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 Copyright
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 EREC research facililty
 "Everglades" crawfish production...
 Relationship of main crop growth...
 1991 Rice performance trials (D....
 Effects of foilar applied gibberellic...
 Chemical control of rice seedling...
 Herbicide evaluation trial (J....
 Effect of seeding density on disease...
 Postemergence grass herbicides:...
 The effect of barnyardgrass copetition...
 Evaluation of fungicides for controlling...
 Lacassine: A new rice variety


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Annual rice field day
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054448/00008
 Material Information
Title: Annual rice field day
Series Title: Belle Glade EREC research report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Belle Glade AREC
Belle Glade EREC (Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Agricultural Research and Education Center.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade FL
Creation Date: 1991
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Rice -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Rice -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Rice -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began 1978?
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1991 or 1992.
Issuing Body: Prior to 1984 this was issued by the Agricultural Research and Education Center (Belle Glade, Fla.), which changed its name to the Everglades Research and Education Center.
General Note: Description based on: 4th (1981); title from cover.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 11th (1991).
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 40942624
lccn - 2006229205
System ID: UF00054448:00008
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    EREC research facililty
        Page 1
    "Everglades" crawfish production potential (M. R. Miltner and D. B. Jones)
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Relationship of main crop growth parameters and ratooning ability of rice cultivars (D. B. Jones and S.D. Linscombe)
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    1991 Rice performance trials (D. B. Jones)
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Effects of foilar applied gibberellic acid on main and ratoon crop growth (J. A. Dusky, F. J. Coale, and D. B. Jones)
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Chemical control of rice seedling diseases ( T. J. Schueneman and L. E. Datnoff )
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Herbicide evaluation trial (J. A. Dusky and D. B. Jones)
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Effect of seeding density on disease development and yield of Lemont rice (F. J. Coale and L. E. Datnoff)
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Postemergence grass herbicides: effects of time of flooding on rice yields of two cultivars (J. A. Dusky and D. B. Jones)
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The effect of barnyardgrass copetition in rice (J. A. Dusky and D. B. Jones)
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Evaluation of fungicides for controlling rice diseases (L. E. Datnoff)
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Lacassine: A new rice variety
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




/00-



BELLE GLADE EREC RESEARCH REPORT EV-1991-6


FOURTEENTH ANNUAL

RICE FIELD DAY


/p/,,
<^7c^

L*L~w~"~ Ct/il


EVERGLADES RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE


BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA
JULY 9, 1991






FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
U UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

FOURTEENTH ANNUAL RICE FIELD DAY

JULY 9, 1991

EVERGLADES RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA

Frank J. Coale, Presiding & Editor
Extension Agronomist
STOP # PAGE #

1 "Everglades" Crawfish Production Potential 2
M.R. Miltner and D.B. Jones

2 Relationship of Main Crop Growth Parameters 5
and Ratooning Ability of Rice Cultivars
D.B. Jones and S.D. Linscombe

3 1991 Rice Performance Trials 8
D.B. Jones

4 Effects of Foliar Applied Gibberellic Acid On 11
Main and Ratoon Crop Growth
J.A. Dusky, F.U. Coale, and D.B. Jones

5 Chemical Control of Rice Seedling Diseases 16
T.J. Schueneman and L.E. Datnoff

6 Herbicide Evaluation Trial 18
J.A. Dusky and D.B. Jones

7 Effect of Seeding Density on Disease 22
Development and Yield of Lemont Rice
F.J. Coale and L.E. Datnoff

8 Postemergence Grass Herbicides: Effects of Time 24
of Flooding on Rice Yields of Two Cultivars
J.A. Dusky and D.B. Jones

9 The Effects of Barnyardgrass Competition in Rice 30
J.A. Dusky and D.B. Jones

10 Evaluation of Fungicides For Controlling 34
Rice Diseases
L.E. Datnoff

APPENDIX: RELEASE OF A NEW RICE CULTIVAR: 'LACASSINE' 36

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to Individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.





EREC RICE RESEARCH FACILITY

1


VERY EARLY 8E
VARIETY TRIAL/
RATOON PHENOL.
7E
ARLY-MIDSEASO
VARIETY TRIAL
6E
RATOON
PHENOLOGY
5E
ADV. SELECTIONS
1988 & 1989 URN
4E
SELECTIONS
1990 URN
3E
UNIFORM RICE
NURSERY
2E
UNIFORM RICE
NURSERY

GERMPLASM 1E
EVALUATION


N


BW
FOLIAR GA/
GA RATOON
7W
SEED
TREATMENT
SW
HERBICIDE
TRIAL
5W
SEEDING
DENSITY
4W
POST GRASS
HERBICIDE
3W
BARNYARDGRASS
COMPETITION
2W
FUNGICIDE
TRIAL
1W
FALLOW







"EVERGLADES" CRAWFISH PRODUCTION POTENTIAL


Michael R. Miltner, Aquaculture Biologist, FGFWFC
David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist

Crawfish (Procambarus spp.) are commonly grown in rotation
with rice in Louisiana. There has been some interest in attempting
to produce rice and crawfish in the EAA. One of the initial
difficulties encountered with this system in South Florida was that
the species of crawfish utilized in Louisiana (the red swamp
crawfish) is a non-native species in South Florida, and thus cannot
be introduced in this area without first determining if it will not
interfere with existing species. Since this would require
considerable time and money to develop this information, it was
decided to first attempt to study the potential for commercial use
of a native species (dubbed the "Everglades" crawfish). The
objectives of this study is to evaluate the production potential of
the Everglades crawfish.

Rice (cv. Mars) was established in two one acre plots at EREC
in May. Approximately 85 lbs. of crawfish were seeded into each
plot in June. The rice will be managed as a "typical" rice crop
with the exception of holding a flood of 8-10 in. The flood will
then be drawn down for harvest and the ratoon allowed to regrow for
approximately one month before it is flooded. The flood will be
held at 15-20 in. in the ratoon crop, and the ratoon will not be
harvested. Harvesting of the crawfish with baited traps will begin
in December and continue until the end of March, at which time the
field will be drained and prepared for rice planting, beginning the
cycle once again.












Proposed Experimental Rice/Crawfish Management Schedule
EREC Facility, Belle Glade
FY 1991-92

1991


ACTIVITY APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

Plot prep 'x x

Plant rice (Mars) x x

Plot flood x x x x x xxx
(to 8-10")

Stock crawfish x x x x
(Broodstock)

Hold "deep flood" x x xx x
(min 12")

Drawdown x x x x x x
(rice harvest)

Ratoon regrowth x xxxx xxx

Plot reflood x x x x x x x
(8-10")

J Hatchling emergence x xxxx xx xx
(Monitoring)

Water quality x x xxx xxxx xxx x
monitoring
(maintenance = plot
flushing)

"Deep" flood xx x x x x x
(15"-20")


Crawfish growth xx x x x x x x
(monitor)


Crawfish harvest x x'x x
(baited trap)

Plot drawdown
a a a a a a a


-------- t- r


1992



SJANi IEB MAR APR
ai a


a a aI a
a a I I
a a a
a a a a
a
a ~ a 4
a a a
a I
a a a
a a a

a I a a

a a a a I
a a a I I

i 4 a

a I a a
a a I a

a I4
ai I a

a 4 4 a I

a aI a

a I S a
a XXXX'a XX ai : L
a a I a


a XXXX4 jIX a XXX IlIXa

I 4
a a a
* a a a
* a
a a aai



I a 4
aI a


a I


I a I 4
a a
a a a






EREC CRAWFISH TRIAL, 1991


CULVERTFLOAT SWI CH

\ .. .. ,/.....DITCH


AERATION


C


DITCH o X
DIKE

f- 183 ft -

i t
1.07 A

U U
X Z DIKE


"--183 ft
DI
04


DIfK
DIKE


ROAD
TT7--


3REEN


-NLET PIPE





N







RELATIONSHIP OF MAIN CROP GROWTH PARAMETERS AND RATOONING ABILITY
OF RICE CULTIVARS

David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist
Steven D. Linscombe, Rice Breeder, LSU Rice Research station

Ratoon, or second, cropping of rice is the practice of raising
an additional crop of rice from the regrowth of the stubble of the
harvested first crop. Although the process of ratooning is not
well understood, it has been known for some time that rice
cultivars vary in their ability to ratoon or produce regrowth from
the remaining main crop straw. Therefore, the selection of a
proper cultivar is an important part of producing a successful
ratoon crop.

Although ratooning has been commercially practiced in the
United Satats since the 1960's, little research has been performed
on the ratoon crop. Over the past few years, several studies have
investigated management practices for the ratoon crop. Yet even
under optimum management, a cultivar that produces inferior ratoons
will not produce a satisfactory ratoon yield. Therefore, there
remains the need to genetically improve the ability of U.S. rice
cultivars to produce ratoons. One of the first steps in this
improvement process is the development of selection criteria for
superior ratooning ability. Once a satisfactory criteria is
determined, rice breeders will be able to screen large numbers of
breeding lines for ratooning ability, which in turn should allow
the development of rice cultivars with superior ratooning ability.

The objective of this study is to measure several agronomic
traits in both the main and ratoon crops of several rice cultivars
in an effort to identify main crop characters which might be used
as a selection criteria for improved ratooning ability by rice
breeders.

Eleven and 13 rice cultivars in the very early and early
maturity groups, respectively, will be evaluated at EREC in 1991.
This study is the continuation of a study begun in 1990 at the LSU
Rice Research Station, at Crowley, LA. It is also being duplicated
at Crowley in 1991.








1991 VERY EARLY RATOON PHENOLOGY
EREC FIELD 8E
B B B B B

B 1 1 1 1 1 VERY
EARLY
RPT


MAIN CROP

PLOT SIZE:
PLANTED :
FLUSHED :



HERBICIDE:
DATE:
RATE:
FLOOD
DRAIN
HARVEST
DATE
SIZE :


1.2 X 5.0M
4/10 B
1. RAIN, 4/25
2.
3.
4. B
PROP,BOLERO
4/16, 5/2


5/2


RATOON CROP

MOW
FLUSH
FLOOD
DRAIN
HARVEST
DATE
SIZE


ALAN
AS 3510
BOND
L202
LBLE
RSMT
MBLE
RT 7015
SKBT
TBNT
TXMT


B B B B B
I II III IV V


6/5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
7/1
3
5
7
9


11 7 2 7 6



10 9 7 4 2



9 3 10 5 1



8 10 8 11 4



7 2 3 9 3



6 8 11 6 11



5 1 4 10 8



4 5 6 1 10



3 6 1 2 9



2 11 9 8 5









cv
LCSN
GFMT
GCHW
JSMN
KATY
LBNT
LMNT
MARS
MERC
NWBT
RICO
2207
2214


MAIN CROP

PLOT SIZE:
PLANTED :
FLUSHED :



HERBICIDE:
DATE:
RATE:
FLOOD
DRAIN
HARVEST
DATE
SIZE :


1991 EARLY RATOON PENOLOGY EREC


1.2 X 6.0 M

1.
2.
3.
4.


RATOON CROP

MOW
FLUSH
FLOOD
DRAIN
HARVEST
DATE
SIZE


13 6 9 8 8



12 9 13 12 4



11 2 2 4 3



10 1 10 11 6



9 7 11 5 12



8 10 5 1 7



7 13 12 3 13



6 8 1 10 11



5 4 4 9 5



4 5 8 2 1



3 11 7 6 9



2 3 6 7 2



1 12 3 13 10







1991 RICE PERFORMANCE TRIALS


David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist

The objective of rice performance trials is to determine
which rice cultivars are best adapted to local growing
conditions. Information, such as seedling Vigor, plant
height, disease resistance, maturity, grain yield and
ratooning ability is gathered to evaluate a cultivar's
suitability for production in the EAA.

In 1991, 29 entries are being evaluated in two maturity
groups at the EREC Rice Research Facility. Entries were
planted on April 10 in plots 1.2 x 6.0 m at a seeding rate of
100 kg/ha (90 lbs/ac). The very early maturity group (VERPT)
has 12 entire comprised of 9 cultivars, 2 advanced
experimental lines, and 1 URN selection. The early-midseason
maturity group (MERPT) has 17 entries consisting of 14
cultivars and 3 advanced experimental lines.








1991 VERY EARLY MATURITY RICE PERFORMANCE TRIAL
EREC FIELD 8E
B B B B B


AL
JKSl
LBLE
MBLE
MIL
RSM
SKBT
TBN
TXMT
TX72
88-V0
1176


MAIN CROPq
PLANT: 4/10/91
EMERG: 4/15
FLUSH: I
1. RAIN, /25
2.


3.
HERB :
DATE:
RATE:
FLOOD:
DRAIN:
HVST :


PROP BOLERO
4/16, 5/2

5/2


RATOON CROP
MOW :
FLOOD:
DRAIN:
HVST :


RATOON 111 31 31 7 10
PHENOLOGY II II II II


2 11 6 6 2



3 5 7 2 9



4 4 8 9 1



5 8 4 10 5



6 10 1 3 11



7 12 5 1 12



8 1 11 5 7



9 2 10 11 6



10 9 2 4 3



11 6 12 12 4



12 7 9 8 8


B B B B B
I II III IV V


B
6/5 =
7=
9
B 11=
13=
15=
17=
B 19=
21=
23=
25=
B 27=
29=
7/1 =
3 =
B 5 =
7 =
9 =













ID
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24


DLLA
DLMT
GFMT
KATY
LCSN
LMNT
MARS
NWBT
ORIN
RICO
TX46
8027
8070
8149
8185
9061
9063
9072
9082
9143
9162
2207
2214
LMNT


1991 EARLY MATURITY RICE PERFORMANCE TRIAL
EREC



12 24 2 10 6 9 3 16 2 11



11 23 8 20 18 11 13 8 19 6



10 22 12 15 12 20 14 22 7 22



9 21 1 3 21 14 11 10 24 8



8 20 21 13 15 13 4 19 13 4



7 19 14 9 10 5 12 7 3 1



6 18 5 19 1 16 6 2 18 5



5 17 6 24 23 4 18 21 20 14



4 16 16 7 22 19 1 15 9 12



3 15 11 17 2 17 9 20 16 21



2 14 18 23 8 7 5 23 15 23



1 13 4 22 3 24 17 24 10 17



I II III IV V


PLANT:
EMERG:
FLUSH:
1.
2.
3.
FLOOD:
HVST :








EFFECTS OF FOLIAR APPLIED GIBBERELLIC ACID ON
MAIN AND RATOON CROP GROWTH


Joan A. Dusky, Weed Scientist
Frank J. Coale, Extension Agronomist
David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist

pU)arh was inititod4 4ist year to determine the effects of
foliar applied gibberellic acid applications Qp main crop and
ratoon crop development. Studies are again being conducted to
evaluate the feasibility of the use of gibberellic acid during
main crop development which may alter ratoon crop growth to
provide a more uniform rate of ratoon crop development.
Gibberellic acid at rates of 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 g ai/A are being
applied at panicle initiation, 10% heading, 100% heading, 30%
grain moisture and to the stubble immediately after main crop
harvest. Grain yields and grain yield components will be
determined of both the main and ratoon crops.
The application at panicle initiation was made on June 7,
1991 using a back-pack sprayer. Three days after application
there was a visible increase in plant height in the treated
plots. Subsamples were removed from each of the treated plots
and plant height, total internode length, length of the longest
internode, number of internodes, and number of the longest
internode was determined. Plant heights were also determined 10
and 14 days after application. As gibberellic rate increased
there was an increase in plant height, and total internode
length. The longest internode was almost always the second
internode and there was no increase in the number of internodes.







University of Florida
GA EFFECTS ON RICE RATOON GROWTH
Project Code:108-91 Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
Cooperator :FRANK COALE By:Joan Dusky

All rates are specified as gm ai/A

Trt Treatment Form Fm Grow Appl
No Name Amt Ds Rate Stg Code

1 CHECK PI A

2 GA .268 EC 2.0 PI A-

3 GA .268 EC 4.0 PI A

4 GA .268 EC 6.0 PI A

5 GA .268 EC 8.0 PI A

6 CHECK 10%HD B

7 GA .268 EC 2.0 10%HD B

8 GA .268 EC 4.0 10%HD B

9 GA .268 EC 6.0 10%HD B

10 GA .268 EC 8.0 10%HD B

11 CHECK 100%HD C

12 GA .268 EC 2.0 100%HD C

13 GA .268 EC 4.0 100%HD C

14 GA .268 EC 6.0 100%HD C

15 GA .268 EC 8.0 100%HD C

16 CHECK 30%GM D

17 GA .268 EC 2.0 30%GM D

18 GA .268 EC 4.0 30%GM D

19 GA .268 EC 6.0 30%GM D

20 GA .268 EC 8.0 30%GM D

21 CHECK STUBL E

22 GA .268 EC 2.0 STUBL E

23 GA .268 EC 4.0 STUBL E

24 GA .268 EC 6.0 STUBL E

25 GA .268 EC 8.0 STUBL E

12










GA EFFECTS ON MAIN CROP AND RATOON GROWTH


18 25 10 17 21 10 13 17 19 6
5 7 9 19 2 1 18 5 9 24
19 4 25 23 15 6 17 18 11 25

24 14 22 6 1 22 15 23 20 16

13 22 20 12 4 7 25 1 8 13

6 1 23 3 8 23 24 19 3 4

2 3 16 13 16 2 16 4 21 12
10 12 20 18 7 8 9 11 14 10

21 8 11 14 5 5 3 14 22 7

9 15 17 11 24 20 21 12 15 2


KREP I


REP II


REP III


REP IV






University of Florida
GA EFFECTS ON RICE RATOON GROWTH
Project Code:108791 Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
Cooperator :FRANK COALE By:Joan Dusky


Site Description
Crop: RICE Variety: LEMONT
.Planting Method: DRY-SEEDED Rate, Unit: 72 G PLOT
Perennial Age, Unit: Row Spacing, Unit: 8
Soil Temp., Unit: Soil Moisture: GOOD


Planting Date: 04-16-91
Depth, Unit: .075, IN
, IN
Emergence Date:


Plot Width/Area, Unit: 1.2 M Plot' Length, Unit: 6 M Reps: 4
Site Type: MUCK SOIL Seed Bed Desc.: GOOD Ground Cover: 0%
Tillage Type: COMMON CULTURAL Study Design: RCB
Field Preparation/Plot Maintenance: ROTOTILLED, LASER-PLANED, ROTOTILLED,
ROLLED, SEEDED, ROLLED, FLUSHED.


Texture: ORGANIC
pH: CEC:


Moisture On: Date


Soil Description
% OM: % Sand:
Soil Name:

Moisture Conditions
Amount Unit Type


% Silt:
Fertility Level:


Date Amount Unit


% Clay:


Type


1. 2.
3. 4.
5. 6.
7. 8.
Overall Moisture Conditions: GOOD


Application Date:
Time of Day:
Application Method:
Application Timing:
Air Temp., Unit:
% Relative Humidity:
Wind Velocity, Unit:
Dew Presence (Y/N):
Water Hardness:
Soil Temp., Unit:
Soil Moisture:
% Cloud Cover:

'Weed Species Weed
RICE


Sprayer
Type
A. CO2 BACK-PACK
B.


C.
D.


Application Information
B C


06-07-91
9:00 AM
BROADCAST
PI
82 ,F
90
0 ,MPH
Y


S


E





,


F




ir



r
r
__ _








r
__ i


__ i _


83 ,F _
FLOODED
20

tage, Density at Application
PI ,
S___ ___ ___ _________ ___ ______ ________

____________ ___________ I _____ __________


Application Equipment
Speed Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Boom
MPH Type Size Height Spacing Width GPA Carrier PSI
70 FLAT-FAN 8001 20 IN 20 IN 6 FT 17.1 WATER 20


~


r


r r

r r


~ _-- ~ --- --- -- ~ _









Summary Comments: SPEED IS METRONOME SETTING. BOOM IS HELD HIGH ENOUGH ABOVE
THE PLANT CANOPY TO ENSURE COMPLETE COVERAGE.
06-07-91 A NON-IONIC SURFACTANT PENETRATORR) WAS ADDED TO ALL THE SPRAYS AT
0.25% (V/V).











CHEMICAL CONTROL OF RICE SEEDLING DISEASES 1991


Thomas J. Schueneman, PBCo Extension Agent
Lawrence E. Datnoff, EREC Plant Pathologist

Seed-rot and damping-off diseases are common in all rice
production areas and can cause serious stand reductions with
resultant yield losses. Theoretically, seed and seedling diseases
of rice can be economically controlled by seed treatment fungic-
ides. A cooperative program to develop more effective fungicidal
seed treatments is being conducted at experiment stations in
Florida, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Fungicides
or formulations of fungicides are screened in experimental test
plots at each station. Promising results are expanded to coopera-
tive field tests in subsequent years.

Experimental Design: Randomized Complete Block
Treatments: 16
Replications: 5
Planting Date: April 16, 1991
Plot Size: 6 meters X 1.2 meters (6 rows, 18cm apart)
Seeding Density: 72 grams per plot
Variety: Lemont


TREATMENT
NUMBER


TREATMENT


RATE/100 LB


Control
Dithane DF75
Benlate DF
Thiram 42S +
GUS PP 17
Apron-TBZ
Vitavax 200
Thiram 42S
ART
(Apron-Rovral-TBZ)
LOV 80240A
Champ SD
Champion SD
CGA 173506
WECO 389
WECO 389 +
Apron TL
Nusan 30
Nusan 30 +
Vitavax 200


4.3 oz
4.0 oz
3.3 oz
0.4 oz
0.16 oz
4.0 oz
3.3 oz
0.2 oz

91.0 ml
6.0 oz
6.0 oz
6.8 g
5.0 oz
5.0 oz
2.0 oz
1.25
1.0 oz
2.0 oz


Rohm & Haas
DuPont
Gustafson

Gustafson
Gustafson
Gustafson
Gustafson

Loveland
Agtrol
Agtrol
Ciba-Geigy
Wilber-Ellis
Wilber-Ellis

Wilber-Ellis
Wilber-Ellis


COMPANY











Chemical Control of Rice Seedling Diseases, 1991 (Cont.)


PLOT PLAN


----- NORTH


-" 1 ----- .- ---U~


I I
12


III
6


III
7


IV
9


I II II III III IV IV V
15 13 1 4 5 1 13 9


I II II III III IV IV V
14 3 6 15 8 6 3 16


I II II III III IV IV V
13 8 14 12 2 14 8 1


I I II III III IV V V
12 1 11 1 II 11 14 12


I I II III III IV V V
11 2 15 16 3 15 10 15


I I II III III IV V V
10 3 7 9 10 7 3 4


I I II III III IV V V
9 4 10 13 1.4 10 11 6


I I II II IV IV V V
8 5 5 4 4 5 2 7


II
16


Planting Date: April 16, 1991
Plot Size: 6 meters X 1.2 meters


IV
2








HERBICIDE EVALUATION TRIAL


Joan A. Dusky, Weed Scientist
David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist


Observational herbicide evaluation trials are being
conducted to assess efficacy and rice tolerance to several
herbicides and herbicide combinations. 'Gulfmont' and 'Lebonnet'
rice were seeded at a rate of 100 lb/A on May 13, 1991.
Herbicide applications were made on June 7, 1991 using a back-
pack sprayer when the rice and the weeds were in the 4-5 leaf
stage. Major weed species were dayflower, annual sedge, and
barnyardgrass which had been seeded into the plots. Herbicides
being evaluated are Stam, Basagran, Cobra, Ordram, and Arrosolo
at several rates and in several different combinations.







7-1-91 (RICE111.DAT)



Project Code:107-91


Cooperator


:DAVE JONES


TOUR SHEETS
University of Florida
RICE HERBICIDE STUDY
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
By:Joan Dusky


ALL


Trt
No

1

2

3

4

5


6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14
14

15
15

16
16

17
17

18
18

19
19

20


-=r~-IrP= Z=-------LLD~-----=-" =


Form Fm
Amt Ds Rate
:asC=Js=D:=!!r-SC:s!s^aa;


Treatment
Name

CHECK

PROPANAIL

PROPANAIL

PROPANAIL

BASAGRAN

COBRA

COBRA

ORDRAM

ORDRAM

ORDRAM

ARROSOLO

ARROSOLO

ARROSOLO

PROPANIL
BASAGRAN

PROPANIL
BASAGRAN

PROPANIL
ORDRAM

PROPANIL
ORDRAM

PROPANIL
ORDRAM

PROPANIL
ORDRAM


CHECK


4.0 EC 1.5

4.0 EC 1.5

4.0 EC 3.0

4.0 EC 0.75

2.0 EC 0.2

2.0 EC 0.4

8.0 EC 1.5

8.0 EC 3.0

8.0 EC 6.0

3.0 EC 2.0

3.0 EC 3.0

3.0 EC 4.0

4.0 EC 1.5
4.0 EC 0.75

4.0 EC 3.0
4.0 EC 0.75

4.0 EC 1.5
8.0 EC 1.5

4.0 EC 1.5
8.0 EC 3.0

4.0 EC 1.5
8.0 EC 6.0

4.0 EC 3.0
8.0 EC 3,0


rates are tb a

Grow App
Stg Code




POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A


POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A

POST A
POST A

POST A
POST A

POST A
POST A

POST A
POST A

POST A
POST A

POST A
POST A
POST A


i/A

PLot No. By Rep
1 2 3 4 5

101 206 317 419 510

102 207 313 416 511'

103 209 304 406 509

104 215 303 404 516

105 201 305 402 513


106 212 312 412 514

107 202 309 401 520

108 213 310 414 519

109 217 319 417 515

110 220 311 418 506

111 211 307 403 508

112 210 318 410 518

113 216 301 415 503

114 208 302 420 504



115 219 308 407 517



116 218 314 411 501



117 214 320 408 505



118 204 316 405 502



119 205 306 409 507



120 203 315 413 512


Notes
;:rSi!S-i


-----~-~-------~


______________________


-


- I"-------~------~-~---L-~"- I



~- -~--II---------



I _. _~___



- -----











HERBICIDE TRIAL


RE' III .


,n


10 20 15 10 17 16 16 13 6 18

9 19 20 14 4 7 11 9 13 16

8 18 9 1 5 13 7 8 11 3

7 17 18 5 15 12 5 4 10 19

6 16 7 11 18 14 17 20 7 17

5 15 8 16 1 6 2 1 20 12

4 14 19 2 11 3 10 14 2 8

3 13 4 12 8 2 19 6 14 9

2 12 13 6 19 10 15 3 1 5

1 11 17 3 9 20 12 18 15 4
DE n RE r r, ,-


l Ia.


REP IVV


REP V


JkVLr J-






7-1-91 (RICE111.DC


Project Code:107-9
Cooperator :DAVE



- Crop: RICE
Planting Method: S
Perennial Age, Uni
.Soil Temp., Unit:


)i

>1
JONES


SITE DESC.
University of Florida
RICE HERBICIDE STUDY
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
By:Joan Dusky


Site Description
Variety: LEBONNET & GULFMONT Planting Date: 05-13-91
;EEDED Rate, Unit: 72 G PLOT Depth, Unit: 0.75, IN
t: Row Spacing, Unit: 8 IN
Soil Moisture: GOOD Emergence Date:


Plot Width/Area, Unit: 1.5 M Plot Length, Unit: 6 M Reps: 5
Site Type: Seed Bed Desc.: GOOD Ground Cover: 0%
Tillage Type: COMMON Study Design: RCB
Field Preparation/Plot Maintenance:


Texture: ORGANIC
pH: CEC: -


Soil Description
% OM: % Sand:
Soil Name:


% Silt:
Fertility Level:


Moisture Conditions
Moisture On: Date Amount Unit Type Date Amount Unit Type
1. 2.
3. 4.
.5. 6.
7. 8.
Overall Moisture Conditions:


Application Date:
Time of Day:
Application Method:
Application Timing:
Air Temp., Unit:
% Relative Humidity:
Wind Velocity, Unit:
Dew Presence (Y/N):
Water Hardness:
Soil Temp., Unit:
Soil Moisture:
% Cloud Cover:

Weed Species Weed
RICE
BARNYARDGRASS
DAYFLOWER
ANNUAL SEDGE


App
A
06-07-91
8:00 AM
BROADCAST
POST
82 ,F
90
0 ,MPH
Y


location Information
B C


82 ,F __,
WET
5

Stage, Density at Application
4LF ,_ ___, _
4LF ,L-MO ,
4 IN,MOD ___, ,_
4 IN,M-H ___ ,
-.,,,-- __ ._ ___i _______ ______, ______


I _





___ ___I


Sprayer
Type
A. C02 BACKPACK
B.


C.
D.


Application Equipment
Speed Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Boom
MPH Type Size Height Spacing Width GPA Carrier PSI
106 FLAT-FAN 11004 12 IN 20 IN 6 FT 31.8 WATER 30


71


% Clay:


r


r__ r

r








EFFECT OF SEEDING DENSITY ON DISEASE
DEVELOPMENT AND YIELD OF LEMONT RICE


Frank J. Coale, Extension Agronomist
Lawrence E. Datnoff, Plant Pathologist


The grain yield of rice is dependent on several inter-
related yield components. The major yield components are the
number of panicles per unit area, the number of rice grains
produced in each panicle, and the weight of each individual
grain. Past research has shown that the rice plant is capable of
altering the balance among these yield components in response to
environmental and cultural conditions. For example, research in
the EAA demonstrated that drill-seeded rice planted at 50, 100,
and 150 kg seed/ha did not produce different yields. Plants
growing in a high density population produced more panicles per
unit area but the panicles had decreased filled grain number per
panicle. Plants in a low density population produced fewer
panicles per unit area but each panicle produced more grain. The
net result was no yield differences among seeding rates.
Currently, we do not know the impact of seeding density and the
resulting differences in the crop canopy on disease development.

In this experiment, 'Lemont' rice was drill-seeded on 8 May
1991 in 20-cm rows at 10 seeding rates: 25, 50, 75, 100, 125,
150, 175, 200, 225, and 250 kg seed/ha. Brown spot, sheath
blight, and blast disease ratings will be performed periodically
during crop development. Plant leaf samples will be collected at
panicle initiation and heading to assess plant nutritional
status. Yield components will be determined at maturity.







SEEDING DENSITY STUDY 1991


VARIETY: LEMON F
SEEDING RATE: kg/ha


PLANTINGG DATE: 5/8/91


250


250


100


150


50


200


75


50


225 100 250 125 200 250 200 225


200 25 75 225 175 175 100 175


175 75 25 250 75 150 225 25


150200 50 200225 75 250125


125 50 175 25 150 225175250


100 125 150 175 100 125 150 100


75 175225 75 25 100125150


50 10 125 50 125 50 25 75


25


225120011001250


25


50


I A. A. I I I


200


0
UJ
I-







0
O
O






0P


01

0


.:E
UL)
cm
z
0

-j
cc







0
0


0
O
cn


I-.
w
z
O


0
swao
0
cc


o0wa%
Cm





z
0
2


-I
O




m
0

I:1:


I I








POSTEMERGENCE GRASS HERBICIDES: EFFECTS OF TIME OF FLOODING ON
RICE YIELDS OF TWO CULTIVARS

Joan A. Dusky, Weed Scientist
David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist

Interest has been indicated in the registration of a
postemergence grass herbicide in rice. However, one of the main
concerns has been the influence and timing of flooding on the
phytotoxicity of the compounds and-their influence on yields.
'Gulfmont' and 'Lebonnet' rice were planted on May 13, 1991 at a
rate of 100 lb/A. The postemergence grass herbicide Poast
(sethoxydim) was applied using a back-pack sprayer 1, 2, 3, 4,
and 7 days before flooding. At harvest rice yields and grain
component analysis will be determined. Past research has
indicated that the degree of phytotoxicity, thus loss of yield,
is greatest when the herbicide is applied just before flooding.






7-1-91 (RICE112.DAT) TOUR SHEETS
University of Florida
POSTEMERGENCE GRASS HERBICIDES & TIME OF FLOODING
Project Code:112-91 Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
Cooperator : By:Joan Dusky

ALL rates are Ib ai/A

.Trt Treatment Form Fm Grow Appt PLot No. By Rep
No Name Amt Ds Rate Stg Code 1 2 3 4 5 Notes

1 GULFMONT 101 213 303 403 501
1 CHECK

2 GULFMONT 102 218 308 401 505
2 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 7DBFF A

3 GULFMONT 103 211 305 404 507
3 PAST 1.5 EC 0.1 4DBFF B

4 GULFMONT 104 214 306 410 503
4 PAST 1.5 EC 0.1 3DBFF C

5 GULFMONT 105 212 301 409 504
5 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 2DBFF D

6 GULFMONT 106 220 310 408 510
6 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 1DBFF E

7 GULFMONT 107 219 302 406 509
7 PAST 1.5 EC 0.1 SFLOD F

8 GULFMONT 108 216 309 405 508
8 SELECT 0.94 EC 0.075 2DBFF D

9 GULFMONT 109 217 307 402 502
9 SELECT 0.94 EC 0.075 1DBFF E

10 GULFMONT 110 215 304 407 506
10 SELECT 0.94 EC 0.075 SFLOD F

11 LEBONNET 111 204 318 414 519
11 CHECK

12 LEBONNET 112 206 320 412 514
12 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 7DBFF A

13 LEBONNET 113 202 315 413 512
13 PAST 1.5 EC 0.1 4DBFF B

14 LEBONNET 114 208 312 416 515
14 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 3DBFF C

15 LEBONNET 115 210 313 411 513
15 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 2DBFF D

16 LEBONNET 116 201 317 419 511
16 POAST 1.5 EC 0.1 1DBFF E







7-1-91 (RICE112.DAT) TOUR SHEETS
University of Florida
POSTEMERGENCE GRASS HERBICIDES & TIME OF FLOODING
Project Code:112-91 Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
Cooperator : By:Joan Dusky


ALl rates are Ib

Form Fm Grow Appt
Amt Ds Rate Stg Code



1.5 EC 0.1 8FLOD F



0.94 EC 0.075 208FF 0



0.94 EC 0.075 10DFF E



0.94 EC 0.075 @FLOO F


ai/A


Plot No. By Rep
1 2 3

117 203 319



118 207 316



119 209 314



120 205 311


4 5 Notes

417 516



420 517



415 520



418 518


:2=3=;


Trt
No
17
17

17

18

18

19
19

20
20


Treatment
Name

LEBONNET
PAST

LEBONNET
SELECT


L.EBONNET
SELECT

LEBONNET
SELECT


SI== ====~iir --I==^=35r ==r~~~~J -


7.


i


-II--~- -" -











POSTEMERGENCE GRASS HERBICIDES & TIME OF FLOOD


10 20 15 6 6 12 4 18 6 19

9 19 19 7 8 17 5 16 7 11

8 18 18 2 2 11 6 20 8 20

7 17 14 9 9 16 10 17 3 18

6 16 12 8 4 18 7 14 10 17

5 15 20 10 3 13 8 19 2 14

4 14 11 4 10 19 3 11 5 12

3 13 17 1 1 15 1 12 4 15

2 12 13 5 7 14 9 13 9 13

1 11 16 3 5 20 2 15 1 16
iThrn ~t tl=rm--- = -- _


GT. L" IJDLILT4
REP I


JLBN a jFVIT
REP II


jF'IMT LbNT'
REP III


GFMT LBNT
REP IV


GFMT LBNT
REP V







University of Florida
POSTEMERGENCE GRASS HERBICIDES & TIME OF FLOODING
Project Code:112-91 Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
Cooperator : By:Joan Dusky


Site Description
.Crop: RICE Variety: GFMT, LBNT
Planting Method: DIRECT Rate, Unit: 72 G PLOT
Perennial Age, Unit: Row Spacing, Unit: 8
Soil Temp., Unit: Soil Moisture:


Planting Date: 05-13-91
Depth, Unit: 1 IN
, IN
Emergence Date:


Plot Width/Area, Unit: 6 FT Plot Length, Unit: 20 FT Reps: 5
Site Type: Seed Bed Desc.: GOOD Ground Cover: 0%
Tillage Type: COMMON Study Design: Split-Plot
Field Preparation/Plot Maintenance:


Texture: ORGANIC
pH: CEC:


Moisture On: Date


Soil Description
% OM: % Sand:
Soil Name:

Moisture Conditions
Amount Unit Type


1.
3.
5.
7.
Overall Moisture ConditTons:


% Silt: % Clay:
Fertility Level:


Date Amount Unit


Type


Application Date:
Time of Day:
Application Method:
Application Timing:
Air Temp., Unit:
% Relative Humidity:
Wind Velocity, Unit:
Dew Presence (Y/N):
Water Hardness:
Soil Temp., Unit:
Soil Moisture:
% Cloud Cover:

Weed Species Weed
RICE


Application Information
A B C D
06-07-91 06-10-91 06-11-91 06-12-91
10:00 AM 11:00 AM 8:00 AM 11:30 AM
BROADCAST BROADCAST BROADCAST BROADCAST
POST POST POST POST
84 ,F 85 ,F 77 ,F 90 ,F
90 88 82 62
0 ,MPH 7 ,MPH 4 ,MPH 5 ,MPH
Y N Y N

83 ,F 82 ,F 76 ,F 90 ,F
WET WET WET MOIST
40 20 5 50

Stage, Density at Application
4LF ___
___, ____ ___, ...__ __


E
06-13-91
8:15 AM
BROADCAST
POST
81 ,F
88
3 ,MPH
Y


F






ir


80 ,F __,_
so F-
MOIST
0


Sprayer
Type
A. C02 BACKPACK
B. CO2 BACKPACK
C. C02 BACKPACK
D. CO2 BACKPACK


Application
Speed Nozzle Nozzle
MPH Type Size
106 FLAT-FAN 11004
106 FLAT-FAN 11004
106 FLAT-FAN 11004
106 FLAT-FAN 11004


Equipment
Nozzle Nozzle
Height Spacing
12 IN 20 IN
12 IN 20 IN
12 IN 20 IN
12 IN 20 IN


Boom
Width GPA Carrier
4.5FT 31.8 WATER
4.5FT 31.8 WATER
4.5FT 31.8 WATER
4.5FT 31.8 WATER


PSI
30
30
30
30


I-I- 1~1 -I-~ ----L---------111~1


7-1-91 (RICE112.DD)


SITE DESC.






7-1-91 (RICE112.DD)


SITE DESC.


Summary Comments: 06-06-91 PROPANIL AND BASAGRAN SPRAYED FOR WEED CONTROL.
RAINED AN HOUR AND A HALF AFTER APPLICATION WAS FINISHED.

TREATMENTS 10 AND 20 WERE NOT APPLIED AND ARE CHECKS.









THE EFFECTS OF BARNYARDGRASS COMPETITION IN RICE


Joan A. Dusky, Weed Scientist
David B. Jones, Rice Agronomist


Barnyardgrass is a major weed pest of rice grown in the
Southern U. S. Research has been conducted during the last three
years in cooperation with other researchers throughout the
Southern region to assess the effect of barnyardgrass densities
and duration of competition on yields of a tall (conventional)
cultivar and a semi-dwarf cultivar. 'Lebonnet' and 'Gulfmont'
rice were planted on June 4, 1991 at a rate of 100 Ib/A.
Barnyardgrass was seeded at the time of rice planting. Densities
of barnyardgrass are 0, 2, and 40 barnyardgrass plants per square
meter. The durations of interference are 0, 21, 42, 63, and 120
(maturity) days after emergence. Past research has indicated
that tall cultivars are more able to compete with barnyardgrass
compared to a semi-dwarf cultivar. All barnyardgrass plants will
be removed and dried for biomass data at the appropriate times
after emergence. At harvest, grain yield and grain yield
components will be determined to assess the impact of
barnyardgrass interference and duration of interference on rice
yields of a tall and short-statured cultivar.






7-1-91 (BYGRICE.DAT)


Project Code:111-91
Cooperator :



Trt Treatment
No Name


TOUR SHEETS
University of Florida
BARNYARDGRASS COMPLETION IN RICE
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
By:Joan Dusky

All rates are

Plot No. By Rep
1 2 3 4 5 Notes


---I- I----~ -I=== i=--===~====i==- ==:=--=3==--=--. ~ =:GI=


S1 GULFMONT
1 CHECK

2 GULFMONT
2 2 WEEDS 21 DAYS

9 GULFMONT
9 40 WEEDS 120 DAYS

6 GULFMONT
6 40 WEEDS 21 DAYS

5 GULFMONT
5 2 WEEDS 120 DAYS

7 GULFMONT
7 40 WEEDS 42 DAYS

4 GULFMONT
4 2 WEEDS 63 DAYS

8 GULFMONT
8 40 WEEDS 63 DAYS

3 GULFMONT
3 2 WEEDS 42 DAYS

12 LEBONNET
12 2 WEEDS 42 DAYS

17 LEBONNET
17 40 WEEDS 63 DAYS

11 LEBONNET
"11 2 WEEDS 21 DAYS

10 LEBONNET
10 CHECK

13 LEBONNET
13 2 WEEDS 63 DAYS

15 LEBONNET
15 40 WEEDS 21 DAYS

16 LEBONNET
16 40 WEEDS 42 DAYS


101 203 313 406 517


102


103


104


105


106


107


108


109


110


111


112


113


114


115


116


204


205


206


207


201


202


209


208


213


215


212


210


214


216


217


311


315


316


312


310


314


317


318


304


306


309


307


302


301


303


402


401


409


40'7


403


404


408


405


416


418


413


411


414


412


417


513


512


518


510


514


511


516


515


503


505


504


509


508


502


501


-~~---~II~--------


I -- -






7-1-91 (BYGRICE.DAT)


Project Code:111-91
Cooperator :


TOUR SHEETS
University of Florida
BARNYARDGRASS COMPLETION IN RICE
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL.
By:Joan Dusky

All rates are


Trt Treatment
No Name


Plot No. By Rep
1 2 3


4 5 Notes


.18 LEBONNET
18 40 WEEDS 120 DAYS

14 LEBONNET
14 2 WEEDS 120 DAYS


117 218 305 415 507


118 211 308 410 506


=rf==P======~=============Z~II===P==-===









RICE COMPETITION BARNYARDGRASS


LBNT


LBNT


G(;'- 1I


LBNT


GFMT


13 10 13 10 4 -1 13 10 7 1
10 14 12 18 1 11 17 2 6

11 18 11 16 5 8 15 16 9 1

17 16 14 15 2 6 10 12 4 8
12 15 10 17 7 9 14 18 5 3

5!. 1 __ 9 18 10 3 1 17 10
S6 3 2 8 12 11 4 6 11 10
9 9 8 1 36 15 14 7 8 12 13

S2 4 4 5 13 10 2 5 15 18
S1 7 7 6 15 17 9 1 16 14
iMT' GFM'T L NTCr GWM T L NT
I III I I


II


III


I


IV V










EVALUATION OF FUNGICIDES FOR CONTROLLING RICE DISEASES

L. E. Datnoff
Plant Pathologist

There are several important diseases of Florida-grown rice
such as blast, caused by Pyricularia qrisea; brown spot caused by
Bipolaris orvzae; and sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani.
Little information is available on the impact of these diseases on
rice yields or managing them by using fungicides in the Everglades
Agricultural Area. The purpose of this study is to evaluate
registered and experimental fungicides and time of application for
their efficacy in controlling, important rice diseases and
determining their effect on yield.
The rice cultivars Lemont and M-201 were planted on 14 May
1991 at a seeding rate and row spacing of 100 kg/ha and 0.20 m.
The experimental design is a randomized complete block with four
replications of each fungicide treatment. Each experimental unit
is 5.0 m x 1.2 m.


Treatment
#


Flag
Color


Fungicides
(Rate lbs or oz/A and Application Time')


1 Yellow
2 Pink
3 Orange
4 Blue
5 Orange/Orange

6 Yellow/Pink

7 Orange/Blue
8 Orange/White
9 Yellow/Orange

.0 Pink/Blue
1 White
2 White/Blue


Tilt 3.6 E
Tilt 3.6 E
Benlate 50WP
Benlate 50WP
Tilt 3.6 E /
Benlate 50WP
Tilt 3.6 E /
Benlate 50WP
LS86263
Rovral 4 SC
LS86263 /
Rovral 4 SC
Mertect 340F
Control
Rovral 4 SC /
Benlate 50WP


(0.17
(0.28
(0.50
(1.00
(0.17
(0.50
(0.28
(0.50
(0.18
(0.50
(0.18
(0.50
(0.34
-


ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)
ai)


(0.50 ai)
(0.50 ai)


PD + B
PD + B
B
B
PD + B


PD + B + H

PD + B
PD + B
PD + B

B + H

PD + B + H


PD=panicle differentiation, B =boot and H =heading.


~I__ _~ ~1~1_1~









PLOT PLAN OF 1991 RICE FUNGICIDE TRIAL


I- 2 I- 5 III-10 III-12

I-11 I- 4 III- 8 III- 4

1-12 II- 6 III- 7 III-11 IV-11

I- 1 II- 3 III- 1 III- 5 IV- 4
M M M M M M M
I- 6 II-11 II- 6 III- 3 IV- 7
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 N
0 I- 3 0 II-12 0 III- 2 0 III- 9 0 0 IV- 1 0 --->
1 1 1 ------ 1 ------ 1 1 1
I- 8 II- 8 II- 4 IV- 5 IV- 6

1-10 II- 7 II- 2 IV- 2 IV-10

I- 7 II- 5 II- 1 IV- 8 IV-12

I- 9 II-10 II- 9 IV- 3 IV- 9






APPENDIX


LACASSINE A NEW RICE VARIETY


The Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station has released a new long-grain
rice variety, 'LA(ASSINE.' Joining in the release were the agricultural
experiment stations of Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, and Texas and the United
States Department of Agriculture. Lacassine was developed by the Rice Breeding
Project at the Rice Research Station near Crowley. It was tested under the
experimental designation LA 2201.

-Lacassine most closely resembles 'Lemont' and 'Gulfmont' among the currently
grown varieties-and should replace some of the acreage grown to these varieties.
In 1990, of 540,000 acres of rice grown in Louisiana, 40% was planted to Lemont
and 8% was planted to Gulfmont.

The new variety has a semidwarf plant type and is highly resistant to
lodging. It is in the early maturity group and similar to Gulfmont in days from
emergence to heading, thus making it 3 to 4 days earlier than Lemont.

The overall average yield of Lacassine in the regional nurseries in
Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Texas over the 5-year period 1986-1990 was
above that of Lemont and Gulfmont. The average yield per acre in these tests
averaged 6798, 6339, and 6438 lb/A for Lacassine, Lemont, and Gulfmont,
respectively.

Milling quality is extremely important in a rice variety, and the milling
characteristics of Lacassine are good. The whole grain milling yield in the
regional tests averaged 58, 58, and 60% for Lacassine, Lemont, and Gulfmont,
respectively. Stability analyses indicate that Lacassine has broad adaptability
and excellent yield and milling stability. This means that Lacassine should do
well planted in most areas of Louisiana and should be flexible to different
planting dates.

The cooking and processing qualities are comparable to those of present
long-grain cultivars grown in the south. It is characterized as a relatively
high-amylose intermediate gelatinizing types.

Lacassine is moderately susceptible to blast disease races IB-49 and IC-17
and highly resistant to other major blast races. It is very susceptible to
sheath blight, moderately resistant to narrow brown leaf spot, and moderately
susceptible to straighthead.

Lacassine has displayed very good second crop potential under timely
planting in southwest Louisiana. In addition, the flag leaves of the new variety
are shorter and have less of a tendency to remain upright at maturity than those
of Lemont and Gulfmont. This should increase threshability and may make the
variety more suitable for use with the new stripper type combine header.

Breeder seed of Lacassine will be maintained at the Rice Research Station
near Crowley. Foundation seed will be available from the Rice Research Station.








LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL CENTER
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA


ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY EXPERIMENT STATION
MISSISSIPPI.STATE UNIVERSITY, STARKVILLE, MISSISSIPPI


TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS


and

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE

The Agricultural Experiment Station of the Louisiana State
University Agricultural Center, the Agricultural Experiment Station
of the University of Arkansas, the Agricultural Experiment Station
of the University of Florida, the Agricultural and Forestry
Experiment Station of Mississippi State University, the
Agricultural Experiment Station of Texas A&M University, and the
Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture
announce the release of a new long-grain rice cultivar,
'Lacassine.' It was developed at the Louisiana State University
Rice Research Station by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment
Station.

Lacassine was developed from the cross Newbonnet/Lemont made
at the Rice Research and Extension Center at Stuttgart, Arkansas
in 1981. It was entered in the cooperative Uniform Regional Rice
Nurseries (URN) in 1985 with the designation RU8502045.

Lacassine has a semidwarf plant type, possessing the
semidwarfing gene of Dee-geo-woo-gen and is highly resistant to
lodging. Lacassine is comparable in height to 'Lemont.' In the
URN in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Texas in 1986-1989,
the average height of Lacassine was 90 cm and that of Lemont and
'Gulfmont' 91 and 91 cm, respectively. The flag leaves of
Lacassine are shorter and have less of a tendency to remain upright








at maturity than those of Lemont and Gulfmont. Lacassine is in the
early maturity class and the average number of days from seeding
to heading in the URN (1986-1989) were 90, 89, and 92 for
Lacassine, Gulfmont, and Lemont, respectively.

The spikelet of Lacassine is straw-colored, glabrous, and
awnless. The apiculus is purple; however, the purple color becomes
inconspicuous as the grain matures. The grain is non-aromatic and
non-waxy. The length/width ratio of Lacassine milled kernels is
3.59 and the milled kernel weight is 19.0 grams per 1000 kernels.
The milling quality of Lacassine js acceptable and whole grain
milling yields (1986-89 URN) were 58, 58, and 60% for Lacassine,
Lemont, and Gulfmont, respectively.

The overall average yield of Lacassine in the regional
nurseries in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Texas over the
5-year period 1986-1990 was above that of Lemont and Gulfmont. The
average yield per.acre in these tests averaged 6798, 6339, and 6468
lb/acre for Lacassine, Lemont, and Gulfmont, respectively.
Stability analyses indicate that Lacassine has broad adaptability
and excellent yield and milling stability.

Lacassine is moderately susceptible to blast (Pyricularia
oryzae) races IB-49 and IC-17 and highly resistant to the other
major blast races. It is very susceptible to sheath blight
(Rhizoctonja solani), moderately resistant to narrow brown leaf
spot (Cercrgosra Szi), and moderately susceptible to
physiological straighthead.

The cooking and processing qualities of Lacassine are
comparable to those of present long-grain cultivars grown in the
south. It is characterized as a relatively high-amylose-
intermediate gelatinizing type.

Breeder seed of Lacassine will be maintained at the Rice
Research Station at Crowley. Foundation seed will be available
from the Rice Research Station. The U.S. Department of Agriculture
has no seed for distribution.

Each agency will make such news releases and other publicity
as it considers appropriate after the date of final signatures.








APPROVED BY:


Director, Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station


Date














Date


Dir r, Florida cl Et
Direc or, Florida Agrlcultural Experiment Station
7/


Admrriistrator, Agricultural Research Service


Date






Date