• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Introduction
 The well-behaved little boy
 The attentive little boy
 The inattentive little boy
 The covetous little boy
 The dilatory little boy
 The exact little boy
 The quarrelsome little boy
 The good little boy
 The farewell
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sketches of little boys : The well-behaved little boy, The covetous, The dilatory, The exact, The attentive, The inattentive, The quarrelsome, and, The good little boy
Title: Sketches of little boys
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054425/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sketches of little boys The well-behaved little boy, The covetous, The dilatory, The exact, The attentive, The inattentive, The quarrelsome, and, The good little boy
Physical Description: 56, ii, 4 p. : col. ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Corner ( Julia ), 1798-1875 ( Author )
Dean and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1846?]
Edition: 4th ed., with seven coloured engravings.
 Subjects
Subject: Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1846   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1846   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1846   ( local )
Bldn -- 1846
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Solomon Lovechild.
General Note: Also attributed to Miss Corner.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054425
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002233343
notis - ALH3751
oclc - 65537493

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    The well-behaved little boy
        Page x
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The attentive little boy
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The inattentive little boy
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The covetous little boy
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Unnumbered ( 34 )
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The dilatory little boy
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The exact little boy
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45-46
    The quarrelsome little boy
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The good little boy
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The farewell
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Advertising
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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SKETCHES

OF


LITTLE BOYS:


THE WELL-BEHAVED LITTLE BOY,

THfE COVETOUS, THE DILATORY, THE EXACT,

THE ATTENTIVE, THE INATTENTIVE,

THE QUARRELSOME,

AND, THE GOOD LITTLE BOY.



AUTHOR OF SKBTCHKs OF LITTLE GIRLS.

FOURTH EDITION. WITH SEVEN COLOURED ENGRAVINGS.




DEAN AND Co. THREADNEEDLE.STREET.



















WELL, Summer is come again, and here I am
once more, among my little village acquaintances;
who seem just as glad as ever to see me, though
I did write a book to give them a hint of their
several errors and failings: but as it was all done
in a good-natured way, and with no other view
than to render them more amiable and beloved,
I hope they have taken it in good part; and in
fact, I have every reason to believe they have
done so, since I have met with a smiling reception
B

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Vi INTRODUCTION.

every where, even from those whom I have cen-
sured the most.
I am told that the Sketches of Little Girls"
have been read very attentively, and that most
of my portraits have been recognized. Well, so
much the better:-for I am almost certain I can
see an improvement in two or three of my young
heroines, which I am delighted to think may be
in some measure owing to the perusal of my
book; and if it has had the effect of amending a
single fault in any one of them, I shall consider
myself well rewarded for my pains.
But my work is yet only half done; for there
are little boys in the village, as well as little girls,
and I see no reason why I should not be as much
interested in the well-doing of the former as of
the latter. Besides, if I were to be silent on that






INTRODUCTION. Vii

subject, the little gentlemen might, perhaps, say,
" You see, Mr. Lovechild could not find any faults
in us to write about." So for fear they should
boast, and fancy themselves better than their
sisters, I shall take the opportunity of my present
visit, to notice their proceedings, and give a
sketch of their characters.





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THE

P &L-l-BEHAVED LITTLE B@Y=


I DO not know any thing more pleasing than to
see children conduct themselves properly on all
occasions. There are some boys who never seem
to know how they ought to behave, or to have the
least idea of the difference between good and ill
manners. For instance, I knew one who would
teaze people with questions when they were
reading or writing; take one's chair, if one hap-
pened to rise for a moment; leave the door wide
open on a cold day; and do a hundred other rude
things, just because he did not take the trouble
to think about the matter.
However, I am going to mention a little boy
who is exactly the reverse of this; I mean Tom
Tribe, whose sisters you are already acquainted






12 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
with. Now nobody has taken any particular
pains to teach Tom to be polite, yet I never saw
him guilty of any rudeness; and I will tell you
why it is: he always considers what is likely to
be pleasant to other people, and carefully avoids
doing what he knows will be disagreeable.
Yesterday, his mamma had the head-ache; and
the moment Tom heard her say so, he put away
the cup and ball that he was playing with, and
getting a book, sat down quietly to read.
"Are you tired of your cup and ball, Tom?"
said Mrs. Tribe.
No, mamma," replied Tom; "but it makes a
noise, and I heard you say you have the headache."
If he is asked what he will have, at dinner, he
never chooses anything of which there is but a
small quantity, though it may happen to be the
nicest; but he looks to see what there is plenty
of, and asks for that:-for he knows that to take
just what we like best, without caring whether






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 13
there is enough left for other people, is both rude
and greedy.
If Tom sees any one of his sisters standing,
because there is no seat vacant, he never fails
to offer his; and if any body happens to drop a
handkerchief, a glove, or any other thing, he
always run to pick it up.
This morning, Fanny was coming down stairs
with a work-box in her arms, which was almost
too large and heavy for her to carry. Tom was
busy spinning his top in the passage, but as soon
as he saw Fanny with her box, he called out,
Stop, Fanny, I will come and bring down that
box for you, I am stronger than you are."
I like to see boys kind and attentive to their
sisters, I always think well of them, directly; for
many young folks, both boys and girls, are too
apt to think, that so long as they behave well
S before company, it does not matter how rude and
rough they are among themselves; but this is a
great mistake, I can assure them.






14 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
Politeness should be exercised at all times,-it
then becomes natural, and displays itself without
effort on every occasion; whereas, those who
are habitually rude in their manners, when they
are among their brothers and sisters, either at
play, at lessons, or at meals, find it is very diffi-
cult to behave like ladies and gentlemen at any
time. But I was speaking of Tom Tribe: now,
Tom is not particularly bright or clever; but his
good manners make him so pleasing and agree-
able, that I doubt whether any body would ever
say, Tom Tribe is a dull boy."
Yesterday morning, I was walking in a field
adjoining the garden, enjoying the freshness of
the breeze, when suddenly there came on a heavy
shower of rain. It came down so thick and fast,
that I saw I should get wet through if I attempted
to return to the house till it was over; so I took
up my station under a large tree, hoping the
branches were close enough to keep me dry. But
I soon found the great drops come dropping from






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 15

the leaves upon my hat and coat; and should
have been uncomfortable enough, in a very few
minutes. But before much harm was done, I saw
Tom running as fast as he could, with two um-
brellas. Here, Mr. Lovechild," said he, almost
out of breath, "I saw you from the window, so I
have brought you an umbrella."
You may be sure I thanked the good-natured
little fellow very heartily; for I am not fond of a
wetting, particularly when I happen to have on a
new coat, which was the case on this occasion.




--;










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THERE is one little boy in the village who, I have
no doubt, will make a clever man, for he never
misses an opportunity of adding to his store of
knowledge; which even now is not inconsiderable,
although he is only just nine years old. The
name of this very promising young friend of mine
is Henry Goodwill. He is tall of his age, has
light curly hair, and a countenance so full of in-
telligence, that you may see at once he is a boy
who observes and understands.
I was quite surprised the other evening, in
taking a walk with him, to find how much he
knew of the wonderful improvements that are
going on in the world. He was able to converse






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 17
with me quite in a scientific manner about rail-
roads and steam-vessels; and seemed to compre-
hend perfectly well, how much the commerce ot
various nations must be increased and benefitted
by these speedy means of conveyance. He also
knows what foreign countries carry on trade with
England; and what are the chief commodities
they export; and can tell you who is the reigning
sovereign of every state of Europe, and what wars
are going on in different parts of the world, and
what are the causes of them.
Now all such knowledge as this is gained .by
attention. For instance, I have often observed
that, when at his father's table, the conversation
turns on any subject that may afford him some
useful information, Henry is always extremely
attentive to all that is said; by which means he
learns a great deal.
At school, I understand, he is generally at the
top of his class, although there are boys in it
three or four years older than himself; and I have






18 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
heard it whispered, that he is likely to obtain the
prize at Christmas: but this is easily accounted
for, when I tell you, that he always makes it a
rule to learn all his lessons before he thinks of
any thing else. Then his exercise is usually the
most correct of any in the class; for he writes it
first on a slate, then looks it over carefully to see
if he has made any mistakes; and having altered
all the errors he can find, he copies it into his
book: an excellent plan, which saves all the inter-
lining and scratching-out that frequently adorns
a school-boy's exercise book.
After this description, I think I hear some of
my juvenile readers exclaim, "This is all very
fine, but I hate boys who are always poring over
books; they are so dull, they never have any fun."
Now, as far as regards Henry, they would be very
much mistaken; for I assure you he is as fond of
fun as any body, and takes care to have plenty of
it, whenever he can.
We may love pleasure and wisdom too; but






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SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 21

there are times and seasons for all things. They
who do nothing but play, never grow wise; but
they who study first, and play afterwards, will be
both wise and merry. Henry is an only son, and
it is a great pleasure to his parents to see him so
attentive to instruction; for it gives them hopes
that he will distinguish himself hereafter in any
profession he may follow; nor do I think their
expectations are likely to be disappointed.










THE

SJL-TTETIVE L TITLE B@Y.


THERE cannot possibly be a greater contrast than
between Henry Goodwill and Frank Careless; the
latter being as heedless and unthinking as the
former is thoughtful and attentive. Frank does
nothing well, because he never thinks about what
he is doing. Let him be employed about what he
may, on he goes, hap-hazard, without considering
for a moment whether he is right or wrong; con-
sequently, he is almost sure to be wrong: at least,
that is the case nine times out of ten, on an
average.
"Have you finished your exercise, Frank?"
asked his papa, one night, when I happened to be
there.






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 23

Oh, yes, a long time ago," replied Frank.
Then let me look at it," said his father; for
I think you must have hurried it very much."
"No, papa, I took plenty of time; but I will
show it to you:" and he brought his book without
the least hesitation; in full confidence, I dare say,
that the examination would prove satisfactory:
but his fancied security in the merit of his per-
formance soon received a check, for there was a
mistake in the very first line.
"Why, look here," said his papa; "Do you
call 'happy' a noun?"
No; I have not put it so," replied the heed-
less little boy; "it is an adjective."
But you have written a noun, Frank; look at
it yourself."
So I have, I declare; why, I must have been
thinking of the next word: here, I can scratch it
out in a minute."
"Ah! that scratching-out is a very bad system,"
observed his father, gravely; I wish you would





24 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
bestow a little more thought on the words, before
you write them, and then there will be no occa-
sion to scratch out at all."
"Well, I don't think you will find any more
mistakes, papa."
I hope not, my dear; but I have my doubts
on the subject; however, we shall see." He pro-
ceeded with the exercise; but before he came to
the end of the third line, a fresh exclamation
betokened another mistake. Bless me, Frank,
how do you spell preposition?"
Frank spelt the word correctly enough; and his
papa asked him why he had not written it so. I
thought I had," answered Frank, as usual: then
added, on looking at it, "Oh, now I see: I have
left out the 'ti,' it is a mistake. I can easily alter
it, papa: I can write 'ti,' over the top."
In this manner they went through the whole
exercise; in which there were no fewer than
twenty-five mistakes; all proceeding from care-
lessness, and not from want of knowing better.






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 25
After a severe admonition from his father, and
a promise of amendment, he brought a puzzle map
to the table, and amused himself by putting it
together till it was time to go to bed, He then
put it into the box, and wished us all 'good night.'
Are you sure you have put away all the pieces
of your map,-Frank?" asked his mamma.
Yes, mamma."
Did you count them, my dear?"
No: but I know they are all right. Good
night, mamma." And away he went, with his box
under his arm, and nothing more was thought
about it.
Soon afterwards, mamma let her handkerchief
fall; and in stooping to pick it up, found two
pieces of the map, which proved to be Durham
and Middlesex, under the table. This was so
like Frank: if he had only taken the trouble to
count the pieces as he arranged them in the box, he
would at once have discovered that there were two
missing, and he might have looked for them at
C





26 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
the time, and have seen that the map was com-
plete before he put it by; but as it was, he had
very nearly rendered a nice toy worthless and in-
complete by mere negligence; for if his mamma
had not happened to drop her handkerchief, the
two poor unfortunate counties of Durham and
Middlesex might never have been heard of again.
In every thing that he does, Frank exhibits the
same carelessness and inattention. If he is sent
up stairs for any thing, he is sure to bring some-
thing different, or to return before he gets half
way, to ask what it was that he was told to fetch.
Frequently when he is reading, he will ask the
meaning of some difficult word, which his papa or
mamma will kindly explain to him; but if he
meets with the same word again, ten minutes
afterwards, he has to ask its meaning again, so
little attention does he pay to what he is told.
Now all young people, girls as well as boys,
must see, if they reflect about it at all, what a bad
thing it is to be inattentive; for what progress





SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS, 27
can they possibly make in their studies, if they
forget as fast as they learn?-There is constantly
the same thing to be taught them over and over
again, and so they never get any forwarder.
Attention is one of the best qualities children
can possess; and I would advise all my young
friends to think seriously of this matter. Nothing
is more likely to affect the interest of their fu-
ture lives, than habits of attention or inattention,
formed in early youth.





.fe~edM










THE

@WIET@U3 LITTLE B@Y.


I DO not recollect whether, in speaking of the
Tribes, I ever mentioned Charles; and I wonder
at it, too, for he is a great favourite of mine, and
would certainly be one of the best and nicest little
boys in the village, if it were not for one great
fault, that I have frequently observed with regret.
But it is one that he may easily get over, if he
takes any pains to do so: and I hope he will, for
he is old enough now, and wise enough too, to
see his faults, and to correct them.
I dare say, you are wondering all this time
what it is that I do not like in Charles: I am just
going to tell you. He is covetous. He cannot














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SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 31
see a new toy without wishing for it; and if any
of his younger brothers or sisters have a present
made to them, Charles is never easy till he has
obtained it for himself; either by persuading them
to change with him for some of his old toys, that
he is tired of, or by making them fine promises,
that he may never be able to perform.
I found all this out some time ago, quite by
chance; and I own I was surprised as well as
grieved when I made the discovery, for till then
I had thought him a very generous boy.
A lady who came on a visit for a few days,
brought with her from town a little present for
each of the young Tribes. To some of them she
gave a book, to others a pretty toy; and very
much pleased they all were. But I soon perceived
that Charles, whose present was a small micros-
cope, cast a longing eye on a Noah's-Ark and a
fine elephant with a castle on his back: the former
belonging to Fred., and the latter to a little fellow
about five years old.






32 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
Soon afterwards, I saw them all three holding a
deep consultation, in one corner of the room; and
I had the curiosity to listen to what was going
forward, when I distinctly heard Charles trying
to persuade his two little brothers to give him
their new toys for some of his old ones.
I will give you my sand toy and box of domi-
noes, and Jack in the box, for your Noah's Ark,
Fred.," said he; then, you know, you will have
three things instead of one: so that will be a
great deal better for you."
Poor Fred. looked rather incredulous; but after
a little more of the same sort of argument on the
part of Charles, he consented to give up his new
toy; and the exchange was made forthwith.
By similar means, Charles made himself master
of the elephant; and thus the two little boys were
deprived of the presents that were made to them,
and Charles ungenerously took possession of more
than was intended for him.
The next morning, I saw Charles playing with






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 33
the Noah's-Ark. "Why, Charles," said I, I
thought this was Fred.'s?"
So it was," replied Charles; but he has given
it to me."
Yes; Charles persuaded me to give it to him,"
said little Fred., but I should like to have it
back again; for I do not like the things he gave
me half so well as the Noah's-Ark."
I now endeavoured to show Charles how un-
generous it was to induce his little brothers to
part with their play-things; and to convince him
that he, being the elder, ought rather to protect
them, than to take any thing from them; but he
still seemed to think, that if his brothers con-
sented to exchange, it was all fair.
However, I hope he will reflect on the subject
and see how wrong it is, in the first place, to
covet that which belongs to another person; and
secondly, that he ought to do as he would be
done by; and I am quite sure he would not like
to be talked out of his toys by his brother Tom,






34 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
who is older than he. But Tom would not at-
tempt to do such a thing, I am quite sure; and I
hope Charles will in future be contented with his
own things, and let his brothers rest quietly in
possession of theirs.






:: "









THE

LaT@RY ITTiE B5@Y.


" HENRY, my dear, I wish I could see you learn-
ing your lesson for to-morrow."
I will, directly, mamnia; let me just finish
this game."
And away he went, hopping round the garden
on one foot, in pursut of a ball that was rolling
along on the ground. I could not think what
amusement he could find in such an employment;
but afterwards understood, it was the object of
the game to keep the ball moving forward, by
touching it with the foot while in the act of
hopping. This is a favourite pastime of all the
little boys in the village, who try to outdo each
other at it; the difficulty being to send the ball
along in a direct line.






36 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.

Henry was so entirely engrossed by this sport,
that he did not observe me, although I was stand-
ing at the window, talking to his mother, who
was telling me what a bad habit he has of putting
off every thing he has to do till the very last
moment; In consequence of which," said she,
" he is always behindhand; and you cannot think,
Mr. Lovechild, what trouble it gives me."
The day in question was a holiday; but Henry
had a long Latin exercise to write, and a lesson
to learn for the next morning. Again he passed
the window, hopping after his ball, and again his
mamma reminded him of the duties he had to
perform. Come, Henry; come, you know what
your papa says: Business first, and pleasure
afterwards.' "
I will come in, directly, mamma," said the
dilatory little boy, "there is plenty of time; it is
not five o'clock yet, and I can do all I have to do
in one hour."
Five o'clock came-half past five-and yet no






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 37
lessons were begun. At length, it struck six; and
we saw Henry running up the garden so fast that
he was quite out of breath. As he approached,
we both perceived that he looked highly delighted;
and as soon as he came within hearing, he called
out, Oh, mamma! here is Aunt Jane, with Willy
and James, coming across the common,-they are
coming to tea, I dare say; I am so glad. What
fun we shall have!"
Willy and James were Henry's cousins; both
nearly the same age as himself, and he was very
fond of them; but as they lived at some distance,
he had not seen them for several weeks.
Now, what a pity it is your lessons are not
learned," said his mamma.
Poor Henry, in the excess of his joy, had quite
forgotten this circumstance, till thus reminded of
it; and I think if you had seen the change that
came over his countenance, you would have been
convinced that procrastination is a fault which
brings its own punishment.






38 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.

Instead of being able to enjoy himself with his
cousins, Henry had to sit down to his tasks.
And I do not think his mamma was sorry that he
had brought this disappointment on himself; for
she thought it might be a salutary lesson for the
future; and help to cure him of a failing, which,
if not checked while he is yet young, may become
a settled habit, and prove a serious misfortune to
him in after life.
It is one of my favourite maxims, as I think I
have before observed,-never to put off till to-
morrow that which can be done to-day;-and the
older I grow, the more I am convinced of the
danger of delay.







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THE

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I DARE say you will be surprised at the term,
and wonder what I mean by an exact little boy:
but I can easily explain it; and, in so doing, shall
say a few words in praise of the quality of exact-
ness; which is a very valuable one to its possessor,
and has often been the means of making men's
fortunes. Think of that, little boys,-for you will
all be men some day, I hope, and have your for-
tunes to make by some trade or profession. It
is then you will find the benefit of exactness:
therefore it is desirable that you should acquire
the habit while you are young, that it may grow
up with you.
The exact little boy always rises at the same






42 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
hour in the morning; performs all his tasks at
the proper time; is neat in all that he does; makes
a point of finishing one thing before he begins
another; carries messages correctly; puts every
thing into its right place, and is sure to remem-
ber whatever he is desired to do.
George Timewell is one of the very few young
gentlemen who answer to this description. In-
deed, he is so very exact, that some of the children
in the village say he is like clock work, and take
upon themselves to ridicule him in consequence;
but as we are all moving machines, every one of
us perhaps may be with equal justice compared to
a clock, the only difference being, that some are
like a clock that goes right, and others like one
that goes wrong. Now, I should think that no-
body can have the least doubt about which is the
best.
George Timewell, then, resembles a good clock,
that goes well, and can therefore be always de-
pended upon; which is a great comfort to his






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 43
friends, and a great pleasure to himself, for he is
both believed and trusted, beyond the extent that
boys of his age usually are; for there are many,
who, although they would not wilfully tell a story,
are yet so heedless and forgetful, that they are
often quite wrong, even when they think they are
telling the truth.
Whatever George says is sure to be correct to a
letter, and I have known him to carry a long mes-
sage without misplacing a single word. 1 will
just give you two or three instances of the advan-
tage of establishing a character for exactness.
The other day, Mr. Timewell missed a volume
of the History of England from his bookcase; the
work had just been handsomely bound, therefore
he was very particular that it should not be laid
about to be soiled; so, finding the second volume
was not in its place, he enquired rather angrily,
who had taken it out.
I saw George reading it yesterday," said a
little girl.



,<* *** *





44 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.

George was called, and asked what he had done
with the book. I put it in the book-case, as
soon as I had done reading," said George.
Then somebody must have taken it out since,"
said Mr. Timewell, for when George said he had
put it back in its place, his papa felt as sure that
he had done so, as if he had seen him do it.
I dare say, you can imagine that many little
boys are so forgetful, that their papas would still
have suspected that they had not replaced the
book, although they thought they had; but no
one entertained such an idea about George; for
the moment he said he had put it away again,
every body was convinced he had done so.
It was afterwards found that his uncle James
had called in the evening to borrow this very
book, and finding nobody at home, he had taken
it away with him: as he knew he was at liberty
to borrow any volume he wanted, from his bro-
ther's library.
On another occasion, a dispute arose among




Pages
45-46
Missing
From
Original









THE

QUARRELO@M[E LITTLE B@Y.


THERE is a pleasant meadow at the end of the
village, called Daisy Green: a pretty name enough,
and given to it, I suppose, because it is so thickly
studded with daisies, the whole summer long. To
Daisy Green the boys are in the habit of going
every afternoon, to amuse themselves with a va-
riety of sports; among which are Cricket, Trap-
and-Ball, Fly-the-Garter, Prisoners' Base, and
many others, that I used to be well acquainted
with fifty years age; and even now, old as I am,
I sometimes join in, for although I am not nimble
enough to play at fly-the-garter, I can fly a kite;
and as to cricket, I am a match for the best
among them.





48 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
It is here that I have had occasion to remark,
more than once, the quarrelsome temper of Mas-
ter.Anthony Crabbe, the.brother of Susan Crabbe,
whom I described in my Sketches of the Girls."
Anthony is quite as ill-tempered as his sister, and
far more violent. Neither of the young people
are much liked, and I have sometimes heard them
called the two cross Crabbes; and, if I must speak
the truth, I am afraid they merit the title.
When a number of boys are accustomed to play
frequently together, they should each give way a
little to the rest; and if any game is proposed
that is not quite.agreeable to some of them, they
should join in it good-humouredly; and then the
others will be willing, another time, to join them
in any game that they like best.
This is the only way to be happy together; and
indeed, I believe they all do so, except Anthony,
who objects to every thing that is not proposed
by himself, and seldom plays for half an hour
without having a dispute with somebody. The














, I
,,:iliJrill lt' III III: illj
III -lifil I llllll


~III/,,,I ,I--









SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 51

consequence is, that none of the boys like to play
with him, so that he is often left almost by himself;
then, instead of trying to make himself agreeable
to the rest, and offering good-humouredly to join
in any game that is going forward, he goes home
in a sulky temper, and quarrels with his brothers
and sisters.
It is the same thing at school. He is always
making complaints to the master, of one or other
of his schoolfellows; but I understand the master
does not often give ear to him, for he knows what
a quarrelsome boy he is, and that any offence
he complains of is very likely to have been his
own creating. Therefore, you see, a quarrelsome
temper prevents a boy from gaining friends, and
is sure to make him very unhappy.




D 3.....

D3










THE


@@@D9D LMLE B@Y.



AYE,-That's the boy for me!-The good boy.-
There is nothing like being good; for without
goodness, the brightest genius in the world is of
little worth. We cannot compensate for the want
of goodness by great talents, although we may
easily make up for want of talent by being good.
A boy may be clever, he may be at the head of
his class, he may gain prizes, and be distinguished
above all his schoolfellows, by his superior abilities;
but if he is not good as well as clever, he will
not be half so much beloved as the boy of inferior
capacity, but more amiable disposition.
Now, I am myself a great friend to genius, and






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 33
think there is nothing more worthy of admiration
than a good head, coupled with a good heart; but
were I obliged to make a choice between the two,
I should certainly prefer excellence of heart to
excellence of understanding, at any time; and I
believe most people would do the same.
Richard Best is as good a boy as I ever knew;
or he is dutiful to his parents, kind and affec-
tionate to his brothers and sisters, diligent at
school, attentive at church, never forgets to say
his prayers night and morning, and would not, I
am convinced, be tempted to tell an untruth. He
is gentle and humane towards all living things,
never hunting butterflies, taking birds'-nests, or
fishing, for mere amusement, as many boys do;
for all those sports he calls cruel, and not only
refrains from them himself, but tries to dissuade
his companions from such amusements.
Richard is careful with his clothes and books;
for he knows that they cost a great deal of






54 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.
money; and that money is not obtained without
labour. "My papa," he says, "must have a great
deal of trouble to get money enough to buy us
all the things we want; so we ought to take care
not to spoil them, that he may not have to buy
more for a long while. If all the boys and girls
had as much consideration, they might save their
parents many guineas, which are wasted through
mere idleness and neglect.
I will just give you an instance of the difference
that a careless or a careful behaviour may make.
Richard and his brother Sam had each a new
suit of clothes last New Year's Day. Whenever
Richard had his on, he took care to put on a
pinafore in the house; and when he was out,
avoided the dirty paths, and did not romp about
as he did when he had his old clothes on.
But Sam made no difference, old or new; often
sat down to dinner without his pinafore, and
soon had his nice new coat and trowsers covered






SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS. 55

with spots of grease. Then he would climb up
trees, or swing upon a gate, or make snow-balls,
or play any other pranks, wholly regardless of
his clothes; so that in three months they were
quite spoiled; while Richard's were as good as
new. Yet Richard had quite as much fun as Sam;
only he took care to have his old clothes on when
he was going to play at any rough kind of
game.
Sam was therefore obliged to have another suit
of clothes, which cost three guineas; besides
which, he had two extra hats, because he tore
the crown out of one, and let another fall into a
ditch. Yet, after all this needless expense, he
never looked half so neat as his brother.
Then at school he was so careless with his
books, that all the covers got torn off, and the
leaves half lost, in a very short time; while
Richard's remained in good condition; so that
when the bill came in at Midsummer, there were






56 SKETCHES OF LITTLE BOYS.

no less than twenty-five shillings down for books,
that were merely to replace those that Sam had
spoiled or lost; and all in the short space of six
months. A good boy never wastes the property
of his parents in this heedless manner; but consi-
ders, as Richard does, that money is not gained
without trouble.








L-4


















IT is now time for me to conclude my visit for

this year; for the leaves are beginning to fall

from the trees, and the autumn evenings to grow

cold. Once more, then, I bid adieu to the plea-

sant village where I have spent so many happy

hours; and to the little friends for whose welfare

I am deeply interested.







11 FAREWELL.


May they live long and be happy! and may

each succeeding year see them improve in good-

ness and knowledge, as well as stature.


With these, and all other good wishes,

I remain,

Their very true Friend,

SOLOMON LOVECHILD.










DEAN AND CO. PaINTEDS,
TKDSRA ED LD-S'rZRDET, LoNDON.









204






-.A.,--
~c7$m. i'








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Neat square size, with sixteen humorous coloured engravings.


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The Letters printed in plain bold type, each rendered familiar by an easy
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Neat square size, with twenty-nine pleasing coloured engravings,

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ABOUT ANIMALS, INSECTS, PLANTS, &c.
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Square size, embellished with seven appropriate engravings.


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AND THEIR INHABITANTS, MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.
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Square size, embellished with sixteen appropriate engravings.

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Square size, with seven coloured engravings, in fancy borders.







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Square size, with seven coloured engravings, in fancy borders.

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OR, A PEEP AT CHARLES' PROGRESS IN LEARNING;
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Square size, with seven coloured engravings, in fancy borders.

A GIFT TO YOUNG FRIENDS; OR, THE GUIDE TO GOOD;
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in words of One Syllable. By Miss Corner.
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UNCLE BUNCLE's STORY OF LITTLE P. PAGANINI,
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Exhibited in six very pretty and amusing coloured engravings.
AND, HOW A LITTLE BOY BECAME LORD MAYOR
OF LONDON, as exhibited in six very pleasing coloured engravings.








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