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 Copyright
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Rice competition- Barnyardgrass...
 Manganese and phosphorus studies...
 1989 uniform rice nursery (Dr....
 1989 rice performance trials (D....
 Rice herbicide evaluation trial...
 Rice tolerance to postemergence...
 Effect of fungicide and time of...
 Chemical desiccation on main crop...
 Main and ratoon crop growth and...
 Ratoon reflooding study (Dr. F....
 Release of Jasmine 85, a new rice...
 Release of a new rice cultivar,...


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Annual rice field day
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054448/00006
 Material Information
Title: Annual rice field day
Series Title: Belle Glade EREC research report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Belle Glade AREC
Belle Glade EREC (Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Agricultural Research and Education Center.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade FL
Creation Date: 1989
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Rice -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Rice -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Rice -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began 1978?
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1991 or 1992.
Issuing Body: Prior to 1984 this was issued by the Agricultural Research and Education Center (Belle Glade, Fla.), which changed its name to the Everglades Research and Education Center.
General Note: Description based on: 4th (1981); title from cover.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 11th (1991).
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 40942624
lccn - 2006229205
System ID: UF00054448:00006
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Rice competition- Barnyardgrass (Dr. J. A. Dusky)
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Manganese and phosphorus studies (Dr. G. H. Snyder, D. B. Jones, F. J. Coale, C. A. Sanchez)
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    1989 uniform rice nursery (Dr. C. W. Deren and D. B. Jones)
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    1989 rice performance trials (D. B. Jones)
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Rice herbicide evaluation trial (Dr. J. A. Dusky)
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Rice tolerance to postemergence graminicides (Dr. J. A. Dusky)
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Effect of fungicide and time of application on blast, brownspot, sheath blight, and yield of rice (Dr. L.E. Datnoff and Dr. D. B. Jones)
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Chemical desiccation on main crop stubble (Dr. D. B. Jones and J. A. Dusky)
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Main and ratoon crop growth and development (Dr. D. B. Jones)
        Page 25
    Ratoon reflooding study (Dr. F. J. Coale and D.B. Jones)
        Page 26
    Release of Jasmine 85, a new rice cultivar
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Release of a new rice cultivar, Maybelle
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




j00oo
FG.C rm
3-S


BELLE GLADE EREC RESEARCH REPORT EV-1989-5




TWELFTH ANNUAL

RICE FIELD DAY
Central Science
Library
OCt 4 1989
University of Florida
tf


EVERGLADES RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE


BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA
AUGUST 10, 1989









TWELFTH ANNUAL RICE FIELD DAY


AUGUST 10, 1989

EVERGLADES RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA

FIELD TOUR

STOP 1 FIELD TOUR BRIEFING
Dr. F.J. Coale

STOP 2 RICE COMPETITION BARNYARDGRASS
Dr. J.A. Dusky

STOP 3 MANGANESE AND PHOSPHORUS STUDIES
Drs. G.H. Snyder, D.B. Jones, F.J. Coale, C.A. Sanchez

STOP 4 VARIETY DEMONSTRATION AND SEED INCREASE
Drs. D.B. Jones and C.W. Deren

STOP 5 1989 UNIFORM RICE NURSERY
Drs. C.W. Deren and D.B. Jones

STOP 6 1989 RICE PERFORMANCE TRIALS
Dr. D.B. Jones

STOP 7 RICE HERBICIDE EVALUATION TRIAL
Dr. J.A. Dusky

STOP 8 RICE TOLERANCE TO POSTEMERGENCE GRAMINICIDES
Dr. J.A. Dusky

STOP 9 EVALUATION OF 1988 UNIFORM RICE NURSERY SELECTIONS
Drs. C.W. Deren and D.B. Jones

STOP 10 EFFECT OF FUNGICIDES AND TIME OF APPLICATION ON BLAST,
BROWNSPOT, SHEATH BLIGHT, AND YIELD OF RICE
Drs. L.E. Datnoff and D.B. Jones

STOP 11 CHEMICAL DESICCATION OF MAIN CROP STUBBLE
Drs. D.B. Jones and J.A. Dusky

STOP 12 MAIN AND RATOON CROP GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
Dr. D.B. Jones

STOP 13 RATOON REFLOODING STUDY
Drs. F.J. Coale and D.B. Jones

APPENDIX

RELEASE OF TWO NEW RICE CULTIVARS: 'JASMINE 85' AND 'MAYBELLE'









RICE COMPETITION-BARNYARDGRASS


Project Code: Rice 1-89 By: Joan Dusky

Location: Belle Glade, FL



This study is part of a southern regional weed biology project

being conducted in the rice growing regions of the Southern U.S. The

objective of this study is to determine the influence of barnyardgrass

(Echinochloa crus-galli) density and duration of competition on rice

yield and yield components. Two varieties, 'Lebonnet' and 'Gulfmont',

were seeded at 100 Ib/acre on May 18, 1989. Barnyardgrass seed was

broadcast in the plots prior to rice seeding. Rice emergence was on May

23 and weed emergence was on May 21. Plots were established by thinning

the weeds to specific densities during the week of June 5. Plots (4

m2) were arranged in a split-plot design with four replications.

Main plots are rice varieties and subplots, weed density and time of

removal. Densities of barnyardgrass were 0 (control), 2 barnyardgrass
2 2
plants/m2, and 40 barnyardgrass plants/m2. Weeds are being

removed at 21, 42, 63, and 126 days after emergence. Data being

collected are weed biomass (dry weight) at time of removal, actual weed

density, rice grain yield, straw yield, and yield components.









Rice Competition Barnyardgrass


Treatments


Treatment #


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18


Variety


GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

GFMT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT

LBNT


Barnyardgrass
Density/m2

0

2

2

2

2

40

40

40

40

0

2

2

2

2

40

40

40

40


Duration of
Competition (Days)

--M

21

42

63

126

21

42

63

126

--

21

42

63

126

21

42

63

126


FIRST FLUSH: 05/30/89

PERMANENT FLOOD ESTABLISHED: 06/13/89














RICE COMPLETION BARNYARDGRASS


LBNT


GFMT


LBNT


13 10 13 10 4 1 13 10 7 1



10 14 12 18 1 3 11 17 2 6



11 18 11 16 5 8 15 16 9 1



17 16 14 15 2 6 10 12 4 8



12 15 10 17 7 9 14 18 3 5



5 1 9 1 18 10 3 1 17 10



6 3 2 8 12 11 4 6 11 10



9 8 1 3 16 14 7 8 12 13



2 4 4 5 13 10 2 5 15 18



1 7 7 6 15 17 9 1 16 14


GFMT


GFMT


LBNT


GFMT


REP 3 REP 4


LBNT

REP 5


LBNT


GFMT


REP 1 REP2









Rice Field Day 10 August 1989


Manganese and Phosphorus Studies

G. H. Snyder, D. B. Jones, F. J. Coale, and C. A. Sanchez

Two experiments utilizing 'Lemont' rice are being conducted on the same
site. It appears that phosphorus (P) limited rice seedling growth at this
site last year when a manganese (Mn) rate study was conducted. The EREC
soil-test for P (Pw) was 1. Therefore, the Mn-rate study is being repeated,
this time with all plots receiving P broadcast at 60 kg ha before
planting.


The Mn treatments are as follows:
Treatment
no.


Mn
rate

kg ha-


The Mn
The soil pH
root growth


(from manganese sulfate) was placed
averaged 7.3. On 8 June, seedlings
measurements. The area was flooded


with the seed on 5 May, 1989.
were sampled for shoot and
on 9 June.


The treatments for the P experiment are:
Treatment
no.


P rate and
method of placement


kg ha


0

20 banded


8 40 banded

9 60 banded

10 20 broadcast

11 40 broadcast

12 60 broadcast

Banding refers to applying P (triple superphosphate) in the row with the
seed. Broadcast refers to applying P over the plot area and incorporating by
rototilling prior to seeding. All plots received Mn at 50 kg ha with
the seed. This experiment was planted, sampled, and flooded on the same dates
given for the Mn experiment, above.










Mn and P Studies


5 3 7 12 8 3 7 2

8 6 8 2 5 11 :::::::: 3 6

12 11 9 6 12 1 I 9 10

491 5 7 6 124

7 1 3 10 2 9 :.:: 5 1
10 2 4 1 10 4 ::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::: 8 11
10 2 4 11 10 4 8 11

A B C D* E


REPLICATION


*All of replication D should be ignored.









EREC RICE RESEARCH AREA

1989


KI


W-4


1 FALLOW



GRAMINICIDE
2 TRIAL



RICE HERBICIDE
a TRIAL



MID-EARLY MATURITY
4 RICE PERFORMANCE TRIAL
(MERPT)
PLANTING DATE 2

VERY EARLY MATURITY
RICE PERFORMANCE TRIAL
5 (VERPT)
PLANTING DATE 2


1989 URN
5 BLOCK




1989 UNIFORM RICE NURSERY (URN)
7 OB8EVATION BLOCK 1


VARIETY DEMONSTRATION
B AND
URN SEED INCREASE

-- 80o m


VERPT
1 PLANTING DATE 1



MERPT
2 PLANTING DATE 1



1958 URN
3 SELECTIONS



RICETEC
4 VARIETY TRAIL



RICETEC
VARIETY TRAIL




B FUNGICIDE
TRIAL


CHEMICAL DESICCANT
AND
7 PLANT GROWTH 20 m



8 FALLOW 1 m


- 7a m










VARIETY DEMONSTRATION / SEED INCREASE

A301

BOND

L202

LABELLE

M201

MAYBELLE

SKYBONNET

TEBONNET
004

008

007

3083

f URN9484

URNBB-4

URNSB-108

DELLA

DELLAX2

GULFMONT

JASMINE 85

KATY

LEBONNET

LEMON

MARS

MERCURY
NEWBONNET

RICO

REXMONT

045
ALEMONT

1988
URN
ELECTIONS








Evaluation of 1988 Uniform Rice Nursery Selections
and 1989 Uniform Rice Nursery


C. W. Deren and D. B. Jones


Twenty-four entries were selected from the 1988 Uniform Rice
Nursery (URN) based upon their plant-crop grain yield, grain
type, maturity group, and ratoon yield. Three selections were
very early maturing and the remaining twenty-one were in the
early-midseason maturity group.

Selections were planted in plots 1.2 x 6.0 m at a seeding
rate of 100 kg/ha (90 lb/acre). The three very early maturing
entries were planted in the VERPT test with appropriate checks.
The twenty-one early-midseason selections were planted in a
separate test with Gulfmont, Lebonnet, Newbonnet, and Jasmine as
checks. Jasmine is an aromatic 1988 URN entry which has been
released. All selections were replicated four times. In
addition, each entry has also been planted in a demonstration/
seed-increase plot.

Data will be taken on the usual characteristics and plants
will be more closely observed for general agronomic type.
Milling yield will also be evaluated.

If some selections show promise, they will be further tested
at different locations in replicated trials.


1989 URN
This year the URN is being replicated twice. Plots are 1.2
x 4.0 m and seeding rate has been reduced from last year's 52
kg/ha (46 lb/acre) to 46 kg/ha (37 Ib/acre). The slight
reduction in seeding rate will allow us to observe two plots. We
will select approximately twenty-five entries to be grown in a
replicated test next year.











1989 Uniform Rice Nursery
Planted 4 May 89
Plots: 1.2 x 4.0 m
Seeding Rate: 42 kgiha
37 lb/ac
Her
131 I 18

I 24 1 25 I 70 172 1 111 1 112 I 145 I 146 i 180 132 17
L-- -- -------
I 23 I 26 1 69 I 74 I 110 113 144 I 147 I 179 1 *3 1 16
I I 1 I i 1 I I I I

1 22 27 1 68 1 75 1109 1114 143 1 148 I 178 184 1 15
I I I I I i I i i1

I 21 I 28 1 67 I81 1 108 i 115 I 142 1 149 i 177 15 1 14
I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I 1
------ --- ----. -I
1 16 1 29 I 66 1 82 1 107 I 116 I 141 I 150 1 175 1 16 13
I 1 I I I I I I I

I 15 1 30 65 1 83 106 1 117 I 140 t 151 I *174 I 187 12
I I I I I I i i

I 12 I 31 64 84 1 05 1 118 139 I 152 i 173 188 11
I I I I I I i I 1
1 11 I 34 63 1 85 104 1119 138 1153 1172 i 169 10
I I I I I I 1 I I I
S10 1 35 62 I 86 1103 120 1 137 154 171 190 9
I I I I 1 I I I t
I 9 136 61 1 87 I102 121 1 136 155 1 170 1 19 1 8
I I I I I I I I i II

I 8 I 41 156 1 88 1101 1122 1 35 156 1 169 I 192 7
1 I I I I I I I
I 7 1 42 155 1 89 1 00 I 123 I 134 1157 1 168 1 193 6
I I I I -I 1 I i I
I 6 I 43 52 90 1 99 I 124 133 t 158 167 1 194 5
I I I I I I I I I
I 5 44 I 51 1 91 198 1 15 132 i I 166 I 195 4
I I I I I I t t I
II ~ ---.- .-.-.-----.------.---------------.-- -.--- 1
I 4 45 I 50 1 92 97 I 126 I 131 I 160 I1b 1 196
I I I I I I I I I 1
--------- ---~'- ----- --------- I
12 46 49 I 93 196 1127 130 1 161 164 198 1 2
I II 11 I I I I i I
I1 1 47 48 1 94 I 95 1 128 I 129 1 162 1 163 i 199 1

S- -----.--.--.------.-.--.---.-------- ------ --- ----
Row 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10













Planted 4 May 89
Plots: 1.2 x 6.0 mI
Seeding Rate: 100 ko/ha
90 lblac


1988 URN Selectios
Seed Increase Plots

DBJ
entries
-- ------------
I 21
I


2 8


S 30
I I

I 63
I I

I 64
---------------
I 67
I I

I 768

1 70


1 72
I 1
------ -----

I 1


------------ I
I 163

I I
--------------- I
S 1867




183

183
I I


1 186


I I
i 190

1 194
I I

WJ4






















Replicated Test of 1988 URN Selections
Planted 25 April 89
Plots: 1.2 x 6.0 m
Seeding Rate: 100 kg/ha
90 lb/ac


1 64 I 68
I I
S30 I 63
I I
IGULFMONT I 70

1 167 1 152
I I
INEWBOWNETI 149
I I

1 190 1 27

1 167 1 68
I I
I 138 IJASMINE

1 186 I 64

I I1


1 190

1 167

1 182

1 149

1 152

1 70

ILEBONNET

I 189

1 194
1


INEWBONNET
1


I JlSMINE
I
1 185
I
I 194
I
1 70

IGULFMONT

I 183
I
I 190

1 67


ILEONNET I 27


I I
1 27 1 166

1 64 1 30
1 1
1 21 1 67
I I

I i
I 28 1 182

I 67 16ULFMNT
I i

1 72 1 190
I I
1 185 1 72
I 1
INEWBONNETI 21
I I


JI3SM1NE I 27

i 30 I 63
I 1
1 138 1 21

IGULFWNT1 66
I I

1186 30

INEWIBUNETI 189
1 1

1138 1 68

1 182 ILEBONNET

I 67 i 183
I 1


Row I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


I b3

I 70

S72

I 28

I 63

21

IUSMIJNE

I
1 189

164


I 167

1 194

I 186
1

1 194




1 189


i165

1 183
1


-I




---

-I



--I

-i

--1


1 149 1 149 I 152 I 28 1 185 1 28 1 138 I 72
I I I I I I I
E^ ----------- i


1--111----~~~


---------------- -- --- -- ---- ---------- --- ---- ------









1989 Rice Performance Trials


D. B. Jones

The objective of rice performance trials is to determine
which rice cultivars are best adapted to local growing
conditions. Information, such as seedling vigor, plant height,
disease resistance, maturity, grain yield and ratooning ability
is gathered to evaluate a cultivar's suitability for production
in the EAA.

In 1989, 38 entries are being evaluated in two maturity
groups at two planting dates at the EREC Rice Research Facility.
Entries were planted on April 25 and May 23 in plots 1.2 x 6.0 m
at a seeding rate of 100 kg/ha (90 Ib/A). The very early
maturity group (VERPT) has 18 entries comprised of eight
cultivars (A301, Bond, L202, Labelle, M201, Maybelle, Skybonnet
and Tebonnet), four advanced lines (004, 006, 007, 3083), three
1988 URN selections (010, 094, 108), two experimental hybrids (RA
2003, RA 2041) and a private cultivar (V7035). The early-
midseason maturity group (MERPT) has 20 entries consisting of
eleven cultivars (Della, Gulfmont, Jasmine, Katy, Lebonnet,
Lemont, Mars, Mercury, Newbonnet, Rico, and Rexmont), a germplasm
line (Della X2), two advanced lines (045 and an aromatic Lemont),
three experimental hybrids (RA 2233, RA 2235, RA 2243) and three
private cultivars (V4716, V4916, V7817).













VERPT EREC 1989


ID CV

1 A301
2 BOND
8 L202
4 LBLE
8 M201
B MBLE
7 SKBT
9 TBNT
9 RA2003
10 RA2041
11 V7035
12 004
13 00B
14 007
15 3083
18 URNBB-10
17 URN88-94
18 URN88-108
19 MBLE
20 TBNT




PLANT CORP

PLOT SIZE: 1.2 X .0
PLANTED: 4/25/89
EMERGED: 6/1-2/89
FLUSH:
1. 4/28/89
2. 5/8/89

FLOOD: 8/17/89
DRAIN:
HVST:
DATE:
SIZE:

RATOON CROP
MOW:
REPLOOD:
DRAIN:
DATE:
SIZE:


18 20 10 11 8 16 4 1 13 7



17 18 9 12 17 13 14 13 11 12



15 18 B 13 4 10 a 18 18 14



13 14 7 14 8 7 17 8 18 18



11 12 B 15 18 1 7 11 17 19



0 10 5 18 11 2 20 10 5 20



7 8 4 17 1B 8 19 2 1 5



6 8 3 18 14 20 18 12 9 3



3 4 2 19 3 19 B 16 2 4



1 2 1 20 12 8 3 9 10 8






MERPT EREC 1989


ID CV

1 DLLA
2 DLLA-X2
3 GFMT
4 JSMN
5 KATY
8 LBNT
7 LMNT
0 MARS
0 MERC
10 NWBT
11 RICO
12 RXMT
13 045
14 RA 2233
15 RA2235
1B RA 2243
17 V471B
19 V4918
19 V7817
20 ALMNT




PLOT SIZE: 1.2 X 8.0 m
PLANTED 4/25/88
EMERGED: 5/1-2/88
FLUSH:
1. 4/28/89
2. 5/7/B9
FLOOD: 5/17/89
DRAIN:
hUST:
DATE:
SIZE:




RATOON
REFLOOD:
DRAIN:
HUST:
DATE:
SIZE:


18 20 10 11 15 4 1 13 7



17 1B 0 12 17 13 14 1 11 12



15 18 8 13 4 10 I 18 15 14



13 14 7 14 6 7 17 8 18 18



11 12 8 15 18 1 7 11 17 19



8 10 5 19 11 2 20 10 5 20



7 B 4 17 18 8 19 2 1 B



5 B 3 18 14 20 18 12 B 8



a 4 18 3 19 B 15 2 4



1 2 1 20 12 8 3 9 10 B

I


I If III


IV V








Project Code:RICE3-89
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL


Date Planted 5/25/89
Design Randomized Complete
Field Preparation and Plot
as flushed after planting


University of Flordia
HERIBICIDE EVALUATION TRIAL
BytJoan Dusky
Cooperator :


Experimental Management
Variety Lebonnet Row Width 8 in.
Block No. Reps. 5 Plot Size 6 by 20 ft
Maintenance Field was disked and rolled. Field
for uniform stand establishment


Site Description


eason Moisture
oil Texture organic muck
oil Series


% sand % Silt % Clay
% OM _pH CEC


Application Information
A B C


ate Treated
ime Treated
loud Cover
ir Temperature
elative Humidity
ind Speed/Direction
oil Temperature
oil/Leaf Surface Moisture
oil Subsurface Moisture'
oil Tilth
rop Stage
est Name, Stage & Density
oosegrass
yperus sp.


5/26/89
8:00 am
Clear
77
92
0
78
moist/NA
Wet
Good
Pre


Pre
Pre


Application Equipment


Speed Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Boom
MPH Type Size Height Spacing Width


GPA Carrier PSI


. C02 BACKPACK
. C02 BACKPACK


FLATFAN
FLATFAN


11004 12 IN 20 IN 6 FT 31.5 WATER
11004 12 IN 20 IN 6 FT 31.5 WATER


Comments
dis study is being conducted to evaluate herbicides and herbicide combinations
Lth respect to herbicide efficacy and crop tolerance. Data being collected is
recent weed control, crop vigor, and yield response. The objective of this
:udy is to gain information for developing weed management strategies for
Lce production on organic soils.


Lrst Flush: 5/26/89
acond Flush: 6/9/89
,rmanent Flood Established: 6/22/89


6/12/89
7:15 am
Clear
75
98
0-3/SW
76
Wet/yes
Wet
Good
Post

3-41f/H
3-41f/H


Sprayer
Type


I








University of Flordia
RICE HERIBICIDE EVALUATION TRIAL
Project Code:RICE3-89 By:Joan Dusky
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL Cooperator :


TOUR SHEETS


All rates are specified as Lb/A


Fm Form


Grow Appt Plot No. By Rep


Ds Amt Rate Stg Code 1 2 3 4
===========XS=3 ====Et==C= B===aa3== SBC=====3====:


Wssx


Treatment
Name

WEEDY CHECK

WEEDFREE

BOLERO

BOLERO

HARMONY

HARMONY

ORDRAM

ORDRAM

BUCTRIL

BUCTRIL

BUCTRIL

BASAGRAN

PROPANIL
BOLERO

PROPANIL

PROPANIL
BUCTRIL

PROPANIL
BUCTRIL

ARROSOLO

ARROSOLO

COBRA

COBRA


EC 8.0 4.0

EC 8.0 6.0

DF 75.0 0.02

DF 75.0 0.04

EC 8.0 3.0

EC 8.0 6.0

EC 2.0 0.2

EC 2.0 0.4

EC 2.0 0.6

EC 4.0 0.75

EC 4.0 1.5
EC 8.0 4.0

EC 4.0 1.5

EC 4.0 1.5
EC 2.0 0.2

EC 4.0 1.5
EC 2.0 0.4

EC 3.0 2.0

EC 3.0 3.0

EC 2.0 0.2

EC 2.0 0.4


5 Notes

519

511

510

508

509

513

514

512

518

506

502

520

507


516

515


PRE

PRE

POST

POST

POST

POST

POST

POST

POST

POST

POST
POST

POST

POST
POST

POST
POST

POST

POST

POST

POST


205 320 416

202 317 403


EIIS1S===Sli=e=J==IE============-l=====


116 203 313 413 505






RICE HERBICIDE EVALUATION TRIAL


10 20 13 17 9 6 14 19 9 11



9 19 9 14 12 4 17 20 5 13



8 18 3 5 7 16 1 15 6 4



7 17 20 2 15 14 6 16 14 17



6 16 8 11 8 18 11 3 15 1



5 15 19 10 2 13 9 4 12 8



4 14 4 15 11 17 8 18 18 19



3 13 16 12 3 5 10 13 3 10



2 12 1 18 10 20 7 5 7 20



1 11 7 6 19 1 2 12 2 16


REP 1


REP 2 REP 3 REP 4


REP 5







University of Flordia
RICE TOLERANCE TO POSTEMERGENCE GRAMINICIDES
project Code:RICE2-89 By:Joan Dusky
location :BELLE GLADE, FL Cooperator :



Experimental Management


ate Planted 5/25/89
design RANDOMIZED COMPLETE
field Preparation and Plot
LUSHED AFTER PLANTING FOR


Variety LBNT & GFMT Row Width 8 IN.
BLOCK No. Reps. 5 Plot Size 6 BY 20 FT
Maintenance PLOTS WERE DISKED AND ROLLED. PLOTS WERE
UNIFORM STAND ESTABLISHMENT.


Site Description


eason Moisture
oil Texture ORGANIC MUCK
oil Series


% Sand


Silt % Clay
pH CEC


Application Information
A B C


ite Treated
ime Treated
loud Cover
ir Temperature
1lative Humidity
'.nd Speed/Direction
:il Temperature
:il/Leaf Surface Moisture
il Subsurface Moisture
il Tilth
op Stage
ist Name, Stage & Density


6/14/89
7:00 AM
CLEAR
78
92
0
76
WET/YES
WET
GOOD
3-4 LF


Application Equipment


Speed Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Nozzle Boom
MPH Type Size Height Spacing Width


GPA Carrier PSI


C02 BACKPACK


3 FLAT-FAN


11004 12 IN 20 IN


6 FT 31.5 WATER


Comments
is study is a continuation of previous studies conducted to examine the
lerance of rice to selected postemergence grass herbicides. This year the
udy was expanded to include two varieties, 'Lebonnet' and "Gulfmont'. Data
be obtained includes crop injury, yield, and yield components.

1 treatments had X-77 @ 0.25%(v/v) added to the spray mix.
rst Flush: 5/26/89
cond Flush: 6/9/89
rmanent flood established; 6/22/89


Sprayer
Type


_ __


%
% OM







TOUR SHEETS
University of Flordia
RICE TOLERANCE TO POSTEMERGENCE GRAMINICIDES
project Code:RICE2-89 By:Joan Dusky
location :BELLE GLADE, FL Cooperator :

ALL rates are specified as Lb/A


rt Treatment
o Name
=0 SELECT==

0 SELECT

9 SELECT

8 ASSURE

7 ASSURE

5 PAST

4 FUSILADEPOAST

4 FUSILADE
3 FUSILADE

2 WEEDFREE

1 WEEDY CHECK


Fm Form Grow
Ds Amt Rate Stg
aEC 2.0 0.125 POST

EC 2.0 0.125 POST

EC 2.0 0.07 POST

EC 0.9 0.06 POST

EC 1.5 0.0 POST

EC 1.5 0.2 POST

EC 1.5 0.125 POST

EC 1.0 0.0125 POST
EC 1.0 0.063 POST


Apple Plot
Code 1
====1===!
101

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

109

110


No. By Rep
2 3

201 303 4

202 305 4

203 302 4

204 301 4

205 309 4


206 304 4

207 308 4

208 307 4

209 310 4

210 306 4


9 10 Notes

909 1002

910 1010

903 1005

906 1004

902 1008

901 1001

904 1007

905 1009

907 1003

908 1006


:SS WeS5SB=IDPIWWSSSBS:W3B=


i


BS:


:==


IPII===-===II=3-r--Pil======Il






PLOT DIAGRAM
University of Flordia
RICE TOLERANCE TO POSTEMERGENCE GRAMINICIDES
Project Code:RICE2-89 By:Joan Dusky
Location :BELLE GLADE, FL Cooperator :


PLOT REP 1 REP 2 REP 3 REP 4 REP 5
+...................------ ......-...........-...........-...................-....
101 I 10 10 7 1 10 9 1 1 1 4 5 1 5 I
I I I I I I
......--......... ...--.........----...........-..........-...............-+.......-
102 9 1 9 8 1 8 2 1 9 10 I 6 6 10 I
I I I I I I I
+-.............----......------.........---......-- ................. .............
103 1 8 1 8 10 I 5 4 10 5 1 10 8 1 2 I
1 I I 1 I I
+-.......----+-----.................... ........------.........................--.............
1041 7 7 5 1 1 6 8 4 1 8 4 1 7
I I I I
+- --... ---..+ ----.......---..+-----------.......----..----------------------------... ... .. .......---+
105 1 6 1 6 9 1 6 8 1 7 6 1 3 3 1 8
I I I I I I
.. ---....................+.............-.......... ............... ................
106 5 1 5 1 1 9 1 1 4 7 1 5 7 1 1 1
I I I I 1 1
+-------- ------ -------------------- .....-- --.. --.---.. -----. --------..+.....
1071 4 1 4 3 1 3 5 1 2 8 1 9 2 1 4
1 I1 I I II
+-...-..-------------------..-..------- -------.-------------... -----... --------.. --.
1081 3 1 3 4 2 3 1 5 2 1 7 1 1 6
I I I I I I

109 5 2 1 2 6 1 7 7 3 9 1 2 10 1 3 1
I I I I I I I

1101 1 1 1 2 1 4 10 1 6 3 1 1 9 1 9 1
I I I I I I l
+-.......--...-...--.-----.... --.----......... ..---- ----.----..--- ......---- --....

LBNT GFMT GFMT LBNT LBNT GFMT LBNT GFMT GFMT LBNT









EFFECT OF FUNGICIDES AND TIME OF APPLICATION ON BLAST, BROWNSPOT,
SHEATH BLIGHT, AND YIELD OF RICE

L. E. Datnoff and D. B. Jones
Plant Pathologist and Rice Agronomist
Everglades Research and Education Center

There are several important diseases of rice in the
Everglades, blast caused by Pvricularia oryzae, brownspot caused
by Bipolaris orvzae, and sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia
solani. Very little information is available on the impact of
these diseases on rice yields in the Everglades. In addition, a
paucity of information exists on fungicide usage and the time of
application of these fungicides for controlling these diseases in
the Everglades. The purpose of this study was to select several
registered fungicides and evaluate them at selected times of
application, i. e. growth stages of rice, for controlling these
diseases and their effect on rice yields..


Fungicides and rates (lbs or oz./A)


Time of Application


(1) Benlate 50WP
(Red Flags)



(2) Rovral 50WP
(Blue Flags)


(3) Tilt 3.6E
(Green Flags)

(4) Control
(White Flags)


1.5 lb


(1) Boot (B)

(2) Heading (H)


1 lb


(3) H + 14


6 oz


(4) B + H


(5) H + (H + 14)

(6) PI + B + H +
(H + 14)

(7) Panicle Initiation
(PI)


(8) PI + B










Experimental Design:


Replications: 4

Number of Plots: (4m x 1.5m)=96 + 4 controls= 100
(0.5m between subplots)

Date of planting and rate: 5-11-89 emerg. 5-17-89 100 kg/ha


cultivar: Lemont


plotplan


I II III IV


13 14 20 18
1=1-1 1 14 8 22 21 13 17 3
2=1-2 2 15 23 11 10 9 14 6
3=1-3 3 16 19 15 24 19 19 4
4=1-4 4 17 3 7 25 5 10 15
5=1-5 5 18 13 21 6 11 23 20
6=1-6 6 19 17 10 16 4 11 12
7=1-7 7 20 20 16 3 1 24 21
8=1-8 8 21 12 5 18 12 2 9
9=2-1 9 22 9 2 7 17 25 7
10=2-2 10 23 1 24 15 14 8 16
11=2-3 11 24 25 4 2 8 5 1
12=2-4 12 25 6 18 23 22 22 13
13=2-5
14=2-6
15=2-7 East
16=2-8
17=3-1
18=3-2
19=3-3
20=3-4
21=3-5
22=3-6
23=3-7
24=3-8
25=untreated



Time of Applic-6,7,8 applied at PI on 7-07-89
1,4,6,8 B 7-20-89


RCB










CHEMICAL DESICCATION OF MAIN CROP STUBBLE


D. B. Jones and J. A. Dusky



Ratoon crop yields have been shown to increase in response
to decreased main crop stubble height (mowing). It is assumed
that this response is, in part, related to increased light
interception by the ratoons at an early stage of growth. This
study is investigating the possibility that by chemically
desiccating the main crop stubble shortly after harvest, light
penetration through the stubble will be increased, and a yield
response may result. Applying the desiccants by aircraft would
be much more rapid and reduce wheel traffic through the field
when compared with the current practice of mowing.

This study will compare the response of two cultivars
(Gulfmont and Lebonnet) to desiccation by three chemicals (sodium
chlorate, paraquat and a cotton defoliant). The control
treatments will consist of 20 and 50 cm stubble heights without
chemicals applied. The treated stubble height will be 50 cm.













CHEMICAL
DESICCANT


CD
ID TRT
CV CH DE8S
1 GFMT 20 -
2 GFMT 50 -
3 GPMT 60PARA
4 GFMT 50 SC
5 GFMT 50 DEPP
8 LBNT 20 -
7 LBNT 50 -
8 LBNT 60 PARA
8 LONT 50 SC
10 LENT 60 DEPP




RPG

SAMPLE TIMES


1.4 WKS
2. PI
3. PI+2
4. HO
5. HO+2
8. HVST


RICE
PLANT
GROWTH


SPARE PLOT


10 B 3 8 7 2A 28 48 4A LBNT


\
9 1 2 4 8 3A 3B 1A 1B GFMT




S 2 9 8 8 1A 18 3A 3B LBNT



7 10 1 3 4 4A 48 2A 28 GFMT



8 7 8 2 1 s3B A IA 1B GFMT


II
6 8 4 10 3 2A 28 48 4A LBNT




4 8 7 a5 4B 4A 1B 1A GPMT

-- --- -- --- --- --- -- -- -- --

8 6 10 1 2 3B 3A 2A 2B LBNT



2 4 B B 10 2B 2A 4A 49 LBNT



1 3 6 7 8 1A 18 3A 3B QFMT


I II III IV V










Main and Ratoon Crop Growth and Development


D. B. Jones


The understanding of crop growth and development is useful
to both growers and researchers. Growers can use the information
in developing proper timing of cultural events in managing the
crop while researchers can use the information in identifying
possible ways to increase yields.

Two cultivars of contrasting plant types, Lebonnet (tall)
and Gulfmont (semi-dwarf) were planted on May 11 at a seeding
rate of 100 kg/ha (90 Ib/A). Plots will be sampled once at the
tillering stage and at two week intervals until maturity
beginning at the panicle initiation stage. Plots are sampled by
cutting all of the plants in 0.4 m area. Data to be collected
will be fresh weight, dry weight, leaf area, plant height and
grain yield. This information from the main crop will allow us
to compare the growth of rice in the EAA to that of rice from
other areas. If the growth of EAA grown rice is abnormal in some
way, we may be able to identify ways to make improvements. The
information from the ratoon crop will enable us to better manage
the ratoon since we currently know very little about this crop's
growth and development.









RATOON REFLOODING STUDY


Frank J. Coale
Extension Agronomist


David B. Jones
Rice Agronomist


Approximately 75% of the rice grown in Florida is ratoon
cropped. The ratoon crop is usually harvested 75-85 days after
the main crop harvest. Typically, the stubble of the main crop
is reflooded 2-3 weeks after main crop harvest. Under this
management, the ratoon crop grows in upland (drained) conditions
during 25% of its development. Research has shown that having a
rice crop flooded prior to panicle initiation is essential in
order to achieve maximum grain production. .It is likely that in
many rice fields in the EAA, panicle initiation in the ratoon
crop occurs prior to ratoon reflooding and may be resulting in
reduced ratoon crop yield.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of
time of reflooding a ratoon rice crop on ratoon crop yield.

This experiment was conducted in the greenhouse with rice
(cv. 'Gulfmont') planted in 5-gallon plastic buckets. The
treatments were replicated 11 times over 3 planting dates. The
treatments were as follows:
1. Main crop flood never drained.
Main crop harvested with standing flood.
2. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble reflooded the day of main crop harvest.
3. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble reflooded 10 days after main crop harvest.
4. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble reflooded 20 days after main crop harvest.
5. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble reflooded 30 days after main crop harvest.
6. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble reflooded 40 days after main crop harvest.
7. Main crop flood drained 5 days prior to harvest.
Stubble never reflooded.

The data being collected include baseline main crop biomass
and grain production. For the ratoon crop, tiller number,
heading date, panicle number, grain yield, and total biomass
yield will be determined.

Thus far, we have made the following observations: Ratoon
tiller initiation did not appear to be affected by never draining
the main-crop flood. Delaying reflooding for more than 10 days
after harvest of the main crop reduced the number of ratoon
panicles. It appears that the incidence of sterile panicles
increased as ratoon reflooding was delayed.









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20250
and
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS 77843
and
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL & FORESTRY EXPERIMENT STATION
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI STATE MISSISSIPPI 39762
and
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS 72701
and
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA 70893
and
THE INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
LOS BANOS, PHILIPPINES

RELEASE OF JASMINE 85, A NEW RICE CULTIVAR


The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Texas
Agricultural Experiment Station, the Mississippi Agricultural & Forestry
Experiment Station, the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, the
Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, and the International Rice Research
Institute announce the release of Jasmine 85, a new long-grain rice cultivar.

Jasmine 85 (IR841) was developed at the International Rice Research Institute,
Los Banos, Philippines. It was derived from the cross IR262/Khao-Dawk-Mali
105. IR262 was from the cross Peta *3/Taichung Native 1. Jasmine 85 was
included in the Uniform Regional Rice Nurseries (URRN) in Texas, Louisiana,
Arkansas, and Mississippi in 1988, and in seven replicated tests across four
locations in Texas in 1988.

Jasmine 85 is an aromatic (scented) rice possessing the flavor and aroma of
the premium Basmati types if India and Pakistan and the Fragrant rices of
Thailand. The average amylose content and alkali spreading value (primary
indicators of milled rice cooking and processing quality) of Jasmine 85 is 17%
and 6.5 respectively, characterizing it as a low amylose, low gelantinization
temperature type similar to the Thailand Fragrant rices. Typically, cooked
grains of Jasmine 85, like those of the Fragrant rices of Thailand, are soft
in texture and cohesive with the cooked kernels tending to cling together.

A taste test panel was organized by the Rice Council for Market Development
and a taste test was conducted to determine the acceptability of Jasmine 85
grown in Texas as a substitute for imported Thai Jasmine rice. The panelists
rated Jasmine 85 higher in aroma, taste, texture and overall than Thai Jasmine
rice.








Jasmine 85 is very resistant to all known U.S. pathotypes of Pyricularia
oryzae, the rice blast fungus. It is moderately resistant to sheath blight.
Jasmine 85 is very susceptible to straighthead and is moderately susceptible
to panicle blight. Jasmine 85 apparently possesses the semidwarf gene from
Dee-geo-woo-gen. It averaged 106 cm in height across 10 tests compared with
88 and 90 cm for Lemont and Gulfmont, respectively, and 112 and 116 for
Newbonnet and Skybonnet. It is moderately susceptible to lodging, having
lodged in 3 of 10 tests in 1988. Jasmine 85 is relatively late in maturity,
averaging 97 days to heading across 9 tests, compared with 85, 81, 86, and 81
for Lemont, Gulfmont, Newbonnet, and Skybonnet, respectively.

The flag leaves of Jasmine 85 are upright and pubescent. The spikelets are
straw-colored, pubescent, and awnless. The apiculus is colorless. There is
no anthocyanin pigmentation in any Jasmine 85 plant parts. The grain is
aromatic. Paddy, brown, and milled grains of Jasmine 85 generally are longer,
wider, and heavier than those of current Southern U.S. long-grain cultivars.
The whole grain and total milling yields of Jasmine 85 are below those of
current cultivars, averaging 49/66% across 10 tests compared with 58/70,
60/70, 58/68, 56/68 and 60/69 for Lemont, Gulfmont, Newbonnet, Tebonnet, and
Skybonnet, respectively.

Jasmine 85 has good to excellent yielding ability based on 12 replicated yield
trials across the South in 1988. The four-State average yield for Jasmine 85
in the URRN was 7200 kg/ha, compared with 7168, 7784, 7239, 6512, and 6273
kg/ha for Lemont, Gulfmont, Newbonnet, Tebonnet, and Skybonnet. In 7 tests at
satellite locations in Texas, Jasmine 85 averaged 7521 kg/ha, with yields in 4
of the 7 tests averaging above 9000 kg/ha.

Breeder seed of Jasmine 85 will be maintained by the Texas A&M University
Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Beaumont. Foundation seed will
be available from the Texas Rice Improvement Association, Route 7, Box 999,
Beaumont, Texas 77713. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has no seed for
distribution.

Each agency will make such news releases and other publicity as it considers
appropriate after the date of final signature.



7 ________________ JUN 14 1989
6- Administrator Date
agricultural Research Service
United States Department of Agriculture



Director Date
Texas Agricultural Experiment Station
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas




4.


Va X-A L~ ,--4 / -- &-------------
C Director
Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS





Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas




Director
Lou Jiana Agricultural periment Station
Loui iana State Univers ty, Baton Rouge, LA



KLAUS J. LAMPE
Director General
The International Rice Research Institute
Los Banos, Phillipines


Date /





d//^/^


- /Dat e






Date






Date









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE

and

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS

and

LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA

and

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL & FORESTRY EXPERIMENT STATION
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI STATE, MISSISSIPPI

and

ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS

and

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA




RELEASE OF A NEW CULTIVAR OF RICE, MAYBELLE


The Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the
Agricultural Experiment Station of Texas A&M University, the Agricultural
Experiment Station of Louisiana State University, the Agricultural & Forestry
Experiment Station of Mississippi State University, the Agricultural
Experiment Station of the University of Arkansas and the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station of the University of Florida announce the release of a new
long-grain rice cultivar, 'Maybelle'. It was developed at the Texas A&M
University Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Beaumont, Texas, by
the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Texas
Agricultural Experiment Station in cooperation with the Texas Rice Improvement
Association and the Texas Rice Research Foundation.

Maybelle was developed from a cross of RU7603015/'L201' (Davis Cross #622) made
by J.N. Rutger, USDA-ARS, Davis, CA in 1978. Seed from the F1 plant was sent
to Beaumont, Texas and an F2 population was included in the breeding nursery in
1980. In 1983, RU7603015 was released as 'Skybonnet' in Texas. L201 was
released in California in 1979. Maybelle is a F7 bulk of a single progeny row
in the breeding nursery at Beaumont, Texas in 1983, Selection C622A-Bk-16-3-2-5.
It was entered in the Uniform Regional Rice Nurseries (URRN) in 1984 with the
designation RU8403113.


% .








Although Maybelle does not possess a gene for semidwarfism, it is distinctly
shorter than all current normal, i.e., non-semidwarf, cultivars and is highly
resistant to lodging. In the URRN grown in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and
Mississippi in the period 1984-1987, the average height of Maybelle was 96 cm
and that of Skybonnet, 'Labelle', and 'Gulfmont' 113, 118, and 88 cm,
respectively. Maybelle has a short flag leaf that remains essentially upright
to maturity. The flag and upper leaves of Maybelle are shorter than those of
all other currently grown cultivars in the Southern U.S., resulting in
significantly less leaf canopy. Maybelle threshes more readily than Skybonnet,
Gulfmont, and 'Lemont'.

The outer surface of the leaf sheath of Maybelle is green and the inside is
colorless with a purple tinge near the base. The internodes are light yellow
on the outside and cream colored on the inside. The pulvinus is green. The
leaves are glabrous. The spiklet is straw-colored, glabrous, and awnless. The
apiculus is purple at heading but the color is very faint at maturity. The
grain is non-aromatic.

Paddy grains of Maybelle are similar in size and appearance to those of
Tebonnet but are slightly longer. Whole grain milled kernel length and width
measurements from samples of rice grown at Beaumont in 1988 averaged 6.77 and
2.07 mm for Maybelle, 6.62 and 2.03 for Tebonnet, 6.57 and 2.04 for Skybonnet,
6.90 and 2.14 for Gulfmont, 7.07 and 2.16 for Lemont, 6.67 and 2.01 for
Newbonnet, and 6.34 and 1.93 for Labelle, respectively. Maybelle and Tebonnet
had the same length/width ratio, 3.27. The overall average percent whole grain
and total milling yield for samples from the URRN in Texas, Louisiana,
Arkansas, and Mississippi in 1984-1987 was 59/71, 62/71, 62/71 and 62/71
percent for Maybelle, Skybonnet, Gulfmont and Labelle.

Maybelle has excellent first crop and superior ratoon yielding ability. The
overall average first crop yield of Maybelle in the URRN in the four major
rice-producing states in the South in the years 1984-1988 was 6616 pounds per
acre, compared with 6058, 5654, 6573, 6610 and 6223 for Skybonnet, Labelle,
Gulfmont, Lemont and Tebonnet. Data for ratoon crop yields are available only
from Texas. The average ratoon crop yield for Maybelle in eleven tests over
several years was 2288 pounds per acre compared with 1549, 1411, 1737, 1666 and
1460 for Skybonnet, Labelle, Gulfmont, Lemont and Tebonnet, respectively.

The principal reason for releasing Maybelle is as a replacement for Skybonnet,
Labelle and Tebonnet in those areas of Texas and Louisiana where ratoon
cropping is an important practice. However, because of its wide adaptability,
Maybelle may do equally well in those areas of the South where the growing
season allows the production of only the main crop.

The cooking and processing qualities of Maybelle are comparable to those of
present long-grain cultivars varieties grown in the South. Like other high
quality long-grain cultivars, it is characterized as a relatively high
amylose-intermediate gelatinizing type.

Maybelle is susceptible to all U.S. pathotypes of Pyricularia oryzae (rice
blast) and has lower levels of field resistance to blast than Skybonnet,
similar to that of Newbonnet in nursery studies. According to symptoms,
Maybelle is only slightly more resistant than Skybonnet to sheath blight on the
average, however, Maybelle sustained less than half the yield loss suffered by








Skybonnet (23% vs 51%) in a replicated study in 1988. Based on other field
observations as well, Maybelle and Skybonnet are similar to Lemont in
susceptibility to the bacterial leaf blight pathogen, both the Texas strains
and Philippine strains. Maybelle is more resistant to straighthead than
Skybonnet.

Breeder seed of Maybelle will be maintained by the Texas A&M University
Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Beaumont. Foundation seed will
be available from the Texas Rice Improvement Association, Route 7, Box 999,
Beaumont, Texas 77713. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has no seed for
distribution.

Each agency will make such news releases and other publicity as it considers
appropriate after the date of final signature.


Administrator, Agricultural Research Service



Director, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station


Director, Louisiana Agricutural Experiment
Station



Director, MiSsissippi Agricultural and Forestry
Experiment Station



Direct Ark Fl sa Agricultural Experiment Station



Director, F a0 da Agricultural Experiment Station


JUN 141989

Date


Date 6

Date






Date


Date

Datel



Date