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Florida mirror
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 Material Information
Title: Florida mirror
Uniform Title: Florida mirror (Fernandina, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: A.B. Campbell, Geo. Burnside
Place of Publication: Fernandina Fla
Creation Date: March 14, 1885
Publication Date: 1878-
Frequency: semiweekly[<1894-1899>]
weekly[ former 1878-<1886>]
triweekly[ former <1890-1891>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 30, 1878)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1901.
General Note: "Democratic" <1880>.
General Note: Editor: Geo. R. Fairbanks, <1887>.
General Note: Publishers: George R. Fairbanks, <1885-1886>; Moore & Manucy, <1887-1891>; The Mirror Pub. Co., <1894-1898>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002057832
oclc - 33834378
notis - AKP5868
lccn - sn 95047336
System ID: UF00054505:00007
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Nassau County star

Full Text

Amputation of the Leg.
Money is the universal necessity, and
none but a cynic or a fool will affect to de-
spise it. Mr. Abram Ellsworth, of Port
Ewen, Ulster county, N. Y., had realized
the truth. His disease involved the whole
of his thigh-bone, and the suffering man
looked forward, not without apparent reas-
on, to death as his only deliverer. The fam-
ily physician refused to amputate the limb,
asserting that the operation would kill the
patient on the spot. Dr. David KENNEDY,
of Roundout, N. Y., who was consulted,
held a different opinion, and amputated the
limb. The Doctor then administered freely
his great Blood Specific FAVORITE REM-
EDY to afford tone and strength to the sys-
tem aud prevent the rctai n4of"the disease,
and Mr. Ellsworth remains to this day in
the bloom of health. This gentleman's dis-
ease was the offspring of foul blood, and
Kennedy's FAVORITE REMEDY purified
the blood, and restored to him the power
once more to enjoy his life. Are you suffer-
ing from any disease traceable to the same
cause? Try Favorite Remedy. Your drug-
gist has it. ONE DOLLAR a bottle. Bear
in mind the proprietor's name and address:
Dr. David KENNEDY, Roundout, N. Y.
To Keep the Blood Pure is the
principal end of inventions and discoveries
in medicine. To this object probably no one
has contributed more signally than Dr. Da-
vid Kennedy, of Roundout, N. Y., in the
production of a medicine which has become
famous until the title of the "Favorite Rem-
edy," It removes all impurities of the
Blood, regulates the disordered Liver and
Kidneys, cures Constipation, Dyspepsia and
all diseases and weaknesses peculiar to fe-
males. J. L. HORSEY & Co., AGTS.


In the Circuit Court,
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
DAVID WILSON and EBEN-'
HUNTING, doing business
as WILSON & HUNTING, Attachment.
VS. i A o n ,$ ,0 -
JOHN H. BOYNTON, doing Amount, $1,700.
business under the name ond ,
and style of JOHN BOYN-
ToN's SON. J
DEFENXDA TS__W o.LLTAE_ QTICE
D.J of commencement of suit in theabove
entitled cause by attachment issued out of
the Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Circuit,,
in and for the County of Nassau, and are,
notified to appear in said cause on or before,
the first Monday in April next, or judgment
by default will be entered therein upon fail--
ure on the part of said defendant to plead;.
answer or demur to the declarations filed-
in said cause on or before the first Monday,:
ii May, 1885. H. J. BAKER,
Attorney for Plaintiffs..
JOHN A. EDWARDS,
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
IIn and for the County of Nassau, Fla.:
Fernandina, Fla., Dec. 27, 1884-3mo.
In the Circuit Court Fourth Ju-
dicial Circuit, Nassau County,.
Florida, In Chancery.
LOVIE EUGENIA SUTTON,
vs. DDIVORGCE:
DAVID HUNTER SUTTON.}.
ON MOTION OF THE COMPLAINANT
by her counsel, John T. & George W.
Walker, (it being made to appear to my sat-
isfaction that the Judge of the Fourth Cir-
cuit of Florida is disabled by illness to at--
tend to the duties of his office), and, on read-
ing and considering the Bill and the-
affidavit thereto attached, it is ordered that:
a hearing be had on the facts charged in the-
said Bill on the first Monday in May, 1885,
at Chambers.
THOMAS F. KING, Judge.
January 3d, 1885. 10-3m1

s NEW, CHEAP AND GOOD.

NGINEES, BOILER'
--- NEW AND SECOND HAND.-V
ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY AT LOW PRICES
Combined Orange Box Ind Shingle Machine
Eagle Gins, Saw Mills, Planers, Resaws, &c
Ask for Catalogue and Prices before buying.
RANOLE & DUGAN MACH'Y GO,
65, 67, 69, ELM ST., CINCINNATI, 0..
(Write for Catalogue and mention this paper.)

Spring and Summer Clothing
At New York cost.
AT PAUL FUNKE'S..


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: MARCH 14 1885.


:Sheriff's Sale.
Y VIRTUE OF -AN EXECUTION
issued out of the Circuit Court of the-
Fourth Circuit of Florida for Nassau County,-
September 5th, 1867, in favor of Adam C..
Dunhamn against Andrew M. Jones, I have
levied upon as the property of said defend-
ant, and will sell at public auction on the
first Monday of April, 1885, in front of the
court-house door in Fernandina,. in said
county, to satisfy said execution, the follow-
ing property, to-wit: One undivided third
part of the tract of land containing about
five hundred acres, more or less, known as
the Suarrez tract, situated on Amelia Island,
in said county, at a place called Black-
Point, it being the land originally granted(
by the Spanish Government and confirniIedI
to the heirs of Antonio Suarrez and after-
wards owned by Robert Harrison, deceased ;
also, one undivided third part of the one
hundred and fifty acres of land adjoining
said Suarrez tract, which were purchased by
said Robert Harrison, deceased, from Johni
C. Pelot, being a part of the James Pelot
grant, the said undivided third part in each.
of said two tracts of land having been con-
veyed by Robert Harrison, Jr., an heir at
law of Robert Harrison, deceased, to said
defendant; also, a parcel of land on said
Amelia Island, conveyed December 21st,.
1865, by Ephraim Harrison* to said A. M.-
Jones, the deed being recorded in Book G,..
pages 503 and 504, of the records of said "
county, which land is there described as a,
tract of land known as the Ephraim Harri-
son share of the Samuel Harrison tract of
land, bounded on the north by Anna M.
Clark's land, on the east by the Atlantic,,
Ocean, on the south by Robert Harrison's
land and on the west by Half-Moon Creek,,
containing one hundred and fifty acres, ex-
cept the family cemetery of one acre.
J. A. ELLERMANN,_
Sheriff of Nassau County, Fla.
Fernandina, Fla., March 7, 1885-td


thank heaven for that !-step forth
from out the shadow of those weird
rocks, with the farewell smile still .on
his lips and the love-light in his eyes.
While they were still at Morthoe,
one morning-a morning which Hes-
ter Conway will never forget-a letter
and newspaper were carried up on the
tray with the early cup of tea which
she took, invalid fashion, upstairs.
Dora's letter were not wont to be ex-
citing, and Hester, opening it, read
with rather languid interest, till she
came to this strange paragraph:
I send you a paper with an ac-
count of the rejoicings at Guestwycke
on Talbot's return. All went of
well, (we were there, of course), and
the poor old people's quiet happiness
was a sight to see. Isn't it a strange,
romantic kind of story ? The hero of
the day asked particularly after you,
and seemed rather annoyed at your
absence. I did not dare mention poor
Lorette to him. Didn't you laugh
over her imposture? If Talbot had
not turned up again the truth would
actually never have been known at all!
Mrs. Tracy was staying with friends
at Exeter when the news of Talbot's
safety reached Guestwycke. Mr.
Guest sent her a telegram at once, and
the very next day Lorette wrote to
her landlady here, throwing up her
rooms and ordering all her belongings
to be sent to her at Exeter directly.
It seems she does not intend to show
her face in this neighborhood again.
Of course you won't be surprised to
hear that Talbot's good father and
mother have quite forgiven her and
paid the month's bills she left owing."
Hester put her hand to her head in
bewilderment. Was she dreaming?
Had Dora lost her senses ?-Or was it
possible-barely possible-
She took her letter, and without
even waiting to coil up the auburn
hair, which rippled over her shoulders,
rushed to her sister's room.
"Janet! I have heard from Dora.
What does she mean? Was the re-
port about Captain Guest untrue ? Did
he escape ?"
My dear, there was no need to es-
cape. Luckily for him lie was safe at
Khartoum on sick leave all the time.
Didn't I tell you ? His mother sent
you a message. Perhaps I forgot to
deliver it. Ah! I remember now;
it was the day Mysie was so ill !"
"I heard nothing of it -until this
moment." Then-very low-with
down-bent head: "And Lorette Tracy,
Janet, was that tale false too?"
Mrs. Ormsby laughed heartily.
Oh! Dora has been telling you the
denouement of that story, has she? It
seems her engagement was all a fabri-
cation. Ingenious, wasn't it'? She
would never have been found out,
either, if her supposed fiance had not
come to life so opportunely Mac did
laugh when I told him about it. He
always rather admired Mrs. Tracy.
Now, Hester, help me to think. Had
I better order tapioca or sago for the
chicks to-day ? Mysie likes sago best,
but Jack"-
Domestic details such as these, how-
ever, had no power to invade the dream-
land where Hester was wandering this
morning. She evaded the children, and
as soon as she could hurried away by
herself to carry her joy where she had
carried her sorrow-to the lonely shore.
The purple sea was sparking and danc-
ing under the bluest of Devon skies; the
white foam was throwing a lace mantle
over the lower levels of the jagged rocks,
and leaping over higher and higher to-
ward the white auartz pinnacles which


crowned them. Nature with strange
sympathy had shed a sunshine and bril-
liance over all the beautiful bay. Hes-
ter, .well-wrapped, sat long and content-
edly under the shelter of a great brown
ironstone giant looking out on the
sparking waters, till a shadow fell upon
the book lying so uselessly open on her
lap.
It was Colonel Ormsby's daily habit to
come and escort her home, and being
still but feeble, for her spirits were
aweary, she had been glad of her kind
brother-in-law's strong arm to help her
up the cliff. But to-day a new courage
braced her limbs. She looked up with a
smile, one of her old smiles.
"I can do without an arm to-day,
Mac," she was beginning, but the words
died on her lips.
The new-comer was even taller and
broader than Mac. His mustachios
bristled fiercely, and he was bronzed by
desert suns to the tint of an Arab chief.
Mac has sent a deputy to-day, Hes-
ter," he said smilingly. She remained
dumb in trembling surprise, utterly un-
able even to gasp out a welcome. But
perhaps the light in her eyes spoke for
her, for Talbot Guest threw himself
down beside her and seized her hands.
"Oh, Hester You at least might have
known me better!" Then as still she
did not speak: "Hester!" very wistful-
ly-" Hester! I have not changed!"
But I have", she whispered softly.
And in another moment her head lay
on his shoulder, (they were so safely out
of sight), and this bold wooer, whom
Lorette had claimed for her own, was
holding her against his heart in a clasp


which defied a world to take her from
him.
Colonel Ormsby and his wife, walking
down to the shore later, met the pair
climbing up the cliff together, a pretty
impersonation of Love's Young Dream.
Hester, who found that she did need
support after all, leant on Talbot's arm,
while he, tall, bronzed and soldier-like,
was looking down tenderly into her fair
face half hidden by a wind-blown tangle
of auburn curls. She had been telling
shyly, with hushed breath, of the via
Dolorosa her feet had so lately trodden,
and listening with pitiful tears in her
sweet eyes to his tale of the- dangers he
had passed, and of the short, sharp,
merciful illness which had been a bless-
ing in disguise. Mrs. Ormsby looked at
her husband significantly.
Hester's brother-in-law gave an ex-
pressive whistle, and began to hum
under her breath. Oh! there's noth-
ing half so sweet in life Both
guessed what had happened and were
ready with their best wishes.
But the warmest congratulations came
from Guestwicke, where John Guest and
his good wife soon had theo joy of wel-
coming a daughter-in-law after their own
heart. We may be sure that the flowers
bloomed brightly, and they place wore
its gayest aspect for this visitor who
came to take up her abode there for good
and all.
"It is always what we wished, Hes-
ter," said Mrs. Guest. her bright old eyes
shining with happiness. I never could
take to that Mrs. Tracy, even before she
turned out an impostor."
Hush! my dear !" reproved her hus-
band gently. "Hester knows how much
we love her," taking his new daughter's
hand in his, and patting it affectionate-
ly, "and I think there should be no ill-
feeling!"-The Argosy.
"Those Blinding Headaches--
I know what they mean ; ever since I can
remember I have been a victim to them,"
said Mrs. J. Nichols, of Rochester, N. Y. I
could understand what the author meant
when he said : Life is sometimes not worth
living.' By the merest chance I heard of
Dr. David Kennedy's Favorite Remedy.' I
tested its virtues, and it, truly worked a
transformation for me; I amin now practi-
cally a new creature." ,


always friends; indeed I once hoped
* *"-passing her hand caress-
ingly over the girl's auburn hair-
" But it was not to be !"
Hester writhed under the kind
touch which almost broke down her
composure. She could not speak a
word.
You know this lady, I think, my
dear," Mrs. Guest went on. Tell me
what is she like? Pretty? Gentle?
well-mannered ?"
Oh! don't ask me,'' poor Hester
broke out in uncontrollable agony.
Her overcharged heart seemed burst-
ing with pain. Then in a stiffled
voice, "I know-so little-about her."
I am not fond of strangers," sighed
Mrs. Guest.
I wish you could have staid, Hes-
ter !-But of course she is very nice,
and we are sure to like her; dear Tal-
bot's choice !" the mother consoled
herself softly.
As Herter in the humble sociable
reached the end of the drive that af-
ternoon, the returning barouche dashed
in at the great gates of Guestwycke.
The groom who was driving her pulled
up to make way for it, and its occu-
pant, Mrs. Tracy, leaned forward with
a bow and a smile. A smile of triumph,
Hester thought bitterly. And this
was the rival who had supplanted her,
who was to take her place at Guest-
wycke as the child of the house !


It had been comfort
heart to think she could
Talbot's dear ones. To


to her sore
be of use to
cherish and


care for them-to fill the place he had
left empty-what else was left to her!
Poor Hester covered her face, and in
her loneliness and humiliation broke
into a flood of tears. The blow had
fallen so heavily, sweeping away all
at once, not only the peaceful present,
the hopeful future-it was the past
also, the past with all its memories
which had vanished in an hour.
III.
A telegram was thrust into Hester's
hand as she presently crossed the Rec-
tory threshold; a summons from her
eldest sister, Mrs. Ormsby. Hester
always thought afterward it must have
been by her good angel's special pro-
vision that measles made its appear-
ance in the Ormsby household just at
this particular time. She obeyed the
rather incoherent telegram, and flew
- to Taunton to her sister's help. Mrs.
Ormsby had five little .ones who all
succumbed in turn, and kept Hester's
hands full as she glided from one bed-
side to another, smoothing the pillows
under feverish little heads, or carrying
cooling drinks to parched lips, or an-
swering appeals from fractious conva-
lescents.
Janet was a motherly sort of body,
with no conception of any world be-
yond her nursery, nor an idea that it
was possible for Hester to have any
interests beyond a brew of black-cur-
rant tea, or the spreading of a lin-seed
poultice. At times Hester scarcely
thought so either. The clamoring lit-
tle voices, and the steam from bronchitis
kettles shut out bitter thoughts and
painful memories. They faded into
the dim distance in -face of the absorb-
ing necessity for seeing that Jack did
not take cold, and that Mysie did take
nourishment. Those two cost the
mother and aunt many a wakeful night
of nursing, long after the robuster
ones were safely convalescent.
Perhaps it was no wonder that as
the strain relaxed and the pare-taking
grew less arduous, Aunt Hester should
droop and lose her bright color. Al-
,though Janet was so comfortably un-
observant, she could not help 'noticing
it. Of course it was the want of sleep
and the warm rooms. Hester was al-
ways such a one for air. She must
come with them to the seaside and re-
cover tone. So a week later found
them all wandering over the sands at
Morthoe, an out-of-the-way corner of
the world after Hester's own heart.
Long before this, people had quite
left off talking about the disaster in
the Soudan. The news was some
weeks old now, and so many things
had happened since. Only at Morthoe
a sad and silent woman moved through
life with all the hope crushed out of
her.
Could she only have known for cer-
tain that she had a right to weep !
If but for one moment Talbot could
have come back from the realms of
peace to tell her the truth-Was he
her's still or that other's-Hester felt
she could have borne it .better. A
wild, longing, which was almost a
prayer, .would come over her some-
times, as she wandered on the rugged
shore washed by the wild Atlantic;
and she would scarcely have been sur-
prised to see the familiar form of him
who had been her lover-yes, once!


A-TLL


SI IS'T D S


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=TBLANK BOOKS!

FO---?"T





M:FJP MU -r' s-
B^A-ILBIOA3DS,


BTE-A1VIBO-ATS,


~1.VIERCI-3.A.5TT3,


BA.T:ES, ETC



-ALSO-




BgI A
im lmiauilmu nlWuipiil


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
DEXTER HUNTER,
VS.
JOHN H. BOYNTON, ATTACHMENT,-
Doing business under the $1,663.00.
name and style of John.
Boynton's Son. J
AID DEFENDANT, JOHN H. BOYN-
S ton, doing business as John Boynton's
Son, will hereby take notice of the conm-
mencement of the above entitled suit by
Attachment in the Circuit Court, Fourth,.
Judicial Circuit, in and for the County of
Nassau, Florida; and is notified to appear,.
plead or demur to the declaration filed:
therein, on or before the first Monday in,
March next, or judgment by default will be-
taken herein on behalf of Dexter Hunter,
the plaintiff above named.
R. W. DAVIS,
H. J. BAKER,
Attorneys for Plaintiff.
Fernandina, Fla., Nov. 28, 1884. 1-3m


AND DEALER IN

MfEif, a ME \
a ** t - ,


-AND AT-



REASONABLE PRICES








sw- SEND IN YOUR WORK.-a









SATISFACTION GU ARANTEED,



BOTH IN STYLE AND PRICES.



Address


Of the Latest and Most Approved Patterns.

COOKING UTENSILS OF ALL KINDS,

LIFT AND FORCE PUMPS,
WROUGHT-IRON APES.

DRIVEN WELLS A SPECIALTY

IN AND IRON ROOFS PUT ON.
Orders for Tin Gutters promptly filled.
Wind Mills for pumping watr-r o.r running
light machinery promptly e*'i,:..1 on order.
Church, Factory and School Bells for sale
at a bargain.
Stoves at Wholesale Prices.
All goods delivered at the various trans-
portation stations within the city free of
charge. All sales for cash.
CORNER BROOME AND SECOND STS.
Fernandina, Fla., July 12, 1884.


PATRIZESME M:iTrE








FLORIDA 'MIRROR










BOOK BIN Ry








HAVING ESTABLISHED A BOOK
BINDERY in connection with our
Printing Office, we are prepared to RULE
AND MANUFACTURE


NOTICE.
O ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby, given that I have been
appointed Administrator of all and singular
the goods, chattels, rights and credits of
William S. Rawson, deceased; and all cred-
itors of said estate, legatees and persons en-
titled to distribution are notified to present
their claims and demands, duly attested,
within two years from this date, and that
the same will be barred unless exhibited
within said period aforesaid.
FRED W. HOYT,
Administrator
Estate of William S. Rawson, dec'd..
Fernandina, Fla., February 7,1884. 6w


M. A6U UE&HTINT,
MANUFACTURER OF


Tin Sheet-Iron Ware BOUND in ALL STYLES


FLORIDA MIRROR,

FERNANDINA, FLA.





NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following described lands will be sold at public auc-
tion on the 6th day of April, at Fernandina, in the County of Nassau, or so much
thereof as will be necessary to pay the amounts due for taxes for the year 1884, herein set
opposite to the same, together with costs of sale and advertising:


Subscription, 82 per year; six months 81.

Office corner Centre and First streets, second floor
s-
jUATES OF ADVERTISING.
Ten cents a line for the first, and five cents for
each subsequent insertion.
Special local notices, 15 cents a line.
Reading notices, 25 cents a line.
Special rate for time advertisements upon appli
cation at the office.

Communications upon all matters of local inter-
est solicited from all parts of the county and from
along the lines of Florida railways.
All communications intended for publication
should be addressed to the Editor; all business
letters simply to THE FLORIDA MIRROR.


SATURDAY Y, MARCH 14, 1885.


suits at New Orleans had been ac-
complished by the expenditure of a
little more than a million and a half
of dollars, while that at Philadel-
phia, much inferior in the size of its
buildings, and the extent of exhibits,
cost over seven millions of dollars.
If the Tribune chooses to jibe at
the want of public spirit of the New
York people who will not give the
money to make a pedestal for the
statue of Liberty, it is welcome to do
so; but its meanness must be deep-
seated indeed when it can make so
far-fetched a fling at the South,which
it misrepresents as much as it does
the feelings of the people of the
North.
./ THE RAILROAD GRANT.
In the debate on Mr. Van Wyck's
resolution, Mr. Call is reported to
have said:,
The debt of the original company was un-
paid, and the creditors sought by processes
of law to prevent sales of lands by the as-
signees. The construction of the road had
now been commenced and was continued;
but in the meantime the country had been
opened up and developed by two other com-
panies without the aid of land grants. Lands
worthless when granted had come to be
enormously valuable. Meantime, settlers
had gone upon these lands. There was an
impression that the Senate was too far re-
moved from the people to listen to com-
plaints that it represented the property and
incorporated power without sympathy with
the people, and he was anxious to disabuse
the public mind in this regard. The settlers
upon these lands had been recognized in
their rights. .,Now, an agent of this com-
pany, a Mr. Wailes, of Washington, had un-
dertaken to expose these lands for sale at
public auction, to sell the improvements,
the orange groves of the settlers, and the
settlers had been deprived of their rights as
far as an act of sale could deprive them.
This was done without the authority of law.
It was proper that Congress should prevent
this.
The Secretary of the Interior advised this
company that it had no title to the lands,
yet the sale had gone on and the settlers
were alarmed. The land was granted while
Yulee was a member of the ,Senate, and at
the same time president and principal stock-
holder of the company. The road was built
entirely frotv the proceeds of the land sales'
and without itary outlay of private means.
It was the dutyof the Government to inves-
tigate the subje t.
We can hardly suppose the report
to be correct. It certainly does not
conform to the known facts in rela-
tion to the history of this railroad,
and the statemicnts are entirely incon-
sistent.
We learn that the debt which is
referred to is of no great amount and
is not recognized, but is in litigation.
The lands are said by Mr. Call to
have been worthless when granted;
but he says that "the road was built
entirely from the proceeds of the
land sales," which is very inconsist-
ent with the alleged valueless char-
acter of the lands. He also says that
although the road is building, the
country has been opened up and de-
veloped by two other companies with-
out the aid of land grants. What
two companies does he refer to ? The


Florida Southern has the alternate
sections and 10,000 acres additional,
and the Florida Railway is almost
the only company that is building a
road without a grant from the State
of from 6,000 to 20,000.
otitity Tax-Payers.
I am now re dy to receive the city taxes
of 1884. Can b)e found at my office, next
door to Customs-House, from 9 a. m. to 4 p.
m. every day, except Sunday, until March
4th, 1885, afteriwhich time the books will be
closed, and al| property that the taxes are
not paid on at that date will be advertised,
as provided b, statute.
C. J. WESTBERG,
City Tax Collector of Fernandina, Fla.


MR. VAN WYCK'S RESOLUTION.
'Senator Van Wyck, of Nebraska,
seems to be a counterpart of White,
of Kentucky. He has a great apti-
tude in looking after the interests of
the remote people of the United
States, and is especially rabid on the
subject of land grants. His latest
performance is the offering of a reso-
tion in the extra session of the Sen-
ate directing the Secretary of the In-
terior and the Attorney-General of
the United States to take such action
as each may deem 'necessary to pre-
vent any sale by the Atlantic and
Gulf & West India Transit Compa-
ny, or by any other company claim-
ing under them of the lands de-
scribed in the act approved May 17,
1856, and entitled an act granting
public lands in alternate sections in
Florida and Alabama to aid in the
construction of certain railroads in
said States, so far as the same lie
within the line of said railroads be-
tween Waldo and Tampa Bay, until
Congress shall have authorized the
same.
This is a very queer resolution, by
which the Senate, sitting only in
special session and not for legisla-
tive purposes, is asked to undertake
to direct executive office as to their
duties by a resolution of the Senate
alone. The executive officers have
their duties designated, and are not,
we have always supposed, officers of
the Senate, to be instructed as to
'their duties by simple resolutions of
the Senate acting alone.
Section 2,249 of Statutes at Large
oof the United States provides that
-where lands have been, or may here-
after be granted by any law of Con-
gress to any one of the several states
and territories, and where such law
does not convey the fee simple title
of the lands as require patents to b be
..'... issue d terefor, the lists of such lands

which have been or may hereafter be
certified by the commissioner of the
general land office, under the seal of
his office, shall be regarded as con-
veying the fee simple of all the lands
embraced in such lists that are of the
character contemplated by such act
of Congress, etc.
The Supreme Court of the United
States has decided that the land
grants to railroads pass to them when
they file the map of their line of
roads, so far as to vest the title in
them in future.
Mr. Van Wyck's resolution is a
brutum fulmen, a rabid railroad bark,
which will probably go, where very
much of his work goes, into thin air.
The effect of such action, if any was
had under it, would be to prevent
the completion of the Peninsular
portion of the road into South Flori-
da, and delay the construction of
roads more necessary to the people
of that section.


The resolution is ill-drawn, in-
complete, and a poor attack on the
interests of our State.

THE FRUIT EXCHANGE.
The action of the Fruit-Growers as
assembled at Jacksonville on the
llth inst., the proceedings of which
we publish, promises to be of very


FAIRMOUNT,
A SCHOOLFFOR YOUNG LADIES,
MOUNT EAGLE, TENN.
SITUATED ON THE CUMBERLAND
Mountain Plateau, near the University
of the South, at an elevation of 2,000 feet
above the sea. Combines the advantages of
health and r-i-reation. Vacations in the
winter. Terr.- moderate. Send for circular
to SILAS McBEE,
i Principal,
.Mount Eagle, Tenn.
References--G. R. Fairbanks, Fernandina ;
Dr. Hy. Robinson, Jacksonville; Rev. N.
Harris, Jacksonville.
Sit". a Sfin ""d T'p mi f


1885.


THE FLORIDA MilRROR.

GEORGE R. FAIRBANKS, EDITOR.


be called the leading interest of our
State.
We have a soil and a climate pecu-
liarly favorable for the cultivation of
fruits and early vegetables. We can
supply the world with oranges and
lemons at less cost of production
than any other accessible region.
We can supply all the markets of
the United States with early vegeta-
bles, and Florida may be made a
garden spot, teeming with popula-
tion and profitable industries.
We have already found that the
business of fruit and vegetable pro-
duction is so large that it must be
systematized in order to get the ben-
efits of our peculiar products.
The Fruit Exchange announces
that its general purposes and objects
are understood to be to arrange, in,
the most effective manner, for the
proper preparation for market and
for the speedy, careful and cheap
transportation and for the judicious
and satisfactory marketing of oranges
and other fruits and perishable pro-
ducts.
We can well recall the crude way
in which oranges were forwarded ten
years ago, not packed, but put into
barrels, tierces, soap boxes, starch
boxes, kegs and boxes made of split
palings, without assorting, without
wrapping and without care in gath-
ing. Of course our fruit made -no
appreciable impression on the mar-
ket. Afterwards, through packing-
house establishments at and near
Palatka, system began to be intro-
duced, the necessity of careful hand-
ling and packing was recognized, a
standard box was introduced, box
materials were contracted for, assort-
/. /
ing into sizes and wrapping began
to be deemed important, until now
the system of handling is well settled.
But we have no system of market-
ing our fruit. We ship it at random
to consignees of whom oftentimes
we know nothing of their capacity
to do the business or of their busi-
ness standing; our fruit is subject to
delays, rough handling, improper
storage on board ship, close, unven-
tilated cars or care without protec-
tion against cold weather. We send
to a market already well supplied,
or to people who are not in the line
of business, or who, having no capi-
tal or experience, sacrifice the fruit
and depress the market.
We have learned how to prepare.
our fruit for market; we now need
to know how to properly market our
fruit.
The Fruit Exchange is a sponta-
neous movement of the fruit-growers
to overcome the evils of the present
want of system, and to put the
orange production of the State on a
sure and reliable footing.
With the heartyco-operation and


support of the fruit-growers it will,
we have no doubt, succeed, and ac-
complish as much in the way of im-
provement in the marketing as has
already been achieved in the way of
preparing the fruit for market.

INTENSELY MEAN.
Undoubtedly the South has no
more ungenerous foe than the New
York Tribune. In a recent issue it
says:
The Bartholdi Statue Committee feel de-
pressed that Congress did not give them
$100,000 for the pedestal fund; but they
have nobly resolved to continue their work
until the statue has a place to stand on, if
" It takes all summer." From present ap-
pearances it will at. least take that length of
time. Although the committee are grieved,
there are not a few persons who think Con-
gress did quite right in not granting an ap-
propriation for the fund; yet it must be ad-
mitted that if the sum asked for had been
allowed, the country would at least know
how it was spent-which is more than can
be said for the million or so given to the
managers of the New Orleans Exposition.
The Tribune would, undoubtedly,
take the first prize for intense mean-
ness at the New Orleans or any other
exposition. It was shown in the de-


OWNER. DESCRIPTION OF LAND.


Atkins, W. T................. All of (except 16 acres in N E corner).....
A tkinson, Geo............ A ll of ...................................................
A ll of ....... ...........................................
N of NE 1,'SE'I of'NE'I, lot 2of'SW
Armstrong & Wilkes... S I of lot 1 of S W I........................
Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9 and 10........................
Lots 4, 5, 6 and 7.....................................
As described in a deed on record in book
Buzzell, J.................. R," page 409, County Records...........
The same for 1883..................................
Basquain, Chas.............. Lot 2, block 40, Fernandina....................
Bradley, Newton........... Lot 7, block 77, Fernandina ....................
f NElofSWi, NWiofSEI ..............
S A ll of...................................................
Bryce, Geo. W............ All of sections 20, 29 and........................
N E I. S of S E, NW I......................
All of sections 25 and...........................
As described in a deed on record in book
Baxter" Daniel P," p" ages 347 and 348, County Rec-
B axter, D aniel............ ords.. ........ ................................. .....
S of lot 7, block 45, Fernandina............
Burney, W m ................. N E of N E i......................................
( In the S E corner of the Pedro Pons
Booth, J F................. grant, or as described in a deed on rec-
ord in book "R," pages 229 and 230,
County Records. ............ .................
Best, Wm..................... Lot 1, block 21, Hilliard........................
B ooth, W J......%........... Lot 1....................................................
B achlot, J. R ...*.......... Lot 2 ............................... .................
A ll o ft ...................................................
Clay, John L .............. A ll of ..-*................................................
Clay, John L .............. S part of..... ...... .. ................... .....
Caldwell & King............ El of NE I, E ofSE 1.......................
Connor. Jos................... N E I ofS W I......................................
Crane, Wm................ N W of S W i..........'''...'''.'''
Cr n ,- ...............Ni f W 41., ,,............,.oo. ,* ,' ** ...o ... *
Capo, Miss ..................... Lots 3, 4 and 6, block 2, Old Fernandina..
Counts, J. C.................. N E I of N E 4.......................................
( Lot in Callahan as described in a deed on
Cay, R., Jr., agent....... record in book R," pages 550 and 551,
County Records ..................................
N W corner of*Sanchez grant*..................
Duffee, Fred. J.............. Lot 24, block 8, Fernandina ....................
Dean, S. S..................... Lot 3. block 22, Hilliard.........................
SAll of (except S W 1).............................
Dyal, D..................... All bf E Watterman grant......................
ElofSEI, NW ofSEI, lots 1 and2
( Lot 10 block 17
Lot 7, block 39 \ .
Lot 29. block 26,8 Fernandina ...............
Dickinson, M. S......... Lot 2, block 269 J
Lot 9, block 7, Old Fernandina...............
Lots 2, 3 and 4, EIofS EIofNE I......
A ll of ...................................................
Drummond, Prince..... Subdivision A of lot 3, block 244, being
--- part of................................................
Eubanks, Eliza............ Lots 5 and 12, N ofNW NW of N
t E o.....................................................
Errickson, Martin.......... S W of N W ...................................
Freeman, C................... W of lot 13, block 33, Fernandina........
Faulk, Jane.................. WiofSWiofSWI ofSWI ..............
F ord, M rs. M ary.... .......... ............................................................
Gust, A llen.................... S E I of S E I...... ................ ...............
f S W I ofS W i ......................................
I SE I ofSE i......-- *- .....................
Gardner, E. A., est. of.. E of N E .........................................
SWi ofN W i.......................................
I Lot 4 ..................
Green, Philip J.............. In S E corner of....................................
Gany, Chas................ -- Lot 4....:.................. ..; ........ .. ......
SLot 2 of SW 1, E of8 W i...................
SIofSW1i, SW ofSE ,S E1, EI of N
E ........I ... ee" """"*
E I........ ........... ................. ........... .
Lots 6, 7, 8 and 10, N W I of SE T...........
Lots 2and 3...........................................
SEi of NE i.......................................
S W I ofN E I.......................................
Green & Connor......... NE I, W of SE lots2, 3 and 4.........
N E ofS E I.......................................
NEIofSWI, NWiofNE SE of
NWI,. NWiofNW i.........................
W ofSW SE 1ofSE i....................
SEIof SEI, NE IofSE i.................
N W i ofN E i......................................
SN of lot 8............................................
H unt, W F .................. S E I of S W I.......................................
H enderson, Celia S of lot5............. { S E................................. '
f "" N E & of 8 E I.......................................
Higginbotham, J. S ........ In S corner of the Christopher grant........
Haddock, Paul f N i of lot 4............................................
Haddock, Paul ........o w i......................................S
Higginbotham, Arthur... SW of S E.......................................
Higginbotham, C........... The Reuben Hogan grant.......................
Lots 3 and 4, block 3..............................
Higginbotham, E. M... S of lots 1 and 2, block 3.....................
Lots 1 and 4, block 8, King's Ferry.........
Higginbotham, Mrs. E... Lots 3 and 4..........................................
Higginbotham, W. F...... N W of N'W i....................................
Hughes, E..................... E of SW of SW of SW .............. ;
Henderson, E. F., est. of Lots 17 and 18, block 269, Fernandina .....
Hall, J. H...................... All of the Sable grant ........................ ....
H ardy, R A .................. Lot 1.....................................................
( Part of the Christopher grant lying on S
I E line of said grant, and bounded on
Higginbotham, A......... the N and E by lands of E Warden......
L ot 1.......................................................
[E ofNW, NE, NW ofSE, NE
(. E of S W i..........................................
Jones, Hamp ................. S E ofS E ........................................
J o h n so n D a n 'l..'............ W o f lo t 2 ............................ .. ... ... .
Johnson, D an'1.............. N ofN E ........................... ...............
J o h n s o n T W .............. N o f S E .................... ... . .
Jones, Harley............. { SW of S W'......................................


7 0. ,Ul ................................................. ...
Jones, J. Hamp ........... { In the S W corner of the S W I of the N
E .. ...... ........ ; ....................... .. .. .
Joseph, J. E.................. S E ofN E I...... ....... ....... ........ ....
SS E corner of Pelot grant, or as described-
Jones, Mary L............. in a final decree in chancery order
book, page 229....................... .........
K eckley, J. B ................. N E S E............................................. '
Lan Moses .............. As described in a deed on record in book
Iag Coe. P, page 365, County Records............4
Love Samuel ..............I N of subdivision A of lot 5, block 243,
Being a part of.................................... '
Longworth, E................ Lot 1, block 17, Old Fernapdina..............
Lang, Mrs. C................. E ofN W i, SW i...............................
Lancaster, F. W .........{ Subdivision B of Lot-3, block 444, being
a part of.............................................
Menzies, James........... ... Lot25, block 8, Fernandina....................
Mclntosh, J. A.. { SE NE i of S W I............................
J. A N ofN E i..........................................
Motes, Mrs. H............... N W W of S E.1, lot 3.............................. 1
Mooney, J. H-.:.............. Lot 25, block 3, Fernandina....................
Murch, Mrs. E. J............ Lots 2, 3,4 and 6, block 5, Old Fernandina
Meddaugh, J. E.............. N E Iof J. D. Uaughan grant................. 5
N NEi, Eiof SE, SW of SE1, W i
of NW ofS E i.............................. 3
As described in a deed on record in book
4 R," page 353, County Records........... 3
Lotin Callahan...................................... 3
W 4 ofS W i.......................................... 2
Moore, J. N................ N ofS W ofS E1, W ,S EIof-8E-I,2
NAl of S E I............................ ............... 3
A ll of ................................................... 3
L ot 8 ..................................................... 2
All of the Griffith grant.......................... 3
All of the Griffith grant..........................3
All of the Griffith grant........................... .
N of ...................................................


o


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2 N
3 N
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0
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235
439
230
323
303




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1280


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207

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200
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546
202
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640


172
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79
51
144
160
240
120
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201

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25
100
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84
110
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303


105
40
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653
42

63
33
320
40
26
80
80
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1


2 N25E
4N;23E
5 N24E
2N27E
2 N 27 E
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7
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82
10
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38
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1 31
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3 09
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45 70
5 58
3 88
1 90
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4 93
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9 34
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7


51 2N25E


35
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24 E
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31 2N25E
11 1N24E
22 3N28E
21 4N24E
22 2 N 24E
34 4N24E
14 2 N 24E
29 3N25E
3 1N25E
4 1 N 25E
91 N 25E
10 1 N 25E
9 2N27E
23 N26 E
7 4 N 25 E
8 1S23E


34
4
28
33
35
27
33


2N
1 N
2N
2N
2N
2N
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1 N
2N
2N
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1 N
1 N
4N
4N
3N
3N
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2S
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4N
2N
4N


23 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
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23 E
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23E
24 E
25 E
25 E
27 E
25 E
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23 E
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25 E
24 E
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3
3
4
7
5
28
17
18
48
2
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7
39


20
36
34


3 4N23E


48
1
2
17
25
22
22
27
26


3N27E
3N26E


3N
2N
2 2N
2N
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3N


26 E
25 E
25 E
24E
24 E
25 E
25 E
25 E
26 E

28 E
28 E


30
33


2N
25 2 N


67
460
70


143



300
89

5 00
302


80
384
80
638
60
302
640
640
929


47 2 N 25 E


23
8
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18


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24 E
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6
6
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65
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35
36
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27 E 5


25 E
25 E
25 E
24 E
23ES
23 E
23 E
25 E
23 E
23 E
23 E
24. EP


42 48


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: MARCH 14,