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 Results
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 Tables






Title: Hybrid field corn variety test results from the Everglades Agricultural Area
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054461/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hybrid field corn variety test results from the Everglades Agricultural Area
Series Title: Bradenton AREC research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station. -- Dept. of Agronomy
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Agricultural Research & Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Agricultural Research & Education Center, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Place of Publication: Bradenton Fla
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Corn -- Varieties -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Issues <1981- > are part of the Agronomy research report series, published by the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, Fla.
Numbering Peculiarities: Some years combined.
General Note: Description based on: 1978/1979; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1982.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054461
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 66260574
lccn - 2006229225

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Experimental procedure
        Page 1
    1978
    Results
        Page 2
    1979
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Tables
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




/oo
P`6361 Agricultural Research & Education Center
6-s5 IFAS, University of Florida
Bradenton, Florida
Bradenton AREC Research Report GC1979-19 December 1979
HYBRID FIELD CORN VARIETY TEST RESULTS FROM
THE EVERGLADES AGRICULTURAL AREA, 1978 and 1979
C. G. Chambliss and Kenneth D. Shuler1

The Everglades Agricultural Area has not been a major corn-grain production area.
Traditionally, sugarcane, various vegetables and pasture have been the important crops.
At the present time, there is interest in growing field corn or other grain crops in
sequence with sugarcane or vegetables. F. M. Pate reported that "Each year in the
Everglades Agricultural Area approximately 80,000 acres of cane land (between replant-
ing) and 50,000 acres of vegetable land (off season) lies fallow from 6 to 14 months
between plantings" (1). Much of the vegetable land may only be fallow for 4 months.
This unused land and portion of the growing season could produce a considerable amount
of corn or other feed for beef cattle. It has also been reported that growers are
presently producing 100 to 150 bushels of corn per acre at a cost of $1.30 to $1.87
per bushel (2). This corn has the potential of being stored and used as high mois-
ture corn (25 to 30 percent moisture) in local feed lots. This system of storage
and use eliminates several energy related costs that are normally involved with pro-
viding beef to the Florida consumer.
In order to determine adaptability and productivity of field corn hybrids for
grain and/or silage production, several hybrids were tested under local conditions
in the spring growing season (Feb-June) of 1978 and 1979. The following report
includes results of these tests with each year reported separately.

Experimental Procedure

The tests were conducted in Palm Beach County on the A. Duda and Sons farm at
Belle Glade. The 1978 test was planted on Pahokee muck, 11.5 miles southeast of
Lake Okeechobee. The 1979 test was planted on Pahokee muck, 8 miles southeast of
Lake Okeechobee. For both years the preceding crop was sugarcane. The experimental
design was a randomized complete block with four replications of 25 different varie-
ties in each year. Plots consisted of three 34-inch wide rows, 21 feet long, with
data taken from the center row. Plots were thinned to a uniform stand at two to
three weeks after planting. All plots were planted and harvested by hand. Rainfall
from planting until harvest as recorded at the Belle Glade AREC was 21.95 inches in
1978 and 11.69 inches in 1979.
1978
1978 HUME LIBRARY-
The test was planted on February 28 and harvested on June 27. Plant populat on
at harvest was 21,000 plants per acre.' JIAN 1 1980

.F.A.S.- Univ. of Florir'r


1Carrol G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomy Specialist, AREC-Bradenton; Kenneth D. Shuler,
County Extension Agent, Vegetable Crops and General Agriculture, Palm Beach County
Cooperative Extension Service. The authors gratefully acknowledge the careful assis-
tance and cooperation of E. S. Horner, Dept. of Agronomy, and F. G. Martin, Dept. of
Statistics, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville; R. J. Allen, Agricultural Research and
Education Center-Belle Glade, Fred Boss, Palm Beach County Extension, and A. Duda
and Sons, Belle Glade.








All other cultural practices (preparing seed bed, fertilization, etc.) were
conducted by A. Duda and Sons. Production materials used were as follows:


Fertilizer -


750 pounds per acre of 0-16-21 with micronutrients broadcast dry.
750 pounds per acre of 4-8-21 with micronutrients broadcast liquid.
33 pounds per acre of 2-9-12 starter fertilizer banded at seeding.
Techmangam (75-78% manganous sulfate), applied in 13 applications
at 2 pounds per acre each application.


Herbicides Atrazine and 11-E oil, 1 pounds and 2 quarts per acre, respectively.

Insecticides 2% Parathion on corn glutin, one application at 50 pounds per
acre for wireworms.

For armyworm and earworm control:
Toxaphene 8-E, 2 applications at 1 pints per acre per application
Lannate L, 10 applications at 1 pint per acre per application
Lannate L, 3 applications at 1 quart per acre per application

Results

In 1978, yields were lower than expected. Grain yield results are given in Table
One with differences between varieties indicated. Cocker hybrid 22 and DeKalb hybrid
XL-78 produced the highest grain yield in 1978, each producing 110.5 bushels per acre.
These yields were not statistically different from those of several other hybrids.
Asgrow RX114 produced the highest forage yield with 6.53 tons of dry matter per acre.
Total forage yields (silage) are given in Table Two.

1979

The test was planted on February 14 and harvested on June 27. Plant population
at harvest was 21,000 plants per acre.
Again, all of the cultural practices except for planting and harvesting were
carried out by A. Duda and Sons.

Production materials used were as follows:

Fertilizer 1500 pounds of 0-16-23 plus minor elements per acre broadcast dry.
Techmangam (75-78% manganous sulfate), 3 applications at 2 pounds
per acre each application.
Herbicide Atrazine, 1 pound per acre, and 11-E oil, 1 quart per acre

Insecticide Parathion, 2% on corn glutin, 50 pounds per acre for wireworms
Toxaphene, 1 quart per acre
Lannate L, 2 applications at 1 pint per acre per application
Lannate L, 1 application at 1 quart per acre
Lannate L plus Lorsban, 1 application at 1 quart each per acre
Fungicide Manzate, 2 applications at 1 pounds per acre per application for
rust.








All other cultural practices (preparing seed bed, fertilization, etc.) were
conducted by A. Duda and Sons. Production materials used were as follows:


Fertilizer -


750 pounds per acre of 0-16-21 with micronutrients broadcast dry.
750 pounds per acre of 4-8-21 with micronutrients broadcast liquid.
33 pounds per acre of 2-9-12 starter fertilizer banded at seeding.
Techmangam (75-78% manganous sulfate), applied in 13 applications
at 2 pounds per acre each application.


Herbicides Atrazine and 11-E oil, 1 pounds and 2 quarts per acre, respectively.

Insecticides 2% Parathion on corn glutin, one application at 50 pounds per
acre for wireworms.

For armyworm and earworm control:
Toxaphene 8-E, 2 applications at 1 pints per acre per application
Lannate L, 10 applications at 1 pint per acre per application
Lannate L, 3 applications at 1 quart per acre per application

Results

In 1978, yields were lower than expected. Grain yield results are given in Table
One with differences between varieties indicated. Cocker hybrid 22 and DeKalb hybrid
XL-78 produced the highest grain yield in 1978, each producing 110.5 bushels per acre.
These yields were not statistically different from those of several other hybrids.
Asgrow RX114 produced the highest forage yield with 6.53 tons of dry matter per acre.
Total forage yields (silage) are given in Table Two.

1979

The test was planted on February 14 and harvested on June 27. Plant population
at harvest was 21,000 plants per acre.
Again, all of the cultural practices except for planting and harvesting were
carried out by A. Duda and Sons.

Production materials used were as follows:

Fertilizer 1500 pounds of 0-16-23 plus minor elements per acre broadcast dry.
Techmangam (75-78% manganous sulfate), 3 applications at 2 pounds
per acre each application.
Herbicide Atrazine, 1 pound per acre, and 11-E oil, 1 quart per acre

Insecticide Parathion, 2% on corn glutin, 50 pounds per acre for wireworms
Toxaphene, 1 quart per acre
Lannate L, 2 applications at 1 pint per acre per application
Lannate L, 1 application at 1 quart per acre
Lannate L plus Lorsban, 1 application at 1 quart each per acre
Fungicide Manzate, 2 applications at 1 pounds per acre per application for
rust.








Results
Overall, grain yields were higher in 1979 than in 1978. Yields ranged from
130 bu. per acre to 185 bu. per acre (Table 3). McNair hybrid S-388, the highest
yielding hybrid, produced 185.2 bushels of grain per acre. See Table 3 for yield
and other data. Silage yield measurements were not taken in 1979. Area producers
are mainly interested in grain yields, and, in general, hybrids producing a high
grain yield will also be best suited to produce high energy silage needed in beef
cattle feed lots. The 1979 results indicate the potential for producing high corn
yields in the Everglades Agricultural Area. Temperate zone hybrids appear to be
well adapted to the Everglades Area and their organic soils. Tropical hybrids do
not seem to have any advantages over the temperate hybrids when grown under the
conditions of this test.
The ability of plants to stand during strong winds should also be considered
when selecting a variety. Varieties differed in percent lodging as indicated by
results given in Table 3. In this test, ears were harvested from all plants whether
lodged or standing erect. With machine harvest some of these ears might have been
lost.


References
1. Pate, F. M. Finishing Beef Cattle in South Florida (1979). Proceedings of 28th
Annual Beef Cattle Short Course, May 2, 3, 4, 1979. Pages 126-128.
2. Alvarez, Jose, and F. M. Pate. The Economics of Growing Field Corn in the Ever-
glades Agricultural Area and of Transporting and Feeding to Beef Cattle. Univ.
of Fla., IFAS, Economic Information Report 102.





-4-


Table 1. Grain yield of commercial corn hybrids grown on muck soil near
Belle Glade, FL, 1978.

Grain yield at
Brand Hybrid 15.5% moisture
Bu/A

Coker 22 110.5 a-
DeKalb XL-78 110.5 a
Pioneer 3368A 105.0 ab
Golden Harvest H-2775 100.1 a-c
IcCurdy 67-14 100.1 a-c
Asgrow RX 114 100.0 a-c
Northrup King PX 715 96.3 a-d
Northrup King PX 95 95.4 a-d
DeKalb XL-80 93.9 a-d
Pioneer X305C2/ 92.3 a-d
Asgrow 58 88.3 a-e
Asgrow RX 60 86.4 a-f
Coker 18 84.9 b-g
McNair S-338 83.4 b-h
McCurdy 75-200 80.3 b-i
Asgrow RX 450A 78.4 c-i
Golden Harvest XC-9045 73.5 d-j
Funk G-5945 71.6 d-j
Coker 77 65.4 e-j
Asgrow RX 132 65.1 e-j
DeKalb XL-395A 63.0 f-j
McNair 508 61.1 g-j
Greenwood 4406 59.0 h-j
DeKalb XL-394 58.0 i-j
Funk G-4810 50.6 j

1/Means followed by the same letter are not significantly different at the
.05 level of probability according to Duncan's multiple range test.
2/Tropical Hybrid









Table 2. Forage yield of commercial corn hybrids grown on muck soil near
Belle Glade, FL, 1978.
Forage yield
Tons/acre
Brand Hybrid (dry matter)

Asgrow RX 114 6.53 al/
Northrup King PX 715 6.35 a
Coker 22 6.14 ab
FcCurdy 75-200 6.10 ab
Golden Harvest H-2775 5.81 a-c
DeKalb XL-78 5.74 a-c
Pioneer X305C 5.66 a-d
Golden Harvest XC-9045 5.64 a-d
Pioneer 3368A 5.64 a-d
DeKalb XL-80 5.60 a-d
Northrup King PX 95 5.59 a-d
McCurdy 67-14 5.18 a-e
Asgrow RX 450A 4.92 b-f
Asgrow 58 4.90 b-f
Funk G-5945 4.86 b-f
McHair S-338 4.79 b-g
Coker 18 4.66 c-g
Asgrow RX 60 4.48 c-g
DeKalb XL-395A 4.30 d-g
McNair 508 4.11 e-g
DeKalb XL-394 3.84 e-g
Coker 77 3.80 f-g
Greenwood 4406 3.78 f-g
Asgrow RX-132 3.73 f-g
Funk G-4810 3.45 g

1/fleans followed by the same letter are not significantly different at the
.05 level of probability according to Duncan's multiple range test.










Table 3. Summary of results for several traits for 25 commercial hybrids grown on
muck soil near Belle Glade, FL, 1979.

Percent Percent Husk
Brand Hybrid Bu/acre @ 15.5% barren stalks lodged stalks-' score3/


McNai r
Pioneer
DeKalb
Northrup King
Pioneer
McNair
Golden Harvest
McCurdy
DeKalb
Pioneer
Asgrow
HcCurdy
Northrup King
Coker
VIcNai r
Pioneer
Coker
Asgrow
Funk
DeKalb
DeKalb
Funk
Pioneer
Asgrow
Pioneer


S-338
3368A
XL395A
PX-95
X5407
508
H2775
67-14
1295
XA730C
RX-450A
75-200
PX-715
16
X-170
X-304C4/
22
RX- 114
G4999-W4/1
XL 78
XL 80
G-4810
X-304A4-
RX-60
3535


185.2
181.8
179.5
176.8
172.5
169.0
168.8
166.5
165.0
164.0
160.0
158.5
155.8
149.5
145.5
144.8
144.5
144.0
141.0
140.5
139.0
137.2
- 13G.8
131.0
129.5


al
ab
ab
a-c
a-d
a-d
a-e
a-e
b-e
b-f
c-g
c-h
d-i
e-j
f-k
g-k
g-k
g-k
g-k
g-k
h-k
i-k
i-k
j-k
k


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.8
0.0
2.6
1.7
1.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
6.0
5.2
2.6
6.9
7.8
5.2
0.0
0.0


31.1
.1.7
27.8
15.4
13.7
22.5
18.6
34.4
33.9
5.9
-43.5
54.2
16.6
8.7
2.5
28.7
12.2
30.1..
35.3
6.8
5.1
18.2
27.1
S19.6
1.7


1l/eans followed by the same letter are not significantly different at the .05 level
of probability according to Duncan's multiple range test.
2/High winds occurred a few days before harvest.
/The husk score was based on a scale from 1 to 9, with 1 being a loose shuck not
covered well over the tip of the ear and 9 being a very tight shuck, covering well
over the tip of the ear.
-/Tropical Hybrids.


5.5
-6.0
6.5
6.0
5.0
7.5
5.5
4.5
7.5
6.0"
7.5
5.0
5.5
5.5
.4.5
8.5
5.5
4.5
4.5
5.0
* 4.0
5.0
6.5
3.0
4.0




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