
to the Transit Railroad ; thence westerly by
the railroad to Lofton creek ; thence down
Nassau river to Amelia river; thence down
Lofton creek to Nassau river; thence north
by Amelia river to place of beginning.
District No. 4-To commence where the
railroad crosses Lofton creek ; thence up
Lot'ton creek to McQueen's swamp ; thence
up McQueen's swamnip to the Waterman Old
Field ; thence following the public wagon
road to Port Henry on the St. Marys river to
Amelia river; thence up the Amelia river
to the mouth of Clark's or O'Neill's creek ;
thence by the line of Clark's or O'Neill's
creek to the railroad'.; thence by the line of
railroad to place of beginning.
District ANo. 5-To commence where the
railroad crosses Lofton creek where Mc-
Queen's swamp intersects Lofton creek
thence up McQueen's swamp to the ford of
Mr. Hligginbotliam's place'\ thence in a
southwesterly direction, following the old
public road to Boggy swamp ; thence down
Boggy swamp to Nassau river; thence down
Nassau river to the mouth of Lofton creek ;
thence up Loftoil creek to the place of be-
ginning. -


District No. 6-To commence at Port Hen-
ry, on the St. Marys river; thence up the
St. Marys river to the mouth of Little St.
Marys river; thence up the Little St. Marys
river to the intersection of the range line
between 24 and 25 ; thence south along said
range line to township line between .Town-
ships 2 and 3 N.; thence along Boggy swamp
and river to the old ford near Mr. Peter
Green's place ; thence following the public
road in a northeasterly direction to the ford
on McQueen's swamp ;, thence down the
McQueen's swamp to Waterman's old field ;
thence by the public road to Port Henry,
the place of beginning.
District No. 7-To commence at the mouth
of the Little St. Mary's river; thence up the
Little St. Marys river to the old King's road
(one leading to camp Pinkney) ; thence by
thie old King's road to Camp Pinkney, on
the St. Marys river; thence down the St.
Marys to the mouth of Little St. Marys river,
the place of beginning. ,
District No. 8-To commence at the inter-
section of the township line 3 N., R. 24 and
25 East; thence west to the St. Mary's river;
thence down the St. Mary's river to Camp
Pinkney ; thence along Alachua trail to its
intersection with the Little St. Mary's river;
thepce along the Little St. Mary's river east-
wardly to the township line between Ranges
24 and 25 East; thence along said township
line to point of beginning.
District No. 9-To commence at the niouth
of Boggy creek, on Nassau river; thence up
Boggy creek rear the ford of the King's road
at the intersection of Township line 3 North,
between Rlanges 24 and 25 East; thence west
along said township line to Alachua trail:
thence by the Alachua trail to the range
line No. 23; thence following the range line
south to the base line; thence by the base
line to the boundary line of Duval county;
thence by the dividing line between Duval
and Nassau counties to the mouth of Boggy
creek to the place of beginning.-
District No. 10-To comnimence at St. Mary's
river at Township lines between 2 and 3
North ; thence east along said township line
to intersection of Alachua trail; thence
southwest along said trail to range line No.
23; thence south by range line No. 23 to
base line; thence iy base line to Crosby's
bay -thence to Dee'p creek: thence down
Deep creek to its mouth.
-District No. 11--To con-i'st of all that por-
tion ofthecounty south of the linecomnmenc-
ing at the mouth of Deep creek ; thence by
said creek to Crosbey's bay to the base line;
thence by the base line to the dividing line
between Nassau and Duval counties.
The voting precifihct of No. 1 is established
at the court-house in Feriianidlin .
The precinct of District No. 2 is estab-
lished at Amelia settlement, formerly J.
D. Vuughan's place, situated in section 15,
township 2 north, range 28 east.
District No. 3.-The precinct is established
at School House No. 20, located on lan I
deeded by W. F Wood to the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction for school purposes, and lo-
cated in section 37, township 2 north, range
26 east.
District No. 4-The precinctis established
atSchool House No. 12, at. Cmeville, located
in section 43, township 3 north, range 28 east.
District No. 5-The precinct is at a bnil',
ing at Hart's Road, on the Florida Rail vay


& Navigation Company's Railroad, on the
south side of said road, and opposite the
residence of Webster W. Farmer.
District No. 6-The precinct is established
at the residence of John Owens
in section 7, township 3 north, range 26 east.
District No. 7-The precinct is established
at School House No. 7, in the town of King's
Ferry, on the St. Marys river.
District No. 8-The voting place of Pre-
cinct No. 8 is at Hilliard's.
District No. 9-The precinct is established
at School House No. 5, located in the town
of Callahan, on the Transit Railroad.
District No. 10-The precinct is estab-
lished at Mr. L. W. Higginbothom's, situ-
ated in section 22, township 4 north, range
24 east.
District No. 11-The voting place of Pre-
cinct No. 11 is at the Public School House
at Mr. Nathan Fouraker's, Sr., situated near.
the bridge across Brandy Branch, on the old
Alachua trail, situated in Section 28, Town-
ship 1 South, Range 23 East.
JOHN A. EDWARDS,
Clerk Circuit Court.
Fernandina, Fla., Sept. 26, 1886.


NOTICE.
THE following names were stricken off
ithe Registration List for Nassau County
in accordance with law. at the meeting of
the Board of County Commissioners held on
Monday, October 4, 1886:
Precinct No. 1.


Adkins, James
Amen, John
Alberty, William
Bell, Berry
Brownson, David
Bush, James
Batees, Frank L
Barrett, Jack
Baker, John
Bunningham, Robt
Clark, Henry C
Clirk, William
Camnrell, Charley
Crinnp, C B
Donovan, Cornelius
Douglass, John
Dohloney, RV
Edwards, Brown E
Francis, Paul
Friend. E 0
Funk, Paul
Gibbs, Adam
Geirmain. Oswold
Greenfield, Council
Grimley, Jacob H
Harget, John
Hedges, John
Howell, W J
Hanley, Wm J
Howard. Joseph G
Hearst, John J
Howell, J W
Hazelton, James
Holzend6rf, Henrv J
Hummins, R W C
Kelly, Owen
Latham, F C
Lared, Samuel
Lizzemrnore, Samuel
Lee, Samuel
Lang. James L
Lundquest, Peter
Long, William
LeC:iin, W H
-2-7wis.- Oorge F


Lonn, Leo
Lotio, Louis
Miller, Peter
McCall, James
Mooney, James


Martin, Henry
Maxwell, Clarence W
Mavo, Henry
SMcDermott, John
Mooney, J H
Morris, James J
Mooney, John W
McCann, W A
McRary, A B
Mason, Warren
Middleton, P M
Nickles, Dennis
Norman, George
Nickles, Dennis
'Nickles, Dennis No 2
Perkins, Robert
Palmer, Rodwell
Panlhemus, W H
Roberts, Richard L
Roberson, Wilson
Sims, Thlomis
Saunders, Charles
Sweetwine, Mark
Spencer, Geo W
Smith, Anderson
Stokes, Jake
Stewart, James
Smith, R F
Stephens, John
Tines, Jesse
Thomas, Reuben
Tison, H M
Tucker Robert
r Thompson, William
Van Nostrand, CJ
Williams, Curtis
Williams, .J L
Williams, Maurice
Wight, Samuel
Washington,Geo JE B
Williams, Ancil
Wood, Richard
Williams, Abram
Williams. Josiah
Wishartt, Abram
White, John
Williams, Sandy
Wilson, Simon
Warren, Dock


Precinct No. 2.
Armstrong,PeterNo 1 Jones, Caesar
Agent, Butler Johnson, Prince
Armstrong, Jeffrey Smith, Richard
Clark, Bunch Smith, Benjamin
Cooper, Charles Swann, George
Cooper, William Taylor, James
Gumruer, Julius J
Precinct No. 3.
Dozier, Leonard Walker, Louis
Precinct No. 4.
Hubbard, Cesar Lewis, Frank, Sr
Austin, Mack Robinson, George
Andrews, Jacob Smith, George
Brewton, Jake Thorn, Elija
Branch. H M Williams, George
Darv. .Tospnh


Precinct No. 5.
Braddock, Lewis C Snowball, J C
Green, Peter Smith, Willian
McWilliai)'. Willing m
Precinct No. 6.
Bunch. W M Me'adNws, W J
Cobb. S:um Melton, Robert


Colley, ,LJames


Precinct No. 7.


Alberti, Richard
Barber, Lewis
Brooks, George
Beeks, Randolph
Clark, E D
Colley, David
Crain, Joshua
Haddock, John H


Jones, Cmisar
Jones, David H
Little, Washlington, Jr
Paulk,1 laVid
Smith, Anderson
Washi-igton, Nathan
Washington, George
Young, Simon


Precinct No. 8.
Adams, Tillman Freeman. Jacob
Berry, Richard Wick, William
Precinct No. 9.


Atkins, J C
Davis. Y G, Sr
Gerald, A D
Hazelton, Hay wo',
Harris, J 0
Henderson, John
Miles. Spencer
Mitchel. George


Powell, John
R,,mlin-, Mack
Ryal, JT J
I Shlmw, Lewiq
Sli,'rni.I H, T C
VWild.-main, H- V
Wimberly, Green
W;I-liin -t 'n. Jack


7Precinct No. 11.
Clark,F M Stephens, Jacob
Elam, C D Stokes, Pompy
PHINEAS JOHNSON,
Chairman Board County Commissioners,
Nassau County.
Attest: J. A. EDWARDS; Clerk.
Fern ndina, Fla., October 9, 1886.
W T E. FRASER,

HOMCEOPATHIC AND HYDROPATHIC
PHYSICIAN,
Hts permanently located at Fernandina,
and *.4frs his professional services to the
pe,)ple ofthis place and surrounding country.
Diseases of children a specialty.
Ai-Can be found at the Tourist Hotel.
Warranty and Mortgage Deeds
SINEN PAPER-75 CTS. PER DOZEN
J Samples sent upon receipt of 2-cent
stamp. Address
FLORIDA MIRROR,
26 Fernandina, Fla.


RAILROADS.


Florida Railway & Navigation Co.

SCHEDULE IN EFFECT MAY 3,1886.

CENTRAL MERIDIAN TIME.
(One hour slower than Washington, D. C., and 33
minutes faster than Jacksonville Local.)

WESTERN DIVISION.


Leave
'C
cc

(C'
CC
cc


GOING WEST.
Jacksonville...............
Baldwin....................
Lake City ..................
Live Oak....................
Ellaville....................
Madison ....................
Drifton......................


Arrive Monticello................
Leave Tallahassee.................
Quincy .......................
Arrive River Junction..........


No. 1.
8.00 a m
8.45 "
10.10
10.59
11.28 "
12.01 "
1.07
1.30 p min
2.20 p m
3.15 "
4.00 "


No. 9.
3.00 p im
4.10
6.03 "
7.04 "
7.45 "
8.35
10.05 "
10.35 p m
12.00 "
1.52 a min
3.25 "


Train No. 1 makes close connection at River
Junction with through train on the Louisville &
Nashville for New Orleans, and all points South-
west; arriving at DeFuniak at 7.25 pmin. Pensacola
10.10 p min, Mobile 2.25 a min., and New Orleans at
7.20 a inm.
Close connection is made at Flomaton for all
points North and West; arriving at Montgomery
at 7.15 am, Nashville 7.26 pm, Evansville2.30 pm,
St Louis 8 p min, Chicago 7.05 a m, Cincinnati 6 35 a m.
No. 9 makes close connection at River Junction
with Louisville & Nashville train for Montgom-
ery. and points North and West; arriving DeFu-
niak at 8.20 a min, Pensacola 12.30 p min, Montgom-
ery 7.55 p m, Nashville 7.20 a min, St. Louis 8 p inm,
Chicago 7.00 p min, Cincinnati 6.35 p inm.
GOING EAST. No. 2. No. 10.
Leave River Junction........... 11.30 a min 12.35 a min
Quincy............ 12.17 p in 1.52 "
Tallahassee................ 1.15 3.45 "
Drifton....................... 2.20 4.50 "
Arrive Monticello.................. 3.05 p min 5.05 a min
Leave Madison.................... 3.22 p min 5.58 a min
Ellaville..................... 3.53 6.35
Live Oak.................... 4.20 7.05
Lake City.................... 5.07 8.16 "
Baldwin..................... 6.30 10.55 "
Arrive Jacksonville............... 7.15 11.58
No. 2 makes close connection at River Junction
with Louisville & Nashville trains from New Or-
leans, and from Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinnati,
Montgomery.
No. 10 makes close connection with trains from
Montgomery and North.

SOUTHERN DIVISION.
GOING SOUTH. No. 7. No. 5. No. 3. No. 19.
Lv Fernandina. 10.10 AM 4.10PM
Callahan...... 11.30 7.25 "
Lv Jacksonville ........... 11.45 AM 8.45PM ............
Baldwin...... 1250PM 12.30 10.00 9.30PM
Highland.... 1.27 10.57 "
Lawtey........ 1.43 11.16 .
Starke......... 2.04 No.11. 11.42 No. 21.
SWaldo......... 2.45 2.45 P M 12.30 AM 4.15 AM
Lv Gainesville.. 3.30 6.25 "
Archer ........ 4.20 8.20 "
Bronson....... 4.50 9.10
Cedar Key... 6.45 12.25PM
Lv Hawthorne.. 3.25 PM 1.37 AM
Citra............ 3.57 2.24 "
Silver Spring 4.42
Ocala........... 4.57 3.37 "
Wildwood.... 6.04 5.14 "
Leesburg...... 6.37 5.52 "
Ar Tavares........ 7.00 6.30 "
No. 7 is through train from Fernandina to Tav-
ares, connecting at Callahan with Fast Mail from
the East, at Baldwin with train from Jackson-
ville, and also No. 10 from all points on Western
Division; at W.il .-'t-Hi N. 11 for Cedar Key.
and at Tavares 1. ri i;vai,., )rland6 and Atlan-
tic train for Orlando. ,
No. 3 is through train from Jacksonville to Tav-
ares, connecting at Baldwin with evening train
from Fernandina, and at Tavares next morning
with Tavares, Orlando & Atlantic train for Orlan-
do, connecting at that point with South Florida
train for Tampa and intermediate points. This
train carries Sleeper through from Jacksonville
to Orlando.


GOING NORTH
Lv Tavares........
Leesburg:.....
Wildwood...
Ocala...........
Silver Spr'g.
Citra ...........
Hawthorne..
Lv Cedar Key...
Bronson ......
Archer........
Gainesville..
Lv Waldo .........
Starke.........
Lawtey........
Highland....
Baldwin......
Jacksonville
Callahan....
Ar Fernandinam-..


No. 8.
7.20 AM
7.47
8.16
9.20 "
9.33 "
10.17
10.49



11.35 AM
12.20PM
12.40 "
12.56 "
1.40 "
2.45"
4.00 "


No. 12.
7.15 AM
9.10 "
9.40 "
10.35 "
11.25 "

No. 6.
1.50PM
2-35 "


No. 4.
8.05 Pi3
8.52 "
9.45 "
11.25 "
12.47 AM
1.37 "



2.30 AM 1
3.00 "
3.35 "
3.55 "
5.00
5.50 "


1


No. 22.
2.00PM
4.50 "
5-50 "
8.45 "
10.00 "

No. 20.
5.00 AM
8.10"o
0.10 "


No. S is through train from Tavares to Fernan-
cina, connecting at Tavares with Tavares. Orlan-
do & Atlantic train from Orlando; at Wildwood
with train on Withlacoochee Branch for Pn'asoff-
kee, leaving W ildwood at 9.35 a m; at Waldo with
No. 12 from Cedar Key. and at. Baldwin with No.
6 to .Jacksonville and No. 9 on Western Division
for all points West on that division; at Callah Ln
with Fast Mail for all points East.
No. 4 is night train through from Tavarf'-; to
Jacksonville, connecting with Tavares, Orl'nlo
& Atlantic train with Sleeper from Orland.>: :it
Waldo with No. 22, afternoon accommodacio'
train from Cedar Key, and at Baldwin with No.
20 for Fernandina.

Fernandina & Jacksonville Branch.

GOING NORTH Week Days. Sunday.
LvJacksonville 925 AM 5,90PM 9.00 AM 6.00PM
Ar Fernandina. 11.00 6.10 10.10 7.10 "
GOING SOUTH
Lv Fernandina. 7.00 AM 2.45AM 7.00 AM 4.00PPM
Ar Jacksonville 8.10 4.25 8.10 5-10 "


GOIN
Lv St. Cal
" Panas
Ar Wildw


Withlacoochee Branch.
G NORTH. GOING SOUTH.
therine 4.00PM Lv Wildwood..... 9.35 AM
offkee. 5.20 Ar Panasoffkee.10.10 "
rood..... 5,50 St.Catherine 11.10


CONNECTIONS.
At Callahan with Savannah, Florida & West-
ern Railway, for Savannah, Macon, Atlanta,
Charleston, Washington, Baltimore, New York,
Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, and all points
West and Northwest.
At Silver Spring with Ocklawaha River steam-
ers : at St. Catherine with Florida Southern Rail-
way, for Brnoksville. Bartow and Tampa; at
Orlando with South Florida Railroad, for Sanford.
Lakeland and Tampa; at Cedar Key with Steamer
Governor Safford, Monday and Thursday, for
Manatee and Tampa.
MALLORY STEAMSHIP LINE.
Steamer express leaves Jacksonville Thurs-
day at &5.10 p. min., connecting with the elegant
steamships of the Mallory Line, sailing weekly
for New York direct.
SEA ISLAND ROUTE.
Steamer Express leaving Jacksonville 9.25 a. m.
Wednesday and Saturday, connects with the ele-
gant Steamer St. Nicholas-inside route for Bruns
wick, Darien, Savannah, connecting with steam-
ers for Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and
Boston.


ON AND AFTER FRIDAY, MAY 7th, 1886,
passenger trains will run as follows:
FOR THE WEST, NORTH AND SOUTH.
S P; Mail. Express.
Brunswick ........................Lv 1:30 pmi 9:00 p m
?yles' Marsh...................Lv 1:55 p m 9:25 p m
Jamaica............................Lv 2:22 p m 10:00 i m
Waynesville................Lv 3:00 p m 10:40 p m
Hoboken ..........................Lv 3:55 p m 11:45 p m
Schlatterville..................Lv, 41:12 p m 12:00ng't
Waycross..........................Ar 4:38 p m 12:30 a m
Savannah, via S, F & W...Ar 7:5S p m 6:15 a mi
facksonville,via S, F& W..Ar 7:80 p m 8.05 a m
racksonville,via S, F &'W..Lv 2,00 p m 9:30 p m
Savannah, via S, F & W...Lv 7:01 a m ..............
Vaycross...........................Lv 5:00 p m 12:45 a m
Pearson..........................Lv 6:13 p m 2:00 a m
Alapaha..........................Lv 7:17 pm 2:58 am
Ty Ty ................. ...........Lv 8:41 p m ..............
Sumner.....................Lv 8:5p.........Lv 8:56
Vilmington...................... Lv 9:28 pm ... ..........
)avis......................... ..... Lv 9:44 pm ..............
Albany......:.......................Ar 10:00 p m 5:30 p m.-
lacon. via C R R...............Ar .............. 9:40 a m
Atlanta, via C R R............Ar .............. 1:55 p m
Marietta, via W & A.......... Ar ............. 2:39 p m
&hattanooga, via W &A..,Ar .............. 7:07 p m
Cincinnati, via Cin So......Ar,............. 6:50 a m
FROM THE WEST, NORTH AND SOUTH.
Mail. Express.
'ineinnati, via Cin So......Lv ......... 8:47 p m
Chattanooga, via W & A..Lv ............. 8:55 a m
larietta, via W & A.........Lv .............. 1:36 p m
Atlanta, via C R R............Lv ............. 2:45 p m
facon, via C R R............Lv .............. 7:10 p m
JAlbany..............................Lv- 5:30 a m 11:10 p m
)avis................................. Lv 5:55 a m .............


Willingham.......................Lv 6:10 a m
Sumner............................. Lv 6:38 a m
TyTy................................Lv 6:53am
Alapaha...........................Lv 8;13 am
Pearson.............................Lv 9:14 a m
Waycross...........................Ar 10:29 a m
Savannah, via S, F & W...Ar 7:58 p m
Jacksonville,via S, F & W..Ar 7;30 p m


......... o...
..............
1:45 am
2:52 a m
4:00 a m
8:05 a m


CUMBERLAND ROUTE.
Steamer Express leaving Jacksonville daily a
9.25 a. min., except Sunday, connects with elegant
Steamer Thos.Collyer, for Brunswick, and through
trains of the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia
and Brunswick & Western Railroads.
A. 0. MAcDONELL,
General Passenger and Ticket Agent
D. E. MAXWELL,
General Superintendent.


Savannah, Florida & Western R'y

WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.

All trains of this Road are run by Central Stand
ard time.
TIME CARD IN EFFECT MAY 2, 1886.
PASSENGER TRAINS will leave and arrive(
daily, as follows:
NEW ORLEANS EXPRESS.
Leave Jacksonville.................................. 7:35 a n
Arrive Jacksonville................................. 7:30 p n
Leave Callahan...................................... 8:18 an
Arrive Waycross.......................................10:15 ain
Arrive Brunswick via B & W R R............ 1:50 p m
Arrive Thomasville................................ 1:37 pin
Arrive Bainbridge.................................. 3:35 p min
Arrive Chattahoochee............................. 4:04 pin
Arrive Pensacola via L & N R R..............10:10 p in
Arrive Mobile via L & N R R.................... 2:30 a nx
Arrive New Orleans via L & N R R......... 7:20 a n
Pullman Buffet Cars to and from Jacksonville
and New Orleans, via Pensacola and Mobile.
FAST MAIL.
Leave Jacksonville ................................ 2:00 p mi
Arrive Jacksonville.................................12:00 n'r
Leave Callahan................................... 2:45 p m
Leave Chattahoochee.............................11:30 a in
Leave Thomasville.................................. 1:40 p in
Arrive Waycross ...................................... 4:40 p min
Arrive Jesup ............................................ 6:15 p m
Arrive Brunswick via E T, V & G........... 8:35 p min
Arrive Savannah..................................... 7:58 p m
Arrive Charleston.................. 1:25 a m
Arrive Wilmington.................................. 8:20 a min
Arrive Weldon......................................... 2:15 p m
Arrive Richmond.................................... 6:00 p m
Arrive Washington..................................11:00 p min
Arrive Baltimore........................12:35 a m
Arrive Philadelphia.................................3:45 a m
Arrive New York......................................6:50 a min
Pullman Buffet Cars to and from Jacksonville
and New York.
EAST FLORIDA EXPRESS.
Leave Jacksonville.................................. 4:30 p m
Arrive Jacksonville...................... .....11:30 a m
Leave Callahan....................................... 5:14 p m
Arrive Callahan.......................................10:46 a min
Leave Waycross...................................... 7:30 p m
Arrive W aycross...................................... 8:25 a m
Leave Gainesville................ ................. 3:50 p min
Leave Lake City................. ................... 3:45 p min
Leave Live Oak....................................... 7:10 p m
Leave Thomasville...............................11:15 p min
Arrive Albany........................................... 1:30 a min
Arrive Montgomery via Central R R........ 8-00 a min
Arrive Mobile via L & N R R ................. 2:10 p m
Arrive New Orleans via L & N R R......... 7:30 p min
Arrive Nashville via L & N R R............... 7:10 p min
Arrive Louisville via L & NR R .............. 2:25 a min
Arrive Cincinnati via L & N R R.............. 6:35 a min
Arrive St. Louis via L & N R R................. 7:40 a min
Pullman Buffet Cars to and from Jacksonville
and St. Louis, via Thomasville, Albany, Mont-
gomery and Nashville.
JACKSONVILLE EXPRESS.
Leave Jacksonville.................................. 9:30 p min
Arrive Jacksonville................................. 8:05 a min
Leave Callahan.......................................10:20 p min
Arrive W across .....................................12:35 a-m
Arrive Albany via B & W R R................. 5:30 a min
Arrive Macon via Central R R................. 9:40 a min
Arrive Atlanta via Central R R ............... 1:35 p min
Arrive Jesup ............................................ 2:15 a min
Arrive Brunswick via E T, V & G R R ..... 6:00 a min
Arrive Macon via E T, V & G RB............ 8:30 a min
Arrive Atlanta. via E T, V & G R R.........12:05 n'n
Arrive Cincinnati via Cin South'n R'y..... 6:50 a min
Pullman Buffet Cars and Mann Boudoir Buffet
Caes via Waycross, Albany and Macon, and via
Waycross, Jesup and Macon, between Jacksonville
and Cincinnati. Also, through Passenger Coach-
es between Jacksonville and Chattanooga, via Al-
bany:; and Jacksonville and Cincinnati via Jesup.
SAVANNAH EXPRESS.
Leave Jacksonville .............. .................. 9:30 p min
Arrive Jacksonville................................ 8:05 a min
Leave Callahan.................................10:20 p min
Arrive Callahan....................................... 7:05 a min
Leave Gainesville.................................... 3:50 p mi
Arrive Gainesville .................................. 9:35 a min
Leave Lake City...................................... 3:45 p min
Arrive Lake City......................................10:00 a min
Leave Live Oak....................................... 7:10 p min
Arrive Live Oak....................................... 6:15 a min
Arrive Thomasville................................. 7:50 a min
Arrive Albany .........................................11:50 am
Arrive Montgomery via Central R R........ 7:23 p min
Arrive Nashville via L & N R R............... 7:10 a min
Arrive Louisville via L & N R R ............. 2:20 p min
Arrive Cincinnati via L & N R R............ 6:35 p min
Arrive St. Louis via L & N R R............... 800 p min
Arrive Waycross ......................................12:35 a min
Arrive Brunswick via B & W R R........... 7:40 a min
Arrive Jesup ............................................ 3:13 am
Arrive Savannah...................................... 6:15 a min
Arrive Charleston....................................12:55 p min
Arrive Wilmington ............................... 8:30 p m
Arrive Richmond................................. 5:48 p m
Arrive Washington .............................. 10:30 a m
Arrive Baltimore ..................12:05 p m
Arrive Philadelphia................ 2:37 p m
Arrive New York.................. 5:30 p m
Pullman Palace Cars between Savannah and
Tampa, via Gainesville.
Pullman Buffet Cars between Jacksonville and
Washington.
Through Tickets sold to all points by rail and
steamship connections and baggage checked
through. Also Sleeping Car berths and sections
secured at Company's Office in Astor's building,
82 Bay street, and at Passenger Station, and on
board People's Line Steamers "H. B. Plant" and
"Chattahoochee." and DeBary-Baya Line Steam-
er "City of Jacksonville."
WM, P. HARDEE,
General Passenger Agent.
B. G. FLEMING, Superintendent.


Brunswick & Western Railroad.

TY TYROUTE.

FIFTY MILES SHORTER THAN ANY OTHER
ROUTE BETWEEN WAYCROSS
AND ALBANY.


Fast Mail
Daily.
Palatka.................Lv 10.00 a
June. J. T. & K.W..Ar 10.15 a
Interlachen......... Ar 11.07 a
Wait's Crossing.....Ar 11.43 a
Rochelle ..............Ar 12.06 a
Gainesville...........Ar 12.45 a


'Daily Ex.
Sunday.
Lv 3.30 p
Ar 3.40p
Ar 4.15 p
Ar 4.52 p
Ar 6.13 p
Ar 5.40 p


Gainesville ..........Lv 11.30 a Lv 4.40 p
Rochelle ..............Lv 12.21 a Lv 5.13p
M icanopy........................ ...............
Evinston ............ Lv 12.43 p Lv 5.32p
Lochbie................Lv 12.55 p Lv 5.40 p
Ocala....................Lv 1.52 p Lv 6.25 p
*Welshton............Ar 2.15 p Ar 6.44 p
South Lake Weir..Ar 3.05 p Ar 7.27 p
Conant..................Ar 3.14 p Ar 7.36 p
Leesburg...............Ar 3.53 p Ar 8.02 p
Center Hill...........Ar 4.28p ...............
Pemberton'sF'ry..Ar 5.12 p ...............
Brooksville...........Ar 6.10 p ..............
Dinner at Welshton at 2.15 p m;
6.45 p m.


Accom' n
Daily.

.......... .H .
..............


6.55 a


7.45 a
8.20 a
8,50 a
10 00 a
1.22 p
2.28 p
2.48 p
4.20 p

S....... ......
Supper at


St. John's & Lake Eustis Division.


Fast Mail M
Daily. Da
Leesburg...............Lv 4.00 p ......
Fort Mason...........Ar 4.50p ......
Fort Mason.......................... Lv
Eustis...................Ar 5.05 p Ar
Tavares................Ar 5.35p Ar l
Lane Park............Ar 5.45p Ar ]
Altoona..........Ar 6.45 p ......
Pittman.............Ar 7.04p .....
Astor....................Ar 8.10 p ......
GOING NORTH.
Fast Mail M
Daily. Da
Astor....................Lv 7.00 a ......
Pittman ...............Lv 8.01 a ......
Altoona............. Lv 8.20 a ......
Lane Park...........Lv 9.00 a Lv
Tavares................Lv 9.10 a Lv
Eustis...................Lv 9.40 a Lv
Fort Mason...........Lv 9.55 a Ar
Leesburg...............Ar 11.00 a ......


Main Line.


ail
lily.

9.20 a
9.30 a
0.10 a
10.25 a


Daily Ex.
Sunday.
Lv 11.15 a
Ar 12-45 p
Ar 1.00 p
......... .... .
..............


ail Ac. Daily
,ily. Ex. Sun.
.......... ...............
..... ..... ...... .........
... ....... .......
4.20p ...............
4.35 p ...............
5.20 p Lv 1.20p
4.45 p Lv 2.00 p
....... Ar 3.35p


Fast Mail Daily Ex. Accom'n'
Daily. Sunday. Daily.
Brooksville...........Lv 8.20 a ............... ............
Pembert-on'sF'ry.;Lv 9.40 -............ ...............
Center Hill..........Lv 10.25 a ... ................ .......
Leesburg .............Lv 11.05 a Lv 6.35 a ..............
Conant................Lv 11.34 a Lv 7.00 a ...............
South Lake Weir..Lv 11.43 a Lv 7.06 a ...............
*Welshton............Ar 12.12 p Ar 7.24 a ...............
Ocala....................Ar 1.00 p Ar 8.14a ...............
Lochbie ...............Ar 1.53 p Ar 9.04 a ...............
Evinston...........A...r 2.07 p Ar 9.14,a Lv 4.53 p
Micanopy............................ .............. Lv 5.45 p
Rochelle...............Ar 2.35p Ar 9.37.a Ar 6.30p
Gainesville ..........Ar 3.20 p Ar 10.05 a ..............
Gainesville ..........Lv l.. p Lv 1..'5 a ...........
Rochelle...............Ar 2.25p Ar 9.30 a ............
Wait's Crossing.....Ar 3.14p Ar 10 00 a ...............
Interlachen .........Ar 3.55 p Ar 10.33 a ...............
JunceJ, T & KW..Ar 4.37 p Ar 11.20 a..............
Palatk a................Ar 4.50 p Ar 11.30 a& ..............
*Breakfast at Welhston at 7.34 a m.
STEAMERS A. J. LANE AND DISPATCH
Make daily double round trips of Lakes Eustis
and Harris, touching at all landings.
CONNECTIONS.
At Palatka, with Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railway, and fast river steamers,: for St. Au-
Augustine, Green Cove Springs, Jacksonville, and
all points North, East and West, and with up-river
steamers for South Florida: also with tAe new
twin-screw iron steamship "City of Palatka." and
steamship City of Monticello. for Charleston, New
York, Boston, Philadelphia, etc.
Mail trains make close connection both ways
via Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railway, at
Jacksonville, with Atlantic Coast Line-fast mail.
At Gainesville. with through Pullman Sleepers
over Savannah, Florida & Western Railway, for
New Orleans, Cedar Key, Pensacola, Savannah,
Albany, Montgomery, Louisville, St. Louis, and
all points West. I
At Ocala. with Florida Railway &'Navigation
Company, and hacks, for Silver Spring.
At Astor, with St. John's River steamers, for
Jacksonville, Sanford and way landings.
At Leesburg, with the St. John's & Lake Eustis
Division of the Florida Sonthern Railway, and
boats on Lakes Harris and Eustis, for points on.
Lakes.
At Pemberton's Ferry, with South Florida Rail-
road, for Lakeland, Tampa, Kissimmee, Bartow,
Orlando, Sanford, Tuckertown, and Fort Dade.
0. W. BROMWELL,
General Passenger Agent.
A. C. CGWAN,
General Traveling Agent.
SHERMAN CONANT,
General Manager.


SOMETHING NEW!


1TTHEeLAITIEISTeNOIVEILI1YI;

IN -
WINDOW SHADES.

A LL MADE READY TO HANG.
Size 3 feet wide by 6 feet long; Nickle
Trimmed, Stop-Spring Roller, good grade of,
Holland, with handsome Pull-Down, at the
astonishingly low price of
A& FIFTY CENTS EACH.-Ig
,These Shades come in different Colors-
Drab, Brown, Olive, Green, etc.
-ALSO -


A NEW DADO WINDOW SHADE,
On Hartshorn's Patent Stop-Spring Roller.
Across the Curtain. about nine inches from
the bottom, is stamped in Gold Fancy Dado,
nine inches deep. This Shade we sell for
_W- SEVENTY-FIVE CTS. EACH,-
all Complete, with Handsome Pull-Down.
J' .& T. XJJuD


16 1886.


Jacksonville,via S, F & W..Lv 7:35 a m 9:30 p m
Savannah, via S, F & W...Lv 7:01 a m 8:45 p m
Waycross..........................Lv 10:40 a m 4:10 a m
Schlatterville................... Lv 11:05 a m 4:35 a m
Hoboken ..........................Lv 11:20 a m 4:25 a m
Waynesville.....................Lv 12:18 p m 5:55 aI mI
Jamaica...........................Lv 12:55 p mn 6:40 a mn
Pyles' Marsh....................Lv 1:15 a m 7:00 a mn
Brunswick........................Ar 1:50 p m 7:40 a m
BRUNSWICK AND WAYCROSS ACCOMMO-
DATION.
Stopping at all Stations.
Leaves Brunswick .................................. 5:15 a m
Arrives W aycross.....................................10:10 a mn
RETURNING:
Leaves W across. .;.................................. 5:15 p m
Arrives Brunswick................................... 8:00 p mn
Purchase tickets at the station, and save extra
fare collected upon the train.
The mail train stops at all B & W stations. Ex-.
Connections made at Waycross to and from all
points on Savannah, Florida & Western Railway.
Pullman Palace Sleeping and Mann Boudoir
cars upon Jacksonville and Cincinnati through
trains.
J. A. McDUFFIE, G. P. A.
F. W. ANGIER, A. G. P. A.
A. A. GADDIS, V. P. & G. M.

Florida Southern Railway Co.

ORANGE BELT ROUTE.

GOING SOUTH.


-- ---- ------


1








THE FLORIDA MIRROR: OCTOBER 16, 1886.


THE FLORIDA MIRROR.
$8.0 A YEAR; $1.00 FOR SIX MONTHS


Reflections.
Mr. John Tompkins returned, with his
family, from the up-country on Saturday
last.
County Clerk Edwards assures us that
there is very little busitiess on the civil
docket of our Circuit Court for next week.
The Fall Term of the Circuit Court for
Nassau county, Judge J. M. Baker presiding,
convenes at Lyceum Hall on Tuesday next.
The uniforms for our volunteer military
company have arrived, and the boys will
drill in them for the first time on Monday
evening next.
Messrs. George R. Fairbanks and H. E.
Dotterer are lay members of the Triennial
Convention of the Episcopal Church, now
being held at Chicago.
The machinery, building, etc., of the
Huot mill was sold by United States Mar-
shal Bird, at Jacksonville, last Monday to
G. W. Miles, of Philadelphia.
Receiver Duval, General Superintendent
D. E. Maxwell and Captain J. H. Thomas,
the treasurer, have been on a tour of in-
spection at the southern extension of the
Florida Railway & Navigation Company in
Hernando county.
Mrs. John Hedges returned from Wash-
ington on Wednesday last. Mrs. Hedges
accompanied the remains of her late hus-
band, John Hedges, Esq., to Washington,
where they were interred in the family plot
in Oak Hill Cemetery.
J. Fred Lohman, Esq., returned on
Wednesday evening last from Charleston, S.
C., with his family, where they have been
spending the summer. We are sorry to
learn that Mr. Lohman has been in bad
health the past two months.
Contractor Kelly is pushing the work on
the southern extension of the Florida Rail-
way & Navigation Company. Of the thirty-
nine miles to be graded under his contract,
twenty have already been completed, the
gangs having reached Hillsborough river.
The regatta of the Fernandina Boat Club
will be sailed on Wednesday morning next
at 10 o'clock. Outside of the club boats, it is
probable that Captain Simmons, of the reve-
nue cutter' George S. Boutwell, will try his
new cutter. Captain S. L. Dennette will act
as judge.
Steps are being built for the landing of
mall boats on the northwest corner of the
Centre street dock. Mr. Hewitt, of the firm
of Wheelwright & Co., has kindly donated
the lumber, and Captain Simmons, of the
revenue cutter Boutwell, is having the work
done.
Receiver Duval returned from the North
last Monday. He arrived in this city about
noon on a special train, accompanied by
Mr. J. H. Thomas, treasurer of the Florida
Railway & Navigation Company. After in-
specting the work on the extension of the
road here and the hew steamship dock, Mr.
Duval left for Jacksonville about 4 p. m.
A load of Florida raised and cured hay
was offered for sale on the Noyes corner on
Tuesday last. It was cut from crab grass on
Pine Island, which grows there in large
quantities. It is said that cattle are very
fond of this hay. If this is so, there is no
reason why it should not be cultivated for
this purpose in large quantities, at least for
home consumption.
Messrs. F. B. Papy, Esq., General Traffic
Manager, and A. O. MacDonell, General
Passenger Agent, of the Florida Railway &
Navigation Company, left for New York
last Sunday to attend the meeting of Gen-
eral Passenger Agents and Traffic Mana-
gers. We understand that the time-tables
were arranged for the winter season, and
that the Southern railroads have formed a
pool in reference to low passenger rates to
the South for the winter. .
On the Mallory steamship San Antonio
there arrived here on Tuesday last Mr.
Matthew McKemnia, a nephew of Mr. M.
Dwney, of this city. Mr. McKenna, with
a younger brother, spent several years in
Fernandina early in the seventies, but he
returned to his'native home in Ireland in
1875. He is now engaged in business in


Magho.a, county, of Derry, and comes here
frt the benefit of 'his health. He was
heartily elcorned.by. many of his 6-ldtiine
friends.
W. B. Mannn, lately train mniaster. of the
Southern Division of the Florida Railway &
Navigation Company, left on the 14th inst
to accept the superintendent's;position of the
St. Louis,'Arkansas & Texas Railroad. The,
emiployes of his division deeply regret the
change, and, to show their appreciation of
his many kind acts toward them, on the
evening of the 12th presented him with a
very handsome diamond pin and silk unim-
brella. Mr. Mann was completely over-
comiie.
. For Chronic Ulcers, Cuts and Skin Dis-
eases, use Max's Great Cure. *
Constipation, Biliousness and Headache'
cured by Vitaline Tonic. Sold by
HORSEY & Co.
TUse Max's Great Cure for Piles. -
HORSEY m & Co.


Death of Mr. Yutee.


The Savannah News of Monday morning
last brought us the unexpected news of the
death of the Hon. DAVID L. YULEE, which
occurred at the Clarendon Hotel in New
York, on Sunday morning last.
Mr. YULEE, who had been spending the
summer at Bar Harbor, Me., was returning
to his home in Washington, with his daugh-
ters, Mrs. Chas. H. Read, Miss Nanie, Miss
Florida, and his son, C. Wickliffe. While
on one of the Fall River steamboats, he con-
tracted a severe cold which detained him in
New York. Pneumonia set in and he passed
away on Sunday morning.
The sad news of his death was quite a
shock to the citizens here, as it was not
known that he was seriously ill. The re-
mains were taken to Washington and buried
in Oak Hill cemetery on Tuesday afternoon.
Funeral services were held at his late resi-
dence and at the New York Avenue Presby-
terian church. The honorary pall-bearers
were General Joseph E. Johnston, United
States Commissioner of Railroads; Judge
Strong, formerly of the United States Su-
preme Court; Admiral Rogers, Professor
Welling, president of Columbian Universi-
ty; Hon. William Preston, of Kentucky ;
Representative Brown, A. Woodbury Blair,
C. Wickliffe Preston, George E. Hamilton
and Preston Sands. The Supreme Court of
the District adjourned for the day as a mark
of respect to the deceased.
During the hours announced for the
funeral all business was suspended in this
city, the flag of the custom-house lowered
at half-mast, and the Presbyterian Church
bell tolled. The heartfelt sympathy of
the community goes out to his bereaved
children.
Mr. Yulee, during the past half cen-
tury, has been one of the most potent
factors in the -material development and
prosperity of the State of Florida, and more
particularly of the city of Fernandina.
On another page will be found a brief re-
view of his life. It matters not what the
different feelings may be in reference to his
services to the State, his name will go down
to posterity as one of its ablest and most
patriotic citizens.



The Juries for the Fall Term.
The following are the names of the grand
and petit jurors drawn for the Fall Term of
the Circuit Court, which convenes at Lyceum
Hall next Tuesday :
GRAND JURY :


Philip Goodbread, Wm. B. Clark,
Fred. Kruse, J. W. Geiger,
Joseph D. Martin. W. R. Adams, Jr.,
J.,C. Buford, William Gwynn,
Monroe Davis, John S. Eaton,
David Cribb, E. T. Johnson,
David A. Dyal, Wm. B. C. Duryee,
W. R. Adams, Joseph H. Jones,
Henry Clay, J. B. Jones.
PETIT JURY :
Earl Davis, 'I John Hughes,
L. W. Higginbotham, S. J. Higginbotham,
N. S. Gano, B. F. Davis,
Eugene H. Buck, J. J. Conner,
R. E. Edden, Geo. B. R. Grant,
W. W. Boothe, Abram H. Colson,
J. 0. Frey, C. B. Higginbotham,
A. J. Hines, L. A. Davis,
Romeo Donegal, Thomas H. Bradly.

The Race on the Beach.
There was a very fair attendance at the
horse race on Amelia beach on Wednesday
afternoon. Horses were entered by. Chas.
M. Wimberley, Mr. Swearingen, and Geo.
Demotte. The beach was very fine and a
good start was effected. The race was a dash
of 500 yards, and was closely contested, Mr.
Wimberley coming in first and Swearingen
second. The judges, Messrs. P. I. Courter,
M. E. Hunt and H: C. Curry, awarded the
prizes accordingly. After the first race, sev-
eral scrub races were gotten up for the
amusement of the spectators. '
Mr. G. F. Avery arranged for the race and
deserves thanks for providing this entertain-
ment for the public. ,
Democratic, Rally.
On Saturday evening next Hon. Charles
Dougherty and other speakers will address
the citizens of Fernandina at Lyceum Hall
Let all good Democrats attend.
During the day Mr. Dougherty will speak
at Callahan.
His appointment at King's Ferry is for
Monday, October 25th.
Shipments from This Port.
During the past week the following ship-
.ments were made from this port via the New
York steamship line:
Per steamship San Antonio, of the Mallory
Line, for New York, October 14-139 bales
sea island cotton, 190 cases cedar, 214 barrels
rosin, 64 barrels spirits, 55 cans shrimp, 30
30 packages merchandise, 2111 tons old rail-
road iron.
Mr. Henry Daniels has done remarkably
well this year selling strawberry plants. In
response to a four-line advertisement in the
Mi(r'r lie has received nUlinierous orders from
abroad, one for 16,000 plants coining from
Mlissouri.


The Fernandina Volunteers are making
arrangements for a grand ball in the near
future. It will be a complimentary affair to
a newly-married member and his bride.
Mrs. B. A. King left on the Mallory
steamship San Antonio for New York and
Philadelphia last Thursday. While North
Mrs. King will make her selections for the
winter business.
The steamboat Pope Catlin of the Inde-
pendent Line between this city and Bruns-
wick, Ga., is meeting with deserved success.
Capt. Emerson has reduced the passenger
rates thirty-three per cent., and the freight
tariff is very low.
The Mallory Line.
SAILING DAYS OF STEAMSHIPS FOR OCTOBER.
Thursday, October 21...........arondelet.
Thursday, October 28..........State of Texas.
Saturday, October 30..........San Antonio.
Wednesday, November 3......Carondelet.

MARINE.
Port of Fernandina.
HIGH WATER.
Saturday,0ct'b'r16............10:02 A. M. 10:19 P. M
Sunday, 17............10:44 11:05
Monday, 18 ...........11:32 11:57
Tuesday, 19............. ...... 0:27 "
Wednesday,"' 20............ 0:55 1:27
Thursday, 21............ 1:56 2:32 "
Friday, 22......... 3:01 3:36
ENTERED.
Oct. 12-Steamship City of San Antonio. Wilder,
for New York; freight and passengers,
by R. W. Southwick, agent.
8-Schooner Samuel B. Vrooman, Geo. W.
Smith, Beaufort, S. C.; to Hillyard &
Bailey.
11-Schooner Lizzie Chadwick, Chadwick,
New London; W. D. Wheelwright & Co.
11-Schooner Sarah Potter, Summer, Boston;
Mizell & Bro.
12-Schooner Ellwood Burton, Warrington;
Philadelyhia.
14-Schooner Nettie Langdon, Bagley, Jack-
sonville; Mizell & Bro.
13-Schooner Lois V. Chaples, Ross, Bruns-
wick.
CLEARED.
Oct. 14-Steamship San Antonio, Wilder, from
New York; freight and passengers, to
R. W. Southwick, agent.
9-Schooner Fannie E. Wolsten, Marrs,
Philadelphia.
12-Schooner Lewis W. Cottingham, Ped-
wick, Baltimore.
14-Schooner William Frederick, Patterson,
New York.
VESSELS IN PORT.
Bark Agder, Flagestad.
Schooner Samuel B. Vrooman, Geo. W. Smith.
Schooner Lizzie Chadwick, Chadwick.
Schooner Sarah Potter, Summer.
Schooner Ellwood Burton, Warrington.
Schooner Nettie Langdon, Bagley.
Schooner Lois V. Chaples, Brunswick.
Schooner Thos. G. Smith, Swain.
Schooner John C. Smith, Foss.
J. S. Powell, Mason.
Schooner Grace Bradley, McIntyre.

Fresh Sausages,
In lard, at WHITNER & SCHUYLER'S.


To Rent.
That centrally located Cottage on Sixth
street, next south of the Manse, containing
eigh rooms. Apply to -
H. E. DOTTERER.

Inspectors rof Election.
At a meeting of the Board of County
Commissioners, held this day, the following
gentlemen were appointed Inspectors of
Election for Nassau County, to serve at the
general election to be held November 2d,
1886, in the several election districts, as
designated :
District No. 1-G. L. Baltzell, James Mc-
Giffin and G. F. Avery.
District No. 2-W. F. Scott, Stephen Ran-
dall and Adolphus Hunter.
District No. 3-I. S. O'Neill, J. H. Acosta
and Toney Allen.
District No. 4-Nathan Priest, Charles W.
Cone and Luke Richo.
District No. 5-Ralph Russell, H. B.
Wingate and John C. Wilson.
District No. 6.-W. M. Vinzant, D. M.
Higginbotham and Henry Fisher.
District No. 7-William Mizell, S. J. Wit-
ter and R. E. Blair.
District No. 8-G. W. Hodges, J. S. Bailey
and Carter Brown.
District No. 9-H. C. Picket, F. C. Higgin-
botham and F. B. Bryant.
District No. 10-F. :,M. Connor, William
Johnson and L. H. Bradley.
District No. 11-Wade Hicks, H. F.
Campbell and H. I,. Mattair.
PHINEAS JOHNSON,
Chairman Board County Commissioners,
Nassau County.
Attest: J. A. EDWARDS, Clerk.
Fernandina, Fla., October 9, 1886.


St. Joseph's Academy,
FERNANDINA, FLA.
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL
OR, YOUNG LADIES, UNDER THE
direction of the Sisters of St. Joseph.
The scholastic year commences on the
fifteenth of September, and ends on the last
Thursday in June.'
TERMS-Board and Tuition, including
Washing, for quarter, $45 00. Music, Draw-
ing and Languages extra charge (French,ex-
cepted)..
For further particulars apply to the
Mother Superior.

Warranty and Mortgage Deeds
LINEN PAPER-75 CTS. PER DOZEN
Samples sent uponreceipt of 2-cent
stamp. Address


26


FLORIDA MIRROR,1,
Fernandina, Fla.


BILL-HEA.DS. NOTE-HEADS, LET
ter-Heads, Cards, etc., neatly printed
at the MIRROR office-


T HE" MIRROR" STEAM PRINTING
House is noted for the artistic manner
in which it executes all kinds of Printing.


A CURJE 1FOR
CONSTIPATION,
Sick Headache
AND
DYSPEPSIA.
50 Cents a Bottle.


Is superior to all other remedies for Dis-
eases of LIVER AND KIDNEYS;, also for
EXHAUSTED VITALITY, LOSS OF
SLEEP, NERVOUSNESS, TORPID LIV-
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FRED W. HOYT & CO


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Ware-Room on Centre Street, West of Second.


THE ATTENTION

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WHITNER & SCHUYLER,



NO. 47 CENTRE STREET.


Independent Steamboat


H. W. JOHNS ASBESTOS PAINTS


U NTIL FURTHER NOTICE,
stearner


THE


POPE CA..T I'I-T,
CAPT. C H. EMERSON,
Will run daily. Sunday excepted, (and
weather permiitrtiig,) between Bruns-
wick, Ga., an 3 Fernandina, Fla.,
leaving Drur*y's Wharf, Brunswick, Ga., at
8 o'clock a. in., for Fernandina and inter-
mediate points; returning, leave Fernan-
dina at 2 o'clock p. m.
RATES OF FARE-Brunswick to Fernan-
dina, cabin, $2.00; deck, $1.25. Round
Trip Tickets, cabin, $3.00; deck, $2.00.
Special arrangements made for Excursion
Parties. Meals and refreshments served on
board at reasonable rates.
Freight taken at lowest rates.
For further information apply to
THOSE. FULLER, Agent,
On the wharf, Brunswick. Ga.
CAPT. S. L. DENNETTE,
Fernandina, Fla. 47-tf

R. S. SOHUYLER,
---ARICITE T.---

D ESIGNS FOR BUILDING OF ALL
Descriptions, with Plans, Details, Spe-
cifications, and Superintendence.


are acknowledged to be of superior quality,
and will cover mIrh more thani ,cheaper
and lighter brands. Sold only by

FRED W. HOYT & 00.


Building Material,
BRICK, LIME, PLASTER,
CEMENT, SHINGLES, NAILS
SASH. DOORS AND BLINDS,
PAINTS AND OILS.

FRED W. HOYT & 00.


W. K. BAUKNIGHT,
AGENT.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
UTCHER AND]) STOCK DEALER.
B AND
Dealer in I~ee
TENNESSEE BEEF A SPECIALTY
BROOM STREET WHARF,


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