<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



Florida mirror
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054505/00003
 Material Information
Title: Florida mirror
Uniform Title: Florida mirror (Fernandina, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: A.B. Campbell, Geo. Burnside
Place of Publication: Fernandina Fla
Creation Date: December 29, 1883
Publication Date: 1878-
Frequency: semiweekly[<1894-1899>]
weekly[ former 1878-<1886>]
triweekly[ former <1890-1891>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 30, 1878)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1901.
General Note: "Democratic" <1880>.
General Note: Editor: Geo. R. Fairbanks, <1887>.
General Note: Publishers: George R. Fairbanks, <1885-1886>; Moore & Manucy, <1887-1891>; The Mirror Pub. Co., <1894-1898>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002057832
oclc - 33834378
notis - AKP5868
lccn - sn 95047336
System ID: UF00054505:00003
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Nassau County star

Full Text




THE FLORIDAMfRROR: DECEMBER 29.


THE FLORIDA MA1IRROZ.

SATURDAY Y, DECEMBER 29, 1883.


from a book recently published on Florida
titled, "Down South," by Lady Duffus
aidy. We extract the following notice of
rnandina :
Many people prefer Fernandina to Jack-
s nville, as being quiet, cooler, and the cli-
ate more bracing, and less of a resort for
fashionable invalidism.
The surroundings are lovely, full of ro-
mnantic strolls and pleasant wandering ways,
where you may ramble without fear of get-
ting into a swamp or plunging into a quag-
mire. One favorite drive, of which people
never seem to tire, is through a lovely wind-
ing way, something like a Devonshire lane,
with stretcher of flowering shrubs and tan-
gles of palmetto scrub lifting their shining
leaves on either side. This leads to the sea-
shore, about) two miles distant from the
town, where ,here is a wonderful beach of
hard, white sand, as smooth and level as a
ball-room floor.
Here you may enjoy an uninterrupted
drive for twenty or thirty miles, with the
woodland country stretching away on the
one hand, and the white foam lips of the
Atlantic lapping the shore on the other,
while a tiny breeze comes, with a thousand
miles of iodine, fanning your cheek and ex-
panding your lungs with its healing, health-
giving breath. This drive, within such easy
access of the town, brings many visitors to
Fernandina.
One of the most important lines of rail-
way in Florida, the Atlantic, Gulf & West
India Transit Railway (now called the Flor-
ida Transit & Peninsular Railroad), starts
from Fernandina, and runs directly across
the southwest part of the State to Cedar
Key (on the Gulf of Mexico), 155 miles."
There are several reproductions of news-
paper articles published abroad, from one of
which, the Edinburgh Courant, we extract
the following.
"As Florida is unquestionably destined in
the not far distant future to support a teem-
ing population, and to be the centre of vast
and concentrated industries, railway proper-
ties cannot fail to attain high values in that
State.
Even without these further aids of addi-
tional transit facilities, the development of
Florida must now proceed at a greatly accel-
erated pace. It is established beyond ques-
tion that the State is the winter garden of
North America. Lying almost at the door
of Europe, with which she has direct com-
munication by sea, her commerce with the
latter in all her great staple articles, such as
corn, sugar, cotton and tobacco-and event-
ually, no doubt, wine, jute and silk--miust
prove a nost important factor in her national
prosperity ; yet it is chiefly in the vast and
altogether unequaled range of her more del-
icate winter products, for which she has the
outlet within thle borders of her own coun-
try, that her immediate development and
"greatest ultimate wealth are discernible.
The millions of acres of valuable yellow
pine and numerous rare woods in her pri-
meval forests, accessible beyond all others in
America, would in any other State constitute
its chief means of wealth; but in Florida
the production of early garden and orchard
produce is supreme as a source of revenue,
In her other productions she has rivals, but
in this she liolds, and must always retain,
the monopoly on her ow.n continent. Those
wlhio are famniljar with the.United States will
fee,..lleet. t'he. vast pro~fusiln of American
tallet frilits 4Und 'e.:--taull-~. the -4fimucr aC-
companying each meal., Among the fruits
may be mentioned the' orange, pine-apple,
banana, peach, plum, grape, fig, and straw-
berry, the consumption of some of these
being simply enormous, according to Eng-
lish notions. Of the vegetables--and selected
from a host of others--tile tomato, cucum-
ber, melon, pea, bean, cabbage, potato, and
sweet potato, are the more prominent. All
these fruits and vegetables ripen many weeks
earlier in Florida than in any other, even
the most favored, portion of the United
States, and not only realize the high price
which such monopoly insures, but com-
mand the' market throughout the whole
period of supply ; -for when other States are
in a condition to send forward their earliest
and immature growths, Florida,'still in ad-
vance, pours upon the market her ripest
fruits in their most perfect condition, and
reaps to tile end the highest prices for her
Supplies. The value of such an inalienable
r monopoly of market is inestimable. Straw-
Sberries and green peas grown in the open
air, as in Florida, and marketed in January
and February, have a very different value
from those grown in June! Tomatoes and
cabbages grown in Florida net 100 to 120
per acre; while the same area of the popular
(but- less valuable) Irish potato will clear 20
to 25 to the producer. With a soil equal,
under favorable conditions: to the produc-
tion of three crops of garden produce within
the year, and with a highly profitable and
practically limitless market at hand, there
seems a fair prospect of Florida becoming in
time one vast orchard and winter garden."'
AGRICULTURE IN FLORIDA.

STATE CONVENTION TO MEET IN GAINESVILLE.


Mr. J. G. Knapp, of Hillsborough county,
issued a call for a State Convention to meet
at Gainesville on the 21st of January, 1884,
of agriculturists for consultation and dis-
cussion.
The citizens of Gainesville tender their ex-
cellent hall for the meetings, and to give the
hospitality of free entertainment to all par-
ticipants in the work of the meeting.
In addition to the papers to be read and
the discussions thereon it may be proper to
consider the following objects :
1. A complete organization of all the agri-
cultural interests of the State, and of the
counties and neighborhoods.
2. A combination that shall enable Florida
to act in perfect union at the great exposition
to be held at New Orleans in 1884, and at the
other places as may be necessary to place her
in the high rank she can hold among the
States of the Union.
3. To learn what we may produce better
and more abundantly than we are now
doing, and thus not only increase our
wealth, but also raise our people to that high
grade which we are entitled to occupy, by
reason of our climate, healthfulness and
soil.
4. To discover the best means for obtain-
ing more certain and better returns for our
labor.
Many of'our most experienced men and
writers have already promised to attend, and
means will be used to secure others.
Dated at the office of the Statistical Agent
of Florida for the United States Agricultural
Bureau, Limona, Hillsborough County,
Fla., December 15, 1883.
J. G. KNAPP, S. S. Agent.


i


"\


favorable in view of the recommendations
of the Secretary of War, the Engineer De-
partment and the President's message. Witl
the depth of the inland passage increased
fifteen feet, and the improvement of Romtt
Marsh and one or two other points betw n
Savannah and Fernandina, passenger steal m-
:ers of large size could run between Savannah
and Jacksonville or Palatka, and the St.
Johns would virtually be extended to Sa-
vannah, protected against storms by an in-
ge (quite as straight and direct in
its cou agl^tfi rxfLi river itsef.

I'AE STEAMER "PALATKA. F

HER DIFFICULTIES AND SOME FRIENDLY SUlr 'O
TIONS AS TO OBVIATING THEM.
There is a considerable stir among the
transportation men about the steamer Pua-
latka aground this side of the town of Palatka
since Thursday afternoon.
It is alleged that the managers of the Flor-
ida Southern Railway refuse to give their
northern freight to any but the steamer City
of Palatka, and that if they have more than
a load for her they store it away for her
next trip. This trip they loaded her down
till she drew six and a half feet forward and
eight feet aft, and, nine miles this side of
Palatka, she ran fast aground in the fog.
Her destination is Charleston and a connec-
tion with a New York steamer, which leaves
that port to-day. Failing of to-day's con-
nection, which is inevitable, her freights
cannot leave Charleston until Wednesday,
Thursday night the steamers Fannie Dugan
and Florida pulled at the steamer Falatka
without budging her a bit. Yesterday morn-
ing the steamer Sylvan Glen took a tow line
and after a long struggle gave it up. Later,
in the day the steamer Jennie Lane took off
400 boxes of fruit and pulled without start-
inig the belated boat. The Lane gave up,
and the Palatka insisted upon having the
removed h axes of fruit returned to her de' k s,
hi',. ; sile. Ini the afte i :! ,on- ,the.
steamer John Sylvester wrestled with 'the
grounded boat, and was unsuccessful. Last
night two of Dr. L'Engle's towboats went
up the river to the rescue.
The Palatka could obviate very much of
her present difficulties by loading her freight
in barges and towing them. Why not try
this as an experiment ?-Times- Union Dec. 22.
The Palatka got off on the 22d, reaching
Charleston on Monday the 24th, having
grounded on the 20th.
We have regarded the experiment of run-
ning a sea steamer up the St. Johns with
much interest, but with great doubts of its
success. The steamer St. Johns was a side-
wheel steamer of great capacity and elegantly
fitted up. She was financially a failure, and
her owners removed her. The City of Pa-
latka was built to take her place to establish
a line for Florida in connection with the
_::\V York and Charleston steamers. Her
first trip out was unfortunate, and she has
noiv met with one of those very common
iil:, lents of navigation on the St. Johns,
"'rn'-,ill las seriously impaired the hope and
expectation formed for her.
The difficulties to be encountered by a
sea-going steamer with a route partly at sea
and partly in the river are obvious. To
withstand the rough sea voyage from
Charleston to the St. Jons bar she requires
strength and sufficient depth to give her
steadiness-to navigate the St. 'Johns she re-
quires a light draft of water ; she is subject
in the winter season to frequent fogs at the
mouth of the St. Johns and in the river. 1
From her sharp construction she is more
difficult to get off than an ordinary flat-bot-
tomed keel steamer. Her freights are of
perishable products-oranges and vegetables
--and delay is ruinous. For these reasons
the experiment of running steamships to
any point on the St. Johns seems hazardous.
The Mallory Line, after a trialof two seasons,
abandoned the attempt. The Times-Unionj
suggests that the City of Palatkla tow the
freight on barges. This would be incon-
venient and a great loss of time.
Is there not a better plan naturally sug-
gested by this condition of thing ? The City
of Palatka on her first trip ran from Charles-
ton bar to Fernandina bar in ten hours.
We will suppose then that she was to make
her route from Fernandina to Charleston
twice a week, and that her freight was to be
brought by fast river steamers from Palatka
to the dock of the Fernandina & Jackson-
ville Railroad at Jacksonville in six hours,


and brought to Fernandina alongside to the
steamer in two hours, allowing two hours
to handle the freight at Jacksonville and
Fernandina, the time would be from Palatka
to Charleston twenty-two hours, without
any delay, as the City of Palatka could come
in or go out of Fernandina at any stage of
tide, there being thirteen feet of water on the
bar at low tide.
Looking at the matter in a purely business
way, this would seem to be a better and
more certain rule for shippers than attempt-
ing to navigate the St. Johns river with a
sea steamer subject to the.delay of fogs ,and
low water on the bar both ways, and wo ild
give a semi-weekly line instead of a weely
;'line. ..

THE Pensacolian, the new Sunday paper,
under the proprietorship of Messrs. John
O'Connor & Co., made its first appearance
Sunday morning the 16th inst., and, as we
predicted, made a very favorable impression.
It is an eight-page journal, five of its pages
being what is known as patent, while the
others are filled with original editorial and
local matter. The editorial pages reflect the
well-known ability of Major Benj. Robinson,
while Mr. John O'Connor's talents as a local
and newsgatherer are well sustained in that
department of the Pensacolian. We hope
our new contemporary will be well sus-
tained.-Advance- Gazette.


UNITED STATES COURT.

THE OPINION OF JUDGE SETTLE IN THE DREW-
VALENTINE CASE, AND THE FREE
LAND BOND SUIT.
In the United States Court yesterday two
very important decisions were handed down
by Judge Settle. The most important of
these cases to this vicinity is the decision in
the case of Columbus Drew vs. Marie A.
Valentine, a proceeding to enjoin a suit of
ejectment.' Nearly forty years ago when the
United States Land Office was at St. Augus-
tine, the first public offering of government
lands was made. Pending theproclamation
of these lands and until unsuccessfully of-
fered at public outcry they are not subject
to private entry. One Cleland was, at that
time Receiver at that office and fraudulent-
ly permitted persons, ignorantly or wrong-
fully, to buy certain lands before sale day.
The transaction was a fraud, and, Cleland
pocketed the money, making no report of
the sale, though he did enter it on the office
tract-books. One of these tracts was taken
by a man named Goff, in our eastern sub-
urb and upon that tract at present his vari-
ous grantees have beautiful homes and
property valued at several hundred thou-
sands of dollars. They hold warranty titles
back to the long since deceased Goff, who
held a receiver's official receipt. In 1876
Mrs. Valentine found it vacant upon the
records of the General Land Office at Wash-
ington, and entered it with some of her fa-
mous scrip." A few years ago, a suit to
dispossess the occupants was begun, which
was not pushed till recently, when a bill
was filed in chancery to enjoin that proceed-
ing, as stated. The following is Judge Set-
tle's decision refusing the relief prayed,
which does not, however, settle the matter,
as the case must go to a jury.
DREW VS. VALENTINE.
I have examined this case with an earnest
desire to find something in the record to
support the claim of the complainants. For
I confess I have no sympathy with those
who are ready and willing to take advantage
of the ignorance or mistakes of others, and
to appropriate to their own use, property
which has been greatly enhanced in value
by the labor of others.
But whatever my feelings may be upon
a moral aspect of the case, I am bound by
well established principles of law and equity
and must announce such judgments and
decrees as they dictate.
An examination of the statutes and the
decided cases, convinces me that there is
no way for titles to land to be divested out
of the United States, except in strict pur-
suance of some law of the United States;
and as no.statute of limitations runs against
the United States, occupancy and possession
alone, even for a great length of time, can-
not ripen into title, as against the United
States.
It cannot be claimed that the transactions
between Goff and the Receiver at St. Augus-
tine, divested either the legal or equitable
title out of the United States, for the reason
that the lands were not subject to entry, but
it is claimed that the Act of Congress, of
June 15th, 1844, cured that defect, and vest-
ed an equitable title in Goff.
After an examination of the statute, I am
satisfied it was only intended to embrace
such lands as were subject to entry.
The objection that the statute could not
embrace these lands because there was no
i -i' l-, i jf C :' i ml l" ,' '. )'d :'< that ap-
plication for entry wAis v ,"\ r' in' a:le, is `o '--
tenable, for the commigAioner, in' his letter
to Hon. J. J. Finley, states that such entries
are to be found in the general land office,
but the insurmountable obstacle that-the
latids were not subject to entry, still presents
itself.
The complainants allege that the Valen-
tine scrip can only be located on unoccupied
and unappropriated lands, and that the
lands in controversy have been occupied by
them, and by those under whom they claim,
for more than forty years, and have been
greatly improved in value.
The difficulty in the way of the com-
plainants is, that their occupancy, not being
under law, has conferred upon them no le-
gal or equitable estate, and they cannot be
heard to question the title of one who
claims under a patent from the United
States.
While the complainants cannot be heard
to question the Valentine title, it would
seem that the Government might well in-
quire, by direct proceedings, how one, with
authority to locate upon unoccupied lands,
should be permitted, at the price of one
dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, to lo-
cate on lands in the heart, or the suburbs of
a city.
The demurrer must be sustained, and tlhe
bill disniissed.
THOMAS SETTLE, Judge.
December 24, 1883.

In the case of Bella A. Johnson et. al., vs.
the Florida Transit and Peninsula Railroad
Company et. al. the following decision was
rendered :


Waiving the objection to the new bill that
most of the matters therein stated, are not
supplemented to the relief prayed for in the
original bill, the court is of opinion that the
application should not be granted, both be-
cause of the bar of the statute of limitations
and of the laches of the complainants.
Although it is contended that the bonds
are not yet due, and that the complainants
were not compelled to assert their rights, at
an earlier day, yet the acts complained of
and upon which relief is sought, occurred
seventeen years since ; and the original bill
upon which it is now sought to graft the
supplemental bill was filed ten years since.
Reasonable diligence would have brought
to the knowledge of the complainants the
material facts now sought to be introduced,
for the first time, into original litigation.
As is well said in a recent decision of the
Supreme Court of the United States. "The
law of laches, like the principle of the lim-
itation actions. was dictated by experience,
and is founded in a salutary policy. The
lapse df time carries with it the memory and
life of witnesses, the muniments of evidence
and other means of proof. The rule which
gives it the effect prescribed is necessary to
the peace, repose and welfare of society."
The application to file a Bill of Supple-
ment, Revivor and Amendment" is denied.
THOMAS SETTLE, Judge.
Dec. 24, 1883.
In the suit of Henry S. Higgins and
Charles S. Adams vs. J. S. Driggs, adminis-
trator, and E. Higgins, demurrer was sus-
tained.


THE INLAND PASSAGE.


A PROMINENT JACKSONVILLIAN'S ADVOCACY OF
DEEPENING THE SISTERS CHANNEL.
To the Editor of the Florida Mirror:
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., Decelbier 26, 1883.
The holidays will soon be QAr, and Con-
gress will resume business in "ernest. This
being so, it is time to agitate alid formulate
proper plans to be submitted to Congress
during the present session fo ttie purpose of
obtaining appropriations of mcney to be ap-
,Xed te)-oliv"ects,4qA -4 and 2knieral nc -
h- Oil'' s thr e grpatv 0
't!he best,

.. e
say .clean oUt, ,_,laen

up, deepein-alTiee the inwl passage be-
tween Fernandina and Jack\onville. This
has been a pet scheme of~.' i:for,' many
years. When a citizens of Fernaniilinta, from
1867 to 1870, I assisted in organizing a board
of trade, and their and there vl\':,-ca;ted with
voice and pen the importance, of thle project
indicated in this little comnminication. So
impressed was I of the utility ani fIeasibility
of the proposed.plan, that. I ck-jntinu-d the
advocacy of it after I removed to Jackson-
ville in 1870. I regarded it. then, and regard
it now, as being advftitagieout to both places.
Judge then of my surprise when I discovered
that it excited opposition fj:.iun influential
quarter-, in both localities. II Lmust believe
that'time has demonstrated is wisdom, and
that better counsel trow.pr.ev'iilz everywhere
inl preference to it. Why ajpl s:, wedded to
this matter? I will give :i tv reasons, and
leave thle subjeq"' -., bW' elaborated by the
press an d .-llIr: bI -tt, L 'f, ?* i- nel and more
capable than myself to douit justice. All I
desire to do at present is to cll attention to,
what I deemn to be so vital i matter to both
cities named, and, in fact, t'tl-he whole of
peninsular Florida, and thIlirtby to.invite
discussion.
The St. Johns river must have an outlet
navigable without danger fok vessels draw-
ing from 18 to 20 feet of water. This is an
admitted proposition. How, is it to be ob-
tained? The experiment has been tried of
deepening the St. Johns bar by concentrating
by jetties the water into 0oan channel ex-
tended to the outer breakers.s, This is a good
idea if it is practicable. 'alit. Eads tlh..uglht
it could be accomplished wit'L) tlIe cX\lciili-
ture of several millions of' dullzir.-. Thi'-
amount will never be apilrpl,.rittf'.l Iy Cin--
gress in lump. It may be di.oed )nt in Zi[-
aropriations of $50,000 or le-! froim tithe to)
time, and which never have, andl iinever call,
do any permanent good. i ii belicts tent-
porarily secured (if any iare it .,by delay it
not being able to follow uI J I .i dvantaes .
gained to full completion. And so it will
continue to be. But even if all the desired
results could be attained by a successful
opening of the St. Johns bar, still it would
not be undesirable to have two outlets. One
(the St. Johns bar project) is, to say the
least, problematical; the other (the inland,
passage plan) is a certainty, so far as the
practicability of making it a success is con-
i cerned. The one is indefinite as to the time
when it can be completed, and the amount
Required for its accomplishment, but the
other can be done with despatch and with
comparatively small outlay. I hardly think
it will take the amount I have specified, but
I have placed thle appropriation to be asked
for at the figures indicated so as to be certain
to secure enough.
At the mouth of the St. Johns river quick-
a ln-urmnlountable obstacle to success. Along
'.-h,. inland route a very different character
of deposit is found. The soil there is either
hard mud or oyster-shellbanks. These can
be cut through easily, and will never fill up
again. I know this from my memory of the
fact that, when I was a boy, the cut connect-
ing the Amelia and Nassau rivers (which the
railroad bridge now spans), was made by Z.
Kingsley with the ordinary spades and hoes
used on his Fort George Island plantation,
so that his six or eight-oaredboat could pass
through, and the tides have since done the
rest. I suppose there is now at least fifteen


feet of water at high tide in "Kingsley's
Cut." The same results may reasonably be
expected throughout the entire inland route,
of which this cut would and does form a
part. The St. Johns river, by this arrange-
ment, would be turned through the Sisters,
passing through the cut, and uniting with
Amelia river, would pass by Fernandina
and out into the sea at Cumberland Sound,
where there is a capacious bar of from 16 to
20 feet at all times. What grand results !
What incalculable benefits to the whole St.
Johns river country and peninsular Florida
generally! C. P. COOPER.

FLORIDA THE ITALY OFAMliERICA
We are in receipt of a pamphlet from th1e
Florida Land and Mortgage Company (Lim-
ited), of No. 2 Whitehall Place, London.
The share capital of the company is 745,-
000, in 20,500 preference shares of 10 each,
and 54,000 ordinary shares of 10 each. The
board of directors consists of the Right Hon-
orable Earl of Huntington and sundry other
distinguished people, including B. S. Hen-
ning, Esq., president of the Florida Transit
& Peninsular and Florida Central & West-
ern railroads.
The pamphlet contains copious extracts


REVEfRS AND HARBORS.
The Committee on Commerce has been
r.ilieved of the work of framing a bill for
d arbors, which has been relegated
Si iittee, ca4led the Committee
id Harb Tittee

ilis, of Kerituckvy, Bl ichard
a;. Jones of Alabamia', Gibson of
nia, Rankin of Wisconsih, Breck-
Arkansas, Murphy of Iowa, Sum
^- p alifornia, Houseman of Michigan,
f',,!.' H on of Illinois, Bayne of Pennsyl-
. Vfni9, Robinson of Ohio, Chace of Rhode
Sbland, Stone of Massachusetts, and Bur-
leigh of New York.
Speaker Carlisle seems to have given the
memberships of this committee in most in-
stances to the same states as were represent-
ed in the Committee on Commerce in the
last Congress.
Florida has a sea coast line equal to the
remainder of the United States, on the At-
lantic coast, but has never had a representa-
tion on that committee. We had hoped
that Mr. Davidson would have been placed
on the River and Harbor Committee to rep-
resent the majority, or Mr. Bisbee the mi-
nority.
Th'e-commiitee so far as we can judge is a
T'(;))fair and 'iilelligent committee and we hope
Will gi e Florida the consideration that her
important works deserve.
The Engineer Department have reported
s 'fully.~yl^ favprably-upon these works. The
;Veifttran'hb .-llierlan-d Sound, lying be",
tween stl ates ,.., r ait .FlorIl
now has about 13 feet of Owater only at low.
'tide. It' is the prospective harbor and At-
lantic entrance to the ship canal and the
barge canal reported upon by the govern-
ment engineers. It is the terminus of a
thousand miles of railway communication
through Florida. It can be made a first
class harbor with a depth sufficient for the
largest vessels by the expenditure of less
than two million dollars. It possesses the
only fortified entrance on the Atlantic coast
from Savannah to Key West, a distance of
above 600 miies.
It seems to us that a plain presentation of
these facts, illustrated with charts, would
convince the committee of the importance
of a liberal appropriation as recommended
by the Engineer's Department. Our able
cotemporaries on the St. Johns River and
elsewhere can speak for the respective inter-
ests which we hope will be liberally dealt
with. Millions of money are being expend-
ed in the railroad enterprises of the country.. ,
It is due to Florida that her harbors should,
both on the ground of the demands of com-
merce and for the protection of the seaboard,
be cared for by the general government.

THE PROPER CELEBRATION OF
CHRISTMAS.
Christmas is celebrated by all Christian
people as a great religious festival in honor
and in commemoration of the birth of our
Saviour.
It is presumable that people who live in a
Christian land know what Christmas means,
and why it is celebrated.
What kind of an idea of Christmas are we
to suppose is entertained by a crowd of
*people who get up a band of music, dress
themselves absurdly, and ride up and down
the streets making uncouth noises ? Our
colored population are generally very at-
tentive to religious occasions, and doubtless
feel an interest in the Nativity. Would it
........rio0be more seemly if they were to gather
for religious services and discountenancethe
heathenish style in which their young people
keep Christmas.
To a large portion of the community
Christmas is a religious anniversary of the
highest rank, associated with the greatest
blessing ever conferred on our race. It is
sometimes said by those who do not attach
any importance to it as a religious festival
that the exact day of the Nativity is doubt-
ful, and that therefore it is not incumbent
to celebrate the 25th day of December. On
the other hand, we have the use of the
Ch'ristian world in favor of this day, and we


have the fact that over nine-tenths of all
Christendom, the Oriental, the Roman, the
English and the Church in this country
unite in the celebration of Christmas ; and
even granting that there is a doubt as to the
exact day, the setting apart of some day in
honor of Christ's Nativity will be admitted,
by all who profess themselves as Christians,
to be reverent and proper.
The uncouth noises and barbaric methods
of creating sound are an annoyance to con-
gregations assembled in houses of worship.
The remedy must eme from public opinion,
- --and we hope befo t hern h rr Ch
our cergy denominaons and races
recommending its celebration as a religious
as well as a social festival.

THE INLAND PASSAGE.
The subject of increasing the depth of the
channel of the inland passage between the
St. Marys and the St. Johns rivers is ably
treated in the communication in another
column from the pen of Col. Charles P.
Cooper, of Jacksonville. The subject is an
important one, both to the St. Johns river,
the city of Jacksonville, the 'State and the
general Government. The time seems





Professional and Business Cards.

E. LEROY JONES, M.D.,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN and STUGEON,
Fourth St., between Centre and Alachua,
FPRNANDINA, FLA.


GaROCERIES AND PROVISIONS.


DRUGS, MEDICINES, ETC.

ESJSTABLISH-1ED 1875.


DRUGS and MEDICINES


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.


,q- .


WM. B. C. DURYEE,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANT,
CENTRE ST., NEAR R. R. DEPOT,


Hay, Corn, Oats

W. K. BAUKNIGHT,
AGENT,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
BUTCHER AND STOCK DEALER,
SAND
D aler in Ice
TENNESSEEFBEEF A SPECIALTY,
BROOW STREET WHARF,


-IMILLINERY I-


Department, and in FANCY NOTIONS, the
greatest care and judgment have been exer-
cised in the personal selection that an expe-
rience of many years could suggest.
An especial feature has been made this
year in the

.. ...... .... ........ .......................... ..............

Fancy Department
.............................................................I

Among the numerous articles in Russia
Leather, Plush, etc., displayed, are
/

Elegant Toilet Sets,
Jewelry Stands,
Powder Boxes,
Handkerchief Boxes,
Glove Boxes,
Albums, etc.

As in other years,

*.: .. .... .. .. .. .. ...........** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** .. .
Santa Claus IASE Kings Bazar i:
i ~~MADEi >
....................... ............. ........ ......* ......

The Headquarters for his display of '


TOYS FOR THE LITTLE ONES

Dolls, Parlor and Kitchen Furniture, etc.,
for the Girls;
Rocking Horses and Velocipedes, Express
Wagons, Tool Chests, etc., for the Boys;
Games of all kinds in large variety; and
things too numerous to mention.
AB Call early and examine before the
choicest articles are gone.


LOUIS A. C. LANGE,
PHOLST-ERER,
SADDLE AND HARNESS-MAKER,
Foot of Centre Street,


will retire, and neither urge nor disturb you
more."
"Say on," she whispered.
As for our different faitlhs, I have known
some loving ones get on well and happily
together, tenets notwithstanding. Not to be
frvolous, there is Jessica, the Jewess, and
Lorenzo, the Christian, whom Shakespeare
tells us of; so let that hindrance pass. In
regard though to this betrothed cousin of
yours, has-he-had your love?-that's the
question."
"No; how should be? He is in Costa
Rica, and I have not seen him for fourteen
years-since, indeed, we were big boy and
small girl together. Our intended marriage
is one altogether of convenience-to keep
the money in the family, they say."
HurrahI Three cheers for Manuel de
Castro I May he long remain in Costa Rica,
and his shadow never grow less there I Zil-
lah, darling! Jewess or Moslem, Parsee or
Gentoo, Charley O'Sullivan will have you
for his bride. AdTieu, mia carrissima, viva
sted con Dios, as your good old pater has
taught me to say."
And now my tale draws to its close. As
O'Sullivan, all "nods and becks and wreathed
smiles," came from Buena Esperanza into
Stony Hill Barracks, I met him.
Precious bad news, old fellow," said I.
"I am ordered off to Falmouth, on the other
side of the island, and am going instanter.
Had you remained ten minutes longer study-
ing the Talmud I should not have seen
you."
We shook hands and parted, and such
have been the vicissitudes of our military
lives that we have never met since. But I
know that Charley married the girl he saved
and loved, for one day I read in a Kingston
paper as follows:
By special license of the registrar-gen-
eral, Charles O'Sullivan, R. E., to Zillah,
only child of Don Enrique de Leon," etc.
Whether the young lady was converted to
Christianity, whether O'Sullivan became a
proselyte to Judaism, whether Don Enrique
was induced to accede to the marriage, or
whether the young people were wedded
without it-for
Love is a god,
Strong, free, unbounded, and, as some de-
fine,
Fears nothing, pitieth none;"
or in what manner of way the disappointed
Manuel received his conge, deponent sayeth
not, for he knoweth not.-London Society.

THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT
FUND.
The order of Judge Settle, made a few
days since in the Vose case, and recorded in
the Herald of the same date, in effect restores
to the Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund the management of that great trust.
Under Governor Harrison Reed's admistra-
tration, the then trustees were enjoined
from selling lands of the Fund for anything
but money. Sales were made at nominal
prices, and for coupons, and the injunction
violated. These sales were set aside, and
the Federal Court appointed Mr. Aristides
Doggett receiver of the Sinking Funds,"
and of the net sales of land. The trustees
were attached for contempt for violating the
injunction, and brought before Judge Woods,
and all except one, Col. R. HG. Gamle, re-
rired to give bond. Frtm this attachment
te-others were formally discharged, unless
the order recently made discharges them.
The succeeding trustees, under Governors
Hart, Stearns, Drew and Bloxham, found
the administration of the Fund under the
supervision and control of this court, and
encumbered with the machinery of the suit
which has lasted for over twelve years, and
whose orders required that every claim
should be passed on or litigated before this
court. This supervision and restraint has,
during the administration of Governor Blox-
ham, been gradually relinquished by differ-
ent orders. This last-named'order leaves
pending before the court the several special
matters stated therein, which will be adju-
dicated ; but the general charge and manage-
ment of the trust is remitted to the State
officers constituting the Board of Trustees.
It does not in any wise lessen the responsibil-
ity of their charge, but they are in future to
act undei the laws of the State, as its officers,
and are no longer the agents of the court."
Every good citizen laments the necessity
which existed for the proceedings which
crystalized into judicial decrees against the
Reed Board, and rejoices over the order of
last week and the management which has
secured its rendition. Judge Settle remarked
4n court the day that Attorney-General Rai-
ney made the motion that since coming on
the bench, which was in 1877, he had seen
nothing to' disapprove, but much to com-
mend in the management of the trustees.


LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS.


Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, SHIP STORES,
CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS, HAY, GRAIl,
Corner of Second and Centre Streets, near
Steamboat Landing,
FERNANDINA, FLORIDA.
Owner and Agent for Schooner Silas C.
Evans. Special rates for Merchandise in
large quantities.
Agent for Hazard Manufacturing Compa-
ny's CHAMPION BARBED WIRE-the
best in the world.
Agent for B. F. AVERY'S CELEBRATED
PLOWS.
Local Agent for BANK OF JACKSON-
VILLE. 33

STOVES TIN-WARE ETC.

W. P. STREET,
Second Street, opposite the Post-Office,
FERNANDINA, FLA.


NOTICE.
HE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
School Warrants of Nassau County, are
lost or have miscarried. All persons are
cautioned not to trade for them :


HEAD-NOTES TO DECISIONS
THE SUPREME COURT.


L. W. HIGGINBOTHAM,
Sup't Board Pub. Inst. Nassau Co.
Fernandina, Fla., December 14, 1883.


FURNITURE!


29.


............................................................ *

I CHRISTMAS!
4 ,s.........................................................

18831

For the Holiday Season of 1883-'84,


KING'S BAZAR

ON CENTRE STREET,

Offers a large and most attractive assortment
of handsome and useful arti-


Calls answered promptly day or night, and
Medicine furnished without extra charge.
Office hours :--a. m. until 8; p. m. 1 to'2
and 7 to 8. : --... 22 lyA


-DEALER IN-

Family Supplies,

HEAVY GROCERIES,


Hay and Grain,

;B-SHIP STORES, 4

Furniture,

Stoves,

Paints,
Crockery,

Hardware,

Willow-Ware.


DR


w .


0.

H
^
B

^
tf
0
3D
^
^

s
0
M
0
a'
0


cles, suitable for

Christmas Gifts for Everybody.

-IN THE-


FERNANDINA,


FLA.


HRon's-1y. & CO.".


PHARMACISTS =

,. "Centre Street, ..

FERNANDINA, FLORIDA,

K EEP constantly on hand a fine assort-
Sment of FRESH and PURE FOR-
EIGN and DOMESTIC

Drugs and Chemicals,

Homceopathic and Patent Medicines,

Proprietary and Fancy Goods,

FINE TOILET ARTICLES,

PERFUMERY, SOAPS, ETC.,

IN GREAT VARIETY.


Physicians" Prescriptions
carefully com:po:unei:d With pi;ti#e Dlr-ug t, t
reas,:,natl e prices. ,. ; ., __

-' : ,'s '' '..,^ s





PIKENDALC.


THE MOST SUCCESSFUL REMEDY
ever discovered, as it is certain in its
effects and does not blister. READ PROOF
BELOW.

Saved Him $1,800.00.
ADAMS, N. Y., January 30, 1882.
Dr. B. J. Kendall & Co.:
GENTS-Having used a good deal of your
Kendall's Spavin Cure with great success, I
thought I would let you know what it has
done for me: Two years ago I had as speedy
a colt as was ever raised in Jefferson county.
When I was breaking him he kicked over
the cross-bar and got fast and tore one of his
hind legs all to pieces. I employed the best
farriers, but they all said he was spoiled.
He had a very large thorough-pin, a;nd I "
used two bottles of your Kendall's Spavin
Cure, and it took the bunch entirely off, and
he sold afterwards for $1800 (dollars). I have
used it for bone spavins and wind-galls, and
it has always cured completely and left the
leg smooth.
It is a splendid medicine for rheumatism.
I have recommended it to a good many, and
they all say it does the work. I was in With-
erington & Kneeland's drug store, in Adams,
the other day, and saw a very fine picture
,you sent them. I tried to buy it, but could
not; they said if I would write to you that
you would send me one. I wish you would,
and I will do you all the good I can.
Very respectfully, E. S. LYMAN.


Kendall's Spavin Cure.
ON HUMAN FLESH.
VEVAY, IND., August 12, 1881.
Dr. B. J. Kendall & Co.:
GENTs-Sample of circulars received to-
day. Please send me some with my imprint,
printed on one side only. The Kendall's
Spavin Cure is in excellent demand with us,.
and not only for animals, but for hima^--
,-ailmrrnts alsi/. Mr. (Jos. Voris, one of the
leadingg farmers in our county, sprained an.
ankle badly, and knowing the value of the
remedy for horses, tried it on himself, and it
did'far better than he had expected; cured
the sprain in very short order.
Yours respectfully, C. 0. THIEBAND.
Price $1 per bottle, or 6 bottles for $5. All
druggists have it or can get it for you, or it
will be sent to any address on receipt of
price by the Proprietors, DE. B. J. KEN-
DALL & CO., Enosburgh Falls, Vt.
Send for Illustrated Circular.
Sold by all Druggists.


AgURNANDINA, FLA.


19-tf


TO ARRIVE:
BARRELS POTATOES.
500
500 BARRELS POTATOES.
MUST BE SOLD AT ONCE.
FRED W. HOYT & CO.


FLORIDA.


FERNANDINA,


Furniture repaired in the best manner.
Hair Mattresses made to order at short
notice. 36


JAMES McGIFFIN,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER,

Alachua Street, between Second and Third,
FERNANDINA, FLA.
Orders and estimates from a distance care-
fully attended to. 25-tf


A.,


B. NOYES,
(Successor to W. A. SANBORN),


O0 S. OAKES,


CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER,
MANUFACTURES
DOORS ANif 1'DOW FRAMES
OF ALL SIZES.


Post Office Box 174.
jan4


Fernandina, Fla


Commissioner's Sale.
BY VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF THE
County Court in and for the County of
Nassau, Florida, I will sell to the highest
bidder, in front of the Court-House in the
County of Nassau, Florida, on the first Mon-
day in January, A. D. 1884, the following
real estate belonging to the estate of Nelson
Parker, deceased-sold to pay debts; said
lands situated and lying and being in the
County of Nassau and State of Florida, de-
scribed as follows : That portion of Little
Pine Island known as Section (47) forty-
seven, Township (3) three North, of Range
(28) twenty-eight East, that is contained in
Lots (1) one, one and a half (1), two (2),
three (3), three and a. half (31), six (6), and
seven (7) according to map showing the sub-
divisions of said island, containing 23 77-100
acres, more or less.
Terms cash, purchasJ to pay for titles.
J. A. EDWARDS,
Commissioner.
Fernandina, Fla., December 8, 1883.


No.
19
40
41
42
43
44


In Whose Favor. Date of Issue.
W J. Lee............. Nov. 2, 1883...
Geo. W. Schuyler.. Nov. 17, 1883.
A. B.'Noyes ......... Nov. 17, 1883.
G. Stark............... Nov. 17, 1883.
G. F. Avery.......... Nov. 17, 1883.
James McGiffin..... Nov. 17, 1883.


Am't.
$30 00
15 51
13 03
8 ,25
1 25
22 00


Sheriff'S Sale.
UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF AN
execution issued out of the Circuit Court,
in and for Nassau Couniy, and to me direct-
ed, in a certain suit wherein Riley E. Rob-
inson is plaintiff, and Margaret E. Bristol
and V. R. Bristol, heri husband, and the
Florida Town Improvement Company are
defendants, I have levied upon and will sell,
in front- of the Court-House in the City of
Fernandina, on Monday, the 7th day of
January, A. D. 1884, the following described
property, to-wit: Lots even, twelve, and
thirteen, in Block 150, described in a map of
the City of Fernandina, Nassau County, as
lithographed in 1857.
Terms cash, purchaser paying for titles.
JOHN A. ELLERMANN,
Sheriff Nassau County.
Fernandina, Fla., Decef ber 8. 1883.


STOVES, HEATERS, RANGERS.
TIN AND SHEET-IRON WARE
ROOFING AND GUTTERING,
PUMPS, DRIVEN WELLS, ETC
A large stock of Stoves on hand. Give me
a call, and compare my prices with those of
other houses, here or elsewhere.


OF


JUNE TERM, A. D. 1883.
James P. Coker, Appellant, vs. D. C. Dawkins,
Respondent-Jackson County.
RANDALL, C. J. :
i1. Where a fact alleged 'in a petition or bill
in equity is at issue and is testified to by one
witness only, and an equally credible wit-
ness positively denies the fact of transaction
(he being a party to it), and there is no other
evidence bearing upon the fact alleged, it is
error to find that the fact is proved in favor
of complainant.
2. A bonafide purchaser of property at a-
-sheriffs sale is protected by the presumption
that the judgment of a competent court has
been correctly rendered, and that the execu-
tion in, the hands of the officer has been
regularly issued. He may fairly presume
that the sheriff has acted in the discharge of
official duty according to law.
.(3. At public sales by auction, there being
no fraud or unfairness, as soon as the ham-
mer is struck down the bargain is consid-
ered as concluded, and the seller has no
S right afterward to accept other-bids nor the
buyer to withdraw from the contract.
4. Equity will not set aside a public iale
not tainted with fraud or unfairness, and
upon the sole g round of inadequacy of price.
Property offered for sale by auction is offered
to be sold for what it will bring, and unless
the inadequacy of price is so unconscionable
as to demonstrate some gross imposition or
tunidue influence a court should not annul
the sale.
SDecrees reversed.
J. F. McClellan and J. E. Yonge, for Ap-
pellant; J. T. Bernard and D. L. McKinnon,
for Respondent. .


ATENTS obtained for new inventions:
or for improvements in old
ones. Caveats, Infringements, Trade-Marks
and all patent business promptly attended
to. INVENTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN
REJECTED may still, in most cases, be pat-
ented by us. Being opposite the U. S. Pat-
ent Office, and engaged in PATENT BUSI-
NESS EXCLUSIVELY, we can secure pat-
ents in less time than those who are remote
from Washington.
When Inventors send model or sketch,'
we make search in the Patent Office, and
advise as to its patentability free of charge
Correspondence confidential; fees reason-
able; and NO CHARGE UNLESS PAT-
ENT IS OBTAINED.
< We refer by permission to the City Post-
rlaster, and to he Superin.tident 'of the
la -*'- "- v n1 .TVion in y 1ash- .
ington. For spe oreferen cesfra-r; srr-
vice, terms, etc., address
C. A. SNOW & CO.,
Opp.Patent Office. Washington, D.C. 2t


THE CELEBRATED


MONITOR OIL STOVES

FOR SALE BY
FRED W. HOYT & CO.
".- .. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY,
'^--^---_Esanandina. FIi
H 8 INSTITUTION, UNDER THE
direction of the SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH,
is pleasantly located in one of the healthiest
portions of Florida.
The building, which was erected especially
for a Boarding School,'is large and airy.
The Course of Instruction is thorough and,
solid, comprising, both in English and
French, all the branches of a good educa-
tion. Board, Tuition, Washing, Bed and
Bedding, per quarter, $40.50. Music Les-
sons, with use of Instrument, $12.00.
Plain Sewing and every variety of Fancy
Work taught without additional charge.
Payments required in advance.
Schools will reopen October 1st, 1883.
For further particulars, apply to the Acad-
emy. 42


UST RECEIVED THIS
week, a new lol of

Chamber, Suits,
Parlor Suits,
Tables, Lounges,
Rockers, Chairs,
Wardrobes,
Bedsteads,
Springs, Mattresses,
Pillows, etc., etc.

CALL AND EXAMINE.

FRED W. HOYT 00.O


Commissioner's Sale.
Y VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF THE
B County Court, in and or the County of
Nassau, I will sell tq the l ghest bidder, in
front of the Court-House, in the County of.
Nh1sau, Florida, on the first'iMonday in Jan-
uart A. D. 1884, the following rear'estAut&
bel going to the estate of Andrew 'J. Brad-
doc deceased, sithate ana being in the
cou ty of Nassau, Floridai: that is forty
acret of the Francis Wood grant, in town-
ship/2 north, range 25 east, bounded as fol-
lows: On the east by section 15,,north by
lands of Florida Railroad, and on the west
by main run of Summerlin!s Branch, the
line commencing at the Transit Railroad
one-quarter of a mile from the southeast cor-
ner of the grant; thence north 20 chains to
a stake; thence west 80 chains to run of
of branch; thence the run of branch south-
eat to the railroad; thence along the rail-
road to starting point.
Terms cash. Purchaser to pay for titles.
J. A. EDWARDS,
Commissioner.
Fernandina, Fla., December 4, 1883.


THE FLORIDA MIRROR: DECEMBER


MUMLALAN IITAI


'I 1
E-1


Pr ma Lmi L ie


LU!J


FURNITURE!


PATE NTS
MUNN & CO., of the SCrIENTIo AMEaICAN con-
tinue to act as Solicitors for Patents, Caveats, Trade
Marks, Copyrights, for the United States, Canada,
England, France, Germany, etc. Hand Book about
Patents sent free. Thirty-seven years' experience.
Patents obtained through MUNN & CO. are noticed
In the SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, the largest best, and
most widely circulated scientific paper. (3.20 a year.
Weekly. Splendid engravings and interesting in-
formation. Specimen copy of the Sc entific Amer-
Ican sent free. Address MUNN & CO. SCIENTIFIC
AMERICAN Office, 261 Broadway, New York.


.I I