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Florida mirror
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 Material Information
Title: Florida mirror
Uniform Title: Florida mirror (Fernandina, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: A.B. Campbell, Geo. Burnside
Place of Publication: Fernandina Fla
Creation Date: July 19, 1884
Publication Date: 1878-
Frequency: semiweekly[<1894-1899>]
weekly[ former 1878-<1886>]
triweekly[ former <1890-1891>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 30, 1878)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1901.
General Note: "Democratic" <1880>.
General Note: Editor: Geo. R. Fairbanks, <1887>.
General Note: Publishers: George R. Fairbanks, <1885-1886>; Moore & Manucy, <1887-1891>; The Mirror Pub. Co., <1894-1898>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002057832
oclc - 33834378
notis - AKP5868
lccn - sn 95047336
System ID: UF00054505:00006
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Nassau County star

Full Text

















VOL. VI. FERNANDINA, FLA., SATURDAY Y, JULY 19, 1884. NO. 34.


I --mom


no idea of entertnauing any propositions,
or aiding in the construction of any other
canal than that for which we have so long
striven, advocated, and obtained charters,
viz, that known originally: as the.Raiford
Canal, and more recently as the Gillmore
Canal-it being thle route recomlimnded to
the Senate by that distinguished engencer,
-and tile plans for which-coinmencing at
tile mouth of te ntl of tt St. Mary's river, travcrsilfg
the Okeefinokce swamp, debouching at St.
Mark's, and continued thence to New Or-
leans-based on Gen. Gillmore's Surveys
and Reports, have been long since lodged
with our Legislature. And you may rest
assured that now that our board has been
put onil a legal and practical basis, our uit-
most diligence will be used to secure the
co-operation of capitalists to carry oil the
works."
Very respectfully,
ALEY. CURTIS, Secretary.

NEWS NOTES.

The town of Tunbridge, Dakotacelebra-
ted the Fourth of July by hanging six horse
thieves.
The Empress of China has sanctioned a
railway from Tientsin to Peking. The ma-
terials have been constructed iti Germany
and shippje..
The orange crop of southern California
will, it is estimated, reach the enormous
figure of 1,280,000 boxes. The grape crop is
also very large. .
Saturday was a busy day among the fruit
inspectors of New York. They seized aind
condemned 18,000 pineapples, 6,090 cocoa-
nuts, 5,000 watermelons and 4,000.bananas
as being too decayed for food. It is proba-
ble that qven then they did 'not condemn
near all the spoiled fruit. There is hardly
a city in the land in which fruitiand vegeta-
bles unfit for food are not daily offered for
sale.
The Pike's Peak Railroad, which is to be
in operation next year, will probably be the
most remarkable pieceof track in the world..
It is already operated to a point 12,000 feet
above the sea level. The entire tllift, mile
.. ..of it-gl .^n. t.."'f.ll b e a ru.c ..i,,l- i ,,-' i;'i '-, "-
cated curves and grades, with nciA pieco of
straight "track longer than 300 feet. The
maximum grade will be 316 feet. Its nu-
merous curves will be from 500 to 1000 feet
long, in which the radius will change every
chain.
One of the most beneficent arrangements
of the city government of New York is the
special effort of the health department to
prevent the midsummer mortality of chil-
dren. On the 1st of July fifty physicians
are summoned to the health office, assigned
severally to districts of the city precisely
mapped out, given a kit of medicines and
started on their rounds, to attend all indi-
gent sick not already under the charge of a
doctor. They carry also a bunch of free ex-
cursion tickets presented by St. John's
Guild, tickets to a seaside sanitarium, and
circulars containing common-sense direc-
tions to young mothers about the care of
young children. These visits are a great
boon to the straitened classes. The cool-
ness of the season has been highly favorable
to the rates of mortality in the large cities.
The following is a synopsis of the business
of the United States Land Office at Gaines-
ville, for the quarter ending June 34th, 1884:
Five hundred and sixty private entries, em-
bracing 56,909.32 acres; 56 excess entries
embracing 189.72 acres; 21 pre-emptions
perfected 2,645.73 acres; 63 commuted home-
steads at $1.25 per acre, 7,976.72 acres; 2
commuted homesteads, at $2.50 per acre,
240 acres; 43 entries under act June 15th,
1880. 5,180.16 acres; 5 supplemental entries,
255.04 acres; 376 homestead entries, 47,406.03
acres; 123 final homestead entries, 14,547.19
acres; swamp indemnity selections, 3,612.91
acres; railroad selections, 81,000.97 acres;


military bounty land warrant locations, 160
acres; number of homestead declaratory
statements filed, two, 320 acres; number of
pre-emption declaratory statements filed,
113; entire receipts of the office for the quar-
ter as above, $97,381.10.
The Acting Secretary of the Navy received
Thursday a telegram from Capt. Schley,
commander of the Greeley Relief Expedi-
tion, dated St. John's, N. F., stating that the
survivors of Lieutenant Greeley's signal ser-
vice party were found five miles off Cape
Sabine, in Smith's Sound, by the Thetis and
Bear, on the 22d of June. Only seven men
were alive, namely: Lieutenant Greeley,
Sergeant Brainard, Steward Berber Back,
Sergeant Ellison and private Connell. Ser-
geant, Ellison was very badly frost bitten
when found, and died at Godhaven July
6th, after undergoing. The relief ships
Thetis and Bear, with the survivors, are now
at St. John's.
Seventeen of the twenty-five persons coni-
S 14 1-. "_ 1 A -A P _4 -


X


C


i


I


FLORIDA.

A LEARNED TENNESSEN', DOING THE LANI^OF
FFLO ERS.
OI'DO, FLA., June 30.
In my last letter v stated that we, have
suffered in SoutilyFtorida from protracted
d'routlls, and that "nIiy orange trees had
shed their fruit, b1uthlat while I was writ-
ing it was raining. Sce that time we have
had plentiful rains, aind the orange trees
liave in many grove. ot on a new crop of
blooms, so we shall Ivce a crop of very late
oranges for market nI xt spring and summer.
We left our reaNders inning over the great
varitAy of prodtuctiot in Florida. All these
things are in theiji~i'fancy-really nothing
in the wa;y of produudion has been fully de-
veloped in this part c; tlhe State, and we are
in the formative ol. developing state of
things. We have bqeti pressed so often to
answer thle question what can) yOu prr-
duce ini Florida to make a support wile
your groves of frit, a~si:iwvly cornmig into
profitable bearing, W Ct we iust. aisw/ it
before we proceed f', i er in our general
account of things. '
One of the methods b whic-h an in inustious
man can make a liviiti duritgft'his interval
is to engage in mnhrld-~gcardening. This in-
dustrv is growing ra'i4ly i.n ilpprta.ice.
The people, who live outside ofh6s State,
-who should feed upon'the. delicious viegeta-
bles grow in nmid-winter and the very early
spring season, niumbpr nearly fifty lions.
,So there is little prospect that we st over-
stock the Northern and Western markets.
Profitable gardening can be carried on in
South Florida so as ;not to interfere with
other interests and eng'agemnents of the farm-
ers. They begin thisj-ork in the month of
November,' and al'l 'lte vegetables can be
Marketed by the last ',f May. 14e real work
of the vegetable g,,v,ier is done during t.he
winter months, and can be so nnr a'ined as
not to interfere with tiie corn, cotton), sugar
or many other crops, some of wjhi-hi can /be
grown on the same land which ftroduce'd
th e winter-crop of Av,- Ila'ITla l
On account of cli '.nte,, varm, generous
soil, and the rpay1 ,I- iI.,IIii, to the stirnu-
'lnt- ,,'f i nshi e 1_"e. .*w rl-a fer til-
izers, the farmer. i' h 1i Florida, with oi'-
.dinary facilities of it ortation, can put
into the markets of t -,rthern and West-
ern cities, and upon tt a'bles of these peo-
ple, a great variety f delicious vegetables
and early fruits many weeks in advance of
the farmers in any other section of our
country. In midwinter and early spring
they can send to market the most delicious
white headed cabbages, fresh, crisp and of
the finest flavor; the English pea, the snap
bean, new Irish potatoes, crisp lettuces, rad-
ishes, the tomato, cucumber, cauliflower,
indeed every delicacy of the kitchen garden,,
and this too while the balance of our coun-
try is locked up in fi-tte r-of ice and snow.
These products of the Florida farmer, of
course, bring wonderfully- fine prices, be-
cause there is no competition of other pro-
ducers in the market at this early season.
The vegetable and early fruit crops of the
Florida farmer are coming in long before
others further North, and not only com-
mand fine prices, but :the succession of
these crops continues almost the whole year.
After the early vegetables comes the melon
crop, which is easily raised, matures quickly
and is of the most delicate and delicious
flavor.
The want of quick, direct transportation
has been, and is still, severely felt, even in
the most favored spots of Southli Florida.
Our early fruits, especially, are too long in
transit, and sometimes this entails loss on
the shipper. But we expect in the near
future that wide-gauge railroads will traverse
the length and breadth of this favored land,
and when that is accomplished the produc-
tion of these articles will become immense.


It is the interest of broad-gauge roads in
Alabama and Georgi'a to reach this part of
the State as soon as possible, and when it is
remembered that a small farm in Florida
can be made to furnish more business to a
railroad than a large one further north, and
that this section is being settled up by a
thrifty, intelligent population who have no
superior in energy and push, these railroads
had better hurry up. A farm of ten acres
in Florida cultivated in fruits and vegetables
will furnish more business than one in Ala-
bama, Georgia or Tennessee of two hundred
acres. Before I leave the subject of vegeta-
bles let me give your readers just a few facts
and figures that came under my own obser-
vation. I regret my want of ability to
gather more facts from a wider field. The
town of Orlando is the capital of Orange
county and is near the geographical centre
of the county. The town of, Maitland is
six miles north, of Orlando. The South
Florida Railroad, which runs from Sanford
on the St. John's river to Tampa Bay on the
Gnlf. nnaops thrnno'h thpap towns annl is t.he


A number of farmers living near these NOTES FROM UP THE .R
towns, and within a range of twelve iles, OOL EU
S.A SUNDAY SCHOOL REUNION AT KIN,
are engaged, not exclusively but partly, in
Z t I KING's FERRY, FLA., July
the production of early vegetables, and
There has been a miost enjoyable
these two towns are the points from which il e
this section, which will be remen
they ship a large part of their produce at sen
all present witli the greatest pl(
present. In illustration, we take from the
was a celebration of the Fourth o
book of the railroad agent at Orlando, the twe Suacy Schos of Hilliart a
the Sunday Schools of Hilliard ai
quantity of vegetables shipped from this err of this couny, and hose
Ferry, of this county, and those
point to Northern markets for twenty-onef Temple'
days in tile month of May. There were ., a o
Scountiet, Georgia--all connected
shipped by freight and express 6,737 crates Church, South. "The spC
and 36 barrels. A crate contains two-thirds -
',was at Hebron, across the St. Ma
of a bushel. The larger portion of these
and opposite this place, which
vegetables were raised by citizens of one
previously prepared with an arboi
small neighborhood. for the accommodation of th<
At Maitland there were shipped more
Early on the morning of the day
vegetables tlhan at Orlaundo. I
vegetables than at do. the train from Hilliard's arrived
We regret that we are not able to get# the ,
its delegation under the direction
figures frorn Maitland in time for this ar-, i
W. Mlorrison, the Superintenkei
tic!e. It is thought by those well posted
n ,was miet by the Sunday School h
that these quantities of vegetables represent t t .oo
Sthle control of J. H. Flood, and
about one-fifth of the production of Orange
welcomed. They then crossed th(
county, while others think it is not over a
marched en route to the place
tenth of the product of early vegetables. a e e ru t t
above, both having beautiful bai
And now, reader, do not forget the fact that I b
Appropriate devices, the teacher
this has been a very dry, and. consequently dren wearing badges with the a
I )dren wearing badges with the nan
a poor vegetable season. These crates sold
respective schools upon. them. A
in the markets from $6 to $2 50 per crate. were welcomedby t
Hebron, they were welcomed by t
The yield per acre of these products is some- S.i
of Shiloah land Temple, whilich
'times wonderful. We have a friend living'
-,,. /vided with banners and badges
near Lake Apopka, in this county, (Mr. B.
the others and equally as pretty.
Spear), who planted one-quarter of an acre, t and eqa, l re
After a short rest, the intere:
with the addition of eleven. yards width on grime begll, consisting of S,:.
one side, in cabbage the past season. The T
recitations and well-selected son
seed were sown in September; the plants These retle
panied by the organ. These rete
were set out the first week in October, when
credit upon all the schools, and we
there was a good rain. The stand was very to with marked attention b y,
to with niarked attention bv>
poor, and there was not enough rain to lay crowd which hadcome from all '
the dust'on the cabbage patch until the first
I some of them from a diiitan,.e. .
week in December, at which time I visited
S. mniake special mention of a fv"'\ w
his house. At this time many of the heads
ited unnusal skill and ability inl
were hard and firm, and very soon there-ill a d
formancesbut will:'not do so
after it rained and all headed up nicely. .givin office. After all these
Mr. Spear used for his ,\\ in purposes freely ofe I'
t em 4 and instructive services were e
them, giving lmanyv to, his friends, among
honi, we were a few ofthe, o'clock p. in., the people and chi
whom, we were a few of them. .
invited to the tables, which w
One head which he gave your correspon- i w
*. -. v -u & .,. ,.,. with every delicacy that could be
dont furnihed a dish on our table of which
S, and there they satiated their a pl.t
teli. ll s.,,n "at,- M'r.ely : ,nd did not consume were at in -le, to
rnul r h, altf. In J uary Mr. Spear. -gailn call. t)l .
1-V

ov^ ,^r T i was venry atlhprt' mnd : W
N w Mr. World, h6w will that do for was vry ae a
\worthy to be observed by 'al pl';
high ? And if any fellow disputes it, we
will come all the way to Nashville to makeby all who are solicitous as t
himn apologize. But be sure you do not let instruction of children. As soon
of finished, the Rev. A. Clark, of J
our mutual friend, Hon. Oscar Turner, of finished, the Rev. A. Clear, of
arose, and in a very touching a
Kentuicky, hear about this matter ; it might ad n
disturb his mens conscia recti." address presented Ha
the Bible" to Rev. H. M. Morrisc
Perhaps the most wonderful vegetable tonial of affection from the Te
timonial of affection from the Te
grown in Florida is the sweet potato. Of
these we have a wonderful variety. When daySchool. When they had fi:
benediction was pronounced, a
once a place is well set in sweet potatoes it benediction was pronounced, a
will be found hard to get rid of them. Theyheir homes appy
flourish and grow, winter and summer. On best of spirits.
good land the yield is truly marvelous. The Rev'. Wm. R. Johnson, th<
They will grow on any kind of land (except in charge of the Nassau Mis
it be very wet soil), and so easily raised that
very littler care is sometimes taken in their peset but did not take any
cultivation. Everything in Florida feeds proceedings. He appeared, howe
on sweet potatoes-men, women, children, proud of his Sunday Schools, and
hogs, cows, horses, dogs, chickens, sala- will be encouraged to labor more
manders, gophers, moles, alligators and ne- So en
groes. If we had a foreign market for this before for their prosperity. Soen
vegetable we would all get rich. The pro- long to be remembered by the pec
duction of small fruits and berries is yet counties alluded to above.
very limited; want of quick transportation
kept back any development in this line. Railroad News.
But tlihe time is near at hand when our
trucksters will lead all others in the pro- Mr. Damon, of the surveying cc
duction of all these. Florida Railway & Navigation :
An industrious man in Florida who is the town on last Thursday, and in
fortunate possessor of a bearing orange and that his party was engaged in lo
lemon grove and a good garden spot of a line for the southern extension ol
few acres, may be written down the most & N. Co.'s road. They are now
independent and fortunate among his fel- City, in the vicinity of which place
lows. All the year round something ready will cross that of the South Florid;
for the market at remunerative prices; all and will continue southward to s
the time planting, gathering, sowing reap- on Charlotte Harbor. Mr. Diamon
ing. Just give us quick direct transporta- that there is no doubt this time o
tion, and we could stand almost anything- being built, as every arrangement
even a four years' administration of Blaine made, and new rails are being
and Logan, and four years more of a war Fernandina at the rate of a cargo
tari ff. -Tampa Tribune, July 12.
But in answering the question, what can
men make a living at while waiting for the List of Letters


orange trees to grow and put on fruit, we Remaining in the Post-Office at
can say that working men can find employ- a Nassa count, Florida, Jul
ment, if they are willing and able to work. na, Nassau county,
The people are busy building houses, Persons calling for these letters
clearing land, making fences, building rail- advertised:
roads, in fact, busy converting the pine Anderson, Mrs. Sadie Jones, Alex
forests and hammocks into gardens and Clark, E. B. Jonesj L P
fields, building villages and towns, selling, Carmodica, Miss Ger- Lord, Miss I
buying, speculating, etc. Reliable men, ga. Mitchell, MI
who can be depended upon to work, can Cot, Mrs. Pateie Monigan, C
find plenty of work, but it is a very poor Clarck, Hannah McCann, W
country for kid-gloved gentlemen, unless Colley, Hue A Mossis
they have plenty of money. With a very Case, Dorer Perrin, N P
large negro population it may be thought Cotte, Miss Josephine Reed, Tfcke
strange that the demand for labor is not Cleland, John R Sheldon, Ja
supplied. Well, the fact is, that a Florida Endel, Heaman Smith, Jord
free negro is the most unreliable institution Halle Henry Sophia, Geo
under the sun. As a general rule they are Foster, Lein Smith, Mrs
less to be depended on than any class of Hall. Mrs M Taylor, Mrs
laborers known to us. A gentleman lately Young, Sylus L
coming here from Iowa, has tried the negro S. T. RIDDEL
labor in the West Indies and Bahama
Islands, the Dutch, Irish, Moors and natives
of Africa, and also the Florida negro; the CALLAIIAN.
last class he pronounces the meanest and the List of letters remaining. iln Pou
most unreliable of them all. The FloridaCallahan, Jul 1, 1884
negro wants five prices for his labor, and allahan y
then don't work worth a cent. Of course Bingham, Lewis Heazy & He
there are exceptions among them, and there Brown, N S Hardy, Cour
are a few good workers. The only business Blitch, Jonathan O Higgins, Mr
at which the Florida negro is thoroughly Bland, Miss Francy Heazy & He
reliable and never fails is voting the Repub- Campbell, H F Lee, Wesley
lican ticket. Here he is eminently a sue- Fayton, L M Mullins. W


RIVER.

G'S FERRY.
12, 1884.
e affair in
nbered by
measure. It
f July by'
Id King's:
of.Shiloah4
f Camrder,
w\li the
)t selected.`
ry's river,
had been
r and seats-
e people,
alluded to,
1, bringing:
i of Mr. J.
it, which-
ere under
I cordially
e river anwd
indicated
nners with
s and chil--
ies of their'
arrivingg at'
he schools-,
werel, pro.-,.
1in1iliar to

sting' pro-


;cted great
or.elistene ,.--
*the large-
llirerio; ,
'WeV would
ho exhib-
i their per-
fo/ fear of:-
iin erei tiiin
ended, at 2
1'lren were
ere loaded
oLtainyt-,
Itit- until .-
:l!or. T.hl


ATLANTIC AND I'fEXICAt GULF
CANAL.
To tlh Editor of the 3irr : |
in interestiugjetter from the pen of Mr.
Koerner appeared in your isaue of July 12th,
referring to a portflm of the route contem-
plated by our Canal Compan'y. As so many
schemes have been set on foot (and we
presurrte, abandoned after being weighed in
the balance by conpetent judges and" found
wanting,) I am anxious that all readers of
your journal, as well as those wishing to
identify themselves with the success of the
Atlautc and Mexican Gulf Canal Comn-
pany, lhoutld clearly understand that.
so far as my knowledge 'is con-
cerned, and I have been actively
connected with the enterprise since 1875, that
the projectors of that undertaking never
contemplated the construction of a canal--
or water route from St. 'Mary's on the Atlan-
tic tb St. Marks on 'the Gulf coast-onlih as
implied in the letter alluded to. On the
contrary, so far back as the year 1875, when
the carriage of the proceedings through the
Legislature was. entrusted, to the writer,
and the "Statement" in connection with
the application for our Charter drawn up
by him, it was distinctly stated tha& the pro-
posed internal wdher-way "should extend
from St. Mary's, ,bn the Atlantic, to New
Orleans and the Mississippi." This idea put
forward in the preamble, in general terms,
was carefully elaborated in the body of our
Charter, and that there may be no ambigu-
ity I copy the opening portion of the State-
ment alluded to:
The advantages of a cheap and easy mode
of transport for the produce of the grain
producing States of the Great West" and
the cotton and sugar raising sections of the
'"South" and Southwestern States, have so
often and so ably been laid before every
section of our communie that we do not
propose to reiterate them here.
But the gentlemen who have associated
themselves with Colonel Raiford in seeking
a charter for. the construction of th.e Canal
and route n'ow before the House of Legis-
lature,,have done so under the earnest con-
victiotn, that no scheme has ever been pro-
posed, *i.hich ',so entirely meets the require-
-. ments not orgy of 'the largest and richest
sectiorDn 0 n country, but which will
Confer sucon -every country and

commercial bI wit thu United States
of America. i
By this plan, thirty thousand miles of
navigable watter ways are opened up, by
which the Western'Granger" and South-
ern Planter-from the remotest districts
will be enabled toship their produce (by the
easiest and cheapest mode of transportation
known-and without breaking bulk,") to
ocean going steamers, and ships of any ton-
nage or draught of water, lying in safe
harbors and anchorages on our Atlantic
Coast, while thesame means of transport
can be most economically employed in
bringing to the "South," to the Valley of
the Mississippi and the populations on its
vast network of tributary streams and wa-
ters, the produce of the looms and factories
of Europe, avoiding all the perils and dan-
gers now incident to the navigation of the
Gulf of Mexico and the southern portions of
the peninsula of Florida.
While the actual line of route-embracing
as I have said all points between St. Mary's
and the Mississippi-is specifically stated in
section 2 of the charter, which runs:
SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That tlhe
said Company shall have the right, power,
and authority to build, construct, own, and
maintain a Canal, of such dimensions as it
may deem suitable, to connect, for purposes
of navigation, the waters of" Perdido Bay"
with those of Pensacola Bay" and Santa
Rosa Sound ; and," Santa Rosa Sound" and
Choctawhachee Bay" to "St. Andrew's
Bay,"'' and from "St. Andrew's Bay" to "Apa-
lachicola Bay" and St. George's Sound,"
and eastward, by whatever route the Com-
pany may deem best for a continuous line
of land-locked navigation to the "Suwan-
nee River," and from thle Suwannee
River" to the "St. Mary's," or the "St.
John's River," or to both, and over such
line or lines as the said Company may find
best.
The true intent and meaning of this Act
being to encourage and to authorize the
opening of direct and land-locked water
communication between the Southern and


Western rivers, and the harbors of the At-
lantic coast. And to carry out this purpose,
the said Company shall have the right,
power, and authority, to improve by deep,
ening, or otherwise, the natural estuaries-
tide-basins, and other waters wherever
found necessary to make them available as
parts of the line of navigation contemplated
by this Act.
And the said Company shall have the
right, power, and authority, to acquire by,
purchase, and hold for their own use and
purposes, all rights of way, or other rights,
property, or franchises, necessary to the
carrying out of the purposes of this Charter.
Subsequent surveys and eminent advice
determined the actual route between St.
Mark's and St. Mary's, viz., a Steamboat
and Barge Canal from the St. Mary's river,
via the Okeefiinokee Swamp, to St. Mark's,
&c., &c.
So many and so unanswerable have been
the arguments in favor of the Barge Canal,
as compared to a Ship Canal, (whether con-
structed with or without locks,) that I do
not propose to trouble your readers with a
repetition of them, but would rather con-


sirl' t'S, and
e religiou-
n as he had,
esup, Ga.,
.nd feeling
ndbook qf
)n as a tes-
mple Sun-
nished the
nd all re-
and in the

e preacher
ssibn, was
part in the
ver, to be,
d no doubt
e than ever
.ded a day
ople of thel



orps of the-
Co., was in
formed us:
eating the
f the F. R.
near Plant,
ce the: line
a Railroad,
ome point
assures us
f the road,
t has been,
received at
I per week,.



FLI-I I.9 IdI -
y 19, 1S4.,
must-say,


-


Emma
rs EmilyS
C
m c


rr
y G
an
rge,
Mary
Charity-

L, P. ..


st-Office atc

earn
ncil
s L R
ewn

E


&. 64GA r%


Yews Sneal


n'C


o~d


~if~oaAasss6Qk, ~r,







I


-IW- -- "rf


men caused Bob to blush the only
blush he was guilty of in his school
days.
THE DEMOCRAT TIC PLA TFORM.
The Democratic party of the State of Flor-
ida, in con vention assembledd, congratulates
the friends of good government upon its as-
sured prospect of succbss-in the coming cam-
paign, and makes the following declaration
of principles:
Resolved, That we reaffirm the fundamen-
tal doctrines of thle National Democracy as
laid down in the platform of the National
Convention of 1876 at St. Louis, and of 1880
at Cincinnati.
Resolved, That we advocate the liberal p(ol-
icy on the part of the General Government
in the matter of public improvements, and
hold that the South has a right to demand
this until her water ways and harbors have
been adjusted to the needs of :commerce to
the same extent as in other sections of the
country.
Resolved, That we favor the calling of a
constitutional convention for tlhe reforma-
tion of our present undemocratic constitu-
tion.
Resolved, That it is the duty of the State
to educate its children, and that we favor a
liberal provision for the maintenance and
development of our system of free public
schools.
Resolved, That the recent remarkable
growth of population is one of the most
noteworthy indications of the prosperity of
the State, and that we invite worthy and in-
dustrious citizens from all quarters to come
and settle among us, with the confident as-
surance of a friendly welcome and an equal
opportunity.
Resolved, That since the overthrow of
Radical rule the State has had two Demo-
cratic Governors; that to the Hon. Geo. F.
Drew the-State is indebted for the inaugura-
tion of that economic system of admninistra-
tion which has so powerfully promoted the
prosperity of the State, and that in the con-
tinuance of that sound: Democratic policy
the administration of Governor W. D. Blox-
ham has been the most brilliant in the his-
tory of the commonwealth.
Resolved, That in the withdrawal from
public life of that illustrious statesman and
patriot, the Hon. Samuel J. Tilden,, the De-
nrocratic party has lost its most honored -
and trusted leader, but that in the Hon.
Grover Cleveland, Governor of New York,
we recognize a worthy successor, whose no-
mination at Chicago would insure a glorious
victory in ,November, 'and would guarantee
to the people of the country a pure, honest"
and economical administrrtion of the Na-
tional Government.*'
Traveteis Guide.
TRANSIT & PENINSULA ,RAILROAD.
Day Passenger Train leaves-
For Cedar Key and Wild.woad, an d
all points on Transit Road........10.05 a. m.
ForSavannah andallfpoint ?s NiOrtl
-a -_-w oiit :.............................. a. m .
...(ennecting at Callahan .,)

W western Railranll, ..........._ .l.I.i(.I, a. m .
(connecting at Baldwin.)
Day Passenger Train' arrives--
From Cedar Key, Wildwoodl, al n d
all points on the Transit Road... 4.'38 p, m.
From Savannalh and all points in,
the.North and W ,,t............ 4.38 p. m.
From Tallahassee, Pensacola. and
all points on the Florida Central
& W western Railroad................. 4.38 p. m.
Night Passenger Train lea.ves--
For Cedar Key, Wildwood, aid all'
points on the Transit Road........ 4.38 p. m.
For Savannah and all points North
and W est................. ....... ......... 4.38 p. m .
(connecting at Callahan.)
For Tallahassee, Pensacola, and all
points on the Florida Central &
W western 'Railroad..................... 4.38 p.m...
(connecting at Baldwin.)
SNight Passenqger Train arrives-
From Cedar Key, Wildwood, and
all points on the Transit Road... 8.40 a. m.
From Savannah and all points in
the North and West.............. 8.40 a: m.
From Pensacola, Tallahassee, and
all points on Florida Central &
W western Railroad..................:.. 8.25 a. m.
FERNANDINA & JACKSONVILLE R. R. '
Train leaves daily, except .lin,,li- -
For Jacksonville ... :.. ........... 7:05 p. m.
Train arrives daily, except X',,,,lf -- '. *
From Jacksonville...................... 6.40 p. m.
Sunday only--
For Jacksonville .............. ...... 5.00 p. m.
From Jacksonville ............. ..... 10.25 a. m.
SEA ISLAND ROUTE..,


From Savannah, Steamnp : St. Nich-
olas, Tiiesday,, Thursday and,
Saturday...... ........ ........ .......... 6.00 p. m .
For Savannah. Stcalner St. Nich- p.m,
olas, Sunday, Wednesday and
Friday ....... ............................. 9.00 a. mn :.
From Savannah, by the David
Clark, TLe-day and Fi dall........ 6.00 pm.
,For Savannah, by steamer' .iDavil.
Clark, Tuesday and Friday ...... r.:: p.m .
MALLORY LINE.
For New York direct, by: steam- ,
ships State of Tetxasz or t'it\" of
San Antonio, Thursday everiing 7.00 p.m.
Frm;:n New York direct, by cityof- .
San Antonio aiid State of Texas,
every Friday....,......: .............. 3.00, p. m ..
ST., MARYS. RIVER. ,
Steamer Irfhi,,t leaves Centre street i doi-
For St. Marys and Crandall, Tues--
day and Friday ...... ..,.......... 2.00 p. -I .
For St. Marys arid'Dungeness, on
W edesday an'd, Saturday .......... 9.35 a. m: .
For:St. Marys only, MoNndlay and
Thursday............ ................ ..... 8.00 a.m .
Steamer 1Martha ar'rives-
From St. Marys and Crandall,;on
Monday and Thursday............... 7.00 a. m.
Froi, St. Marys and Dungeness,
on Wednesday and Saturday..... 1.00 p; m.
From St. Marys only, Monday and
Thursday............................ ..... 2.00:p. m .


Tri/: f"ErI.M Y;I.7L..
Tln- 1.m:1 i, frill or, reht.l. sand i rebel flag
they fiy,
They 4cttm to hate the patriots who drain
t In" s-urplist dry ;
Reform i,4 on their banner, and its battle cry
they shout.
Andl wtnit to marcll on Washington. to turn
the rascals otut.
1Ko wickedly against the rule of spoil.-smlen
they rebel.
That rings and jobbers tremble when they
hvar that rebel yell.
Thlat rebel yell was heard before, fno Tilden
ltnd reform,
And then the gathered rebels swept the
country like a storm.
"The l),aten spoilninen rallied tlien, to stay
the victor's course,
ndl wlat tthe voters would not give, they
touk by fratudt and force.
No wonder that the honest men should
everywhere rebel,
And raise against the banded thieves a
righteous rebel yell.
Agalivt the variegated man, whose back is
blue with scars
Of jobs and contract swindles, not of just
and lionest wars ;
Against guano statesmanship; against ill-
gotten gains;
Against combined monopolies, that bind the
.land with chains;
.Against the Star route robbers, all these
earnest men rebel,
And for reform and honest ways they raise
the rebel yell.
.That rebel yell is raised again, in freedom's
sacred namne,
'To drive the thieves and rascals out, and
save the land from shame.
And honest men who love the right, and
wish for equal laws,
Are praying now that God may bless that
righteous rebel cause,
And when against corruption's rule its
steady foes rebel
.Millions of throats will gladly join to raise
.the rebel yell..

A TALE OF'TIIE RED PIKE.
I thought I should find you with
the girls, Mr. Godwin. You should
have been with us. We've had such
I scramble over Honister Crag, and
b1ou-vght back no end of flowers for
*Gerttude. But one thing I must say
-that .fellow Losford is a jolly muff,
though, he doesn't look it. Just a
funk, girls, and nothing else. Will
you give me some tea, Mrs. Godwin ?''
( What nonsense you talk, Bob!"
cried his sister, conscious by some
feminine instinct that her friend's face
-was hotter than a moment before;
"'You are a perfect mauvais enfant
bursting in like that. I wisb Mr.
LosTord woulditeach you manners."
"T ( wnud1 iI-- ^ -.-- 1- -"


-





1


--t


win rose be in the main workings. Some of
the men fancy that they have heard
There him knocking.
rks." Violet made no reply. She was
thank- sobbing on Gertrude's shoulder.
>rk. Or Is any one hurt?" asked the lat-
ve been ter eagerly.
as been No, hardly at all. A few cuts.
crushed from stones.
laborers! Another hour passed, while the
Robert crowd thickened and listened all


in his master's ear. 'Mr. Godl
quickly.
My ,dear, this isbad news.
has been a fall at thf lead woi
How unfortunate I am
ful the men were hot at wo
even worse, we pight hax
viewing them, as 'Robert hc
plaguing us to do, arpd been all
together, like any commonn 1
Shocking! -But where can
be.?"


alas, tile insinuation chimed in with
other things.. Walter Lofuorn was
hardly one to please a romantic girl
at first sight. Cold, sensible atnd
wanting in enthusiasm even in his
ambition, trying nearly everything by
the arguments of reason with impartial
severity, he would have made a just
and not too merciful judge. Living
by rule of thumb, no wonder that he
looked older than his thirty years, or
that he repelled chance acquaintances
who called him a prig. Generally
reticent, he would sometimes tell the
truth, with rude abruptness. Alto-
gether, his friends said, a little want-
ing in charity ; too practical, too mat-
ter-of-fact. And yet, poor Gertrude !
when she met him at dinner, the hau-
teur she assumed melted away and
she blushed and smiled, at his glance ;
for what is so fascinating as the hom-
age of one who seems utterly, almost
contemptuously, careless of'all beside ?
If Walter had spoken that evening he
would have assuredly gained his ob-
ject, and Mrs. Godwin been made a
happy woman.
Ihe Red Pike was red indeed in
the evening sunlight, every cliff that
buttressed its rugged top burnished to
ruddiness, and yet the party lingered,
reluctant to abandon the view of sea
and land from Forth to Windermere
that held them entranced. Tea was
over and the servants had started
downwards with the baggage, yet the
party, which all day had wandered
separately or in pairs at their several
wills, still sat together on the top.-
Bob only was on the move, skirmish-
ing hither and thither untiringly.
'' I say, Gertrude, here's a speci-
men for you I Here's a blue gentian
growing on the cliff, and a rare good.
climb it will be to it."
The party hastened to the edge of
the cliff; in a cranny of the rock
about twelve feet down grew the flow-
er Gertrude had been long seeking to
obtain. A slight opening in the wall
of the cliff made it just feasible, if
somewhat dangerous, to reach.
'q Robert, don't gb too near !" cried
Mrs. Godwin.
Gertrude turned with her face a
little flushed to Losford. Can you'
get it for me, Mr. Losford?" she said
gently, and with something of appeal


breathlessly to the dull, muffled sound
of the tools and the creaking of the
barrows. A fresh gang was at work,
and they came out more quickly. The
sky was growing gray, and men's
faces looked so, too, as the fire burned
with a paler light and the hilltops
came out in cold majesty.
Suddenly the tools ceased ; a barrow
on its way out stopped inside the en-
trance. The crowd outside grew close
and breathed more quickly, and
women hid their faces as the sound of
low murmuring voices came from the
passage. Then a little crowd of men
pressed out, and in their midst Walter
Losford, stained and ragged, with the.
boy's form in his arms. He laid him
quickly on the wraps by the women.
The blood was trickling slowly from a
cut in his own forehead, and his face,
where it. was not lead-grimed, was
pallid with fatigue.
He has only fainted," he said, as
the doctor bent over the boy.
Just so," said the latter, cheerily.
" He only wants a glass of sherry."
Gertrude rose from the boy to thank
his bearer, her eyes dim with happi-
ness, but he had turned away.
" 'The worst time was just before
they broke in, Gerty. I thought the
earth must fall again, or something
happened to prevent them reaching
me," confided Bob to her when she
visited him next day in his room.
The whole matter was to Master Bob
one for pure congratulation, and he
spent his time in rehearsing a graphic
account of the adventure for the bene-
fit of his dame's house. But that
fellow Losford is no end of-a trump.
He's been up to say good-bye, and I
told him what an ass I'd made of my-
self about him. That's a comfort. I
heard his voice first of all, do you
know, and Mrs. Godwin says they
wonildn' havP ot me ,oit ,but.J"--.

Tlie li elihoo) of this A -ternative'
appeared to give him unmixed satis-
faction.
"I don't think they would," mur-
mured Gertrude, eagerly presenting
him with a large bunch of grapes from
a side-table. I'll get you some more,
Bob."
You bet your boots they wouldn't.
It's a-pity he can't climb. Fancy a
fellow like that with what the doctor
calls constitutional vertigo '! I can't
make it out."
And Bob fell into a brown study,
which passed into a doze; and thus
refreshed he was enabled to chatter
without ceasing all dinner time.
Gertrude stole out of the room, and,
running down stairs, found Losford in
the hall. He had mislaid a favorite
stick.
-" Mr. Losford," she began hurried-
ly, standing before him in she knew
not what attitude of pretty humility,
" I said something yesterday the
memory of which is burning me with
shame. I cannot forgive myself; but
will you say you do? Bob has made
amends. Let me do so. What a
foolish girl said cannot have hurt
you?" she pleaded, as he made no
answer.
Rather, should not have hurt me,"
he replied, gravely; yet it did cruel-
ly, Miss Godwin. But for the chance
occurrence of last night, you would
be thinking so stilL It was ungene-
-ous as well as thoughtless."
Gertrude winced under each al-


most contemptuous word. She had
not bargained for this. Too much
hurt for tears, she murmured as she
turned away : V
I am sorry."''
A moment, please! From any
other woman I should have accepted,
the apology without a word. I have
s,-.:,lded you that you might know
what it was like before I asked you to
.giye me the right to do it. Gertrude,
rill you be my wife.?"
And Gertrude said Yes."
SWhen, she had: fully's: tisfied .him
. upon this point, slhe asked:
.' And you have quite forgiven
:me; Walter'?"
I shall have when you have done
the penance I order." There was a
twinkle of fun in his eyes a stranger
would not have believed could harbor
there. It is that you 'wear the, bit
of blue gentian at dinner this even-
ing.
I | _- v.il bv io i Ii,' i/--1rn11,o ri Qn a


I am afraid, aa'am," put in the
butler' in a low 0'Mice which every
one heard well, with preternatural
distinctness, that. Master Robert--
leastwise he wentdMtat way when he
came back-is in there. John has
gone to the village4f5r help."
There was a dead silence round
that fair show of I*en and glass and,
gleaming silver, as if the hand which
warned Belshazzar had appeared upon
the wall. Then (irit.rude glided to
her friend's side aidl put her arm
round her. The gentlemen harried
from the room. Bgt almost as soon
as they reached the scene the women
appeared there also ; the poor boy's
sister could not be. restrained, and
Mrs. Godwin, whose woman's heart
was sdund within h'er, signed to Ger-
trude to let her ,go.. Anything was
better tihan inacti fF
Mr. (lodwin's' wad-hole and works
were hdadly a quarter of a mile from
the house, thought hidden from it by a
steep shoulder of thhill. He guessed
at once that the bjy, anxious to ex-
hibit to.the ladies the wonders of the
wad-hole, had taken the private key,
which generally lay upon the study
mantlepiece, and had gone, it might
be, to; make some preparations, where-
by his darling effects would be en-
hanced. A servant seeking him when
dinner was ready discovered the acci-
dent, and, after giving the alarm in
the servants' hall, ad gone on to the
village.
Is there any hope ?" said Gertrude
in a low voice, with Violet Marston's
hand tight clasped in hers. Are
they digging ?"
The flaring light of a pine-knot
fire, just kindled in the little inclosure
at the mouth of -thehotel, fell upon a
score or two of strange ,e-looking figures,
chiefly womn-i'n. Si ere moving
t and frg ,-f',rullaze, butt nost.i-
of them stood an'l impassive.
The shining clcl1 of the men pro-
claimed their trade, as they brushed,
all distinctions forgotten, against the
gay dresses of the hbuse-party.
No," replied her father, with a
groan. The props at this end are
gone and the men say the whole hill-
is coming down. We must wait for
help from Keswick."'
Gertrude was turning to the group
indignantly, but one was before.her.
Now, men, I can handle a pick
though I am a Londoner. Ten
pounds .to every man who joins me.
Don't let them say. that Cumberland
men left their master's guest .to perish
because they were cowards."
The cold impassive face was aglow
with energy ande excitement. Was it
Gertrude's fancy, or awas it that word
in his voice really struck her like a
whip ?
The hill is on the move, master,
and he be dead, too"'' said the fore-
most man; but shamed-facedly.
Hush, his sister 1e there !" put in
a woman softly.
There was an instant's hesitation
while all watched th'e: big miner ; then,
after a glance at their faces:
We're with you, master!" cried
he, seizing the tool-at his feet like a
giant aroused.
The spell was broken; and who
then so reckless as |he Cumberland
men? Losford soornf had to check
them, and assist the foreman to compel
them to underpin, and take other
proper precautions as they worked.
In tiKme, more" me flocked from


neighboring pits to the spot, and the,
task was carried on by gangs. Not'-
withstanding Mr. and Mrs. Godwin's
entreaties, the poor ',girl most con-
cerned would not leave; and hour
after hour, while seemingly countless
loads of earth were w,.lleeled or carried
from r.the d,:,-- openingg eiit'raiilce, hlie
walked' to an d fro, or lay, with, Ger-
trude'slhand in hers on the\wrapslaid
in a corner formed by two w:11.- .How
each: shining worker *wais gazed at as
he came from the darkness into the
blaze of the fire .tnml deposited-.his
load,! Whoever wo rl:d : by, spel.-,
the figure LGertrude lknew best did
not appear. But, when the faint
lingering hope was dying away, one of
the other men staying in the house
came quickly up to Violet.
Miss Marston, do not be -too san-
guine. There is hope yet, however.
rl p _11 1 __ .- 1 1 "1 -.


fm- NIDot witnotat a rope, ne answe ir-a
calmly; we will bring one up to-
,,morrow."
' "To-morrow !" cried Gertrude, with
sudden heat. I want it now. Bob
would get it for me in a moment if I
asked him, Mr. Losford."
Bob's head is perhaps steadier
than mine," answered the other, keep-
ing at a safe distance from the edge.
He was in no way discomposed until,
as he finished, his eyes met the girl's
full of contempt and anger. Stung
by the look, he took a hasty step
towards the edge of the.cliff, and bent
down to make the attempt. For a
moment he remained in that position
as if entranced, scanning the depth
below, a sheer 300 feet, and then a
green ledge, and then, far beneath,
pale blue Crummock water. With ,a
quick shudder he passed his hand
across his eyes and recoiled, white to
the lips. *
I can't get it, for you," he said
hoarsely, falling back, while the others
looked at one another in astonishment.
And quite right, too, Mr. Losford ;
don't try any such foolhardiness, I
beg," cried Mrs. Godwin -loudly.
Loudly, but not so that he failed to
hear the one word Coward" or to
distinguish the tone of contempt in
which it fell from her daughter's lips,
as she turned away. The next, instant
he was his old, calm self again, but
he knew that he had his dismissal.
As for the bit of blue gentian, Bob
brought it up in a twinkling, and chat-
tered on in such a way as to earn
every one's gratitude. Yet it was a
dull party that wended its way down
'the hill, and clear it was to more than
one that a budding romance had come
to an end over the little blue flowers
which nestled so harmlessly in Ger-
Atrude's fair hair. Yet mothers are
sanguine and Mrs. Godwin's face grew
scarlet with anger when the spray ap-
) peared again at dinner conspicuously
fastened in the bosom of her daughters
dress.
S If it was only an awkward hour at
dinner that Mrs. Godwin feared, Fate
f was to save her hospitality from, to do
her justice, an unwonted slur.
- Where is Robert ?" she asked pet-
, tishly, after. helping the soup. Do
i you know Violet,?"'
r, 'Miss Marston did not. Bob was
not wont to be punctual, and she was
I about to say so when the butler, who
t .had been called from the room, en-
1 1 1 l il "


mt~il cowi i yEn ards
'O t e e ge, Mrs. Godwin !"
He showed his usual good sense,
1Master Robert," was that lady's tart
reply. She had her reasons for look-
ing favorably upon Walter Losford, of
Losford Court, Monmouthshire, by, no
means the least honored guest at Mr.
Godwin's lake villa. And they were a
-very cheery and pleasant party, the
.pleasantest set, Gertrude thought,
that her mother had ever got together,
and Gertrude was a young' lady of
decided tastes and somewhat difficult
to please. Even Bob. Marston, when
he was not saying malapropos things
:and appearing where he was not
wanted at inopportune moments, was
;as amusing -as any other Etori boy.
-Nevertheless, at this moment two
people at least were ardently longing
to make his ears tingle.
"And -what is the programme for
to-morrow, Mr. Godwin?" resumed
.,the young gentleman, not a whit
daunted by the unfavorable reception
of his last remark. Can we picnic
,on the Red Pike ? It would be jolly
fun.'.'
The host hummed and hawed; he
rather preferred an open-air. enter-
tainment at a place accessible in an
open carriage. But if you .have a
house among the mountains, up them
you must go. The climbing disease
is infectious, and there is no evading
it until by a permanent residence you
become proof against its attacks. Mr.
CGodwin would have to 'succumb sooner
or later.
Yes, Bob," said Gertrude, sudden-
ly laying dowri the fan with which
she was playing, we will go to, .the
Red Pike to-mororw.''"
And Bob, who thought that in his
own language he had rather put his
'foot in it," was comforted, and knew
that to the Red Pike he would go.
.Gertrude's face as she went upi to
dress for dinner was thoughtful. He
showedd his usual good sense," Mrs.
.Godwin had said, and the words kept
ringing in her daughter's ears until
.her"lips began to curl with scorn. 'I
-there was one thing which Gertrude
admiredd it was courage; .was she. be-
Sginning, almost more than beginning
to like a -man who could be called a
coward even by a boy ? It made' ihe
cheeks tingle with shame and.anger
Proud:arid high-spirited herself, good
sen.-e. of the kind Mrs. Godwin meant
*II I I I A I I- A __ -


Valuable Orange Lands for .Sale.
Tracts containing twenty acres each of
choice, high hammock land on Orange Lake
suitable for orange growing 'and track farm-
ing, are now offered for sale. These lands
are very conveniently situated for transpor-
tation, by water or rail, and will be S.11Md on,
terms to suit purchasers. 'ritle. are unques-
tionable. Also valuable timber lands in
large bodies. G. R. FAIRBANKS,
-r .i ._ _. in r i Don) T7 -_ A^ li- _PA I --i .


THE FLORIDA MIIRIOR: JULY 19, 1884.





JIULY 19. 1884.


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SMII(;iy I STTnR sIN(stls RI:.\Its;."--IFrill
the 1st of .January, 1884, to tthe 1st of Jan-
tuIf'y, 1.S53. we are to have an i nterestiing
snuccessio)II of stirring events of which every
one will wisl to fiar. Two niilitary c'ai,-
paigns are at present in lprogress-lhat of El
.Malidi in the Soudal) alnd of tle F'relci!l ill
To'mplin-both of which arc lpproaccliing
thle critical point. The next l of Par-
lianment is to be marked, according to the all-
nounced purpose of Mr. Parnell, by a bitter
struggle of the Irish nationalists to compel
their English and Scotchi colleagues to coln-
cede to Ireland some measure of home-rule.
In default of this, Mr. Parnell promises to
employ his following to so obstruct the
transaction of parliamentary business aus to
render tlhe presence of Irisli members atSt.
Stephen's intolerable. This programme in-
sures a succession of exciting scenes in Par-
liament. The new r form bill, which Mr.
Gladstone proposes to carry during the ses-
sion orf 1884, will a!so doubtless excite
general interest in the United States, as well
as throughout tile IByitish empire. Vastly
more interesting to AlBericani readers will be
tlihe discussion to take place at Washington
withiii tile next few ioithlis over our own
reform bill. The Republican members of
the present Congress are opposed to tariff
reform. The Demodsats, it is said, are
divided, the majority of them favoring, the
minority opposing it. Which will get the
upper liatid? W ill theihigh-tariff Democrats
cooperate with the Republicans to maintain
tlhe present absurd law.? Or will the Demo-
crats act together, and send a reformun tariff
bill to the Senate, which the Senate will de-
cline to pass? Every step of' tle struggle
in the Capitol at Washington will be watched
with lively concern all over the country,
and by the time Conglrss adjourns the pub-
lic mind will be ripe for the opening of a
Presidential campaign which, it is safe to
say, will exceed in warmth any of its prede-
cessors since 1860. The meeting of the
Maryland Legislature at Annapolis on the
2d of January, and the-reassembling of the
Baltimore City Connqil later in the same
month, will prove also events of engrossing
interest. But supposing tlie existence of a
citizen concerned about none of these things,
still lie will need to tEad The Sun for news
of the thousand and bne other events of
interest that go so far .to make up the cur-
rent history of thle world. The period is
one of rapid movement, and the citizen who
does not take a paper is sure to be left be-
hind. If a man ever means to subscribe for
a paper, now is the time, before the actors
on the world's stage durin,- the year 1884
have taken their places and begun to play
their parts. When it becomes a question of
secunrilg a reliable newspaper, which will
contain all the news, succinctly expressed
and fairly reported, the proper course to
pursue is plain : take The Sun.

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1


m


BOOKS AND STATIONER Y.

HORACE DREW,
Bookseller, Stationer,
Printer and Binder.

School Books and Orange Wraps
NOW A SPECIALITY.

AD- Liberal discounts to Teachers and
Trade. Special prices and Catalogue free on
application.
59 W. BAY STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA-
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FLORIDA MIRROR,
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DRUGS and MEDICINES


& CO.,


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FERNANDINA, FLORIDA,

EEP constantly on hand a fine assort-
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Homnceopathic and Patent Medicines,.

Proprietary and Fancy Goods,

FINE TOILET ARTICLES,

PERFUMERY, SOAPS, ETC.,

IN GREAT VARIETY.


pr Physicians9 Prescriptions
carefully compounded with pure Drugs, at
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FANS, PARASOLS,


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MAIRLES, KITES, ETC.
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Cor. Centre and Fourth Sts., Fernandina.


T ,-, I'i- t_' r ,-pIo I)1 (.] 11 Ic I
jble; and NO CHARGE UNLESS PAT-
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Of the Latest and Most Approved Patterns.

COOKING UTENSILS OF ALL KINDS,
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WROUGHT-IRON PIPES.

DRIVEN WELLS A SPECIALTY

TIN AND IRON ROOFS PUT ON.
Orders for Tin Gutters promptly filled.
Wind Mills for pumping water or running
light machinery promptly erected on order.
Church, Factory and School Bells for sale
at a bargain.
sR Stoves at Wholesale Prices.
All goods delivered at the various trans-
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charge. All sales for cash.
CORNER BROOME AND SECOND STS.
Fernandina, Fla., July 12, 1884.


AT "PRICES FROM


$1.25 to $10 per Acre.


S. I. WAILES,


1884


Premium Copies ]
to Getters Up of Clubs
For the Baltimore Weekly Sun."


1884.


Land Commissioner,
Jacksonville, Fla.


Five Copies.......................................$ 5.00
With an extra Copy of the Weekly
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Getters up of Clubs will find the above
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Address A. S. ABELL & Co., Publishers.
SUN IRON BUILDING,
Baltimore, Md.


M. A. WILLIAMS,


A .


B. NOYES,
(Successor to W. A. SANBORN),
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in


COM1VFO T1 .,rT,



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USE THE CELEBRATED

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FOR SALE ONLY BY

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Salesman.


GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, SHIP STORES,
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Corner of Second and Centre Streets, near
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FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.
Owner and Agent for Schooner Silas C.
Evans. Special rates for Merchandise in
large quantities.
Agent for Hazard Manufacturing Compa-
ny's CHAMPION BARBED WIRE-the
best in the world.
Agent for B. F. AVERY'S CELEBRATED
PLOWS.
Local Agent for BANK OF JACKSON-
VILLE. 33


ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF THE MAILS.


Transit & Peninsular Railroad-
Arrives daily except Sunday.........
Brings mails from the, North, the
Gulf coast, Transit and Peninsu-
lar railroads.
'Closes daily except Sunday...-.......
Takes mails for the North, the
Gulf coast, Transit and Peninsu-
lar roads.
Leesburg train arrives daily...........
Brings Western mail only.


4:00 P. m-


6:00 A. ma


8:30 A- W. -


Fernandmna & Jacksonville Railroad-
Arrives daily except Sunday......... 8:50 A. MSE.
Brings the Jacksonville and St.
John's river mails.
Arrives daily except Sunday ......... 5.00 1.-m
Brings mails same as above.
Closes daily except Sunday.......... 9:00 A. M.
Takes the Jacksonville, St.John's
River and Northern mails.
Closes daily except Sunday.......... 5:30 P. x.
Takes the Jacksonville, St.John's
river, Northerh and Western mails.
Sunday Mail-
Jacksonville and St. John's River,
arrives..........................,.. .. ....10:25 A. M-
Northern mail arrives............. 9:00 P- m-
Jacksonville, St. John's River and
the North, closes......................... 6:00 A.m.
Jacksonville and St. John's River
only, closes ............ ................... 4:00 P. r.


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Combined Orange Box qpd Shltle Machlne
Eagle Gin~, Saw Millls Planer, Reesws, &o.
Ask for Catalogue and Prices before e buvfne .
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65, 67, 69, EL ST., CINCINNATI, 0.
(Write for Catalogue and mention this paper.)


New Goods.


Large lines of new goods in every depart-


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CRAZY PATCHWORK !
HAVING A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
remants and pieces of handsome bro-
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nishing them for "Crazy Patchwork" Cush-
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No. 1-Is a handsome bundle of exquisite
silks, satins and brocaded velvets (all differ-
ent). Just the thing for the most superb pat-
terns of fancy work. Sent post-paid for 56
cents in postal note or. 1-cent stamps.-
Package No. 2-Containing three times'
as much as Package No. 1. Sent post-paid
for $1.00. These are all of the very finest
quality, and cannot be equaled at any other 1
silk works in the United States at three times,
our prices. They will please any lady. One
order always brings a dozen more. LADIES"
MANUAL OF FANCY WORK, with 400
illustrations and full instructions for artistic-
fancy work, handsomely bound, post-paid,
50 cents. Order now. Address
THE ROCHESTER SILK CO.,
Rochester, N.. Y.
Post- Ofice Notice..
Office Hours-From 8:00 A,. to 6,00 p. M.-
Sunday hours, 10:30 A. M. to 11,:30 A. M.
Money Orders and Registered Letters from
8:00 A. M. to 1:00 P. M.; and from 2:00 p. m
to 3:30 P. M.


Tce Machines!- Ice Machines!


Headquarters for
STATE OF FLORIDA,
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jS This Machine has many advantages.
Send for Circular. Address
WILLIAM B. C DURY]E,





GEORGE R. FAIRBANKS, EDITOR.


OmlTi cc corner Centre and Fir.it structs, second floor.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
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Coin munications upon all matters of local inter-
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All communications intended for publication
should he addressed to the Editor; all business
letters simply to Tir, FLORIDIA MInnon.

SA TURDAY, JULY 19, 1884.

THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.

FOR ]'RsIDENT :


home cares; a freshening up of the
thoughts, otherwise always in dan-
ger of narrowing- among the petty
and daily recurring interests of iso-
lated homes; th6 entering into sym-
pathy with others, makes us all
better and wiser-and we go back to
our homes again with a juster appre-
ciation of others as well as of our-
selves.
S." PASCO FOR U. S. SENATOR.
The Marianna Times, one of the best week-
lies published in West Florida, has the
following in refereirce to Hon. S. Pasco :
While we unequivocally condemn the
idea in politics that "rTo thie victors belong
the spoils,''" we think that, for his untir-
ing efforts and zeal for the success of the
Democratic party -of Florida, the Hon.
Samuel Pasco, of Jefferson, deserves some
recognition from the party lie has so faith-
fully served. He failed to get the nomina-
tion for Governorship at Pensacolo, not from
personal objection as to his candidacy, but
from a combinatioi-of circumstances that
may or may not be for the best interest of
the party. There is no doubt that, politi-
cally, lie is the strongest man in the State,
and we think that the Democratic party of
Florida is ready to confer any honor upon
him, that it will be in their power to grant.
The election of a Democratic Governor and
Legislature, we look upon as a certainty;
and thie next Legislature will have to elect
a successor to Hon. Wilk Call, in the Senate
of the United States. Inthe name of justice
and harmony, and in recognition of his
eminent qualifications and services to the
State, we say : Elect the Hon. Samuel Pasco
to succeed Wilkinson Call in the Senate of
the United States.
THE DEMOCRATIC PLA TFORM.-.
Following is the Platform as reported by
the Committee, and adopted at the Chicago
National Convention :
The Democratic Party of the Union
through its repr sentatives in National
convention assembled recognizes that, as
the Nation grows ol1er, new issues are born
of time and prog res,and old issues_,perish,
but the fua.iin, principles- of the De-
mocracy, appro. vy the united voice of
the people, ren i lldlwifll ever remain as
the best an4d dnly;-rcouniity for the continu-
ance of free government. The preservation
of personal rights,, the equality of all citi-
zens before the laWv, the reserved rights of
the States, and the supremacy of the Federal
Government within the limits of the Con-
stitution, will ever" form the true basis of
our liberties and can never be surrendered
without destroying that balance of right
and powers which enables the continent to
be developed in peace and social order; to
be maintained by means of local govern-
rment.
But it is indispensable for the practical
application and enforcement of these funda-
mental principles that the Government
should not always be controlled by one po-
litical party. The frequent change of ad-
ininistration is as .necessary as a constant
recurrence to the popular will. Otherwise
abuses grow, and the Government, instead
of being carried on for the general welfare
becomes an instrumentality for imposing
heavy burdens upon many who are gov-
erned for the benefit of the few who govern.
The public servants thus become arbitrary
rulers.
This is now the condition of the country.
Hence a change is demanded. Thie Repub-
lican party, so far as principle is concerned,
is remiss in practice. It is an organization
for enriching those who control its ma-
chinery. The frayds and jobbery which
have been broughtfto light in every depart-
ment of the Government are sufficient to
have called for reform within the Republi-
can party. Yet those in authority, made
reckless by long pl'Si--on of power, have
succumbed to its cilrrupting influence, and
have placed in nomination a ticket against
which the independent portion of that party
are in open revolt. Therefore a change is
demanded; such a change was alike neces-
sary in 1876, but tie will of the people was
then defeated by a fraud which can never
be forgotten nor condoned.
Again in 1880 a .change was demanded by
the people and was defeated by the lavish
use of money contributed by unscrupulous
contractors and shameless jobbers, who had
bargained for unlawful profits or high office.
The Republican party, during its legal, its
stolen and its bought tenures of power, hias
steadily decayed in moral character and po-
litical capacity. Its platform promises are


now a list of its failures. It has squandered
hundreds of millions to create a Navy that
does not exist. It calls upon Congress to
remove the burdens under which American
shipping has been depressed. It imposed
and has continued these burdens. It pro-
fesses a. policy of reserving public lands for
small holdings by actual settlers; it has
given away the people's heritage, till now
a few railroads and non-resident aliens, in-
dividual and corporate, possess a larger area
than all our farms between the two seas.
It professes a preference for free institu-
tions. It organized and tried to legalize the
control of State elections by Federal troops.
It professes a desire to aid labor; it has sub-
jected the American working nien to the
competition of convicts and imported labor.
It professes gratitude to all who were dis-
abled or (lied in the war, leaving widows or
orphans; it left to the Democratic House of
Representatives the first effort to equalize
both the bounties and pensions. It proffers


OF ESCAMBIA.

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR :
MILTON H. MABRY,
OF SUMTER.

FOR CONGRESS, SECOND DISTRICT:
CHARLES DOU GHERTY,
OF VOLUSIA.

THE RECOIL FROM BISBEE.
Mr. Bisbee's Congressional Conven-
tion was "fixed," as was generally
understood, and had the very brief
"\ and simple duty to perform of regis-
tering the decree of their political
bosses. Unfortunately, however, for
the peace and happiness of the
office-holding family, the Little
*Giant" of Alachua and the sturdy
Walls declined to be used for the


hdad- dihim


1-


I


special periods call for especial men.
The times call for a reform leader,
and the Chicago Convention has re-
sponded to the call in the nomina-
tion of Cleveland and Hendricks.
SUMMERING.
Summer flitting seems the estab-
lished custom of the land. Every
body who can, strives to go some-
where for a change.
Before the increase of railway fa-
cilities those who sought health and
recreation had but a limited choice
of accessible places, and certain well-
known resorts, like Saratoga, were
extremely popular with people from
the South, although the Virginia
springs shared the popular favor.
With the present facilities of travel
there has been opened up a new and
more available region much nearer
to the people of the South. The
high and salubrious table lands of
South and North Carolina, in Geor-
gia and Tennessee, offer every advan-
tage of climate and abounding in
mineral springs of every description,
with varied attractions of scenery.
The increase of visitors has stimu-


this disaffection before November.
Will he succeed, and make the Lit-
tle Giant" and General Walls eat
humble pie and support him? We
doubt this. Mr. Bisbee's promises
have not always been performed,
and with the present outlook he has
no Federal patronage to promise
after the 4th of March next. His
selfish control of the official patron-
age of the government in the inter-
est of his special friends and sup-
porters has disgusted the more re-
.spectable and intelligent members of
the party. He is willing that an
independent candidate for Governor
-a whilom Democrat-should be
,supported, but he wants no inde-
pendent candidate in the Congres-
sional race.
The colored people think he has
fooled them long enough. His
friends have enjoyed the feast of
office while the colored Republican
has been put off with a few crumbs.
if Messrs. Walls and Dennis are in
earnest, Mr. Bisbee's fate is written,
and he will never see the halls of
Congress again. He has no future
,Republican Congress to look to to
.seat him when defeated at the polls.

THE POLITICAL OUTLOOK.
The Democratic nominations at
the Chicago Convention have evoked
a very general feeling of satisfaction
throughout the whole country. The
,only positive dissatisfaction comes
from a faction whose hostility is of
itself an indication that the nomi-
.- -) +1 nn iQ 'Crnlr i-" q14- 11 lq


actual settlers; that all unearned lands
heretofore improvidently granted to railroad
corporations by the action of the Republi-
can party should be restored to the public
domain, and that no more grants of land
shall be made to corporations, or be allowed
to fall into ownership of alien absentees .
We are opposed to all propositions which,
upon any pretext, would convert the Gen-
eral Government into a machine for collect-
ing taxes to be distributed among the States
or the citizens thereof.
In reaffirming the declarations of the De-
mocratic platform of 1856, that the liberal
principles embodied by Jefferson in the De-
claration of Independence, and sanctioned
in the Constitution, which makes ours the
land of liberty and the asylum of the op-
pressed of every nation, have ever been car-
dinal principles in the Democratic faith,"
we nevertheless do not sanction the import-
ation of foreign labor, or thle admission of
servile races unfitted by habits, training, re-
ligion, or kindred qualities, for absorption
into the great body of our people, or for citi-
zenship which our laws confer. American
civilization demands that against the immi-
gration or importation of Mongolians to
these shores our gates be closed. The Demo-
cratic party insists that it is the duty of the
Government to protect with equal fidelity
and vigilance the rights of its citizens, na-
turalized, at home or abroad. To the end
that this protection may be assured. United
States papers of naturalization issued by the
courts must be respected by the executive
and legislative departments of our own Gov-
ernment and by all foreign powers. It is an
imperative duty of this Government to effi-
ciently protect all the rights of person and
property of every American citizen in for-
eign lands, and demand and enforce full
reparation for any invasion thereof. An
American citizen is only responsible to his
own Government for any act done in his
own country, or under her flag, and can
only be tried therefore on her own soil and
according to her laws, and the power exists
in this Government to expatriate an Ameri-
can citizen to be tried in any foreign'land
for any such act. This country has never
had a well-defined and executed foreign pol-
icy except under a Democratic administra-
tion. That policy has ever been in regard
to foreign nations, so long as they do not
act detrimental to the interests of this coun-
try or hurtful to our citizens, to let them
alone; that as the result of this policy we
recall the acquisition of Louisiana, Florida,
California, and adjacent Mexican territory,
by purchase alone, and contrast these grand
acquisitions of Democratic statesmanship
with the purchase of Alaska, the sole fruit
of a Republican Administration of nearly a
quarter of a century.
The Federal Government should care for
and improve the Mississippi river and other
great water-ways of the Republic, so as to
secure for the interior States easy and cheap
transportation to tide-water.
Under the long period of Democratic
rule and policy, our merchant ma-
rine was fast overtaking and on
the point of outstripping that
of Great Britain. Under twenty years of
Republican rule and policy, our commerce
has been left to British bottoms and the
American flag has been almost swept off the
high seas. Instead of the R$pub1li'an party's
British policy we demand for ,the people of
the United States an American policy. Un-,
, merchants and -sailors flying the stars ani
stripes in every part, successfully searched
out markets for the varied products of Ame-
rican industry; under a quarter of a century
of Republican rule and policy, despite our
manifest advantages over all other nations
in high paid labor, favorable climate and
teeming soils; despite the freedom of trade
among all these, the United States, despite
their population by the foremost races of
men and the annual immigration of tlhe
young, thrifty and adventurous of all na-
tions; despite our freedom here from the
inherited burdens of life and industry in the
Old World monarchies, their costly wars,
their navies, their vast tax-consuming, non-
producing standing armies; despite twenty
years of peace, that Republican rule and
policy have managed to surrender to Great
Britain, along witli our commerce,,the con-
trol of the markets of the world. Instead of
the Republican party's British policy, we
demand, in behalf of the American Democ-
racy, an American policy. Instead of the
Republican party's discredited scheme and
false pretense of friendship for American
labor expressed by imposing taxes, we de-
mand in behalf of the Democracy freedom
for the American laborer by reducing taxes,
to the end that these United States may
compete with unhindered powers for the
primacy among nations in all the arts of
peace and fruits of liberty.


With profound regret we have been ap-
prised by the venerable statesman, through
whose person was struck that blow at the
vital principle of republics (acquiescence in
the will of the majority) that he cannot per-
mit us again to place in his hands the lead-
ership of the Democratic hosts for the reason
that the achievement of reform in the ad-
ministration of the Federal Government is
an undertaking too heavy 'for his age and
failing strength. Rejoicing that his life has
been prolonged until the general judgment
of our fellow-countrymen is united in the
wish that the wrong were righted in his
person for the Democracy of the United.
States, we offer him, in his withdrawal from
public cares, not only our respectful sympa-
thy and esteem, but also that lasting hom-
age of freemen, the pledge of our devotion
to the principles and the cause now insepa-
rable in the history of this Republic from
the labors of Samuel J. Tilden.
With this statement of the hopes, princi-
ples and purposes of the Democratic Party,
the great issue of reform, and a change in
the administration is submitted to the peo-
ple, in calm confidence that the popular
voice will pronounce in favor of new men,
and new and more favorable conditions for
the growth of industry, extension of trade
and employment, and due reward of labor
and of capital, and the general welfare of
the whole country.

A Washington special to the New York
Sun states that the understanding between
Pope and the Republican leaders is that the
Independent Democrats will support the
Blaine Electoral ticket.

Florida is one of the Southern States
which Blaine will make earnest efforts to
carry. North Carolina, Virginia, and West


THE FLORIDA


MIRROR: JULY


19, 1884.


candidate cannot 1]n mnnipulatcd or
controlled by a, faction.
The feeling most prominent in the


are very muoderate-about two cents
a mile each way--making the expen-
ses of travel very moderate. It is
wise for our people to embrace the
opportunities thus afforded for a
change during our long summer to
a higher region. It is good for the
wife and the little ones, and gives
both mental and physical recreation
equally valuable to all. It is money
well spent to increase the pleasure
and promote the physical well-being


tariff; it created and has continued them.
Its own tariff cor~nission confessed a need
of more than 20 per cent. reduction; its
Congress gave a reduction of less than 4 per
cent. It professes a protection of American
manufactures; it lias subjected then to an
increasing flood of manufactured goods and
hopeless co()m petition with manufacturing
nations, not one of which taxes raw mate-
rial.
It professes to protect all American indus-
tries but it has impoverished the many to
subsidize a few. It professes thle protection
of American labor; but it has depleted the
returns of American agriculture, an industry
followed by half of our people. It professes
the equality of all men before the law, and
attempting to fix the status of colored citi-
zens, tle acts of its Congress were overset
by the decision of its courts. It accepts a
new duty in leading in the work of progress
and reform, and its caught criminals are
permitted to escape through continued de-
lays or actual connivance in the prosecu-
tion. Honeycombed with corruption, the
outbreaking of exposures no longer shocks
its moral sense. Its honest members, its in-
dependent journals no longer maintain a
succssful contest for authority in its coun-
sels or a veto upon bad nominations.
That a change is necessary is proved by
an existing surplus of more than $100,000,000
wliichi lia.s yearlv been collected frlom a suf-
fering people. Unnecessary taxation is unjust
taxation. We denounce the Republican party
for having failed to relieve the people from
crushing war taxes, which have paralyzed
business, crippled industry, and deprived
labor of employment and of its just reward.
The Democracy pledges itself to purify the
Administration from corruption; to restore
economy; to revive respect for law ; and to
reduce taxation to the lowest limit consist-
ent with a due regard to the preservation of
the faith of the nation to its creditors and
pensioners.
Knowing full well, however, that legisla-
tion affecting the occupation of the people
should be cautious and conservative in
method, not in advance of public opinion,
put responsive to its demands, the Demo-
cratic party is pledged to revise the tariff in
a.spirit of fairness to all interests. But in
making a reduction in taxes, it is not pro-
posed to injure any domestic industries, but
rather to promote their healthy growth.
From the foundation of this Government
the taxes collected at the custom-houses
have been the chief source of Federal reve-
nue. Such they must continue to be. More-
over, many industries have cone lo rely
upon legislation for successful continuance,
so that any change of the law must be at
every step regardful of the labor and cap-
ital thus involved. The process of reform
must be subject in execution to this plain
dictate of justice.
All taxation should be limited to the re-
quirements of economical government. The
necessary reduction in taxation can and
must be effected without depriving Ameri-
can labor of the ability to compete success-
fully which foreign labor, and without iim-
posing lower rates of duty than will be am-
ple to cover any increased cost of production
which may exist in consequence of the
higher rate of wages prevailing in this coun-
try. Sufficient revenue to pay all expenses
of the Federal Government economically
administered, including pensions, intere4s-
and principal of the public debt, can be got
u nd.raour present system of. taxation from
tre custtom-honse taxes on fewer imported'
articles, bearing, the heaviest on articles of
luxury and bearing the lightest on articles
of necessity.
We therefore denounce the abuses of the
existing tariff, and, subject to the preceding
limitations, we demand that Federal taxa-
tion shall be exclusively for public purposes
and shall not exceed the needs of the Gon-
ernment, economically administered. The
systern of direct taxation known as "Inter-
nal Revenue," is a war tax, and as long as
the tax continues the money derived there-
from should be sacredly devoted to the re-
lief of the people from the remaining bur-
dens of the wr, and be made a fund to de-
fray the expense of the care and comfort of
worthy soldiers disabled in the line of duty
in the wars of the Republic, and for the
payment of such pensions as Congress may
from time to time grant to such soldiers, a
like fund for sailors having been already
provided, and any surplus should be paid
into the Treasury.
We favor an American continental policy,
based upon more intimate commercial rela-
tions with our sister Republics of North,
Central and South America, but entangling
alliances with none.
We believe in honest money, the gold and
silver coinage of the Constitution, and a cir-
culating medium convertible into such
money without loss.
Asserting the equality of all men before
the law, we hold that it is the duty of the


Government, in its dealings with the peo-
ple, to mete out equal and exact justice t;o
all citizens, of whatever nationality, race,
color or persuasion, religious or political.
We believe in a free ballot and a 'fhir
count, and we recall to the memory of the
people the noble struggle of the Democrats
of the 45th and 46th Congresses, by which
a reluctant Republican opposition was com-
pelled to assent to legislation making every-
where illegal the presence of troops at the
polls as a conclusive proof that a Democratic
Administration will preserve liberty with
order.
The selection of Federal officers for the
Territories should be restricted to citizens
previously resident therein.
We oppose sumptuary laws which vex
the citizens and interfere with individual
liberty.
We favor honest Civil Service Reforms and
the compensation of all United States offi-
cials by fixed salaries; the separation of the
Church and State, and the diffusion of free
education by common schools, that every
child in the land may be taught the rights
and duties of citizenship.
While we favor all legislation, which will
tend to equalize the distribution of property,
to the prevention of monopoly and to the
strict enforcement of individual rights
against corporate abuses, we hold that the
welfare of society depends upon a scrupu-
lous regard for the rights of property as de-
fined by the laws. We believe that labor is
best rewarded where it is freest and most
enlightened. It should be fostered and
cherished.
We favor the repeal of all laws restricting
the free action of labor, and the enactment
of laws by which labor organizations may
be incorporated, and .of all such legislation
as will tend to enlighten the people as to
the true relation of capital and labor.
We believe that the public lands ought, as
V-1 __ -1 1 1. 1 1 i I 1 __ 1 4- _A P__*


public mind is very clearly


that


Subscription, 02 per year; six months, *1.


there is a most imperative need of
reformation in the administration of
affairs at WVashington. New devel-
opments of corruption and dishon-
esty in the public departments
at Washington, coupled with the
notorious scandals of the past,
indicate that a thorough change is
demanded in the national adminis-
tration.
The reform party has been grow-
ing in numbers and influence for
several years past, and made itself
felt in the elections of 1882, which
swept the congressional districts and
reduced the Republican majority to


of the family.


Relaxation from


GRO VER


CLEVELAND,


The existence of


a small minority.


OF NEW YORK.

FOR VICE-PRESIDENT:


this feeling is one of fhe most en-
couraging signs of the times; the
cry for reform proceeds from the
people who take an interest in good
government and in the perpetuity
of republican institutions. It is the
reserved force of the people brought
out by the feeling of necessity.
The Democratic nomination is the
response to the sentiments of reform.
The candidate is a reformer par ex-
cellence-a bold, brave straightfor-
ward public man, and not a politi-
cian. He has never been in Con-
gress or the State Legislature, we
believe, but has come to the front


STHOMAS


A. HENDRICKS,


OF INDIANA.

FOR GOVERNOR:


ED WARD


A. PERRY,


as the exponent of the people's
preciation of sterling qualities


ap-
of


head and heart. He obeyed a spon-
taneous call to lead in' the reforma-
tion of the affairs of a sadly mis-
governed city; he brought order out
of disorder, and enforced responsi-
bility and faithfulness in office.
Again called to the larger field of
the reform of the government of the
most populous and most powerful
State in the Union he was elected by
the unprecedented majority of nearly
*2(Ii)IIIv< t Yc .;, J -is. i,- rl ar a1 wise,
u"TuSij;uas and h(cinit oGoveruir at-
tracted all eyes to him as a safe and
trustworthy candidate for the Presi-
dential office ; an office where high-
toned honesty, and a thorough
knowledge of public affairs and the
practice of the same industrious and
faithful application of the methods
of reform, would place our public
affairs on the highest plane of a
constitutional administration of the
government.
It is no slight tribute to Governor
Cleveland that he should have be en
chosen in competition with such
names as Bayard, Thurman, Mc-


Mr. Bisbee any longer,


benefit of


and proclaimed their independence
of the dictation which has so long
manned and controlled'the Rep]ub-
1'II L=~=,li ]-, .",-~ Ld ." "--. 'L


----
"^^^^S3'^^^S ^ sit dow,'
upon the Alachua delegation, biit
.Messrs. Dennis and Walls were not
the men to be suppressed. They at
.once retired from the office-holders'
packed convention and held a con-
vention of six counties and nomi-
.nated General Walls.
No doubt Mr. Bisbee expects by


or control


hook or crook to placate


Donald, Randall and Carlisle.


Es-


lated the erection


of hotels and


boarding houses, and comfortable
quarters at moderate rates can be
found all through this elevated, re-


0' ~T


Ir T r ri-i ... T b . -, 1 -r





I I- I-~-_


--


1


.~......'' .'


f I J 4 -I 1 I I 1 f 1 t -- I I : I I .


- ---


Lawns, Cambrics, Percales, Prints, White Goods.

Laces and Embroideries, Hamburg Edgings and Insertings-A
FULL LINE of the newest patterns.
Hosiery, Gloves and Underwear-A large stock at bottom prices.
Our Spring Clothing for Men and Youths has arrived, and for style
and quality cannot be surpassed.
Gents' Furnishing Goods-A fine assortment of all the latest novelties.
&We are Special Agents for BROWNING, KING & CO., of New
York, leading Clothiers. Suits made to order and fit guaranteed.
A&- Call and examine our stock and prices before sending off or purchas-
ing elsewhere. Special orders filled in New York by our resident buyer.
J. c9 E-. K TS I>I,
Northeast corner Centre and Third Sts.,
i-' NEW YORK OFFICE-83 Walker St. } FERNANDINA, FLA.

RIVER AND OCEAN STEAXMlE1

MATLLORY'S STEAMSHIP LINE !

FLORIDA AND NEW YORK.


JUST RECEIVED AN IMMENSE STOCK OF

Dress Goods, Silks, Satines,

FANCY GOODS, WHITE GOODS, etc.

SILK PARASOLS AND LACE GOODS,
(AN ELEGANT ASSORTMENT.)

Hamburg Edgings, Gloves and Mitts.
ALSO A COMPLETE STOCK OF -

Gents' Furnishing Goods,



BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS,

TRUNKS, VALISES, ETC.


--SOLD AT IMMENSE BARGAINS-


ONLY DIRECT LINE TO NEW YORK.
NE of the above STEAMERS will sail from FERNANDINA FOR NEW YORK
EVERY THURSDAY AFTERNOON, on arrival of afternoon trains from Jack-
sonville, Cedar Key, and Peninsular Railroad.
This Line, having no Transfers between Fernandina and New
York, offers the BEST AND QUICKEST TRANSPORTATION TO SHIPPERS OF
FRUITS, VEGETABLES, and others.
The traveling public are offered the advantages of a DIRECT LINE and UNSUR-
PASSED ACCOMMODATIONS TO FLORIDA, WITHOUT CHANGE; making close
connections at FERNANDINA with FERNANDINA & JACKSONVILLE RAIL-
ROAD for JACKSONVILLE, and thence by Steamers to all points on the ST.
JOHNS, OCKLAWAHA and INDIAN RIVERS: and with the FLORIDA TRANSIT
RAILROAD for ALL STATIONS and GULF PORTS OF FLORIDA; and with the
PENINSULAR RAILROAD for OCALA, and with FLORIDA TROPICAL RAILROAD
for LAKE WEIR.
THROUGH BILLS OF LADING TO ALL POINTS.
For freight, passage rates, and schedules, or further information, apply to


Northern and Eastern Markets, and taking advantage of cash pur-
chases, enables us to offer our entire stock at such low

FIGURES THAT WILL DEFY COMPETITION.

We have endeavored to select the

Latest and Most Stylish Designs to be Found,

and all we ask is to give us a call and price for yourselves, and see the


-I- JnENSE BA oAs --


GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, SHIP CHANDLERY, ETC.


L UCY COTTAGE,
Seventh-St., near Egmont Hotel,
FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.
Offers pleasant rooms, well furnished, with
or without board. Table Boarders will be
acconlmmodated; also transient.
2 Miss LUCY O. THOMPSON.


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: JULY 19, 1884.


Hotel Arrivals.
HTIATHMTiR E.
Jas 'M Kreamtr, Suan H I Smith and wife,
Jacksonville; Chnrles H Brown, 11 Z Rob-
erts, Knoxville, Tenn; C E Tiylor and wife.,
Stark; (C E Taylor jr, F R & N Co; Annie It
I'p\y, South Flu; Ftinnie MI Papy, Tilliahas-
sec;'J E I'Dravton. S F & W R It; John (G
Christpher mnd wife, Joe 1( Clishv jr, Chas
Benedict and wife, Jacksonville: EC C(amp-
bell Herald; Hinton A Helper, Dispatch; D
T Green, SlephcI E Foster tH S C')oper, 'Mrs
A I)lDubose, Mlist Emilv Webstcr, T J )Dubos,
It F NWildcihair, A ( IHolingcr, M IRN Moran.
L 8 Olustead. LEi Ba3rker, Jacksonville; (4
B1 Lawrence, Len Dozrier. Waldo; J M Mc-
Mutt; 8 AScssor, Jacksonville; F B Ander-
son. Tallahassee; D P Holland, Perry Hol-
land, J IH Burroughs, Jacksonville; G A
Beard, Tallahassee; Jos F Torus, wife and
daughter, Miguel Prada, Euiigene Townes,
F Delano, Jacksonville; E A Ioustonn, Tal-
lahassee: JH H ardee, Jacksonville; S I
Wailes. Washington, D C; Dr and Mrs A L
Rtandolph, Jolhn S Winthrop, Tallahlissce,
-0 S talieshe, W I Talbot, Boston: A Pee-
bles, New York; W H Poole. Chicago: H R
Clark, Jacksonville: Marie Chrines, Tallains-
see; W 8 Blitch and lady, C J Kenworthy,
wife and servant, Jacksonville; W A Ma-
hony, Callahan; J S Bailey, jr, wife and
child, 21is Annie IHilliard, Hilliard; ChIs T
Lucy, C L Chamberlin, J Newcome, H W
Chamberlin, Mrs Landauer and 2 children,
Jacksonville; H V Weder man, Tnampa; W R
Bowring, Conn: Nornman Merry, New York.
Fine Printing.
Cards. Letter-Heads, Note-Heads, Bill-
Heads, Statements, and every description of
Printing, neatly executed at this office.
Summer Silks,
40 cents a yard at
J. & T. KYDD'S.
Special Casih Sales
IN
BLE.\CIHED AsND BROWN DOMESTICS,
ON
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday only,
AT"


J"


piar- ARE NOW RECEIVING LARGE SHIPMENTS OF- n


I


I


J-


I
-p
T


I


1


t i ~( t (- r? f i I t I i r : -r t I t I I r i


NEW AND LATEST STYLES IN

DRESS GOODS and SILKS,


CENTRE STREET, TWO DOORS FROM SECOND,


NUN'S


28


MODE BRO'S.


For Rent.
A store and dwelling on Centre street.
Apply to J. A. ELLERMANN.
ro Rent.
The two-story frame residence on Centre
street, north side, corner of Eighth street;
conveniently located. Terms liberal.
H. E. DOTTERER.
Wood, Wood.
Having recently established a Wood-Yard
near Duryee's mill, provided with all the
necessary machinery for sawing and splitting
FIRE-WOOD,
I am now prepared to furnish Oak Wood,
sawed to any lengths, for either stove or fire-
place, at ONE DOLLAR PER LOAD.
J. A. ELLERMANN.
Valuable Orange Lands for Sale.
Tracts containing twenty acres each of
choice, high hammock land on Orange Lake
suitable, for orange growing- and truck farm-
ing, ae now '0fftere. fsor riWle. Tnsi.c- hln,:rd
are very conveniently situated for transpor-
tation, by water or rail, and will be sold on
terms to suit purchasers. Titles are unques-
tionable. Also. 'valuable timber lands in
large bodies. G. R. FAIRBANKS,
February 16, 1882. Fernandina, Fla.


P


TTL


.,.
-


- - :- -- .-


i


I-


AN]


-THE FINE STEAMSHIPS--


1,6e80 T4ONS,
. 1,52a TON ,WS.
1,508 TONS.
. 1,210U TONS.


CITY OT SAN A.NTONIO,
STATE" OF T3E3XA.S,
CARONDELET,
WJESTERNV TEXAS,


Have just received an entire new stock in every department, from the


R. W. SOUTHWICK,
FERNANDINA,


Agent,
FLORIDA.


C. H. MALLORY & CO.,
Pier 20 East River, New York.


51-


to be had in Fernandina at the establishment of


BROTHERS,
-IN-- *


~c ~c


*r


~lc 3F ~e ~fe 3C ~t: yc


EMBRACING NEARLY EVERYTHING IN THIS LINE, ALSO IN THAT OF

FANCY IMPORTED GROCERIES.
ONLY SUCH GOODS KEPT IN STOCK AS CAN BE RECOMMENDED AS

PURE AND OF GOOD QU A TTTY.
ESPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SELECTIONS OF

-IFINE TEAS AND COFFEES -
-- -tt' THAT CAN BE PROCURED.
THE BEST GOODS OF THIS ,DESCRIPTION THAT CAN BE PRtOCITBED.


S,


Every


Steamer.


Cor. Second and Centre Sts..


FERNANDINA, FLA.


FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.


18-1y


&


Tr


PAUL FUNKE'S

L ~ I f 1 I I I i ) ( 1 I l 1 1 f 1 i I +


NE W.


SPRING AND SUMMER:


DRY GOODS EMPORIUM


(3001E~


- FLORIDA.


FERNANDINA,


VETLTNGS, BUNTINGS,


1FUTNKE.


SUMMER GODS



SPRING


CENTRE STREET, NEAR THE DEPOT,


ROT
CA'O YAL 8W(o
La. T....* a'


POWDER,
Absolutely Pure.
HIS POWDER never varies. A marvel
of purity, strength and wholesomeness.
More economical than the ordinary kinds,
and cannot be sold in competition with the
multitude of low test, short weight, alum or
phosphate powders. Sold only in cans.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO.,
38 106 Wall Street, NeRw York.
Notice of Letters of Administra-
tion.
TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The heirs, representatives, and all per-
sons interested, are cited to show cause, if
any they can, before the County Judge of
Nassau county, Fla., on or before the first
day of September, 1884, why letters of ad-
ministration should not be issued from the
County Court of Nassau county to Charles
W. Lewis, of Fernandina, Fla., upon the
estate of E. LeRoy Jones, deceased.
SWitness my hand as Judge, and the seal
of said court, this 16th day of July, A. D.
1884. H. J. BAKER,
6w County Judge, Nassau County.


H. E. DOTTERER
INVITES ATTENTION TO HIS LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT OF


MODE


FINE FAMILY GROCERIES }


DRY GOODS, FANCY


GOODS,


GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING-GOODS,

Boots, Shoes, Curtains, Rugs, Floor Oil Cloths.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

100 IET'WES TIVr A "E.RT'Ll-RIN-.rS,

WHICH WE OFFER AT IMMENSE BARGAINS.


MODE BRO'


NEW GOODS Received by





I


Spring, erm- 1
Taylor, 1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in
April.
Madison, 2d Monday in April.
Hamilton, 4th Monday in April.
Suwanee, 1st Monday after 4th Monday
in April.
Columbia, 3d Monday after 4th Monday
in April.
Lafayette, 6th Tuesday after 4th Monday
in April.
Fall Termn-
Taylor, 1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in
October.
Madison, 2d Monday in October.
Hamilton, 4th Monday in October.
Suwannee, 1st Monday after 4th Monday
in October.
Columbia, 3d Monday after 4th Monday in
October.
Lafayette, 6th Tuesday after 4th Monday
in October.
FOURTH CIRCUIT


SEWINGr MACHINES.


c


JULY 19,


1884.


I


I


Assesstor of laxes-J. C. Matthews.
Ocllecor of Revenue--W. F. Trantham,
Ocala.
Superintendent of Schools-M. L. Paine,
Fort McCoy.
MONROE COUNTY.
County Judge-Chas. 8. Baron, Key West.
C/lerk-Peter T. Knight, Key West.
Sheriff-George A. Demerritt, Key West.
Assessor of Taxes--Walter C. Maioney, Jr.,
Key West.
Collector of Revenue-Mason S. Moreno,
Key West.
Sup)erintendent of Schools--J. V. Harris, Key
West.
NASSAU COUNTY.
County Judge-Hinton J. Baker, Fernan-
dina.
Clerk-J. A. Edwards, Fernandina.
Slieriff-John A. Ellermann, Fernandina.
Assessor of Taxes-Wmin. H. Garland, Fer-
nandina. o
Collector of Revenue-WVarren F. Scott, Fer-
nandina.
Superintendent of Schools-L.. WV. Higgin-
bothamrn, Callatan.
County Treasuree- Gustav Stark, Fernan-
dina.
'ORANGE COUNTY.
County Judge-J. M. Beggs, Orlando.
Clerk-Thoa, J. Shine, Orlando.
Sheriff--Thomas W. Shine, Orlando.
Assessor of Taxes-Jamnes M. Owens, Fort
Reid, Fla.
Collector of Revenue-A. M. Hyer, Sanford.
Sanford.
Superintendent of Schools-John T. Beeks,
Fort Reid.
PUTNAM COUNTY.
,Judge of Prdbate-B. Harrison, Palatka.
Clerk-W. F. Forward, Palatka.
Sherif-Thomas Shally.
Assessor-A. J. Woods.
Collector of Revenue-Joseph Price.
Superintendent of Public Schools--J. VW.
Strickland.
_TAYLOR COUNTY.
County Judge-W. H. Parker, Perry.
Sheriff-Green B. Weaver, Perry.
Clerk-John C. Calhoun, Perry.
Superintendent of Schools-T. J. Faulkner,
Perry.
County Tr -..,', '.--D. S. Sutton, Perry.
County Surveyor-D. N. Cox, Perry.
Collector of Revenue-J. B. Hardee, Perry.
Assessor of Taxes-R. L. Henderson.
ST. JOHN'S COUNTY.
County Judge-M. R. Cooper, St. Augus-
tine.
Clerk-Bartolo F. Oliveros, St. Augustine.
Sheriff-Ramon Hernandez, St. Augustine
Assessor of Taxes A. D. Rogero, St.
Augustine.
Collector of Revenue-Joseph F. Llambias,
St. Augustine.
Superintendent of Schools-C. F. Perpall,
St. Augustiine.
SUMTER COUNTY.
County Judge-J. R. Steele, Leesburg,
Clerk-Thonmas J. Ivey, Leesburg.
1- ,, '--J. S. Dyches, Leesburg.
Assessor of Taxes-A. B. Goodwin.
Collector of Revenue-Joseph Hutchinson,
Sumterville.
Superintendent of Schools-A. H. Helven-
ston, Sumterville.
SUWANEE COUNTY.
County Judhe--M. M. Blackburn, Live
Oak. ^:
Clerk-RI f A. Reid, Live Oar--.
Sheriff-Joh R. Sessions, Live Oak.
Assessor of T xes-G. W. Umsted, Welborn.
Collector of Revenue-Wilson H. Sessions,
Welborn. f
Superintend nt of Schools-J. O. C. Jones
Live Oak..
VOLUSIA COUNTY.


BAKER COUNTY.
County Judge--R. D. Davis, Sanderson.
Clerk-F. J. Pons, Sanderson.
Sheriff--U. C. Herndon, Sanderson.
Assessor of Taxes-A. J. W. Cobb, San-
derson.
Collector of Revenue-J. R. Herndon, San-
derson.
Superintendent of Schools-Jas. D. Chalker,
Salnderson.
BRADFORD COUNTY.
County Judge-J. R. Richard, Providence.
Clerk-Henry F. York, Lake Butler.
Sheriff-W. V. Tumblin, Starke.
Assessor of Taxes-N. C. Wainwright, Lake
Butler.
Collector of Revenue-Bunberry Haynes,
Santa Fe.
Superintendent of Schools-L. B. Rhodes,
Starke.
BREVARD COUNTY.
County Judge-James A. McCrory, City
Point.
Clerk-A. A. Stewart, Titusville.
Sheriff-John H. Laws, City Point.
Assessor of Taxes-Wallace R. Moses, Geor-
gianna.
Collector of Revenue-D. W. McQuaig, Bre-
vard County.
Superintendent of Schools-M-. E. English,
Titusville.
CLAY COUNT Y.
County Judge-J. T. Copeland, Orange
Park.
Clerk-J. T. Weston, Green Cove Spring.
Sheriff-James W. DeWitt, Green Cove
Springs.
Assessor of Taxes-T. J. Branning.
Collector of Revenue-A. S Chalker.
Superintendent of Schools-R. W. Davis,
Middleburg.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.
County Judge-W. M. Ives, Jr., Lake City.
Clerk-John Vinzant, Jr., Lake City.
Sheriff-J. W. Perry, Lake City.
Assessor of Taxes-A. D. Brown, Lake City.
Collector of Taxes-J. L. Parish, Lake City.
Superintendent of Schools-JuliusPotsdamer,
Lake City.
DUVAL COUNTY.
County Judge-William A. McLean, Jack-
sonville.
Clerk-Thomas E. Buckman, Jacksonville.
Sheriff-Uriah Bowden, Jacksonville.
Assessor of Taxes--Daniel P. Smith, Jack-
sonville.
Collector of Revenue-Moses 3. Brown,
Jacksonville.
Superintendent of Schools-Albert J. Rus-
sell Jacksonville.
HAMILTON COUNTY.
County Judge--Henry J. Stewart, Jasper.
Clerk-J. M. Caldwell, Jasper.
Sheriff-Sampson Altman, Jasper.
Assessor of Taxes-J. M. Duncan, Jasper.
Collector of Revenue-W. H. H. McLeod.
Columbia County.
Superintendent of Schools-J. W. Reed,
Jasper.
HERNANDO COUNTY.
County Judge-W. L. Frierson, Brooks-
ville.
Clerk-J. C. Law, Brooksville.
Sheriff-J. B. Mickler, Brooksville.
Assessor of laxes-R. J. Bradley, Brooks-
ville.
Collector of Revenue-F. M. Hedich, Brooks-.
ville.
Superintendent of Schools-A. M. C. Russell,
Fort Dade, J
HILLSBO0OUGH COUNI'J.
County Judge-H. L. Crane, ampa.
Clerk-Wm. C. Brown, Tampa.
Sheriff-D. Isaac Craft, Tampa.
Assessor of Taxes--Hugh Gallagher,Tampa.
Collector of Revenue-Warren A. Givens,
Tampa.
Superintendent of Schools-W.P. Henderson
Tampa.
JEFFERSON.
County Judge-W. B. Lamar, Monticello.
Sheriff--T. B. Simkins, Monticello.
Clerk-W. C. Bird, Monticello.
Superintendent of Schools-W. R. Taylor,
Monticello.
County Treasurer-W. M. Girardeau, Mon-
ticello.
Collector of Revenue-J. H. Tucker, Mon-
ticello.
Assessor of Taxes-J. P. Grantham, Wau-
keenah.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY.
County Judge-W. J. Dixon, New Troy.
sheriff--J. J. Johnson, Old Town.
Clerk-Neal A. McAlpin, New Troy.
Superintendent of Schools-J.C. Rarnsey,New
Troy.
County Treasurer-J. M. N. Peacock, New
Troy.
Collector of Revenue-Adelbert S. Ackley,
Old Town.
Assessor of Taxes-David R. Townsend,
New Troy.
LEON COUNTY.


County Judge-Win. P. Byrd, Tallahassee.
Sheriff-A. Moseley, Tallahassee.
Clerk-C. A. Bryan, Tallahassee.
Superintendent of Schools-Henry N. Felkel,
Tallahassee.
Treasurer-J. L. Demilly Tallahassee.
Collector of Revenue-C. C. Pearce, Talla-
hassee.
Assessor of Taxes-G. A. Croome, Tallahas-
see.
LEVY COUNTY.
Clerk-J. M. Barco, Bronson.
Sheriff-J. S. Parker, Bronson.
Assessor of Taxes-Louis Appell, Bronson.
Collector of Revenue-B. B. Barco, Cedar
Key.
Superintendent of Schools-J. B. Menden-
hall, Bronson.
MADISON COUNTY.
County Judge-R. M. Witherspoon, Madi-
son.
Sheriff-S. A. Parrimore, Madison.
Clerk-John M. Beggs, Madison
Superintendent of Schools-Samuel J. Perry,
Madison.
County Treasurer-S. S. Smith, Madison.
Collector of Revenue-B. D. Wadsworth,
Madison. ,
*Assessor of Taxes-W. P. Thompson, Mad-
ison.
MANATEE COUNTY.
County Judge-Z. T. Crawford, Manatee.
Clerk-Robert S. Griffith, Manatee.
Sheriff-A. S. Watson, Pine Level.
Assessor of Taxes-W. F. Parrish, Braden-
town.
Collector of Revenue-Marion G. Carlton,
Popash.
Superintendent of Schools-Felix J. Seward,
Pine Level.
MARION COUNTY.,
County Judge-Samuel F. Marshall, Ocala.
Clerk-Robert Bullock, Ocala.
Sheriff-A. B. Crutchfield, Ocala.


LIBERTY.
County tJudge-M. J. Solomons.
Clerk-W. W. Jeter.
Sheriff-R. F. Hosford.
Treasurer--J. E. Roberts.
Collector of Revenue-Thlos. P. Shuler.
Assessor of Taxes-Wm. E. Shuler.
SuperintendentofSchools-Dr. T. H. Jackson.
ESCAMBIA.
County Judge-N. C. Shackelford.
Clerk-F. E. de la Rua.
Sheriff-W. H. Hutchinson.
Treasurer-J. S. Leonard.
Collector of Revenue-Manuel Palmes.
Assessor of Taxes-George Reese.
Supq)erintendent of Schools-N. M. Scarritt.
WALTON.
County Judge-Daniel McLeod, Sr.
Clerk-D. G. McLeod.
Sheriff--J. W. Campbell.
Treasur'er-Jamnes S. Bowers.
Collector of Revenue-W. B. McLeod.
Assessor of Taxes-D. L. Campbell.
Superintendent of Schools-Jno. C. Douglas.


HOLMES.
County Judge-A. H. Brownell.
Clerk-T. H. Pitman.
Sheriff-Thomas N. Ellis.
Treasurer-Daniel D. Gillis.
Collector of Revenue-Williamn Tucker.
Assessor of Taxes-J. J. Newton.
Superintendent of Schools-Whitnell Curry.
WASHINGTON.
County Judge-Wm. B. Jones.
Clerk-J. E. Skipper.
Sheriff-E. P. Melvin.
Treasurer-Thomas J. Miller.
Collector of Revenue-John Roche.
Assessor of Taxes-George W. Cook.
Superintendent of ScLhpools-D. H. Horn.
CALHOUN.
County Judge-William Clark.
Clerk-James S. Fannin.
Sheriff-Joseph S. Stone.
Treasurer-J. P. Richards.
Collector of Revenue-Joel P. Atkins.
Assessor of Taxes-JohnT M. Bush.
Superintendent of Schools-W. G. Coxwell.


T 1-1 :E


CE-P. TIB.E AT EP D


SOLID COMFORT OFFICE APPLIANCES



EVERYBODY DELIGHTED

WITH THEM.


No. 8 Flat Top.


Why use Desks of ordinary
construction when, for slight
additional cost you can'have
the benefit of our improve-
ments? Awkward closets and


GENERAL DIRECTORY.

United States Officers.
LAND OFFICE, GAINESVILLE.
Reg.ter--L. A. Barnes, Gainesville.
Receiver-John F. Rollins, Gainesville.
Sureyr- Gener--MJalachi Martin, Talla-
hassee.
DtSTRICT COURT.
'Jwudge-Thomas Settle, Jacksonville.
Marshtd.-J. H. Durkee, Jacksonville.
Clerk-Philip Walter, Jacksonville.
INTERNAL RIV.NUE.
Collector-Dennis Eagan, Jacksonville.
COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS.
John W. Howell Fernandina.
Edwin Higgins, Jacksonville.
John F. House, St. Augustine.

State Officers.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.
Governor-Win. D. Bloxham, Tallahassee.
Lieutenanut-Governor-Livingston W. Beth-
el, Key WVest.
Secretary of State-John L. Crawford, Tal-
lahassee.
CGomptroller-W. D. Barnes, Tallahassee.
Treasurer-HIenry A. L'Engle, Tallahassee.
Attorney-Generdal-George P. Raney, Talla-
hassee.
Couni.isioner of Lands-P. W. White.
Tallahassee.
Superintendent of Public Instruction-E. K.
Fo.-t.-r, Tallahassee.
Adjutant-General-J.E. Yonge, Tallahassee
BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION.
Coumtissioner-A. A. Robinson, Tallahas-
see.
Clerk-R. C. Long, Tallahassee.
Special Agent-Columbus Drew, Astor
Building, Jacksonville.
SUPREME COURT.
Chief ,t,;;e-E. M. Randall, Jacksonville.
Associate Justice-J. Westcott, jr., Tallahas-
see.
Associate Justice-R. B. Van Valkenburgh,
Jacksonville.
Clerk-GC. H. Foster, Tallahassee.
CIRCUIT JUDGES.
First Circuit--Augustus E. Maxwell, Pen-
sacola.
Second Circuit-David S. Walker, Tallahas-
see.
Third Circuit-E. J. Vann, Madison.
Fourth Circuit-James M. Baker, Jackson-
ville.
Fifth Circuit-Thomas P. King, Gaines-
ville.
Sixth Circuit-H. L. Mitchell, Tampa.
Seventh Circuit-W. Archer Cocke, Sanford

Court Calendar.
FIRST CIRCUIT.
Fall Ternm-
Santa Rosa, 2d Monday in October.
Walton, 4th Monday in October.
Holmes, 2d Wednesday after 4th Monday
in October.
Washington, 2d Monday after 4th Monday
in October.
Jackson, 3d Monday after 4th Monday in
October.
Escambia, 1st Monday in December.
This act amended section 2 of act of Feb-
ruary 1i, 1879, and does not Chan e the


-,-- side drawers done away with.
We substitute revolving cases,
which swing with a -slight
1 touch of the hand, and are
Sthus enabled to furnish double
--'the space generally given on
----- each side; and when cases are
open, the whole interior is
flooded with light and all
S" portions readily reached with-


out change of position. A variety of rotary cases are offered for selection, and applied to
the Desk as wanted. We apply this principle to: a great variety of desks.

it TTS^TITHE ^TOOTO~IT
Jij r~u. E^^ ^

Cabinet Office Secretary


--, ,-'.'. 1' The most spacious and elegant desk ever pre-
-I' r,'-- sented to therbusiness public. One hundred and
r" y i- w i'
.",r ..... ten compartments, as shown in cut, all under
;I.:*;,;, L; iione lock and key. Especially adapted for Mer-
''t"LN -tig 'LF/ chants, Manufacturers, Bankers, Railroad Offi-
--------' B cials and Professional Men generally.


Wooton Cabinet Office Secretary. .A._DIBESS :


County Judge-James H. Chandler, Enter-
prise.
SClerk-John W. Dickins, Enterprise.
Sheriff-W. A. Cone, Enterprise.
Assessor of Taxes--S. D. Hodges, Glen
Cove.
Collector of'Revenue-P. N. Bryan, Glen
Cove.
Superintendent of Schools-L. D. Huston,
Enterprise.
WAKULLA COUNTY.
County Judge-W. A. Giles, Crawfordville.
Sheriff-Charles Alligood, Crawfordville..
Clerk-Nat. R. Walker, Crawfordville.
Superintendent of Schools-E. Y. Watts,
Crawfordville.
County Treasurer- W. W. Walker, Craw-
fordville.
Collector of Revenue-R. C. McMillan, Craw-
fordville.
Assessor of Taxes-H. H. Walker, Craw-
fordville.
SANTA ROSA.
County Judge-John Chain.
Clerk-R. R. Shepard.
Treasurer-Robert Robinson.
Collector of tevenue-W. J. Williams.
Assessor of Taxes-W. J. Stephens.
Superintendent of Schools-David Tinner.
POLK.
County Judge-J. A. Fortner.
Clerk-S. J. Pearce.
Sheriff-W. M. Bowen.
Treasurer-F. F. Beville.
Collector of Revenue-J. D. Filles.
Assessor of Taxes-W. H. Johnson.
Superintendent of Schools-P. R. McCrary.
DADE.
County Judge--Allen E. Heyser.
Clerk-P. W. Faulkner.
Sheriff-Win. M. Mattaur.
Treasurer-3. Wm. Ewan.
Collector of Revenue-Wm. H. Benest.
Assessor of !Taxes-Wmi. H. Benest.
JACKSON.
County Judge-George F. Baltzell.
Clerk-Frank Philips.
Sheriff-Andrew Scott.
Treasurer-James E. Heam.
Collector of Reveinue-John B. Anderson.
Assessor of Taxes-W. B. Wynn.
Superintendent of Schools-Samuel J. Erwin.
FRANKLIN.
Countg Judge-Robert G. Baker.
Clerk-J. A. Atkins.
Sheriff-S. A. Floyd.
Treasurer-R. H. Porter.
Collector of Revenne-George A. Patton.
Assessor of Taxes-F. J. Egbert.
Superintendent of Schools-Henry C. Hicks.
GADSDEN.
Countg Judge-J. R. Hams.
Clerk-Henry S. Reeves.
Sheriff-Thomas Mitchell.
Treasurer-A. M. Smith.
Collector of Revenue-R. M. Morgan.
Assessor of Taxes-Hamilton McPhaul.
Superintendent of Schools-C. E. L. Allison.


IMPROVEMENT COMPANY.


Spring Term-
St. John's, 2d Tuesday in March.
Clay, 4th Tuesday in March.
Bradford, 1st Tuesday in April.
Baker, 2d Tuesday in April.
Nassau, 3d Tuesday in April.
Duval, 1st Tuesday in May.
Fall Term-
St. John's 2d Tuesday in September.
Clay, 4th Tuesday in September.
Bradford, 1st Tuesday in October.
Baker, 2d Tuesday in October.
Nassau, 3d Tuesday in October.
Duval, 1st Tuesday in November.
FIFTH CIRCUIT.


Fernandina,

Towns on R. R. Line,

And Cedar Key.



Offers to Lessees and Purchasers a large

number of the most eligible and desirable

Lots, suitable for Business Purposes, or for

City or Suburban Residences,

UPON EASY TERMS.

Liberal Discounts on Values allowed to

parties engaged in manufacturing or indus-

rial enterprises, who will erect on the prop-

erty purchased substantial improvements

for residence, or in which to conduct their

business.


Spring Term-
Sumter, 3d Monday in March.
Mariorf, 4th Monday in March.
Putnam, 3d Tuesday after 4th Monday in
March.
Levy, 4th Tuesday after 4th Monday in
March.
Alachua, 4th Monday after 4th Monday in
March.
Fall Term-
Sumter, 1st Monday in October.
Marion, 3d Monday in October.
Putnam, 3d Tuesday in November.
Levy, 4th Tuesday in November.
Alachua, 1st Monday after 4th Tuesday in
November.
SEVENTH CIRCUIT.
Spring Term-
Orange, 4th Monday in January.
Volusia, 3d Monday in February.
Brevard, 1st Monday in March.
Dade, 3d Monday in April.
..Fall Term-
Orange, 2d Monday in August.
Volusia, 2d Monday in September.
Brevard, 4th Monday in September.
Dade, 2d Monday in November.

County Offlicers.
ALACHUA. ,
County Judge-Junius C. Gardner, Gaines-
ville.
Clerk-J. A. Carlisle, Gainesville.
Sheriff-S. C. Tucker, Arredondo.
Assessor of Taxes-S. H. Wienges, Gaines-
ville.
Collector of Revenue-H. C. Denton, Gaines-
ville.
Superintendent of Schools-W. N. Sheats,
Gainesville.


-/""


INDUCEMENTS TO MANUFACTUR-


ERS, by exemption for a term of years from

taxation, offered by the several cities and

towns. Apply to


CHAS. W. LEWIS,
Fernandina.
.DOffice, cor. Beach & 7th sts.


HOTEL IN NEW YORK.
Persons visiting New York for health, business
or pleasure will find first-class accommodations at
MILLER'S HOTEL. Location central, near
elevated and horse cars. Nice rooms, excellent
table, moderate prices; Turkish, Electric and
Roman baths. Address DR. E. P. MILLER, 39
and 41 West Twenty-Sixth St., New York.


THE FLORIDA MIRROR:


woor-rol\T


DESK .


No. 14 Low Down Roll Top.


WN


'I


WOOTON DESK MANUFACTURING CO.,

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U. S. A.


THE FLORIDA


OWN





















































.....................


14.........
15.........


16..........
13 .........
5...........
5.. .. ......
N 8.....
N 8.....
W 8...
11 .........
...........
8...........
12.........


"



" 1

1 1


........ .............
(Old Town).....
(Old Town).....
(Old Town).....
(Old Town).....


SHERIFF'S SALE.
Y VIRTUE OF AN EXECUTION IS
sued out of thie Circuit Court, Fourth
Judicial Circuit, in and for the county o:
Nassau, Florida, in favor of Sylvania W
Jones, administratrix of the estate of John
D. Jones, deceased, and against William K
Soutter, executor of the estate of James
T. Soutter, deceased, I will offer for sale and
sell in front of the Court-House of said
county, in the city of Fernandina. Florida
f--,-mv ,'sp -rt -Mr ,.W- .q.' 4 .'l ,t- h
rllg L., rln ,>-n i- t^ ere*t . or representatives of said Jamnes T. Soutter,
deceased, in and to the following lands and
tenements, real estate, situated and being in
the county-of Nassau, State of Florida, and
designated upon the maps or public surveys
as Section (15) fifteen, Township (1) one,
North, Range 23, East. Purchaser to pay for
title. JOHN A. ELLERMANN,
Sheriff Nassau County.
Fernandina, Fla., May 31, 1884.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
Y VIRTUE OF AN EXECUTION IS-
sued outofthe Circuit Court, Fourth
Judicial Circuit, in and for thle county of
Nassau, Florida, in favor of Noah S. Green,
executor of the estate of Avanah Green, de-
ceased, an-d against William K. Soutter, ad-
ministrator of the estate of James T. Soutter,
deceased,-I-will offer for sale and sell in
front of the Court House of said county, in
the city of Fernandina, Florida, on the first
Monday in July, 1884, all the rights, title
and interest of the heirs, legatees or repre-
sentatives of said James T. Soutter in and to
the following lands and real estate, lying
and being in the county of Nassau, State of
Florida, and described on the official maps
or surveys as the N W I of N E 1, S E4 of
N E I and S W I of N W I of Section (1)
one, Township (1) one N, R23,E. Purchaser
to pay for title.
JOHN A. ELLERMANN,
Sheriff Nassau County.
Ferriandina, Fla., May 31, 1884.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
NDER AND BY VIRTUE OF AN
U execution issued out of the Circuit
Court Fourth Judicial Circuit, for Nassau
County, in a suit-in 'said Court determined,
wherein J. C. Read is plaintiff and John O.
Donald defendant, I have levied upon and-
will sell at public auction, in front of the.
Court-House in the city of Fernandina, du-
ring the legal hours of sale, on the first(
Monday in August, being the fourth day of
said month, the following described lands,
levied upon. as the property of John O.
Donald: E I of NE of NE 1, Section 30,
Township 2 N, Range 25 E; E of Section
7, Township 2 N, Range 25 E-220 acres;
Lots 7 and 8 in Block 6, Callahan; 8 l of
Section 4, S i of NE'.;W i of NW I" NE I1
Sof NW i, Section 3, Township 2 N, Range 25
-E-495 acres, more or less ; also, fractional
SW I Section 2'. Township 2 N, Range 25 E--
126 acres, more or less.;
Sterns cash,- purchaser paying for title.
JOHN A. ELLERMANN,
Sheriff Nassau County.
Fernandina, Fla., June 28, 1884.


ABOUT sixty million copies of THE SUN
SA have gone out of our establishment
f during the past twelve months.
If you were to paste end to end all the
columns of all THE SUNS printed and sold
last year you would get a continuous
s strip of interesting information, common
Sense wisdom, sound doctrine, and sane
wit long enough to .reach from Printing
i Hoe squareQ to.,.lie top of Mount C.rI,.rnIi-
-k., in tlhl v 1, *n, iit-* back to Pl Laing
House square, and then three-quarters of
the way back to the moon again.
But The Sun is written-for the inhabitants
of the earth ; this same strip of intelligence
would girdle the globe twenty-seven or
Stwenty-eight times.
If every buyer of a copy of The Sun dur-
ing the past year has spent only one hour
over it, and if his wife or his grandfather
has spent another hour, this newspaper in
1883 has afforded the human race thirteen
thousand years of steady reading day and
night.
It is only by little calculations like these
that you can form any idea of the circula-
tion of the most popular of American news-
papers, or of its influence on the opinions
and actions of American men and women.
The Sun is, and will continue to be, a
newspaper which tells the truth without
fear of consequences, which gets at the
facts no matter how much the process costs,
which presents the news of all the world
without waste of words and in the most
-readable shape, which is working with all
its heart for the cause of honest govern-
ment, and which therefore believes that the
Republican party must go, and go in the
coming year of our Lord, 1884.
If you know The Sun, you like it already,
and you will read it with accustomed dill-
gence and profit during what is sure to be
the most interesting year in its history. If
you do not yet know The Sun it is high
time you get in the sunshine.


TERMS TO MAIL SUBSCRIBERS.
The several editions of The Sun are sent
by mail, postpaid, as follows:
DAILY-50 cents a month, $6 a year; with
Sunday edition, $7.
SUNDAY-Eight pages. This edition fur-
nishes the current news of the world, spe-
cial articles of exceptional interest to every-I
body, and literary reviews of new books of
the highest merit. $1 a year.
WEEKLY-$1 a year. Eight pages of the
best matter of the daily issues; an Agricul-
tural Departmnent of unequaled value, spe-
cial market reports, and literary, scientific
land domestic intelligence make The Weekly
Sun the newspaper for the farmer's house-
hold. To clubs of ten with $10, an extra
copy free. Address,
I. W. ENGLAND, Publisher,
The Sun, New York City.


passenger daily except Sunday;
;er daily.
l oqOAqtA


PENINSULAR DIVISI
(WALDO TO WILDwO)D AND L
GOING SOUTH. ,

P..
Leave Waldo......................... 12.01
Leave Dixie........................... 12.22
Leave Hawthorne............. .....12.38
Leave Lochloosa.................... 12.58
Leave Orange Lake................. 1.22
Leave Sparr's......................... 1.38
Leave Anthony Place............ 1.51
Leave Silver Spring ............... 2.25
Leave Ocala............................ 2.45
Leave Lake Weir Station ........ 3.28,
Arrive Oxford........................ 3.45
Leave Wildwood.................... 4.00
Arrive Leesburg..................... 4.35
GOING NORTH.
A.'M.
Leave Leesburg...................... 6.50
Leave Wildwood ................... 7.22
Leave Oxford ......................... 7.33
Leave Lake Weir Station........ 7.49
Leave Ocala......... .................. 8.30
Leave Silver Spring ................ 8.47
Leave Anthony Place ............. 9.15
Leave Sparr's ......................... 9.25'
Leave Orange Lake ................. 9.40
Leave Lochloosa............... .....10.02
Leave Hawthorne...................10.23
Leave Dixie ........................... 10.40


w....-lr 0nortest,-y-U**reyst and Best Route to
all points West.i
Through Tickpts and Sleeping Car Berths
secured at Company's Depot Ticket Office,
and at new office southwest corner of Bay
and Hogan, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. O. MACDONELL,
Gen'l Ticket and Pass. Agent,
Fernandina, Fla.
C. W. MAXWELL,
Master of Transportation,
Baldwin, Fla.
D. E. MAXWELL, adi Fla
General Superintendent,
Fernandina, Fla.


M..
00
30


NtPC
A.
1.
1.
1.
2.
2.
3.
3./


AGENT,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
UTCHER AND STOCK DEALER,
AND
Dealer in Ice
TENNESSEE BEEF A SPECIALTY,
BROOM STREET WHARF,
19-tf FERNANDINA, FLA


4.
5.1
5.
5.
6.3

P. i
5.8
6.3
6.5
7.1
8.2

9.1
9.3
10.0
10.4
11.1
11.3
A. M


CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER,
Alachua Street, between Second and Third,
FERNANDINA, FLA.
Orders and estimates from a distance care-
fully attended to. 25-tf

A. T. BARNHILL & SONS,

Cor. Broome and Second Sts.,

FERNANDINA, FLA.,

Blacksmiths, Gun and Locksmiths,

Carriage and Shipsmiths.

EPAIRING DONE IN ALL BRANCH-
Ses at reasonable rates.
Orders for SIGN and CARRIAGE PAINT-
ING will be promptly attended to, one of
the members of the firm being a first-class


Arrive W aldo.... .... .............11.05 12.15
!--- Day Passenger daily except unday;
Night Passenger daily.

F. & J. SHORT LINE DIVISION.
(FERNANDINA TO JACKSONVILLE.)


GOING SOUTH.


P.
(i,00 p. m
6.;36 p. m
7.40. p. nl
A


Leave Fernandina.......................
Leave Hart's Road......................
Arrive Jacksonville.............. ......


Painter.


,f
s

1


a

ai
d




a



C
H
e

e
T
de


GOING NORTH. ;
Leave Jacksonville...................... 71.i. a. m .
Leave Hart's Road ....................... 8.12 a. m.
Arrive Fernandina..................... 8.t0 a n. m.
_R Trains daily except Sunday.
SUNDAY EXCURSION. ,'i
Leave Jacksonville..................... 1.) p. m .
Arrive Fernandina......................1.( 5 a. m.
Leave Fernandina...................... 5. p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville..................... ;.25 p. m.

CONNECTIONS.

AT FERNANDINA, FLA.,
With New York and Fernandina 8team-
ship Line from New York on Tuesd and
for New York on Thursday. 4
With Sea Island Route from and to Alvain-
ah and Brunswick, daily except Sti, lday.
AT CALLAHAN.
To and from Savannah and Chlarjton,
and all points North and West, daily
AT BALDWIN, FLA.,
To and from Jacksonville, Talla];-;..f ,
nd all points South, West, and N-Nortiwv*:..--t,
laily.
AT HAWTHORNE,
To and from Palatka daily except Sunday.
AT WILDWOOD.
With Stage Line to and from Broo-lvillwe
,nd Tampa daily except Sunday. ,
AT CEDAR KEY, FLA.,
With Morgan's Line Steamships for Key
WVest and Havana, every Saturday; for New
)rleans every Friday ; from Key West and
lavana every Friday; from New Orleans
very Saturday.
With Tampa Steamship Company's Steam-
rs for and from Key West, Monday and
thursday; for Tampa and Manatee, Mon-
lay and Friday.,


23


In the.Circuit Court Fourth Ju-
dicial Circuit, .Nassau County,
Florida.
JANE M. MOORE,
vs. [DIVORCE.
BERNIAH MOORE.
IT APPEARING, FROM AFFIDAVIT
filed, that Berniah Moore, the defendant,
resides beyond the limits of the State of
Florida, so that ordinary process cannot be
served upon him; now, therefore, it is or-
Sdered that a hearing be had upon the facts
charged in complainant's bill of complaint,
filed in above stated cause, on the first Mon-
day in October next.
JAMES M. BAKER, Judge.
June 20th, 1884. 31-3m
For Rent.
SA store and dwelling on Centre street.
Apply to J. A. ELLERMANN.


ST-A--Y-7


1884-


T HIS HOTEL, NEWLY BUILT AND
furnished, will be opened on the 1st of
June for the reception of Summer Visitors.
Situated on the Cumberland plateau, in the
domain. of the University of the South, and
within six miles of the Southern Chautauqua
grounds at Mont Eagle. it offers unusual at-
tractions for Summer Visitors.
The passenger trains on the Nashville &
Chattanooga Railroad connect AT COWAN
with the Tracy City Railroad to Sewanee.
_.- --r The charges will be-per day, $2.00 ;
per week, $10.00; per month, $40.00; for the
season, (three months), per month, $35.00.
Address


. RY S, GEORGIA


i~YDOT A-*-r


Loans procured, Mortgages negotiated, Ex-
changes effected.
SMill Sites, Town Lots from 25 feet to 4
acres, Lands and Plantations from 5 to 5,000
acres, for sale.
N. B.--" St. Mary's having been selected
as the terminus of the Atlantic & Mississippi
Canal (under the survey made for Govern-
ment by General Gillmore), charters for the
construction of which having been granted
by the United States Government and the
Legislatures of Georgia and Florida, a large
increase in the value of adjacent lands may
be confidently looked for." (See New York
Sun, 27-3-83.)


UNIVERSITY HOTEL CO.,
Sewanee, Tenn.


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: JULY 19,


CITY TAX SALE.
,'OTICE Is ,11KRD'Y GIVEN TIIAT
S the following dlscriledci real estate will
hbe sold fit public iiti< n onm the 7th day of
July, ISl, in fl roL ofOW t ('Col-rt Iouse at,
FcrnaUmlina, in the county of N"assait, or so
much thereof as will be necessary to pay the
amountsIt due for taxes herein s(.t opposite to
thile same, together with costs of sale and a(d-
vertising:

OWN. EI. H LOT. A AMO'T.


B radlcv, Newton............ 7........... 7 7 4 01
Capo, MSiss Gert. (0. T ).. 3............I 2 853
4* .. ........... 2' 85
6* ... .. ........ 2! 1 91
Denctfiehl, Sam ........ ...... GO......... 40 11 75
Dorsey, G. (For Islandi
City I,odge)................. 2........... 25) 7 29
F. T. & 1'. IR. 1. 2,606 ft.
main tracks road-bed.. 40 40
F. T. & P. R. 1. 7,295 ft.
sidetrack and roaid-bed 36 91
Hughes, Frank..............14 ...33 3 88
Robinson, R E..............N 5 7 49
Roux, G. 8. (1876).......... 12......... 91 4 2!)
(1882). 12 .... 12......... 9 3 98
(1881).......... 12 ......... 9 1 0 93
(1881).......... 25......... i1 21 50
(1881).......... Ix ......... 6 21 50
( 1S3'1).......... 12 .. .. 91 7 93
......... 25......... 1G 13 28
.......... 18......... 6 13 72
Scott, M C..................... S -i 8...... 40 4 54
W ill.iamson, M J........... 06........... 22 0 50
U nknown......... ............ 13......... 1 2 30
.................... 25......... 1 5 19
..................... 7........... 2 2 30
..................... 8........... 17 7 55
S ..................... 2 ......... 14 4 54
..................... ........... 17 2 30
7. .... 17 230
........ ............ N ..... 17 1 78
.... ................ 1 ........... 19 1 58
.............. ... ..... -).. I ... .... 19 2 30


PIME CARD


GEORGIA AND FLORIDA


Inland Steamboat Co.



NO HEAT!-NO DUST!
-13UT-
A Delightful Sail Along the Pic-
turesque Sea Islands.



sA PERFECT DAYLIGHT SERVICE -


THE STEAMER


FLORIDA RAILWAY & NAVIGATION COMPANY.
In Effect May 10th, 1884.

TRANSIT & PENINSULAR DIVISION.
(FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEY.)
(Ccntal, or Ninetieth ieridian, Time.)
GOING SOUTi.'
Day Pas. Nt Pas.


THE NEW STORE.-&


3B W. F. WOOD, Jr., E

C> Proprietor,

0 0




SS

AND
s S




0 0


SO [ Fernandina, E

E !Cor. Centre & Third. .


THE SUN.
NEW YORK, 1-884.


& THE NEW STORE.-k


W. K. BAUKNIGHT,


JAMES McGIFFIN,


Savannah, Florida and Wester
RAILWAY.
5 WAYCROSS-SHORT LINE.
3
All trains of this road are run by Centra
(90th) Meridian time, which is 33 minutes
slower than Jacksonville time.

O' N and after Sunday, May 11, 1884, Pas
lsenger Trains will leave and arrive as
follows:
NEW ORLEANS EXPRESS.'
Leave Jacksonville daily at........... 8:30 a n
Arrive at Jacksonville daily at...... 8:15 a n.
Arrive at Callahan daily atm............ 9:15 a I
Arrive at Waycross daily at........... 11:01 a m
Arrive at Thomasville daily at...... 3:17 p m
Arrive at Bainbridge daily at........ 5:10 p m
Arrive at Chattahoochee daily at... 5:18 p n
Arrive at Pensacola daily at..........11:45 p m
Arrive at Mobile daily at............... 4:45 a m
Arrive at New Orleans daily at...... .10:10 a m
Connecting at Chattahoochee with Pensa-
cola and Atlantic Railroad daily for Pensa-
cola, Mobile, New Orleans, Texas, all trans-
Mississippi points. Pullman Buffet and
Sleeping Cars on this train, Jacksonville to
Pensacola, Mobile and New Orleans.
FAST MAIL.
Leave Jacksonville daily at........... 2:30 p m
Arrive at Jacksonville daila at...... 2:10 p m
Arrive at Callahan daily at ............ 3:10 p m
Arrive at Waycross daily at........... 5:05 p m
Arrive at Jesup daily at................ 6:35 p mni
Arrive at Savannah daily at ......... 8:17 p mn
Arrive at Charleston daily .at......... 1:45 a m
Arrive at Washington, D.C.daily at11:00 p m
Arrive at New York daily at...... .. 6:30 a m
Connecting at Waycross with Through
Pullman Palace Buffet and Drawing Rooni
Sleeping Cars, Waycross to New York with-
out change.
JACKSONVILLE EXPRESS.
Leave Jacksonuille daily at........... 5:30 p m
Arrive at Jacksonville daily at...... 9:00 a m
Arrive at Callahan daily at............ 6:20 p m
Arrive at Waycross daily at........... 9:00 p ni
Leave Gainesville daily at............. 6.15 p mn
Leave Newnansville daily ut......... 6:57 p mn
Leave New Branford daily at........ 8:20 p m
Leave Live Oak daily at .............. 9.48 p mi
Arrive at DuPont daily at.............12:10 a min
Arrive at Albany daily at.............. 2:25 a min
Arrive at Jesup daily at ................11:05 p mn
Arrive at Macon daily at............... 7:00 a mn
Arrive at Atlanta daily at............12:25 p min
Arrive at Chattanooga daily at....... 8:50 p m
Arrive at Nashville daily at ........... 1:25 a m
Arrive at Louisville daily at .......... 7:50 am
Arrive at Cincinnatti daily at ........ 7:00 a m
Arrive at Chicago daily at ............. 6:10 p m
Arrive at St.Louis daily at ............ 6:20 p mn
Arrive at Savannah daily at .......... 6:30 a m
Arrive at Augusta daily at............12:20 p m
Arrive at Charleston daily at.........12:40 p in
Arrive at Washington daily at.......10:25 a m
Arrive at New York daily at ......... 5:30 p m


C. C. STRATTON & CO.,

OF MACON, GEORGIA,

HAVE MADE THE MODE BRO'S
Fernandina, Fla., the author-
ized Agents to contract for the sale of their

BRICK IN ANY QUANTITIES.

Parties wishing to purchase will get all in-
formation as regards prices from them.
Samples of different qualities and styles
can be seen at the office of
MODE BRO'S,
26 Fernandina.


UNIVERSITY HOTEL

SEWANEE, TENN.


CURTIS & CO.,
EAL ESTATE AGENTS,
RST MATT 7Cl'<


SEA ISLAND ROUT]


Arrive at Thomnasville daily at...... 4:50 a in
Arrive at Albany daily at .............11:30 a m
Arrive at Montgomery daily at...... 7:57 a ii
Arrive at New Orleans daily at......10:10 a m
Arrive at Nashville daily at............ 8:10a m
Arrive at Louisville daily at.......... 3:00 p mn
Arrive at Cincinnati daily at ......... 7:25 p m,
Arrive at St. Louis daily at............ 7:50 a m
Arrive at Chiicago daily at............. 7:00 a m
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this
Train to Chattanooga via Jesup.
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars Gainesville
to Savannah.
Pullmnan Palace Buffet and Drawingroom
Sleeping Cars on this Train to Washington.
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars Jackson-
ville to Savannah.
Pullmian Sleeping Cars on this Train to
Louisville via Thomasville.
A Restaurant has been opened at Way-
cross, and abundant time will be allowed
for meals by all passenger trains.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers by
New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Balti-
More.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers
for New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail
and Steamship connections, and Baggage
Checked through. Also Sleeping Car berths
and sections secured at Company's office in
Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, and at De-
pot Ticket Office, and on board People's
Line Steamers H. B. PLANT, CHATTAHOOCHEE
and JENNIE LANE.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
General Passenger Agent.
A. M. IVES, Agent.


BOOTS AND SHOES.


C. J. WESTBERG.
City Tax Collecto
Fernandina, Fla., June 10, 1884.


Day P,
Night Passeng


5
5
5

3.'
9


51
5
I(
6P

8c
5


r


8
8
8

8


6
5

:2
3
2
.3


.


29'


I


n

1



s1

-
S
1

1
1
1
I
I


I


53
23
53
12
28

20
10
29
50
0 .


o%
N>.
M
35
35
53
17
29

19
39
)3
13
5
5
ir


.
.
.


1884.


RAILROADS.


For information respecting routes, rates,
etc., apply to General Ticket Office, Fernan-
dina, or to the Company's offices in Jack-
sonville.

FLORAL CITY ROUTE.

CENTRAL & WESTERN DIVISION.
(JACKSONVILLE TO CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER.)


OF THE


WESTWARD.
No. 1.
Acconm.
Leave Jacksonville....... 8.35am
Arrive Baldwin ............ 9.12 a in
Leave Baldwin............ 9.18 am
Lake City........... 10.44 am
LiveOak ............ 11.40 am
Madison ............ 1.08 p m
Monticello ......... 1.40 p m
Arrive Tallahassee........ 3.25 p mn
Leave Tallahassee......... 3.33 pm
Quincy .............. 4.35 p m
Arrive Chatta. River..... 5.45 p m


No. 3.
Mail.
5.55 p m
8.03 p mn
7.45 p min
11.04 p m
1.30 p m
3.45 a m
5.30 amna
8.14 a mn
8.40 a mn
10.30 a in
12.23 a m


A.MA.
Leave Fernandina.................. 6.40
Leave Harts Road Junction.... 7.10
Arrive Callahlan....................,, 7.55
Leave Callahan ...................... 8.05
Leave Dutton ....................... 8.35
Leave Brandy Branch............- 8.50
Arrive Baldwin..................... 9.10
Leave Baldwin....................... 9.20
Leave Maxville ..................... /9.47
Leave Highland..................... 10.07
Leave Lawtev..........................10.20
Leave Temple's.......................10.36
Leave Starke..........................10.42
Leave Thurston................. ....10.54
Arrive Waldo........................11.14
Leave WValdo.........................11.25
P.3 ,.
Leave Gainesville................... 12.10
Leave Arredondo...................12.28
Leave Palmer.........................12.41
Leave Archer........................ 12.55
Leave Bronson....................... 1.44
Leave Otter Creek.................. 2.24
Leave Rosewood ................... 3.04
Arrive Cedar Key.................. 3.30
GOING NORTH.
Day Pas.
A.M.
Leave Cedar Key.................... 7.35
Leave Rosewood.................... 8.07
Leave Otter Creek.................. $.838
Leave Bronson........... ........... 9.15
Leave Archer ........................ 9.45
Leave Palmer ....................... 10.01
Leave Arredondo ................... 10.15
Leave Gainesville................... 10.40
Arrive Waldo....... .. ..............11.23

Leave Waldo...........................11.35
Leave Thurston..................... 11.56
Leave Starke..........................12.30
Leave Temple's .....................12.37
P. M.
Leave Lawtey.........................12.58
Leave Highland..................... 1.14
Leave Maxville...................... 1.34
Arrive Baldwin ..................... 2.00
Leave Baldwin......... ........... 2.05
Leave Brandy Branch............ 2.25
Leave Dutton......................... 2.40
Arrive Callahan..................... 3.10
Leave Callahan...................... 3.18
Leave Hart's Road Junction... 4.08
Arrive Fernandina................. 4.38


P.M.
4.25
5.03
6.04
6.30
7.05
7.22
7.47
8.30
9.00
9.25
9.45
10.14
10.25
10.43
11.15
1.15


19
19
19
19
25
40
4
4
52
8
11
1
14


EASTWARD.
No. 2. No. 4.
Accomn). Mail.
Leave Chatt'chee River.10.30 a m 1.30 p m
Quincy ..............11.52 a m 3.15 pmn
Arrive Tallahassee........12.55 pm 4.50 p min
Leave Tallahassee ........ 1.05 pm 5.20 p mn
Monticello.......... 1.40 pm 6.30 p mn
Madison ............ 3.43 pm 9.55 pm
Live Oak............ 5.00 pmi 12.10 a mni
Lake City........... 6.02 p m 2.30 am
Arrive Baldwin............ 7.39 pmin 5.38 amn
Leave B aldw in............ ............ ............
Arrive Jacksonville....... 8.23 pm 7.35 amn
Trains 1 and 2 daily ; Trains 3 and 4 will
not run west of Tallahassee Sundays, but
will run Mondays.
Only line with SOLID TRAINS Jacksonville
to Pensacola daily; and Pullman Sleepers
Jacksonville to New Orleans daily.
j Take the FLORAL CITY ROUTE,
the NEW SHORT LINE via the Florida
Central and Western Division.

ST. MARK'S BRANCH.
(TALLAHASSEE TO ST. MARK'S.)
Leave Tallahassae..................... ... 8.00am
Arrive W akulla ............................. 9.05 a m
Arrive St. M ark's.......................... 9.30 am
Leave St. M ark's............. ............. 10.00 a. m
Arrive W akulla .............................. 10.25 a in
Arrive Tallahassee,........................11.30 am

CONNECTIONS.
At Jacksonville, with Waycross Line for
all points North and East; with the Fernan-
dina & Jacksonville Short Line for Fernan-
dina ; and with Steamers for all points on
the St. Johns River, St. Augustine, etc.
At Baldwin, with Florida Transit & Pen-
insular Division for Gainesville, Ocala, Fer-
nandina, Cedar Key, and all Gulf Ports.
At Live Oak, with the Savannah, Florida
& Western Railroad.
At Tallahassee with St. Marks Branch
Railroad on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat-
urdays.
At Chattahoochee River, with the Pensa-
cola & Atlantic Railroad for Marianna. Pen-
2 -,-,,la Mobile ,,Montgomiery, New Orleans,


2.10
2.36
2.55
3.17
4.00
4.45
5.25
6.00

Nt Pas.
P.M.
6.40
7.15
8.00
8.45
9.25
9.50
10.40
11.45
12.40
A. M.
2.00
2.30
2.47
2.57

3.23
3.45
4.15
4.50
5.40
6.00
6.15
6.60
7.10
8.05
8.40


ST. r TICI-IO-L.AS

EAVES FERNANDINA EVERY MON-
day and Friday mornings.
Returning, leaves SAVANNAH, foot of
Lincoln street, every Sunday and Thursday
mornings, at 8:30 o'clock, standard time.

For Regular and Special Excursion Tickets
-TO-
Points in Florida, Cuba, Mexico,

apply to LEVE & ALDEN, corner of Bull
and Bryan streets,"Savannah.
Brunswick passengers either way will be
transferred at St. Simon's by Steamer Ruby.
Freight not signed for 24 hours after arri-
val will be at risk of consignee.
F. W. SIMMONS, Agent,
Fernandina, Fla.
C. WILLIAMS, Gen. Ag't,
Savannah, Ga.
J. N. HARRIMAN, Manager.


......... ..........
"





















































































































































i


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: JULY 19, 1884.


WHAT SHALL I GET TO EA. T?

S THE CONUNDRUM THAT HOUSEKEEPERS ASK THEMSELVES EVERY
morning, now-a-days. Perhaps we can help you out a little. We have:


RETAIL.


WHOLESALE AND


A. -m.J^l'l S,


FAMILY SUPPLIES, HEAVY GROCERIES,


Hay and Grain,
FURNITURE, STOVES,


FIRE WOOD. AND LUMBER!

FOR SALE CHEAP:
DGINGS AND SLABS,
E 10 cents per load.
ROUGH LUMBER,
From $5 to $16 per M ft., .
according to quality.
DRESSED LUMBER,
$12 to $20 per M. feet.
Orders by Telephone promptly attended to.
WILLIAM B. C. DURYEE,
Steam Saw and Planing Mill.
Office foot Centre Street. 8
MERCHANT TAILOR.

R. G., McQUITTY
Has removed his'business to the rooms over
the New York Bakery, on Centre street.
He has received an assortment of seasonable
goods for gentlemen's wear, and is prepared
to make them up to suit all tastes in the
best style.
490 Repairing neatly done.
Fernandina, Fla., July 12, 1884.
-FOR-


'..A-0"T-TT-IN !J1-/ Y

OF ALL KINDS,

Go to F. M. Robinson,
MANFACTUIERani
MANUFACTURING an, DEALER ,


^^'*^^^^^S~ftfew-ik^Ole-^


wm


. I ;, ..


Prices Low as the Lowest.
N. E. corner Centre and Second Sts,, Fernandina, Fla.


MARINE.

Port of Fernandina.
HIGH WATER. ,


THE FLORIDA MIRROR.

p.o A ,YEAR1; 1.00 FOR SIX MONTHS


St. Joseph's .,cademn.y.
The commencement exercises at St. Jo-
seph's Academy in this city took place on
Tuesday and Wednesday evenings last,
at the Convent of the Sisters of St. Joseph,
Tuesday being set apart for the young ladies
and Wednesday for tlhe boys. Bothli occasions
were largely attended by the friends of the
pupils and of the institution.
Thie order of exercises for Tuesday evening
was as follows:
Entrance March (Blake)..... Misses L. and A. Kelly
W welcome Song (Simplicinw) ...........................Class
Duet-Qui Vive Galop (Ganz)......Misses D. Acosta
and L. Henderson
DRAMA IN TWO ACTS-LILIA, OR THE TEST.
Mmine. De St. Elme, a rich widow......Miss A. Kelly
Lilia, her adopted daughter.............Miss L. Kelly
Vigni,),,, ...Miss M. White
Virginia, Girls of the village ...MissM. White
Delphina, J Miss N. Ligeour
Lisetta Little villagers, ........Miss M. Acosta
Marietta IJ v ...........Miss D. Acosta
Miss Josephine-a friend of Mme. De St. Elme,
Miss A. Starrat
Mrs. Rogers, the housekeeper.........Miss M. Nolan
Margaret, Lilia's mother............Miss M. Peterson
Annette, a waiting maid............ Miss C. Mullarky
After Act I.
Duet-Lucia Di Lammermoor.... Misses H-. Glaiber
and 0. Angel
After Act II.
Duet-Poet and Peasant..Misses D. Acosta and M.
White
STRATTON'S OPERETTA GENEVIEVE."'
Genevieve......................................M iss M Acosta
Isadore, Genevieve's sister..............Miss M. Nolan
Grace..........................................M iss M Peterson
Maids of Isadore...Misses E. Wheeler and A. Kelly
Duet...................Misses C. Mullarky and A. Starrat
Piano Accompanist .......................... Miss L. Kelly
Chorus-Companions of Isadore-School.
Piano Solo-Les Hugenots (S'mith) ...... Miss L Kelly
The young ladies acquitted themselves cred-
itably in the drama, but it was in the vocal
and instrumental music that the careful
training, for which the institutions fostered
by the Sisters of St. Joseph in this State
are noted, was more especially observable
While it is difficult to discriminate amongst
the individual scholars, where all did well,
we cannot help mentioning a few. While
the Misses Aggie Kelly and Maggie
Peterson carried off the palm for
their acting, Miss Mamie Nolan sur-
prised the audience with the sweetness of
her soprano voice in the opening chorus
and the operetta Genevieve." Miss Nolan's
enunciation is good, and her voice clear and
finely modulated; it only lacks power.
With proper training and culture it is cer-
tainly very promising. Miss Liza Kelly
played the accompaniment to the choruses
and operetta with the precision, ability and
grace of a finished performer. The musical


and the audience applauded him gener-
ously.
The exercises closed with the pleasing
operetta "Crown of Virtue," in which all the
young ladies again took part, thus ending
an agreeable entertainment in a most
pleasant manner.
After the close of the exercises the pre-
mruiums were awarded to the scholars accord-
ing to their proficiency. The gold cross for
the highest honors for the young ladies was
awarded to Miss Aggie Kelly. The special
silver medal, contributed by Mrs. V. R.
Johnson was awarded to Master E. Lasserre.

Organize.
It is not at all creditable to the Democrats
of this city that no campaign organization
has yet been formed iTor suggested. There
is plenty of good material here for a live.
pushing and effective club, and it is to be
hoped that steps will be taken to organize
at once. There are many who have never
taken an active part in politics before who
would give earnest effort to the cause of re-
form which the Democratic candidates rep-
resent. Let an effort be made at once to
prepare for the campaign. The first step
is organization, and it should no longer be
deferred.
.The City Counzcil.
The regular meeting of the City Council
was held on Wednesday evening last.
Present: G,- F. Avery, President; Aller-
men Hoyt, King, Robinson, McGiffin, Dor-
sey and Austin.
The following bills were ordered paid :
Emil 0. Friend, services as City Clerk
M ay and June ...........................$50 00
R. L. Denefield, Marshal, salary for
Ju ne.......................................... 41 66
May Denefield, day scavenger service
for June ..................................... 17 00
F. C. Latham, night scavenger service
for June .................................... 98 00
W. J. Godfrey, work on hook and
ladder truck................................ 4 25
H. E. Dotterer, supplies for lighting
street lam ps................................ 9 80
T. A. Acosta, supplies for lighting
street lam ps................................ 2 45
J. E. Meddaugh, hanging lamp for
Council Chamber........................ 5 50
J. H. Mooney, services as Inspector of
Chimneys and Flues.................... 30 00
E. W Nix, stationery ........................ 6 10
R. L. Denefield, feeding prisoners ...... 2 00
Ned Small, 61 days' work on streets... 8 13
Lewis Spalding, special police............ 3 25
Hogarth Williams, special police....... 3 25
A. Peterson, special police................. 1 00
The scrip, bonds and coupons recently
cancelled bty the Finance Committee were
destroyed i. open Council.
The Stre Committee was instructed to
MlHBHnk walk to Old Town repaired.

_of ion of taxes for the year 1883,
,
( ^'w,,J' referred to the Finance Com-
mittee.
The Marshal presented his resignation as
Sanitary Inspector of the city, which was
laid upon the table,
Mayor Pope sent in the following com-
munication to Council, which was read and
referred to the Committee on Sanitary Im-
provements, Cemetery, etc.:
To the Honorable the City Council of Fernan-
dina:
GENTLEMEN-I would most respectfully
recommend to your honorable body that
appropriate legislation be made to pro-
vide for the appointment or election of a
Park Commission, and also for a commis-
sion to have charge of the city cemetery.
These commissions should be given certain
owers, subject to no control, and be, if ap-
pointed, of worthy and prominent citizens,
whose interest in the matter will be some
guarantee of their efforts to improve and
beautify these public properties. These
commissions should be appointed to hold
office for at least one year.
I would also recommend that an ordi-
nance be passed to punish those who are
found with, or using, an implement known
as "slungwshots," and making those damag-
ing public or private property punishable
by fine or imprisonment.
I would also recommend that. Council
provide a dumping ground for garbage and
for the scavenger carts.
W. H. POPE, Mayor.


Alderman Robinson offered an amend-
ment to the ordinance making appropria-
tions for the year, increasing the amount
appropriated for police purposes from $900
to $1,500.
Upon, motion of Alderman Robinson, a
committee of three was appointed by the
President, consisting of Aldermen Robin-
Sson, Hoyt and Dorsey, to classify the rules,
ordinanceS, etc., of the city.
The Stiet Committee was authorized to
utilize tlhe coal ashes discharged by the Mal-
r lory steamners for filling in low places in
Streets, etc.
r Adjourned.

1 Married.
a MIZELL-SA-NDIFORD.-On Tuesday, July
r 15th., at the residence of the bride's uncle,
n Mr. Ralph B. Sandiford, by Rev. Wmn. R.
r Johnson, Mr. WILLIAM MIZELL, of King's
y Ferry, and Miss SUSIE J. SANDIFORD, of St.
Mary's.
- Long known and highly esteemed by the
t communities of both places, the happy
e bride and groom left the same afternoon for
a their honeymoon in the mountains o
d Tennesseo, with sincere wishes for long
- years of health, happiness and prosperity.
S' Entered into Life,
d July 14th, SALLIE WIGHTMAN, daughter
Sof M. A. and Emma Williams.
e "If Thou shouldst call me to resign
f "'What most I prize-it ne'er was mine ;
3- "I only yield Thee what is Thine-
s 'Thy will be done."


Reflectlons.

Monday was the warmest day of the season.
Mrs. R. W. Southwick has gone to New
York for the summer.
Professor Charles E. Avery, of Boston, is
stopping at the Mansion.
The walls of Mode's new building are up,
and the roof timbers in position.
Mr. R. W. Southwick's valuable trotter,
" Prince," died on Monday evening last.
Mr. R. V. Dohoney returned from a flying
visit to New York and Baltimore Tuesday
last.
Mr. Wmin. Mizell and bride, of King's
Ferry, were registered at the Mansion this
week.
Amelia Lodge, No. 47, meets on Tuesday
evening next in called communication.
Work in the F. C. degree.
The steamer Thos. Collycr brought a large
colored excursion party from Darien and
Brunswick on Tuesday last.
The money-order bureau at the Post-
office will be open hereafter from 8 a. m. to
12 rm. and from 1 p. m. to 4 p. nm.
Dr. A. L. Randolph and wife and Mr. J.
8. Winthrop, of Tallahassee, were among
the arrivals at the Strathmore this week.
The Strathmore, on Amelia Beach, is
taxed to its utmost capacity. The manage-
ment this year is commended by the guests.
During the summer months, the morning
services at the Presbyterian Church have
been discontinued. Services will be held
at 7:30 p. m.
The Masion House keeps pretty busy this
warm weather. Mr. Dent is gaining popu-
larity daily by his urbanity and genial
kindness to all.
Among the prominent Jacksonvillians at
the Strathmore this week are Mr. and Mrs.
J. G. Christopher, Dr. and Mrs. Ken-
worthy Mr. and Mrs. C. Benedict.
The iron front and terra cotta trimmings
for the Mode building were shipped from
New York via the schooner Amelia P.
Schmidt, of the Ray line, Thursday.
Josiah T. Walls is out out as an indepen-
dent candidate for Congress from this dis-
trict. At a ratification meeting held in
Gainesville last Saturday, Hughes, a young
.__.^ P n e1;, n.^ W


Ferris' Celebrated Sugar-cured
Breakfast Bacon Strips,
Sugar-cured Shoulders,
Fulton Market Corned Beef,
Breakfast Mackerel in oblong
tins.


'erris' Celebrated Sugar-
cured Hams,
)ry Salted Pig Meat,
moked Beef,
[ackerel by the piece or kitt,
Boneless Codfish,


In CANNED GOODS we have


Salmnou, Oysters, Mackerel, Lobsters,
Codfish Balls, Clamns. Clam Chowder, Brook Trout,
Deviled Crabs, Kippered HIlerring, Tripe, Corned Beef;
Roast Beef, Mutton, Chicken Deviled Ham, Chicken and
and Turkey, Turkey,
Boneless Pigs' Feet, Lunch Tongue,
Potted tHamn, etc., Boston Baiked Beans,
Huckin's Soups, Evaporated Vegetables for Soup
American and Imported Sardines, Sugar-cured Ham, Mushrooms.
; Our limited space in THE MRROR compels us to amputate the list of eatables
here, but we will see you again.
pa Goods delivered to all parts of the city FREE OF CHARGE.


F ECDT W. ITABOYVT & C&.L

SECOND STREET, ABOVE CENTRE. ".......


E ll. ... .. ....


0E-
-i ... ^rT .,._ -tnt __
5.' l .. *... i.- A'"- + ----- .* .-

I-''- '*I-il -a -- --;^.- ^ 1-/ -- -= -a "


shot in the wrist by a Bisbee"rike"r.7
course that' sort of argument will
harmonize the factions.
Pope's friends would make it appear t
Eagan's repudiation of the Independ
ticket signifies nothing. In this they
mistaken. Eagan to-day is the ablest n
in the ranks of the party, and evidently
regarded so at Washington when he recei
the best appointment in the State of Flo:
in the gift of the Federal Government.
opposition to the Independent ticket me
its defeat.
The Walls independent movement
more followers than it is generally gi
credit for. In the nominating conven
here many of the colored delegates
pressed their preference for him, and
only brought to vote for Bisbee by the ci
of the party whip in the hands of
bosses.
Mr. W. H. Garland has placed upon
. table some beautiful samples of grape
the Herbemont variety, raised in his gai
on Ninth street. Mr. Garland has ex]
mented this year with the Bra
orange tree fertilizer on his g
vines, and it has proved a success.
vines fertilized bore more and larger
than other vines, and the leaves wer
twice the size, while the growth of
was much more vigorous.
Dennis Eagan, who is undoubtedly
most clear-headed and powerful of
leaders of the Republican Party in
State, had himself interviewed by a r
sentative of the Times-Union. He rer
ates the, Pope-Greeley Independent ti
and if it receives the endorsement o
Tallahassee Convention will not suppoi
He is not alone in this respect. A
number of the best men in the party w
prefer defeat under a Republican flag
success under such a leader as Pope.

Fire on the Steamer Martha
The pilot-house of the St. M
river packet steamer Martha caught
while she was lying at Centre
dock last Saturday noon. The fire wa
covered by one of the hands of the boa
a stream of water put on it from the st
er's pump. The fire department respo
promptly to the alarm, but when the c
ical engine arrived, the flames were
control. The fortunate discovery of th
in its incipiency saved the little ste
from utter destruction. As it is, the
age is very slight. A number of bedcl
belonging to the mate and Capt. Stone'
were the only articles destroyed.
How the fire originated can only b(
jectured, as there was no one in the
house where it started. It is thn
that it was probably started by the ca
putting down of a cigar.


not nots,'"br is77'i V03
os, by Miss-:jzL Q
regretted that the latter had been put down
,hat as the closing piece for the evening, for dur-
lent ing its performance and before its close a
are number of the younger members of the
nan boys' class, who were sitting in the rear,
was saw more substantial attractions in the ice
ved cream table in the hall, set for the children,
rida and began filing out of the room, and some
His of the finest effects of the piece were lost to'
ans those sitting at a distance from the stage.
The duet by the Misses H. Glaiber and
has Otilie Angel was rendered with precision,
ven and received the hearty approval of the au-
tion dience, both of the misses being under nine
ex- years of age.
were The exercises for the second night were as
rack follows:
the Entrance March Xaveria (E. M. S.) Miss L. Suydam
W elcom e Song......................................Boys' Class
DRAMA-JOSEPH IN EGYPT.
our Joseph, under the name of Orasis.........J. Ligeour
s of Benjamin.......................... Master Frank Williams
rden Simeon, 1 Freddie Williams
peri- Reuben, Brethren of Joseph MasterT.McGiffin
dley Phasear, an Egyptian noble...... Master H. Barker
rape Zares, servant of Joseph................Master F. Papy
The Other brothers of Joseph and guards...School Boys
u After the Drama.
fruit Duet-Le Mardi Gras (Schubert)...............Misses M.
re of Peterson and M. Nolan
wood Recitation-Charge of the Light Brigade...
School Boys
he Duet-Philomel Polka (Kunkel)...Misses A. Starrat
the and A. Kelly
the DIALOGUE-THE NOBLEST BOY.
this George Stedman.............................Master J. Sails
epre- Fred Cummings........................Master E. Lasserre
pudi- sam Ford ..........................---............--Master P. Kelly
cket, Cyril Lowell................................Master F. Acosta
f the Mr. Converse, the teacher.........Master F. Ferreira
St. Trio-The Shepherd's Lay......Misses H. Glaiber,
rt it. A. McGiffin and O. Angel
large BOY TALK-SMALL BOYS.
vould Bennie..........................................Master M Papy
than Jimmie .................. ................. Master R. Starbuck
W illie ............................................ M aster D. K elly
Johnnie......................................Master J. Howel
Duet-The Robin's Return.................Miss L Kelly
. and E. Wheeler
lary's OPERETTA-CROWN OF VIRTUE.
fire Catherine Durand, the grandmother..Miss A. Kelly
ftre Rosetta.............................................Miss M Nolan
s re Rose -.............................. ...............M iss E. W heele
s dis- The Countess ...............................Miss M Peterson
t and Little Peter, the Drummer.............Miss N. Ligeou
team Jenny..........................................Miss C. Mullark:
)nded Chorus-Class.
;1hem- Our growing young crop of future Presi
under dents and statesmen could certainly no
ie fire complain of the reception they had at th
eamer hands of the spectators. The drama
dam- "Josephin Egypt" was given in costume, and
others the lads did well, their youth being con
s gun sidered. But the one who particularly dis
tinguished himself for his nonchalance an
a con- the thoroughness with which he had family
pilot- iarized himself with his r6le, was little
ought Harry Barker, as Phasear, the friend co
treless Joseph. His representation of the charac
ter would have done credit to older heads


DEALER IN


Ship Stores,
PAINTS,

E, WILLOW-WARE.


HARDWARE


CROCKERY,


Range of Thermometer ,.
FOR THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, JULY 18,
HORSEY'S DRUG STORE.

s R Wind
e -4- :co a
Saturday.... July 12 80 88 87 86 S. W.
Sunday .............. 13 80 90 90 87 S. W.
Monday ............14 81 90 92 88 W.
Tuesday .... July 15 79 88 88 86 S. W.
Wednesday........16 80 88 87 86 N. W.
Thursday ..........17 80 87 84 82 W.
Friday...............18 79 86 84 182 S. E.


I


ly 19....... 4:51
" 20...... 5:56
" 21...... 6:54
" 22...... 7:47
23...... 8:37
" 24...... 9:24
" 25......10:09

ENTERED.
St. Nicholas,


5:28 P. M.
6:29 "
7:25 "
8:15 "
9:03 "
6:46 "
10:28 "


Saturday,
Sunday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday
Thursday,
Friday,


Ju


,


A.M.
"t
'

" t


Usina, Savan-


July 14-S. P.


nah ; with passengers, to F. W.
Simmons, agent.
15-S. City of Palatka, Vogel, Pa-
latka.
16-S. S. City of San Antonio, Wilder-
1,680 tons, New York; freight
and passengers, to R. W. South-
wick, agent.
16-Brig Nellie, Peterson, St. Mary's.
17-S. P. St. Nicholas, Usina, Savan-
nah ; freight and passengers to
F. W. Simmons, agent.
17-S. S. City of Palatka, Vogel, Pa-
latka.
CLEARED.
July 15-S. P. St. Nicholas, Usina, Savan-
nah ; with passengers, by F. W.
Simmons, agent.
15-S. S. City of Palatka, Vogel,
Charleston.
16-S. S. City of San Antonio, Wilder,
tons, 1,680 New York: freight
and passengers, by R. W. South-
wick, agent.
17-S. S. City of Palatka, Vogel,
Charleston.
S17-Schr. Florence, Leland, Adams,
New York.
S18-S. P. St. Nicholas, Usina, Savan-
nah; freight and passengers by
F. W. Simmons.



JACKSONVILLE, -' FLORIDA.

:FORE=EN I^_TT.
LARGE DWELLING AND STORE,
with extensive yard-room and gardens
attached, on Alachua street; suitable for a
large family or boarding-house. Possession
can be given about August 1st.
DWELLING ON ESCAMBIA STREET,
facing the bay; has eight rooms, large halls,
piazzas, excellent well, etc.
STORE AND DWELLING formerly occu-
pied by Mrs. Fletcher, on Third street.
For terms, etc., apply to


Fernandina, May 2, 1884.


GJ. TAR..


\v