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Group Title: Bo-peep : Mother Goose melodies
Title: Bo-peep
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054404/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bo-peep Mother Goose melodies
Physical Description: 12 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.,
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1887
Copyright Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Nursery rhymes -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054404
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AJG2321
alephbibnum - 001749431
oclc - 26441379

Table of Contents
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-#LITTLE O -EEP fell fast asleep,
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LITTLE B-PEE has lost her sheep,
And cannot tell where to find 'e; meeting.
Lve them alone, and they'll come home, -----
And bring their tails behind 'em.


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LITTLE BO-PEEP fell fast asleep,
_- And dreamt she heard them bleating; J
When she awoke, she found it a joke,
For still they all were fleeting.

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.,'" ,. i:;. " 'a ymaster,

"ave u fa~ W, One for my dame,
Yes, sir, Yes, Sir, And one fo r the little boy
Three bags fill. That lives in the lane.
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Yes,, sir yesr n n frteltlo

Threebags ill. hat ives n thelane







A, B, C, and D, Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
Pray, play-mates, agree, How does your garden grow?
E, F, and G, Silver bells and cockle shells,
Well, so it shall be. And pretty maids all in a row.
H, I, J, K, and L, Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,
In peace we will dwell. Had a wife and couldn't keep her-
M, N, and 0, He put her in a pumpkin shell,
To play let us go. And there he kept her very well.
P, Q, R, and S, Needles and pins,
Love may we possess, needles and pins,
W, X, and Y, When a man marries, his
Will not guard or die. trouble begins.
Z, and &,
Go to school at corn-
mand.









Thirty days
-_- ------ --hath September,
-- ~-__ --:~- .- --= April, June, and November;
S -All the rest have thirty-one-
Except February alone,
: -- Which has four and twenty-four,
And every fourth year, one day more.












































Who put her in ? Little Tommy Green.
Who pulled her out? Little Tommy Trout.
What a naughty boy was that,
To drown poor Pussy Cat,
" Who never did any harm,
But killed the mice in his father's barn.







As I was going to sell my eggs, Ther was a man in our town, When I was a little boy, I had but little wit,
I met a man with bandy legs- And he was wondrous wise; It is some time ago, and I've no more yet; --
Bandy legs and crooked toes, He jumped into a bramble bush, Nor ever, ever shall, until that I die,
I tripped up his heels, and he And scratched out both his For the longer I live, the more
fell on his nose. eyes; fool am I.
Robin and Richard are two pretty And when he saw his eyes were___
men, out,
They laid in bed till the clock With all his might and main
struck ten; He jumped into another bush, _
Then up starts Robin and looks And scratch'd them in .
in the sky, again.
"Oh, brother Richard, the sun's .-- _,_ _
very high!
You go on with the bottle and bag, -
And I'll come after with jolly -_
Jack Nag."


A farmer went trotting upon his gray mare
lot__ _-__/ Bumpety, bumpety, bump;,
-------- .. ~ With his daughter behind him so rosy and fair
"Lumpety, lumpety, lump.

A raven cried croak, and they all tumbled down,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump;
ft The mare broke her knees and the Farmer his crown,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump.
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake,
i 'baker s man, The mischievous raven flew laughing away,
So I will, master, as fast as I can; Bumpety, bumpety, bump,
Pat it and prick it, and mark it with T, And vowed he would serve them the same next day,
Put in the oven for Tommy and me. .Lumpety, lumpety, lump.









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~my hat,
\-And I'll give you a
slice of bacon;
And when th bakeel'll
'a cake




Pussy sits beside the fire.
How can she be fair? o
In walks a little doggy-
Pussy, are you there?
Sp, so, Mistress Pussy,
how do you do?
Thank you, thank you,
little d ug,, .
I'm very well just'now. ,,







I have a little sister; they call her Peep, Peep,
She wades the water, deep, deep, deep;
She climbs the mountains, high, high, high --
Poor little thing! she has but
one eye. _
[A Star]











-' What are little boys made of?
Scissors and snails,
And puppy dog's tails,
And that's what little boys are made of.
What are little girls made of?
S Intery, mintery, Sugar and spice, and everything nice,
cutery, corn, And that's what little girls are made of.
Apple seed, and
Ss There was a crooked man,
apple thorn; And he went a crooked mile,
Wine, brier, limber lock, And he found a crooked sixpence
Three geese in a flock, Against a crooked stile;
One flew east, He bought a crooked cat,
and one flew west, Which caught a crooked mouse,
And one flew over And they all lived together
the goose's nest. In a little crooked house.







There was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead,
lead, lead:
He went to the brook
-And saw a little duck,
And he shot it through the head,
head, head.






And bid her a fire for to make,
make, make,
To roast the little duck,
He had shot in the brook,
And he'd go and fetch her the
drake, drake, drake.


Three blind mice, see how they run;
They all run after the farmer's, wie
Who cut off their tails with the arv-
i ng-knife-
Syou ete such

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Little Miss Muffett, she sat on a tuffett,
Eating of curds and whey;
There came a little spider, who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffett away.
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There was an old woman Poor old Robinson Crusoe! Old Mother Twitchett, had but one eye,
Lived under a hill; Poor old Robinson Crusoe! And a long tail, which she let fly;
She put a mouse in a bag, They made him a coat, And every time she went over a gap,
And sent it to mill. Of an old Nanny Goat; She left a bit of her tail
The miller declared I wonder how they could do so! in a trap.
By the point of his knife, With a ring a ting, tang, __ _
He never took toll And a ring a ting, tang, -"
Of a mouse in his life. Poor old Robinson Crusoe! ,.

Hush, baby, my doll, I pray you, don't cry,
And I'll give you some bread, and some milk by-and-by; -- ------__
Or, perhaps, you like custard, or, may be, a tart, '''
Then to either you're welcome, _- / .
with all my heart. -- -
---- If I'd as much money
___ as I could spend,
--- I never would cry old
-_ The chairs to mend.
SQueen of Hearts Old chairs to mend, old
_, "_-_ She made some tarts, chairs to mend;
All on a summer's day. I never would -cry old
-The Knave of Hearts, chairs to mend.
He stole the tarts, If I'd as much money
SAnd took them clean away. as I could tell,
SThe King of Hearts, I never would cry old
Called for the tarts, clothes to- sell;
_- ^ My sister Molly and I fell out, And beat the Knave full sore. Old clothes to sell; old
S .And what do you think 'twas all about? The Knave of Hearts clothes to sell;
She loved coffee, and I loved tea. Brought back the tarts, I never would cry old
SAnd that's what caused the trouble, you see! And vow'd he'd steal no more. clothes to sell.
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This little This little pig stayed at home.
This lttle pig went to marker.










This little pig got roast beef.


SThis little ri" got none










his little pig ...







I had a little dog, they called him Buff,
I sent him to the shop for three cents worth of snuff;
But he lost the bag, and spilt the snuff,
So take that cuff, and that's
enough.











Fiddle-de-dee, fiddle-de-dee,
The fly shall marry the humble-bee.
They went to the church, and married was she,
The fly has married the humble-bee.

Hub a dub, dub,
fBoibby Shaftoe's gone to sea, Three men in a tub;
Silver bluckles on his knee; And who do you think they be ?
:-He'll come back and marry me, The butcher, the baker,
\ Pretty Bobby Shaftoe. The candlestick maker;
Turn 'em out, knaves al Three!
3'obby Shaftoe's fat and fair, Yeow mussent sing a' Sunday,
0Combing down his yellow hair; Becaze it is a sin;
Jle's my love for evermore; But yeow may sing a' Monday,
^ Pretty Bobby Shaftoe. Till Sunday cums agin.






























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