• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Executive summary
 First charge: Develop the materials...
 Second charge: Impress on faculty...
 Third charge: Determine how we...
 Fourth charge: Identify prospective...
 Appendix






Title: International Programs Action Team (IPAT) Final Report
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 Material Information
Title: International Programs Action Team (IPAT) Final Report
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Cantliffe, Dan
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida,
Publication Date: 2002
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Farming   ( lcsh )
Agriculture   ( lcsh )
Farm life   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Funding: Electronic resources created as part of a prototype UF Institutional Repository and Faculty Papers project by the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00054298
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Executive summary
        Page 1
    First charge: Develop the materials and an agenda to be used in an external review
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Second charge: Impress on faculty benefits, individually and to the institution, of international involvement
        Page 5
    Third charge: Determine how we position IFAS' international program vis-a-vis large university initiatives
        Page 6
    Fourth charge: Identify prospective partners, public and private, as well as appropriate consortia for elevating our international identity
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Appendix
        Page 1
        List of potential external reviewers
            Page 2
        Faculty international support fund
            Page 3
            Page 4
        The internatinal work component of the FAS
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
        IPAT recommendations for faculty evaluation form
            Page 14
        Oct. 23, 2001 Staal email to Capinera regarding IPAT recommendations for faculty evaluation form
            Page 15
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        A draft strategic plan for international initiatives (UFIC)
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Role of international programs in the mission of the Florida agricultural experiment station, CALS global gators, and extension perspective on international programs
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Expanding international experiences of students and faculty in the institute of food and agricultural sciences (IFAS), task force report, draft 8, April 16
            Page 34
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            Page 64
        Response to request for information: Congressional directive regarding support to foreign extension systems; extension international training program
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
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        IFAS faculty international activity since 1993, survey results
            Page 90
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        December 4, 1998 Cantliffe memo to Martin, international task force review, report and syllabus
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        Statement of vice president Martin to cooperative agreement program managers, April 10, 2001, international focus, March-April 2001
            Page 123
            Page 124
        Report of international programs cooperative agreement program managers' workshop, April 10, 2001
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
Full Text






International Programs
Action Team (IPAT)


Final report


Submitted to:
Dr. M.V. Martin, Vice
President for Agriculture
and Natural Resources

Submitted by:
Dr. Dan Cantliffe, IPAT,
Chairman




June 15, 2002
University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS)











International Programs Action Team (IPAT)
May 2000- April 2001


Final Report


IPAT Chair
Dan Cantliffe, Horticultural Sciences

IPAT Members
Gene Albrigo, Horticultural Science, Lake Alfred
Murat Balaban, Food Science and Human Nutrition
Bill Haller, Agronomy, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Jane Luzar, Associate Dean, College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences
Ken Portier, Statistics
Kathryn Sieving, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
John Van Sickle, Food and Resource Economics
Amy Sullivan, Graduate Student, CNRE
Mickie Swisher, Family Youth and Community Sciences
Pete Vergot, District Extension Director, District I
IPAT Ex-officio members
Peter Hildebrand, Director, International Programs
Lisette Staal, Assistant Director, International Programs



Submitted to:

Dr. M.V. Martin,
Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources,
University of Florida


June 15,2002









International Programs Action Team (IPAT)
Executive Summary

June 2002



The IPAT consisting of Gene Albrigo, Murat Balaban, Bill Haller, Jane Luzar, Ken
Portier, Kathryn Sieving, John Van Sickle, Amy Sullivan, Mickie Swisher, Pete Vergot,
Peter Hildebrand (ex-officio), Lisette Staal (ex-officio), and Dan Cantliffe, Chair met
eight times from May 2000 to April 2001 to discuss and review the charge as outlined
below from Vice President Martin's memo of January 14, 2000.

"In general, here's how I propose we proceed:

First, you as a task force will develop the materials and an agenda to be
used in an external review of our international programs. We will then
invite in a select panel of international program experts to provide
recommendations and advice on how to reposition IFAS in the
international arena.

Second, we need to find ways to impress on faculty the benefits,
individually and to the institution, of international involvement. We need
to create an incentive system for international involvement. This will
mean specifically including international activities in faculty rewards and
recognition.

Third, we will need to determine how we position IFAS' international
program vis-ia-vis large university initiatives. As the university seeks to
redefine university-wide international strategy we in IFAS should, I
believe, assume a leadership role.

Finally, we need to identify prospective partners, public and private, as
well as appropriate consortia for elevating our international identity. This
will be particularly important as we seek to diversify the source of funds
for our international programs.

Your charge as a member of this task force will be to assist in responding
to the above issues and to provide long-term guidance to our international
programs."









I. FIRST CHARGE: develop the materials and an agenda to be used in an external
review

With regard to charge one, the following questions were reviewed.

1. What is the International Programs philosophy?

A. Office of International Programs thoughts.

1. Discussion was that the OIP develops faculty-driven activities.
2. OIP has many cooperative agreements that faculty have developed
over time. It is not an office-centric approach from OIP any longer,
and many of the programs which use to generate overhead no
longer generate any overhead.
3. OIP looks for cross-campus linkages. OIP acts as a catalyst and is
developing and needs to continue developing a web site. Within
this web site what OIP does for faculty, students, and others should
be defined. There needs to be a linkage to UF, to IFAS, and most
importantly, a linkage to the University's International Programs
Office and what they do. Other linkages are very important and
will help prevent duplication of materials being displayed in the
web site.
4. Tracking of alumni is needed on the international status of our
alumni with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

IP Current Update:
International Programs has moved toward supporting faculty programs by
encouraging and facilitating Cooperative Agreements with designated faculty
program managers and specific counterparts in the foreign institutions.There are
currently 36 active Cooperative Agreements, 10 pending and 15 queries. Each is
faculty initiated
IP has worked with faculty to develop project proposals and in some cases, once
awarded, the projects are administered through the faculty member's department.
International Programs provide full level of administrative support to projects
when needed by the faculty member. IP sees limited benefit to larger projects
that have no direct link to faculty or faculty programs and has moved away from
encouraging these efforts. This does have impact on lower overhead being
generated by the projects.
IFAS IP was instrumental in establishing the Cross-campus Collaboration
Committee (C-4) currently facilitated through UFIC. This has provided key
program linkages in several areas including Vietnam and Mexico. In addition an
initiative to establish a Global Transition Center is underway.









B. From the Side of the Faculty Needs and Interest


Faculty feel that there needs to be an interaction between International Programs and
Sponsored Research, potentially using a link to funded programs, so that faculty might
obtain information about ongoing and existing active projects, especially those being
funded. Faculty also feel that the Office of International Programs has to do some
rethinking to stimulate interest, potentially using a programmatic approach to develop
both faculty interest and something for faculty to rally around, could be very important.
In the past, contracts and grants generated overhead funds for OIP, which as previously
mentioned, largely no longer exists. Such programmatic or schematic approaches might
evolve initially around subjects in tropical agriculture. Areas of involvement of
international work should be stressed for both Central and South America and the
Caribbean Basin, as this is the area of our greatest expertise and our greatest involvement,
in the past as well as in the present.

IP Current Update:
IP and IFAS Sponsored Programs have explored potential opportunities and are
currently linked through their web pages. This continues to be an area with great
potential that needs to be expanded.
IP has a person focused on identifying potential funding sources for Cooperative
Agreement activities and others as possible.
IP has helped faculty pursue grant funds and then moved to their department or
using for contract administration, depending on the faculty and department/unit
preference. For example, Haiti Agroforestry program funded at @$800, 000.
IP has established an email listserv that informs faculty of some international
opportunities.

2. How do we get more faculty involved in International Programs?

There needs to be more involvement of IFAS' top administration. A positive indication
needs to be expressed from that group, including IFAS unit leaders, to the faculty as it
relates to both the potential for, the need for, the benefits of, and the rewards from faculty
involvement in international work. There should be an administrative component that
clearly, not only spells out, but rings out this message. Potentially, this could be setup in
the promotion package wherein more credence is put on and more rewards are put on
international involvement. In the past, former Provost Sorenson made it quite clear that
for promotion, especially to Full Professor, faculty had to be internationally known,
internationally linked, and internationally involved. Such similar types of messages can
be sent to the faculty through their promotion processes, not only from Associate for Full
Professor, but most importantly, starting at the Assistant Professor level and continuing
on through the newly forecasted steps of "step raises" at seven-year intervals in the
Professor rank. IFAS Administration could also send a message to faculty by increasing
the reward, especially towards merit, in the annual achievement package. IFAS
Administration could also put more emphasis on international involvement by providing
money for faculty to participate in international projects as well as international meetings








where they actively participate in that meeting. IFAS Administrators could help develop
faculty interest in international programs by helping faculty to take short-term and long-
term sabbaticals at various institutions and/or areas around the world.

3. How do we setup an internship program?

When is it best started for undergraduate students? How do we get more students
involved in international programs? How do we use our College of Agriculture and Life
Sciences alumni to help setup internships around the world?

It is imperative that the Action Team would meet with Dennis Jett, the new Dean for the
University of Florida International Center (UFIC). It would be good if Dr. Jett sets up a
University Advisory Committee for International Programs to .get IFAS personnel
involved. It is imperative that the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences develop their
students on the'basis of society-ready graduates. We can do this through the various
cooperative agreements that we have presently in CALS. Dr. Jane Luzar was to forward
the Action Team the background information that she has regarding our past, present, and
future involvement in such important groups as Zamorano in Honduras, EARTH
University in Costa Rica, and other such programs that we are developing stronger
relations, including the Czech Republic and in Ecuador. It is important as we setup these
relationships to develop mechanisms, not only of bringing students from these areas to
the University of Florida via stimulation through out-of-state tuition waivers for
undergraduates, but more importantly to try to direct our US and especially Florida
students to internships at these various locations. Such interaction not only strengthens
our undergraduate students to make them society-ready graduates who possess a strong
awareness of a global society as well as giving them a global commodity and global
agribusiness mentality. Also, it would strengthen our interaction and continuation of our
agreements with these various institutions by having as many as possible of our students
interacting directly at those institutions.

We should try to get our students involved through alumni and alumni groups in many of
the countries that we have strong alumni ties. We should develop linkages with as many
countries around the world as possible, and not just relate our linkages to developing
nations. We should look at linkages to developed countries such as the Netherlands and
workout both science-based projects, wetlands projects, and other types of projects and
internships directly with such institutions as Wageningen. We have a network of alumni
called the Global Gators where our students are going out and working and have a chance
to interact with people who will take special interest in them. We can use international
alumni clubs that have previously been visited by former President Lombardi and which
have been energized by the vast number of our graduates going out to various stations
around the world in the last several decades. We can also interact through alumni
associations within this country to develop potential internships, ties, and linkages with
programs and people that our US Gators are working with on an international basis.








4. How do we overcome language barriers that act as diversions to students doing
internships in foreign lands?

It is very important to get our students ready to develop internships. Initially, this might
be favored by putting them in programs where English is used, but it is also very
important for our students, for instance, that might go to Zamorano and other such places,
in fact to learn Spanish or the native language of the specific location that they arrive at.
It would be imperative to give various language training courses and probably would help
our students immensely if language requirements were made, especially at the
undergraduate level. Presently we have Spanish classes for faculty. This might then be
expanded to students who potentially will seek or are planning to take internships in
Spanish speaking countries. If demands for other languages were to present themselves,
then potentially language courses could also be funded through the Office of International
Programs so that we might encourage more students to begin learning a language before
arriving for an internship in a foreign land.

IP Current Update:
IP continues to offer Spanish on-campus reaching IFAS Faculty, Staff and
Graduate Students. Enrollment has increased oer the last 3 years fro a low of
6 participants to over 30. Demand and request s for off-campus instruction
remains high and is currently not being addressed

Materials for a review of the OIP and names of potential reviewers (Appendix 1) are
attached as part of this report, in reply to charge one.


II. SECOND CHARGE: impress on faculty the benefits, individually and to the
institution, of international involvement.

With regard to the second charge, "we need to find ways to impress on faculty the
benefits, individually and to the institution, of international involvement. We need to
create an incentive system for international involvement. This will mean specifically
including international activities in faculty rewards and recognition." Several items were
recommended and are presently being instituted.

1. A faculty International Support Fund (Appendix 2) was established as an
incentive for faculty international involvement.

The funding is co-shared and is to come from the Vice President's office, the
three Deans, Departments, and the individual faculty requesting funding. The
match would be 1/3 from IFAS Administration, 1/3 the Department, and 1/3 the
faculty.

2. In order to strengthen the international reporting component,
recommendations were given by IPAT to revise the Faculty Accountability
System (FAS report) (Appendix 3), which should lead to another revision of








the Achievement Report/Plan of Work evaluation procedures and reporting.
It is anticipated that these changes are in progress.

3.. IPAT suggested changes to the Faculty Evaluation Form under each of the three
functional areas Teaching/Academic Programs, Experiment Station/Research, and
Extension (Appendix 3.a.).

IP Current Update:
In February 2002, Hildebrand and Staal met with Ladewig, Osborne and the
vice president to discuss the pending requests for changes to FAS to
incorporate IPAT recommended adjustments. Ladewig indicated intent to
incorporate these recommendations in the design as appropriate. This still is
pending follow-up.
In October2001, Staal responded to a general request for input by Dr.
Capinera regarding revisions to the Faculty Evaluation Form. IPAT
recommendations were shared at that time by email (Appendix 3b). Status of
the suggested changes is unknown


III. THIRD CHARGE: determine how we position IFAS' international program
vis-a-vis large university initiatives

With regard to the third charge, "we will need to determine how we position IFAS'
international program vis-a-vis large university initiatives. As the university seeks to
redefine university-wide international strategy we in IFAS should, I believe, assume a
leadership role." The IPAT met with Dean Dennis Jett and discussed the University of
Florida's strategic plan for international activities (Appendix 4). Essentially all of the
directions UFIC is heading fit with the overall directions OIP and IFAS are heading.
Many suggested improvements for University of Florida involvement in international
activities will enhance IFAS' involvement in international activities.

IPAT requested and received information related to the Mission of the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station, CALS, and the Florida Extension Service related to
their interactions with international activities. The responses are Appendix 5. also,
attached in the IFAS Task Force Report for SACS accreditation for "Expanding
International Experiences of Students and Faculty in IFAS" (Appendix 6), as well as a
summary of Extension involvement in international affairs (Appendix 7). IPAT has made
no attempt to summarize or pass judgment on these documents as they are viewed as
needed information for an OIP/IFAS review of international involvement.

Through Vice President Martin's office IPAT sent a survey to IFAS faculty related to
their international activity since 1993. The results of that survey are in Appendix 8. Of
the 338 faculty (38%) that responded, 226 reported some activity in a foreign country.
Areas reported in the survey included research activities, technical assistance, attending
meetings and conferences, consulting, courses taught and graduate education.








IP Current Update:
IP has established the International Programs Liaison Group (IPLG) to
address the need to better know what international activities are in place,
increased networking, and a need to support faculty and faculty driven efforts
in the international arena. The current members of the IPLG are Bill Brown,
Larry Arrington, Jane Luzar, Jorge Hernandez, Steve Humphrey, Waldy
Klassen and Pete Vergot. We anticipate that this forum will be a beginning
for increased knowledge of activities and networking for program building of
international efforts in research, teaching and extension.
A Task Force, chaired by Jim Jones, was formed in September 2001 to
document current international activities in IFAS and to develop
recommendationsfor expanding international experiences ofIFAS faculty and
students. The Task Force was instructed to also provide information requested
by the University of Florida administration for a Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools (SACS) self-study on international efforts. The Task
Force assembled information on current activities from various sources,
reviewed international opportunities available to faculty and students at other
prestigious AAU universities, interacted with faculty, students and
administrators, and wrote a report to document the findings and
recommendations.

IV. FOURTH CHARGE: identify prospective partners, public and private, as well
as appropriate consortia for elevating our international identity.

The Action Team then reviewed item number 4 under Vice President Martin's charges,
which was stated to specifically "identify prospective partners, public and private, as well
as appropriate consortia for elevating our international identity. This will be particularly
important as we seek to diversify the source of funds for our international programs."
Various items discussed for potential outside funding related to the need for institutional
funding to continue such programs as we have initiated with ESPOL in Ecuador and
Veracruz in Mexico. It is suggested that we work with other universities as well as with
other colleges within the University of Florida to seek funding sources. It is also
imperative to work with private sources, especially those sources both inside and outside
the state of Florida.

In the past, overhead has been extremely important to operating the International
Programs Office, and generally, it was funded through these mechanisms as well as
overhead-funded faculty and administrative travel to various other countries. Funding
from USAID is no longer available, and thus, funding of faculty for international work
from overhead such as attendance at meetings, etc. have not been possible for some time.

At present, Pete Hildebrand has to go to the Vice President's Office for funding. At this
time, the Vice President's Office is funding a one-halftime line for the Director, which is
Dr. Peter Hildebrand, and .60 FTE salary for the Assistant Director, which is Lisette Staal.
There are two state lines for secretarial and one-half line for Maria Cruz, Program
Assistant working with Visitors and Training programs. The other half of Maria's salary








is via overhead. There is also an Accountant being funded in the Office via the Vice
President's Office. It seems imperative that if IFAS is to make a commitment to
international work, that they cannot rely on good programming efforts and consistency
within the Office without fully funding the above positions, including the other half of
the three lines so mentioned previously that either are not funded or being funded from
other sources. It is with that commitment that IFAS can lay the foundation for the Office
and know that we will have personnel to carry out the necessary work emitting from that
office.

Another generated source of funding is to come from the Vice President's Office, Deans,
and the Unit level, as previously discussed in that the Vice President's Office would
commit $12,000 and each of the Deans would commit $4,000 for a total of $12,000 from
the three Deans. That $24,000 could be used for faculty and student interaction in
international work. The $24,000 should be matched at the Unit level, giving a total pool
annually of $48,000 and that $24,000 unit match should also be matched by individuals
requesting the money, thus giving us a pool of $72,000 annually. The formalization for
use of the money has been drawn up (Appendix 2) and the money should be
administered through the Office of International Programs. The IPAT felt that it was
imperative to help fund initiatives that will get a) student involvement, b) improve
potential for Faculty Development Leave to outside US locations, c) help instill more
diversity with regard to teaching at the international level, and d) help promote Extension
experiences in international work.

The Action Team felt that this would be well worthwhile for the Vice President and the
Deans to look for base dollars from the Legislature to benefit the State of Florida in a
global environment. This is probably a good time to be seeking this type of funding,
especially with Governor Bush and the Republican Legislature. It is within our reach to
compose hard-hitting factual needs and directions for the money, as related to the Florida
economy and to the benefit of the people of the State of Florida to invest in international
work. This funding base as described above plus a continued strong affirmative
development of grants to support international work could greatly enhance faculty and
student interaction with regard to International Programs at the University of Florida,
IFAS.

Other items potentially useful to a review of IFAS OIP are the International Task Force
Review Report/Syllabus of December 1998 from a directive of former Vice President Jim
Davidson (Appendix 9), a statement from Vice President Martin to IFAS International
Cooperative Agreement Program Managers dated April 10, 2001 (Appendix 10), a report
from the same Program Managers Workshop on April 10, 2001 (Appendix 11), and a
summary of Program Activities 1960-2000 for IFAS OIP.









International Programs Action Team (IPAT)
Executive Summary

LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix 1: List of potential External Reviewers

Appendix 2: Faculty International Support Fund

Appendix 3: The International Work Component of the FAS

Appendix 3a: IPAT recommendations for Faculty Evaluation Form

Appendix 3b: Oct. 23,2001 Staal email to Capinera regarding IPAT
recommendations for Faculty Evaluation Form

Appendix 4: A Draft Strategic Plan for International Initiatives(UFIC)

Appendix 5: Role of International Programs in the Mission of the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station, CALS Global Gators, and
Extension Perspective on International Programs

Appendix 6: Expanding International Experiences of Students and Faculty in the
Instittue of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), Task Force
Report, Draft 8, April 16.

Appendix 7: Response to request for information: Congressional Directive
regarding Support to Foreign Extension Systems; Extension
International Training Program

Appendix 8: IFAS Faculty International Activity since 1993, Survey Results

Appendix 9: December 4,1998 Cantliffe memo to Martin, International Task
Force Review, Report and Syllabus

Appendix 10: Statement of Vice President Martin to cooperative agreement
program managers, April 10, 2001, International Focus, March-April
2001

Appendix 11: Report of International Programs Cooperative Agreement Program
Managers' Workshop, April 10, 2001




APPENDIX 1


List of potential External REVIEWERS
(submitted to IPAT by Pete Hildebrand and Lisette Staal, April 30, 2001)
F:/Action Team IP/suggested reviewers for IPAT extrmal review.doc

1. Rudy Rabbinge, Netherlands, Wageningen University and Research Centre,
rudy.rabbinge@pp.dpw.wag-ur.nl PO Box 9101, 6700 HB Wageningen: Contributed to
the proceedings on international education "Future position of European agricultural
universities andfaculties, September 2000. Knows University international programs,
understands land grant universities. Jim Jones (ag engineering) highly recommends him
as well.

2. Hubert Zandstra, Director General, CIP, CIP-DG(,cgiar.org
Phone: 5114350266 or 5113492124, fax: 5114350842 or 5113495638: DG of an
international center, Canadian, Animal Scientist (?)

3. Clifton R. Wharton, Jr. Agricultural Economist, Economics of sustainable agriculture,
http://www.aaea.org/foundation/clubs.html#wharton
- an undergraduate degree in history from Harvard, studies in international affairs at
Johns Hopkins University and work in economics at the University of Chicago. As an
economist with the American International Association for Economic and Social
Development (1948-53), he worked on economic issues specific to Latin American
countries. From 1958 to 1964 he directed the work of the Agricultural Development
Council in Southeast Asia. He later moved into leadership positions on the Development
Council, broadening his scope to examine economic issues affecting less-developed
nations around the world He has since occupied executive positions in academia,
becoming president ofMichigan State University in 1970 and the first African American
to head an 1862 Land Grant University. In 1978, Dr. Wharton became chancellor of the
State University of New York system, the largest university system in the country. He
served as the chair of the presidentially appointed Boardfor International Food and
Agricultural Development from 1976 to 1983 and as the U.S. Deputy Secretary of State,
the number two position in the U.S. State Department. Dr. Wharton has been awarded
honorary doctorates from 25 universities since 1970 and has served as trustee or director
of more than 26 business corporations and public affairs associations since 1967..

4. Pat Barnes-McConnell, Michigan State University, baresmc@msu.edu
phone: 517-355-4693: Sociologist, Director ofBean/Cowpea CRSPfor many years

5. Louise Fresco, Deputy Director ofFAO louise.fresco)@fao.org FAO, Viale Della
Terme Di Caracolla, Rome, Italy 00100, phone: 390657051 or 39652253363, fax:
390657053152 or 39652255731 : Agronomist, African experience, Wageningen
experience

6. Ridwan Ali. RALI2(@worldbank.org phone 2024581862 fax 2024581778:
Has been with the World Bank many years in the rural Development Sector Unit, South
Asia Region. Has been working with different US universities in relation to
international development. Would like to retire in Gainesville so is very interested in UF.




APPENDIX 2


Faculty International Support Fund
Policy for use and distribution of funds
January 2002

As a result of International Programs Action Team initiative in early 2001, the VP agreed
to provide $12,000, with the three Deans each contributing $4000 to establish a $24,000
fund for supporting faculty international involvement The fund will be administered
through the International Programs. This fund is available to support faculty
international initiatives when matched equally by the unit and by the faculty member
requesting the funds (1/3,1/3,1/3).

1. Purpose of the Faculty International Support Fund:

The fund will provide support to encourage new faculty, or others who would be initiates
in the international sphere, to become involved in international activities. IPAT
discussions suggested that this fund would help fund initiatives that will improve
potential for faculty development outside US locations, help promote extension
experiences in international work, increase student involvement in international activities,
and help instill more diversity with regard to teaching at the international level. This
fund was not seen as being a funding mechanism to expand and intensify current
cooperative agreements, although this is needed as well.

1. Establishing the fund

The fund must be able to:
Accept deposits from the VP and 3 deans (The transfer of funds from the VP and
Dean's offices will take place on an annual basis as early in the fiscal year as
possible.)
Transfer money to different departments

2. Eligibility and Limitations

IFAS Gainesville, REC and County Faculty may use the funds.

Any request for money from this fund would have to be matched by the
requesting faculty member's unit and the faculty at time of request resulting in a
1/3-1/3-1/3 contribution. That is: 1/3 from the international support fund, 1/3
from the unit, and 1/3 from the faculty member.

The limit on receiving funds from the international support fund is $1000 per
faculty member per fiscal year.


3. Criteria for awarding funds (ranked)








The proposed activity must clearly show benefit to state and should link directly
to an existing or anticipated program
Evidence of opportunity to cultivate collaborative situations and partnerships
involving several IFAS faculty
Engage in professional international development tied to a faculty development
leave
Teach a class or conduct training
Deliver a paper or poster accepted for presentation at an international conference.
Attending a conference should be low priority unless there is a specific
opportunity for collaboration. That is, some pre-arranged group that will utilize
the opportunity to get better acquainted and plan specific activities.


1. How to apply

Any faculty member requesting access to the funds must submit a brief, one page
letter of request including the following information. Requests should be submitted
to the Director of International Programs. Requests can be submitted at any time.

Clearly state the purpose

Specify goals and benefits to UF/IFAS and the State of Florida

Show linkage to existing or anticipated IFAS programs

Include a concise and concurrent statement of support from the immediate
supervisor and unit leader

Demonstrate matching funds committed by the department and the faculty
member to support the activity.

2. Review and Selection Process

IP Director and assistant director will review requests and make the decision based on
established criteria. Response will be made within two weeks of receipt.

3. Reporting requirements

A brief trip report is required stating accomplishments and progress made through the
funding. The report should be addressed to the Director of International Programs,
submitted through the unit head, within two weeks following the completion of the
activity. The report will be made available for viewing by others.

F:/Action Team IP (IPAT) Faculty International Support Fund- IP Policy January25, 2002




APPENDIX 3.
ADDENDUM 1

The International Work Component of the FAS

Both the University as a whole and IFAS have stated their commitment to a greater emphasis on
"globalizing" our campus. We believe that the FAS offers an excellent opportunity to act on this
commitment while simultaneously improving the quality of our accounting system for
administrators, faculty, elected officials and other stakeholders. Therefore, we are making the
following suggestions.

I. Move the International Tab

We are very pleased that "International" is now a major tab on the FAS system. We would like to
see this tab positioned on the display screen immediately after the Personnel, Teaching, Research
and Extension tabs. This will highlight the importance of international work to faculty. Further,
international activities are programmatic in nature; it therefore makes sense that these
programmatic activities be documented along with other programmatic activities, not in the latter
sections of the FAS that deal mainly with non-programmatic items. This applies to both the Plan
of Work and the Report of Accomplishments.

I. International Window Achievement Report

It is important that administrators, stakeholders and other users of the FAS system be able to
understand how the faculty member integrates international activities into his/her overall
program. We would therefore like to see a menu item on the main international tab where the
faculty member could explain the overall approach to international work. We suggest that this be
a pop-up window that the individual fills with text. The instructions for completing this section
should read:

"Approach to and role of international work in my overall program"

1. Add Sub-Headings

The current international window lacks detail. It would greatly facilitate reporting for faculty and
enhance the utility of the'report for administrators if faculty had more guidance in reporting their
international activities and contributions. We therefore would like to see four sub-headings:
Teaching, Research, Extension/Technical Assistance and Other. This would permit us to account
for faculty time according to components of the position description.

We would also like to see more detail under each sub-heading. We feel that faculty will be more
likely to complete a good report of international activities if as many components of this section
of the report can be completed from pop-up menus as possible. Again, this will also facilitate
using the reported information by administration and stakeholders. We make the following
suggestions for the Accomplishment Report section of the FAS.

2. The Teaching Sub-Heading

The Teaching Sub-Heading would have two windows. The first window would report much the






ADDENDUM 1


same information that is reported under the current window for Teaching on the Accomplishment
Report. It would be used to report such items as short courses that are not included in the
Teaching report because they are not numbered courses.

Titles of International Courses
Plays the same role as "List of Courses" under the Teaching tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your international teaching efforts,
please indicate the title of the course and course number here. You do not need to
complete the rest of this report in this case."
Course Number
Course number if applicable
Undergraduate/Graduate
Title
Text box.
Nature of the Course
Text box. Faculty person describes the type of course conducted; e.g., "International short
course for animal science faculty from seven Central American nations"
Credits
If applicable
Number of Students
Length of Course (Days)
Semster Fall, Spring, Summer
Share
Development Effort Existing, Developed, Revised
Contents and Goals
Nations Involved:
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time Spent Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, I to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time Spent by International Collaborator Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, I to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source of Funding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. Federal Agency, International Agency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe
Benefits to the State of Florida
Evaluation
Check boxes: Was this course evaluated? Yes, No
Text box: Brief Description of Evaluation Results

The second window would report the number of undergraduate and graduate international
student advises.





ADDENDUM 1


3. The Research Sub-Heading

Again, the Research Sub-Heading would report information similar to that reported under the
existing main Research Tab. This sub-heading would be used to report research projects and
collaborations that are not reported elsewhere.

List of ProjectsCollaborations
Plays the same role as "List of Projects" under the Research tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your international research efforts,
please indicate the title of the project and the FAES project number here. You do not
need to complete the rest of this report in this case."
Project Title
Text box
New Project, Continuing Project
Check boxes
Project Duration Short, Intermediate, Long Range
Check boxes
Nations Involved:
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time Spent Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time Spent by International Collaborator Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, I to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source of Funding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. FederalAgency, International Agency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe
Goals and Objectives of Project or Collaboration
Text box
Accomplishments
Text box
Impacts
Text box
Benefits to the State of Florida
Text box

4. The Extension/Technical Assistance Sub-Heading

List ofPrograms/Collaborations
Plays the same role as "List of Programs" under the Extension tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your international extension or
outreach, please indicate the title of the program and the SMP number here. You do not
need to complete the rest of this report in this case."






ADDENDUM 1


Title
Text box
Related SMPs:
Text box
New Project, Continuing Project
Check boxes
Project Duration Short, Intermediate, Long Range
Check boxes
Nations Involved
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time Spent Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time Spent by International Collaborator Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source of Funding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. FederalAgency, InternationalAgency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe
Goals and Objectives ofProgram or Collaboration
Text box
Activities Conducted
Text box
Impacts
Text box
Benefits to the State of Florida
Text box

5. Other International Activities

This window would be used to report other kinds of international activities, such as participation
in international conferences and meeting with international visitors. It permits faculty to report
activities not covered under other sections of the Accomplishment Report, or to stress
international activities.

Activity
Plays the same role as "List of Courses," etc. in the other windows. However, this has a
pop-up list of common activities. There should be room for several entries under each type of
activity. These are organized by type of activity below

A. International Conferences and Symposia
Check Boxes: Role -Attendee, Presenter, Organizer
Text box: Dates:
Text box: Country







ADDENDUM 1


Check Boxes: Source of Funding Foreign Government or Business, US Federal
Agency, International Agency, State of Florida, Other
Text box: Benefit to the State of Florida

B. Participant in International Training
Text box: Dates
Text box: Country
Text box: Nature of the training
Check Boxes: Source of Funding Foreign Government or Business, US Federal
Agency, InternationalAgency, State of Florida, Other
Text box: Benefit to the State of Florida

C. Hosted International Visitors
Text box: Country
Check box: Duration Less than 1 Day, 1-2 Days, More than 2 Days
Check box: Nature of Interaction Presentation or Tour, Organized Meeting, Other
Text box: Benefit to the State of Florida

D. Service to International Board or Council
Check box: New, Continuing
Text box: Name of Board or Council
Text box: Nature of the Organization or Group
Check box: Time Allocated: Less than 1 Week, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Text box: Nation(s) or Region(s) Involved
Text box: Benefit to the State of Florida

E. Student Educational Tours
Text box: Name of Student Group, Tour or Organization
Check box: Role Participating Faculty, Organizer
Text box: Country or Countries Visited
Check box: Duration 1 week or less, 1 to 3 weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Text box: Purpose and Goals
Text box: Number of Students
Text box: Benefit to the State of Florida

F. Guest Lecturer in International Course, including Internet Courses
Text box: Describe your contribution

G. Faculty Development Leave

Text box: "Ifyou included an international component in any faculty development
leave, please describe the nature of the international components here. Ifyou have
already described these activities elsewhere in this Accomplishment Report, please
indicate the section where they are reported In this case, you do not need to describe
them again here "




ADDENDUM 1


H. Other
Text box: Briefly describe any other international activities.

III. International Window Plan of Work

We would also like to see the Teaching, Research, Extension/Technical Assistance and Other
sub-headings under the Plan of Work.

1. The Teaching Sub-Heading

Again, the Teaching sub-heading would closely resemble the current window for Teaching on
FAS.

Titles of International Courses
Plays the same role as "List of Courses" under the Teaching tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your planned international teaching
efforts, please indicate the title of the course and course number here. You do not need to
complete the rest of this report in this case."
Course Number
Course number if applicable
Undergraduate/Graduate
Title
Text box.
Nature of the Course
Text box. Faculty person describes the type of course conducted; e.g., "International short
course for animal science faculty from seven Central American nations"
Credits
If applicable
Length of Course (Days)
Semster Fall, Spring, Summer
Share
Development Effort -Existing, Developed, Revised
Contents and Goals
Nations Involved:
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time I Will Spend Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time International Collaborator(s) Will Spend Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, I to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source of Funding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. Federal Agency, International Agency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe





ADDENDUM 1


2. The Research Sub-Heading

Again, the Research Sub-Heading would report information similar to that reported under the
existing main Research Tab. This sub-heading would be used to report research projects and
collaborations that are not reported elsewhere.

List of Projects/Collaborations
Plays the same role as "List of Projects" under the Research tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your planned international research
efforts, please indicate the title of the project and the FAES project number here. You do
not need to complete the rest of this report in this case."
Project Title
Text box
New Project, Continuing Project
Check boxes
Project Duration Short, Intermediate, Long Range
Check boxes
Nations Involved:
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time I Will Spend Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time International Collaborator Will Spend Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, I to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source of Funding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. Federal Agency, International Agency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe
Goals and Objectives of Project or Collaboration
Text box
Expected Outcomes and Impacts
Text box

3. The Extension/Technical Assistance Sub-Heading

List of Programs/Collaborations
Plays the same role as "List of Programs" under the Extension tab. We would like an
opening box that says: "If you have already reported your planned international extension
or technical assistance efforts, please indicate the title of the program and the SMP
number here. You do not need to complete the rest of this report in this case."
Title
Text box
Related SMPs:
Text box








ADDENDUM 1


New Project, Continuing Project
Check boxes
Project Duration Short, Intermediate, Long Range
Check boxes
Nations Involved
Text box
Type of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Check boxes: National Organization, International Organization, Private Sector
Name of Collaborating International Institution/Business
Text box.
Time I Will Spend Overseas
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Time International Collaborator Widl Spend Here
Check boxes: 1 Week or Less, 1 to 3 Weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Source ofFunding
Pop-up list: Collaborating Entity, U.S. Federal Agency, International Agency, State of
Florida, Other with pop-up text box that says: Please Describe
Rationale
Text box
Activities Planned
Text box

4. Other International Activities

This window would be used to report other kinds of international activities, such as participation
in international conferences and meeting with international visitors. It permits faculty to report
activities not covered under other sections of the Accomplishment Report, or to stress
international activities.

Activity
Plays the same role as "List of Courses," etc. in the other windows. However, this has a
pop-up list of common activities. There should be room for several entries under each type of
activity. These are organized by type of activity below

A. International Conferences and Symposia
Check Boxes: Role Attendee, Presenter, Organizer
Text box: Country

B. Participant in International Training
Text box: Country
Text box: Nature of the training

C. Service to International Board or Council
Check box: New, Continuing
Text box: Name ofBoard or Council
Text box: Nature of the Organization or Group





ADDENDUM 1


Text box: Nation(s) or Region(s) Involved

D. Student Educational Tours
Text box: Name of Student Group, Tour or Organization
Check box: Role Participating Faculty, Organizer
Text box: Country or Countries To Be Visited
Check box: Duration 1 week or less, I to 3 weeks, More than 3 Weeks
Text box: Purpose and Goals

E. Professional Development Leave
Text box: "If you plan to include an international component in any faculty
development leave, please describe the component here Ifyou have already described
these activities elsewhere in this Plan of Work, please indicate where they are
described. In this case, you do not need to describe them again here."

F. Other
Text box: Briefly describe any other international activities that you plan.







APPENDIX 3a


November 21, 2000
International Programs Action Team

Changes to Faculty Evaluation Form

Teaching/Academic Programs

Add 1
Works with international students, participates in international courses and study abroad
programs and brings international opportunities to students at UF.

Add 2
Incorporates an international perspective into and uses international experience to
enhance teaching and academic program.

Experiment Station/Research

Change Item 10
Remove the word international when it appears

Add 1
Is recognized internationally as an expert in his/her field of research (receives
international awards or recognition or is invited to address major peer and/or industry
groups.

Add 2
Maintains effective relationships with the international university/scientific community
(presentations, meetings, publications).

Add 3
Regularly participates in or leads international research projects and uses international
experience to enhance research programs.

Extension

Add 1
Actively participates in regional and national extension programs, projects and initiatives.

Add 2
Creates awareness among statewide and county faculty of international research findings,
policy issues and programs and uses international experience to enhance state extension
programs.






APPENDIX 3b


Staal, Lisette M.

From: Staal, Lisette M.
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2001 3:56 PM
To: Capinera, John L.
Cc: Baird, Direlle D.; 'hanlon@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu'; Maynard, Don N.; Mullahey, Jeffrey J.;
'krr@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu'; 'dsw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu'
Subject: IPAT suggestions for-Faculty evaluation form, part 2




IPAT suggestions
-Faculty Eval...
Dear Dr. Capinera:

The International Programs Action Team (IPAT), under the direction of Dan Cantliffe, has
worked over the last year to address mechanisms to increase internationalization in IFAS.
A full report will be submitted to Vice President Martin soon. However, in late November
of last year the IPAT Committee reviewed the faculty evaluation form with an eye toward
incorporating consideration of international activities. This resulted in the following
recommendations for the evaluation form. Dan Cantliffe and Pete Hildebrand shared this
with the VP and Deans around the same time, and they were supportive of these efforts. I
am sending you the recommended changes for your committee's consideration in case you have
not seen them earlier.

Please feel free to contact me or Pete Hildebrand in the International Programs office, or
Dan Cantliffe.

Thanks for your consideration.
Lisette

Lisette M. Staal
Assistant Director, International Programs
Office of the Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Florida
PO Box 110282 Gainesville, FL 32611-0282
phone: 352-392-1965
fax: 352-392-7127



-----Original Message-----
From: John Capinera [mailto:jlcap@MAIL.IFAS.UFL.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2001 5:07 PM
To: IFAS-FACULTY-L@LISTS.IFAS.UFL.EDU
Subject: [IFAS-FACULTY-L] faculty evaluation form, part 2


Concerning my request for input on the faculty evaluation form, several of you indicated
that you weren't familiar with it, or didn't have ready access. I've attached a copy, and
you can view it at the IFAS personnel web site http://forms.ifas.ufl.edu/personnel.htm







November 21, 2000
International Programs Action Team

Changes to Faculty Evaluation Form

Teaching/Academic Programs

Add 1
Works with international students, participates in international courses and study abroad
programs and brings international opportunities to students at UF.

Add 2
Incorporates an international perspective into and uses international experience to
enhance teaching and academic program.

Experiment Station/Research

Change Item 10
Remove the word international when it appears

Add 1
Is recognized internationally as an expert in his/her field of research (receives
international awards or recognition or is invited to address major peer and/or industry
groups.

Add 2
Maintains effective relationships with the international university/scientific community
(presentations, meetings, publications).

Add 3
Regularly participates in or leads international research projects and uses international
experience to enhance research programs.

Extension

Add 1
Actively participates in regional and national extension programs, projects and initiatives.

Add 2
Creates awareness among statewide and county faculty of international research findings,
policy issues and programs and uses international experience to enhance state extension
programs.






Faculty Evaluation Form


Name
Department/Center
Years in UF/IFAS
Name (s) ofEvaluator (s)


Rank
Calendar Year Evaluation
Total Years in Present Rank
Date
Date


Section 1. Attendant Responsibilities

In addition to the specific assigned duties and responsibilities of a faculty member, the established
policy of the University continues to be that the faculty member must fulfill his/her responsibility
to the welfare of the University, to society, and to her/her profession by manifesting academic
competence, scholarly discretion, and good citizenship. These expectations and those pertinent to
employment with UF/IFAS and its mission shall be considered in the evaluation process as they
affect the total evaluation of duties and responsibilities of a UF/IFAS faculty member. All items
are applicable to each faculty member.
UN IR ST CO EX


I. Contributes in a constructive and positive manner to
department/ center/unit's mission and goals.

2. Works cooperatively and harmoniously with colleagues and
administrators.

3. Demonstrates professional conduct in teaching, Exp.
Station Research, or Cooperative Extension assignments
and attendant duties and responsibilities.

4. Complies with the governing rules of UF/IFAS.


5. As appointment or position dictates, the faculty member
works cooperatively and effectively with stake holders.

6. Meets established UF/IFAS and/or unit deadlines.

7. Represents UF/IFAS in a professional manner in all
interactions with clientele.

Annual Assessment of Attendant Responsibilities (Che


(2) (3)
DO D


(4) (5)
DO L


O 0 OD 0

0 0 D a D


0 L O0 0 0

O O] O O O[


ck one)


Unacceptable
(1)


Improvement
Required
(2)
O


Standard
Professional Performance Commendable
(3) (4)
0 [


Exemplary
(5)
0


Page I







Duties, Responsibilities, and Performance


Teaching / Academic Programs
Experiment Station Research
Cooperative Extension


University Governance responsibilities are considered to be part of all three functions. For example,
I00% Research appointment would still mean that the faculty member has governance duties.


Teaching / Academic Programs


UN IR ST CO EX
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)


1. Participates in achieving goals of undergraduate and graduate
academic programs.


2. Uses effective teaching techniques.

3. Course materials are up-to-date.

4. Participates in self-improvement programs.


5. Participates in out-of-class educational (co-curricula/extra
curricula) activities.

6. Participates in interdisciplinary programs; participates in
international programs.

7. Involved with curriculum development activities at
undergraduate/graduate levels.

8. Develops course instructional materials including software,
video, multi-media and/or distance education materials to
support teaching.

9. Is effective as an academic advisor, graduate coordinator,
undergraduate coordinator, placement coordinator or
recruitment coordinator.

I 0. Pursues excellence in teaching and is effective as a teacher as
indicated by students evaluations, peer evaluations, and other
indicators of performance.

I 1. Actively participates in graduate student education, post-
doctoral education, supervision of undergraduate honors
theses and /or undergraduate research projects.


O O 0 0 0

O 0 0 0 0 L

0 LI 0 L L 0


O L 0


0 0 0 0 0 0









0 0 0 00





O 0 0 0 0
O L o O L L


S LI LI LI LI LI




LI LI LI LI LI LI



S LI LI LI LI LI



S LI LI LI LI LI


NAME:


Section 11.


Page 2









Teaching / Academic Programs (continued)


12. Seeks outside funding to support the academic programs.
(Challenge Grants, Scholarships/Fellowships; Academic
Programs Mini-grants, etc.)

13. Actively and constructively participates in university, IFAS,
school, center and/or departmental committees pertaining to
academic programs such as curriculum and student
admissions.

14. Actively participates in academic and/or professional
activities related to teaching and academic programs.


Experiment Station Research
(Florida Agricultural Experiment Station)

1. Maintains an active research program describes by a well
managed, current FAES (CRIS) project.

2. Attracts external funds in support of the research.

3. Pursue research problems that address important questions of
science or identified problems of the industry, and that fit the
mission of the FAES and IFAS.

4. Demonstrates competence in design, conduct and
interpretation of research.

5. Cooperates with other scientists and/or extension faculty as
part of teams to address important issues of science and
society.

6. Manages personnel and budgets, including use of
UF/IFAS standard policies and procedures.

7. Regularly documents results of research by publishing in
appropriate refereed journals.


8. Regularly documents results of original research to a broader
audience in addition to refereed journals (i.e. grower
publications, trade publication).


UN IR ST CO EX n/
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

D 0 0 D 00



D O 0 0 D




0 0 D 0 0 0


UN IR ST CO EX n/a
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

E O 00 0 0


O 0 0Q o O

0 0 0 0 0 0



0 0 l 0 0 O


E0 0 0 0 o


NAME:


Page 3








Experiment Station Research (continued)


UN IR ST
(1) (2) (3)


CO EX
(4) (5)


9. Research results will likely have significant impact on
science and/or contribute significantly to the resolution of
problems facing industry/clientele.

I 0. Is recognized nationally or internationally as an expert in
his/her field of research. (Receives international, national
awards, is invited to address major peer and/or industry
groups.)

I 1. Maintains effective relationships with clientele, industry, and
the university/scientific community. (Presentations,
meetings, regional, or national efforts.)

12. Regularly participates in or leads interstate or regional
research projects.


a 0 0 0 O I


0 0 LI LI LI LI



L0 L O O LI
O a O O O O


Cooperative Extension UN IR ST CO EX n/a
(Florida Cooperative Extension Service) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

1. Actively participates and takes leadership in appropriate state O O L 0 0 L
major program design teams including planning (needs
assessment and setting measurable objectives),
implementation (marketing and delivery), and evaluation of
programs.


2. As an active member of the state major program design team,
develops educational materials (print, electronic, videos, etc.)
needed to support the efforts of programs.

3. Establishes measurable goals for and documents impact of
assigned personal extension program.

4. Is current with the latest research and technologies within
field of expertise.

5. Conducts educational workshops, short courses,
demonstrations, etc. at the local, regional, and state levels to
address clientele needs as defined in the plan of work.

6. Develops and teaches in-service education programs for
county faculty.


NAME:


0I 0 O 0 0


O o O O I


O O 0 O O O



O LI L O OL



0 0 O 0 L OL


Page 4







Cooperative Extension (continued)


7. Creates awareness among county and statewide faculty of
opportunities for new programs initiatives and provides
leadership for the development implementation and
evaluation of new initiatives.

8. Provides subject matter and other assistance to county and
statewide faculty.

9. Responds in a timely manner to county and state faculty and
other state clientele (phone, e-mail, material review, or other
appropriate mechanisms.)

10. Seeks funding sources to supplement/complement existing
and new extension programs.

I 1. Communicates with research and academic program faculty
to address issues faced by industry/clientele.

12. Team teaches with county faculty in support of county
extension programs.

13. Demonstrates scholarship through the application and/or
generation of knowledge.

14. Participates in discipline and professional activities and/or
societies.


UN IR ST CO EX n/a
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

O 0 O a O 0


O. O O O O0


0 O O O O O


C1 12 [2 C1 12 1


12 12 12 C1 12 1


UF/IFAS Governance Activities not specifically related to
Teaching, Research, or Extension. UN IR ST CO EX
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)


1. Actively and constructively participates in UF/IFAS activity
such as search and screen committees, faculty advisory
committees, etc.


1O O O 0


Other (Optional) If used, it should be identified in the annual plan UN IR ST CO EX n/a
of work. This category is for any responsibility not otherwise
covered in this document. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)


NAME:


Page 5








UN IR
(1) (2)


Teaching / Academic Programs

Experiment Station Research

Cooperative Extension


ST CO EX
(3) (4) (5)


0 0 0 0 0

0 0 O 0 0 a
Ol Oi Li Li Li Li
Li Li EL Li Li Li


D 0 0 Q


O O


Note: Ratings UN(1) and IR(2) are below a satisfactory level. Therefore, either of these ratings in any one
of these categories for two or more years within any given six year period will precipitate a Sustained
Performance review.

Section 111. Overall Annual Evaluation

The overall evaluation reflects the assigned duties in teaching / instructional activities, Experiment Station
Research, Cooperative Extension, UF/IFAS governance, and attendant responsibilities expected of and
pertinent to employment as a UF/IFAS faculty member. This assessment will be reflected, to the extent
possible, in salary decisions and other personnel matters (such as awards, tenure, promotions). For
application of the IFAS Sustained Performance Policy, ratings of UN(I) or IR(2) are less than satisfactory;
and receipt of these ratings for two years, within any given 6 (six) year period, will activate a Sustained
Performance review.


Unacceptable
(1)


Improvement
Required
(2)


Standard
Professional Performance Commendable
(3) (4)


Exemplary
(5)


Section IV.


Progress Toward Tenure and Promotion (if applicable) The faculty member is
proceeding toward PROMOTION as noted below. Comments should be included in
Section VI.


Satisfactory L


Unsatisfactory O


The faculty member is proceeding toward TENURE as noted below. Comments should be
included in Section VI.


Satisfactory L


Unsatisfactory Q


Performance Improvement Plan (if appropriate) The faculty member's progress through
their improvement plan is noted below. Comments should be included in Section VI.


Satisfactory O


Unsatisfactory L


NAME:


Annual Assessment of Performance


Section V.


Page 6








Section VI. Faculty Evaluation Summary Comments The evaluator(s) may choose to attach a letter
instead of these comments. Letter attached YES o NO 0
























Section VII. Faculty Response

Any comments by the faculty member should be addressed in a separate response letter to the evaluator(s)
within fifteen (15) calendar days of receipt. Such a response letter becomes part of this evaluation record.
Signing this evaluation does not imply agreement.


Section VIII. Authorizing Signatures


Signature of Evaluator


Signature of Evaluator


Faculty Member's Signature

Faculty response letter to follow? YES D


Date discussed


Date discussed


Date


NO 0


NAME:


Page 7




APPENDIX 4


A DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES

In today's ever more globalized world, a university education must have an
international component if it is to adequately prepare students for the challenges
they will face after graduation. Fortunately the leadership of UF recognizes this
and incorporates it in their planning and goals. As the short television
advertisement during the Orange Bowl stated, UF aspires to be of service to the
state, the nation and the world.

Making internationalization the focus of the accreditation process that is currently
underway is one demonstration of the priority President Young and Provost
Colburn assign to internationalization. Another is the fact that UF has established
a policy of encouraging all its undergraduates to participate in at least two of five
activities: study abroad, internships, research with faculty, volunteer service and
leadership.

These are difficult times for the entire state university system however. The
economic recession, the reaction to the terrorist attacks of September 11, the
legislature's willingness to cut university budgets, but not to grant the authority to
the new boards of trustees to raise tuition, all contribute to greater demands on
increasingly scarce resources. International programs, despite being a priority,
will face much competition for the limited funds from UF's central administration.
In addition, an anticipated INS program (SEVIS) for tracking international
students and scholars will place additional reporting burdens on UFIC's limited
resources.

To promote the goal of greater internationalization of UF, new initiatives as well
as resources will nonetheless be required. To do this effectively over the next 3
to 5 years will be a major challenge for UF, for UFIC and for the EAB.

UFIC is an organization that provides service to a number of constituencies.
There are specific groups requiring individual assistance such as students
studying abroad, international students and international scholars and faculty
members who want to expand their international activities. There are also
broader constituencies where UFIC has a more general role in serving the
university as a whole as well as our city, state, nation and the world.

Since UFIC is a service organization, we can encourage and facilitate the
international activities of our key constituencies, but not control them. Many other
factors come into play when students and faculty make decisions about overseas
involvement including the economic situation at home and abroad, time
pressures, the flexibility of their academic programs, security concerns and
program costs. While we can strive to ensure that no one misses the opportunity
for greater international involvement due to a lack of information, setting long
term goals for the number of students or faculty participating is probably not a







particularly useful exercise. Greater financial resources, however, will allow us to
provide powerful incentives to encourage greater involvement.

One way UFIC will likely address the problem of a lack of resources will be to
move more toward a fee-for-service basis for the three groups to which we
provide individualized services. This will help underwrite our budget and lessen
our reliance on state funds. While we must also serve the broader constituencies
as a way to increase UFIC's relevance to UF's mission of research, service and
education there is no easy way to recover the costs of doing so.

Listed below are several initiatives, in the form of both new and expanded
programs and facilities, which would demonstrate and assist our efforts to
promote a global perspective. Such programs will form the core of UFIC's longer-
term funding strategy.

A. BUILDINGS: The Hub building is to be renovated once the bookstore that
now occupies its ground floor moves into a new facility being constructed at the
Reitz Union. A new International Center at the Hub, which is centrally located on
campus, could become even more of a focal point for international activities. It
could house UFIC's current staff as well as provide additional facilities and
space. For instance, international students could use it as a place to study,
socialize and share their respective cultures with American students.

B. PROGRAMS: Apart from the physical facilities, to further promote
internationalization, UFIC needs to expand or create a number of programs to
serve its various constituencies:

1. Programs for the Broader Community:

Speakers Programs: A series of speakers on international topics would stimulate
debate and better understanding of current issues among UF students, faculty
and the public. One indicator of the potential interest in such programs was a
panel discussion by UF faculty members on the significance of the events of
September 11 that was held in early October. Organized by UFIC with the help of
two student organizations, the event filled the University Auditorium. UFIC is
planning to follow up by organizing periodic gatherings under an International
Issues Forum that would use the same format to have public discussions of
issues of current interest.

There are three levels of speakers programs possible. All of them deserve
support and would be open to the public as a way of promoting consideration of
international issues by the larger Gainesville community beyond UF's campus:







-- High level: An annual lecture by a speaker with a worldwide reputation. If
this event were tied to a conference on a related subject, it could encourage
significant faculty participation.

-- Mid level: A series of lectures by prominent experts speaking on key
international issues. Such a series could form a one credit, 2000 or 3000 level
course in CLAS called "The Frontiers of Globalization" similar to "The
Frontiers of Science" which has been offered in the past. (A 3000 level course
might have wider appeal and meet more requirements for majors in an
international studies curriculum.)

-- Lower level: UFIC initiated the International Speakers' Program in
November 2000 under which UFIC contributes up to $1500 to underwrite the
expense of bringing scholars to campus to speak on international issues of
general interest. UFIC funds are used to match an equal contribution from the
department or college in question and have supported 15 events since its
inception. The funds available in UFIC's budget to continue this program are
limited, however, and unless alternative funding is found UFIC will have to
reduce its support in the future. As budget cuts affect other units on campus,
matching funds from academic departments will also become harder to find.

2. Programs for UF Faculty:

a. Annual Faculty Award in Recognition of International Activities

One of the most effective ways to promote a more global perspective at UF is to
stimulate greater faculty involvement in international activities. Such involvement
would assist the faculty in carrying out their research, teaching and service
responsibilities while raising international awareness on campus.

There is no field where research could not be enhanced by the development of
greater international cooperation and collaboration. The number of students who
obtain overseas experience during their time at UF will greatly depend on the
degree to which there are faculty members who are actively engaged
internationally and who encourage their students to study and do research
abroad. Finally, participation by UF faculty in international efforts that have
significant visibility and impact will raise UF's profile, enhance its role as a major
research university and can be of service to our state, our nation and the world.

A generous annual award designed to recognize and support a UF faculty
member involved in significant international endeavors would acknowledge the
importance of such work and provide a major incentive to others to become more
involved internationally.

A university-wide committee could be established to judge applicants for the
award. Nominations would be made by department chairs and endorsed by the






relevant dean. Nominations would be judged on past accomplishments and
projected future activities. Consideration would be given to the following factors:

Research the extent to which the faculty member's international
activities make a significant contribution to his/her discipline and the
degree to which the international component of the activities adds to that
contribution.

Teaching the extent to which the past activities and future plans involve
the participation of UF undergraduate and graduate students in study or
research activities abroad. Also, the number of new courses developed
and other curriculum changes that resulted from the international efforts.

Service the extent to which the international activities raise UF's profile
as a major research university and the benefits are derived .from them as
indicated by the number of people affected and the ways their lives are
improved.

Ideally the endowment for this award, together with state matching funds, would
be sufficient to permit a prize of $10,000 and one or two lesser prizes each year.


b. Another effective way to encourage overseas experiences is for faculty
from foreign institutions to come to UF and teach for a semester or longer. An
international scholars' fund could be used to support such visits and to
encourage international research by faculty.

c. Endowed professorships could also be established to encourage work
on curriculum development and internationalization in specific areas.


3. Programs for Students:

a. UFIC has a number of scholarship opportunities for study abroad, but
additional resources would help encourage students with financial need to
participate in study abroad. A scholarship of $1000 annually can be endowed for
$20,000.

b. Under a provision of Florida law, students from Latin America and the
Caribbean are eligible to pay in-state tuition if they have a scholarship funded by
the federal or state government. A new fund to provide scholarships for such
students could provide $1,000 annual scholarships for students from Latin
America and the Caribbean (which under state law would allow them to pay in-
state tuition.)







c. Internships could be created at the overseas offices of corporation and
nongovernmental organizations to provide work experience abroad to five
students a year.

d. Development of an International Students' Scholarship Fund to help
international students at UF who need financial assistance to complete their
studies.


4. Other Initiatives:

In addition to these programs, efforts to approach international problems
differently are required. At present, international studies at the UF focus
research and teaching on the languages, culture, politics, and economies of
other countries and regions/areas, with particular emphasis on Latin America and
Africa.

The end of the Cold War and the new millennium have brought significant
qualitative and quantitative changes in the international arena. Supranational
actors such as the World Trade Organization and subnational actors such as
transnational corporations have grown in number and influence. Understanding
countries and regions remains important, but it also is important to consider
transnational and global phenomena such as global climate change, international
peacekeeping, the global women's movement, the AIDS epidemic, global capital
markets, food supply and environmental issues, weapons of mass destruction,
energy supplies, technology, population growth and international law. The
complexity and interconnectedness of such phenomena and the problems they
present require holistic and interdisciplinary analyses that transcend the
customary academic departments and colleges.

a. UFIC has begun a Transnational and Global Studies Initiative (TGSI) to
address the increasingly pervasive, multi-faceted phenomena referred to as
"transnationalism" and/or "globalization." We envision the Transnational and
Global Studies Initiative as building upon existing strengths of UF's regional,
economic, environmental and language studies centers and programs, bringing
together scholars from the various disciplines. The Initiative will enhance UF's
capacity to address transnational issues, promote an integrated approach to
globalization by a variety of academic departments, contribute to UF's area
studies programs, and via traditional means or new technologies, bring our
faculty and students into contact with scholars and students from around the
world.

b. An annual Special Event to honor visiting scholars, students and
faculty would help strengthen the bond between these groups and UF. Many of
them will return to their own countries and be highly successful. The UF
Foundation is just beginning to think about ways to promote contributions by






overseas alumni and our efforts to ensure international students and faculty get
the most out of their UF experience could pay significant dividends in the future.

c. Funded position for On-line Bulletin featuring the international activities
of UF scholars, faculty and students. A regular publication put out several times a
year would be very helpful in expanding our outreach efforts. To avoid the costs
of reproduction and to make it more timely, this "publication" would be entirely
online.


d.
proposed
Generally
salary.


If UFIC shows some success at putting together some of these
programs, it could justify the need for its own development officer.
the UF Foundation underwrites such positions by paying half of the




.... r- os JaV 4965 IFAS DEAN RESRCH ]Ot
APPENDIX 5




Role of International Programs in the
Mission of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station



The mission of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station (FAES) is to invent,
discover and develop applications of knowledge in support of the agricultural and
natural resource industries of Florida.

FAES is a member of the global community and international activities that enhance
the FAES mission are encouraged. Consequently, the use of knowledge generated
outside of the state of Florida to enhance Florida industries is integral to this
mission. Similarly, the application of FAES knowledge to enhance the global
community is appropriate. Collaboration by FAES scientists with other scientists in
the global community can accomplish both objectives.

It is the goal of FAES to encourage such international activities that:

a) enhance the research skills of the faculty

b) develop research information useful to the FAES mission

c) develop research information that contributes to a disciplinary
body of knowledge

d) enhance ability of FAES to support its research activities

e) enhance research skills and contributions of IFAS students

It is an expectation that FAES faculty participate in international activities that meet
this goal. Such activities will be rewarded in promotion and other merit processes.
While there are no expected quantitative goals for each faculty regarding the
amount of international activity, professors and associate professors should
participate in a significant international activity every 5-7 years at a minimum.
There is no minimum expectation for an assistant professor, but any such activity
will be considered and credited. International activity that meets the FAES goal can
be conducted on official time. There are no "trade-offs" of other FAES productivity
expectations since international research should be productive.




MA Nu. JbL-IjYZeYdd


nnK-IJ-LeUU1 Wt U!3;eq Mn Irfi HOHUtrRlU rKUUWSb


CALS GLOBAL GATORS
International Experiences in the
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS)
University of Florida


CALS has begun several initiatives aimed at increasing awareness of and opportunities for
international experiences among our students. This college level initiative is known as CALS
GLOBAL GATORS. Where possible, our college level activities have been linked to larger IFAS-
wide cooperative agreements, including research, extension, and academic programs. Our
internationalization efforts support our Florida First goal of producing society-ready graduates.

We have increased coordination with the University of Florida International Center (UFIC) and have
increased promotion of existing, traditional "study abroad" programs. We are working with the
UFIC to identify any existing study abroad programs which occur at colleges of agriculture which
can better accommodate our upper division students.

We have also worked to enhance an existing international relationship with the Panamerican School
of Agriculture (la Escuela Agricola Panamericana, EAP) in Honduras (Zanorano). A recent visit
to Zamorano was made to recruit students for the existing 3+1 program with CALS, as well as to
arrange a study tour for spring semester 2001. The study tour will include up to 15 students and
include time at Zamorano as well as a national tour ofl onduran agriculture and natural resources.

A new cooperative agreement was implemented with Escuela de Agricultura de la Region Tropical
Ilumeda (EARTH University) in Costa Rica in spring 2000. This relationship will offer CALS
students opportunities to participate in internships at EARTH and for EARTI I students to intern in
Florida. A recent visit to EARTH indicated that opportunities exist for faculty exchanges and study
tours as well.

A cooperative agreement with Escuela Superior Politcenica del Literal (ESPOL) in Ecuador was
initiated this year and a 2+2 agreement signed by both universities in a recent visit to Ecuador. The
2+2 agreement, like the Zamorano 3+1 agreement, pemnits students to transfer from ESPOL to
CALS with in-state tuition and fees. The first students from this program will be enrolling Fall
Semester 2001, primarily in agribusiness. Opportunities for study tours in Ecuador are also being
explored.

Our CALS European connection includes a semester long program in Moscow and a summer
program in Prague. The Moscow State University program includes two CA LS students spring
semester 2001 who will join students from other U.S. Colleges of Agriculture in an academic
program taught in part by U.S. faculty. CALS also actively participates in the faculty portion of this
program, having one member teach in Moscow last spring semester and two scheduled to teach
spring 2002. Our program in 'rague will involve CALS students participating in a six week session.


F. Uj








UNIVERSITY OF
^FLORIDA

EXTENSION
Institute of Food and Agricutural Sdences


March 19th, 2001


Memorandum

To: Dan Cantliffe

From: Christine Waddill

Subject: Extension Perspective on International Programs

Goal Statement

The International Programs Office as it relates to the Extension function oflFAS, should
be a vehicle to enhance faculty knowledge relating to the creation of new markets, the
measurement of competition, the assessment of potential disease or pest importation or
exportation, and the benefits of studying and understanding of diverse cultures. The
context of international Extension work should be based on the model of domestic
Extension programs, which are rooted in the concept of utilizing university based
research knowledge to help solve practical and complex problems for growers, families
and communities.

International Involvement

Extension has encouraged state and county faculty to be involved in international
experiences. We believe that these experiences strengthen the both the individual and
the organization. Numerous faculty have been involved in international experiences but
we have never had an organized and systematic approach to provide these opportunities.

Organized Programs

Ideally, we would like to see an organized effort to enhance the participation of our
faculty in international work. This program may include in-service training with the
international program office on matters of policy and politics in the host country,
language training and forums with faculty in the centers for Latin American Studies,
African Studies, and other internationally oriented academic programs on the campus of
the University of Florida. We would also like the opportunity to host international
visitors in our County Extension Offices and Research and Education Centers to give








them firsthand experience with the U.S. extension model.


Prior to any of the faculty taking assignments out of the country, we would like for them
to be prepared with sufficient in-service training relevant to the area of the world where
they will be working. International participation should be in the framework of the goal
statement of the first paragraph of this document. It will be helpful if faculty could know
in advance what to expect culturally and programmatically, and have a clear
understanding of their obligations to record and subsequently report their experiences to
UF/IFAS. These reports could be made at organized faculty forums or annual meetings
such as the Florida Association of Extension Professionals.

Extension International Experiences During the Past Seven Years

As stated above, several Extension faculty have participated in international work during
the past seven years. Some the participants have been Larry Halsey, Barbara Hughes,
Wayne Odegaard, Howard Beck and Fedro Zazueta. Halsey went to Bulgaria, Hughes
went to South Africa and Odegaard went to Honduras. Howard Beck visited and worked
with colleagues in Japan. Zazueta has visited several countries and is working closely
with his department and other IFAS faculty and staff to host an international conference
on computers in agriculture in Brazil this coming September. Last year a group of agents
traveled to Mexico to study their production, markets and NAFTA.




APPENDIX 6


Expanding International Experiences of Students
and Faculty in the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)










Task Force Report
Draft 8 April 16










Submitted to IFAS
in Response to the Request from
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
for a Self-Study


April 16, 2002








Expanding International Experiences of Students and
Faculty in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Summary

Task Force Mandate

Task Force Members

Task Force Process

Context
IFAS in a Global Context
IFAS Institutional Context

IFAS Mission, How it Relates to International Activities
Mission
Relationship to International Activities

International Activities of IFAS: Current Status Sheet

Contact Information

Unit International Activities
Research/Scholarship
Research Mission
International Research Programs
Gaps, Needs, Opportunities
Instruction/Teaching
Teaching Mission
International Teaching Programs
Gaps, Needs, Opportunities
Service/Outreach (Extension)
Extension Mission
International Extension Programs
Gaps, Needs, Opportunities

Recommendations for Expanding International Opportunities for Students and Faculty in
IFAS








Expanding International Experiences of Students and Faculty
in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)

Executive Summary

A Task Force was formed in September 2001 to document current international activities in
IFAS and to develop recommendations for expanding international experiences of IFAS
faculty and students. The Task Force was instructed to also provide information requested by
the University of Florida administration for a Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
(SACS) self-study on international efforts. The Task Force assembled information on current
activities from various sources, reviewed international opportunities available to faculty and
students at other prestigious AAU universities, interacted with faculty, students and
administrators, and wrote this report to document our findings and recommendations. Most
international activities have been initiated by individual faculty, and there has not been a
mechanism for documenting these activities at the IFAS level. We found that the current
IFAS administration has placed international activities at a higher priority than in the past
and has been working to solve these problems. The major focal points for IFAS international
activities are the International Programs office and the College of Agriculture and Life
Sciences (CALS) for faculty and students, respectively. There were many international
activities in research, scholarship, and service/outreach in IFAS during the last year.
Additionally, the level of international expertise of our faculty is high as judged by their
international grant funding ($8 million), the number who published in international refereed
journals (418), the number that traveled abroad to attend conferences or conduct research
during the last year (216), and other indicators. Nevertheless, the Task Force identified
various needs and opportunities for further enhancing the international experiences of faculty
and students so that IFAS will be recognized as one of the elite agricultural and natural
resource management institutions worldwide relative to its international focus. In all, twenty-
three recommendations were made. Recommendations for undergraduate student
opportunities focused on both on-campus and off campus (international) experiences as well
as encouraging foreign language courses after having dropped this requirement in the past.
Recommendations to expand international opportunities for graduate students focused on
providing support for them to travel abroad for different types of short and longer term
experiences and on-campus opportunities through increasing the international content of core
courses, developing international visitor/lecture programs, and offering international
certificate programs. A total of 12 recommendations were made to increase opportunities for
faculty. These included recommendations related to helping faculty develop international
programs in research, teaching, and extension, integrating international faculty positions
university wide, enhancing mechanisms for helping faculty compete for international
opportunities, providing increased support and recognition for international extension
activities, identifying and supporting International Priority Program Areas, and providing
support for foreign visitors to give lectures and interact with both faculty and students.
Recommendations were made for IFAS to develop mechanisms for more systematic
reporting and evaluation of international activities of its faculty and students and for creating
a "community" of international alumni, capitalizing on the many international graduates from
UF/IFAS who are in responsible positions overseas.









Task Force Mandate


The IFAS Deans formed this Task Force in September, 2001. Its overall purpose was to
document current international activities by faculty and students in IFAS and to develop a
comprehensive globalization plan for IFAS, including the College of Agriculture and Life
Sciences (CALS), the Experiment Station, and the Cooperative Extension Service. The
creation of the Task Force was motivated by the request by the University of Florida
administration for a Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) self-study on
international efforts. One of the components of the UF accreditation is the development and
institutionalization of global awareness and knowledge. Specifically, this committee's charge
was to:

1. Review the current context of IFAS globalization;

2. Evaluate how the IFAS mission relates to international activities;

3. Complete a review of current IFAS international activities, using the
guidelines provided by the SACS review;

4. Identify and describe gaps, needs, and opportunities in IFAS international
activities for research/scholarship, instruction/academic programs, and service
/outreach (extension);

5. Provide recommendations for expanding international opportunities and
activities in IFAS

This report summarizes the results of the self-study.


Task Force Members

James W. Jones (Chair), Nicholas Comerford, Jonathan Crane, Mike Fields, John Hall, Jane
Luzar, Debbie Miller, P. K. Nair, Nick Place, Rick Schoellhorn, Lisette Staal, Mickie
Swisher, Peter Vergot III


Task Force Process

The Task Force activities were organized into five phases. In the first phase, we assessed
opportunities for internationalization experiences for students and faculty at other major
AAU universities to both gauge our own situation relative to theirs and to get additional ideas
for developing recommendations for expanding international opportunities for students and
faculty. During the second phase, committee members gathered information to identify
current international activities in which students (undergraduate and graduate) and faculty
(teaching, research and extension) in IFAS are engaged, and to identify mechanisms that








provide these opportunities. This phase included surveys of departments and centers in IFAS,
review of grant and travel records, and interviews with administrators. Our third phase
consisted of assembling these ideas and writing the first report draft. In the fourth phase, the
Task Force reviewed the draft and discussed its contents with administration, faculty, and
students in IFAS. Finally, we revised the draft and submitted the final Task Force Report to
IFAS administration.


Context

IFAS in a Global Context. The interaction, connection, and interdependence among people
and societies throughout the world are increasing rapidly. Constant improvements in
technology, increased travel, and the mobility of qualified individuals to work, live and
interact across international boarders drive this globalization of societies and economies.
Purely nationalistic or parochial views will not be successful in a future where societies and
economies throughout the world are intimately interconnected and dependent upon each
other. Furthermore, the globalization of societies and economies has profound effects on
domestic politics and international relations as well as on institutions of higher learning.

The State of Florida's geographic situation and demographics position its institutions of
higher education to take full advantage of international opportunities. Florida is already a
gateway to commerce, travel, and cultural exchange throughout the Caribbean and Latin
American region. Large segments of the population are originally from these regions and the
Asian-American population is growing. All along Florida's coastline, major air and water
ports are involved in commerce and Florida hosts millions of tourist from throughout the
world each year.


The University of Florida (UF) is the premier institution of higher education in Florida, and
the University's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is a federal, state, and
local government partnership dedicated to education, research and extension. Core aspects of
the IFAS mission are to develop knowledge in agricultural, human, and natural resources and
life sciences and to make that knowledge accessible to sustain and enhance the quality of
human life. A primary challenge of higher education is to prepare future world citizens to be
competent, confident, and comfortable in an increasingly global cultural and economic
setting. To address this challenge UF-IFAS has internationalization as an integral part of the
institution's mission.

IFAS Institutional Context. IFAS is complex, reflecting the unit's mission and administration.
The University of Florida is the1862 land grant university of the State of Florida and is the
primary unit in the state with the responsibility for agricultural and natural resource research,
education, and subsequent extension of results to citizens of the State of Florida. The federal
legislation that created the land grant or people's university (the Morrill Acts of 1862, 1890,
and 1994, the Hatch Act of 1887, the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and several others) clearly
states this responsibility. The land grant university includes the state Agricultural Experiment
Station and the University of Florida Extension Service.








IFAS was created in 1964 by combining the Agricultural Experiment Station, the College of
Agriculture, the University of Florida Extension Service and the School of Forestry, into one
budgetary unit. The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences is responsible for the
administration of academic programs and serves as the degree-granting unit for the
University of Florida's agricultural and life sciences programs. The Agricultural Experiment
Station, in cooperation with the federal government, conducts the research programs. The
University of Florida Extension, in cooperation with federal and local governments, transfers
information and technology to the people of the state.

The Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources is the chief Administrative Officer
for IFAS and is directly responsible to the President of the University. The deans of the
respective areas of teaching, extension and research administer statewide activities. Most of
IFAS' teaching, research and extension programs are organized through the Vice President
for Agriculture and Natural Resources. Research and teaching programs in the area of
veterinary medicine are shared with the Vice President for Health Affairs. The organization
includes the College of Veterinary Medicine with four departments, the eight
Interdisciplinary Centers, the School of Forest Resources and Conservation, 18 academic
departments, 14 Research and Education Centers in the state, and 71 County Extension
offices. These units are comprised of over 410 faculty FTE on-campus and over 400 faculty
FTE off-campus in Research, Teaching and Extension. (Source: IFAS Planning and Budget,
FTE, FTE Requests 2001-2002 FTE Deans Appr, pb;ase 8/2/2001).


IFAS Mission and How it Relates to International Activities

Mission. The mission of IFAS is to develop knowledge in agricultural, human, and natural
resources and the life sciences and make that knowledge accessible to people to sustain and
enhance the quality of human life (Florida First, http://floridafirst.ufl.edu).

Relationship to International Activities. The current support for and emphasis on an
international agenda within IFAS is strong. "It's our role in administration to encourage,
empower and enable faculty to seek international partnerships and to pursue program
innovations," said Martin in a statement to faculty program managers of international
cooperative agreements. "... we are most interested in efforts which can lead to broad
participation and which transcend individual faculty." Statement of Vice President Michael
V. Martin, April 10, 2001, International Focus Newsletter, March-April 2001.)

In the past much of IFAS' international work was the initiative of individual faculty
members, taken on as an effort above and beyond the individual's designated professional
responsibilities. It sometimes seemed to faculty members that taking on international
activities posed a risk to the faculty member's advancement within IFAS to the degree that
international work was perceived as reducing the person's productivity in assigned
responsibilities. The current administration has reversed this perception and emphasizes the
importance of international professional contributions at all steps in the tenure and promotion
process. "UF/IFAS is committed to expanding and enhancing the international involvement
and visibility of our faculty and students" (Memo to IPAT members from Mike Martin, Feb.
16, 2000). All faculty members, including county Extension faculty, are expected to








demonstrate an international component in their teaching, research and extension
responsibilities.

Major visibility for IFAS international contributions comes through the IFAS International
Programs (IP) Office, which is administratively part of the Office of Vice President. The IP
Office fosters communication through a web page, a bimonthly newsletter FOCUS and a
listserv that advertises international opportunities to the faculty. The IP Office supports
faculty research and teaching overseas through language training, travel support by assisting
travel arrangements and assistance in developing proposals with an international focus or
component. The Office also manages international contracts and facilitates international
Cooperative Agreements. There are currently 35 Cooperative Agreements (Appendix II) and
projects administered through international programs in 2001 totaled $4,500,000 (Source:
International Programs Office).

IFAS supports international efforts in other ways as well. IFAS has a policy of returning
funds generated through salary savings when a faculty member is paid on a short-term
contract (Source: IFAS Internal Management Memorandum Number 6C1-6. 70-3). A change
of duty station is possible for long-term assignment overseas (Source: Peter Hildebrand,
Interim Director, International Programs). In this case the faculty member remains in a
department line with salary paid through IFAS, but the assigned place of work is in the host
nation. No faculty positions are assigned entirely to international work, but significant IFAS
funds are committed to the salaries of individuals that are working on a variety of
international programs and activities. This includes a part-time coordinator for student
internationalization in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Florida FIRST (Focusing IFAS Resources on Solutions for Tomorrow) is a strategic planning
process to enhance the UF/IFAS mandate for serving Florida's food, agricultural and natural
and human resource sector. Florida FIRST includes analyses of major trends and
determinations of change including technological, human, natural resources, and institutional
forces. It sets a broad course and direction for developing and implementing future UF/IFAS
programs and is a template for developing future UF/IFAS research and extension
imperatives. The Florida FIRST initiative recognizes the need for IFAS to function on an
international scale. The plan states specifically that "globalization" is a core value of the
strategic plan. As stated by Vice President Martin (April 10, 2001, International Focus
Newsletter) "We believe it is fully in harmony with our other core values of "excellence",
"diversity" and "service to the people of Florida". The bottom line is this. To be a world-
class university, UF must participate fully in the world. We in IFAS can lead the larger
university in this regard. We are irreversibly committed to our international programs.
Everyone should understand this. It is who we are and a vehicle for who we intend to
become."

Currently, the UF-IFAS effort to offer international learning experiences and globalize its
academic, research, and extension programs is impressive but fragmented. As an institution,
we are not fully engaged and organized. The range and intensity and commitment to
international activity and experiences offered at each department, research and education
center and county extension office vary widely. Educating our students for global
competence and internationalizing our educational, research, and extension programs is








imperative to help Florida and America remain at the forefront of societal, technological, and
economic progress. However, this task force self study is undertaken in a climate that is
better than it has ever been for advancing international education, research and extension
experiences in IFAS.











International Education Current Status Data Form (Table 1)

Table 1. Current Status Data summarizing Internationalization in the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) at the University of Florida. See Appendix II for sources of information and assumptions.

General IFAS Information reflecting the current status of Internationalization
Please note that "current" indicates AY 2000-2001 data.


Current


5-yr Goal


Number of active exchange agreements:
Number of active cooperative agreements:
Semesters of Foreign Language Requirement for undergraduate students:
International Faculty (citizenship outside the USA):
Number of international undergraduate students:
Number of international graduate students:
Number of students who have taken part in a study abroad experience
(AY2000):
Number of International Scholars:
Number of International Post Doctoral Students:


25 35
35 40
0 0
94 100
49 75
237 300

109 200

225 250
68 75


Faculty Activities for IFAS. This unit has 934 full time budgeted faculty members.


Research and scholarship (AY 2000-2001 data):


10. Number of faculty with current grants or contracts with international
components.
11. Number of international grants based on internal funding (i.e. University of
Florida grants, awards, startup funds, etc.):
12. Number of international grants based on external funding:
13. Number of grants supported by foreign funding:
14. Total dollar amount for grants, contracts, and other funding with
international focus:
15. Number of faculty currently engaged in research/scholarship with a foreign
institution or faculty (funded or unfunded):
16. Number of faculty who have held or hold Fulbright, Rhodes or similar
awards for significant teaching or research in another country.
significant teaching or research in another country:

International research/scholarship expertise:
17. Number of faculty with language proficiency in a language other than
18. Number of faculty who have published in a language other than English:
19. Number of faculty who teach, hold visiting professorships, or collaborate in
research with other universities or research institutes in other countries:
20. Number of faculty who have scientific, scholarly, or other research positions
in other countries:
21. Number of faculty who have given scientific papers, workshops, or other
scholarly presentations in another country.
22. Number of faculty who have published in a refereed international journal:
23. Number of faculty who have studied at a foreign institution:


unknown 5

124 200
23 40

$7,965,460 $15 mil

166 300


14 50




135 150
101 110

135 230

45 65

262 475

418 500
76 90









24. Number of faculty who have expertise in a foreign country and are entered
in the UFIC Country Specialist Database (www.ufic.ufl.edu):
25. Number of faculty who attended an international conference in the current
academic year:
26. Number of faculty who traveled abroad to study or do research in the
current academic year:

Teaching and Curriculum
27. Number of courses required for the undergraduate major with substantial
(50%) international focus or content:
28. Number of courses offered as undergraduate electives that have substantial
(50%) international focus or content:
29. Number of study abroad programs in your department:
30. Number of faculty directing study abroad programs:
31. Number of faculty serving as instructors in study abroad programs:
32. Number of faculty serving as mentors or advisors for international exchange
students:
33. Percent of international graduate students among all graduate students
pursuing advanced degrees in your department or Center/Institute/Program:
34. Number of faculty serving on graduate committees in other countries:
35. Number of faculty who have taught a course at a foreign institution:
36. Number of graduate courses with substantial international focus or content:
37. Number of Joint Degree Programs with international partnerss:
38. Number of Certificate Programs with international focus:
39. Number of Certificate Programs targeting an international audience:

Service and Outreach
40. Number of speakers with an international focus sponsored by your
department, Center/Institute/Program:
41. Number of faculty serving on international editorial boards:
42. Number of faculty participating in interviews with an international focus:
43. Number of faculty who served as reviewers for international presses:
44. Number of faculty involved in international service/outreach:


68 200

127 250

89 200




2 2

31 40

5 10
3 10
3 20

18 18

28% 33%

20 40
21 30
37 40
0 2
1 2
1 1



64 76

81 95
61 105
148 150
128 130


Contact Information

Michael V. Martin
Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources
1008 McCarty
PO Box 110180
Gainesville, FL 32611-0180
Email: mvm(mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Tel: (352)392-1971 SC: 622-1971
Fax: (352)392-6932








IFAS International Activities


Research/Scholarship

Research Mission. Through the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station system, the IFAS
research mission is to invent, discover, and develop applications of knowledge. The mission
supports agriculture and the natural and human resources through application of the natural,
biological, and social sciences.

International Research Programs. In 2000-2001, IFAS had 396 Full Time Equivalent (FTE)
faculty members devoted to research located at the main campus in Gainesville and at the
research and education centers across the state. (Source: IFAS Planning and Budget, FTE,
FTE Requests 2001-2002 FTE Deans Appr, pba:se 8/2/2001). These faculty members are
highly engaged in research on state, national and international problems. IFAS has
emphasized the importance of international recognition in tenure and promotion to associate
and full professor, providing some incentive for faculty members to actively participate in
international activities ranging from symposia to exchange visits to research grants. A
summary of the diverse activities is shown in Table 1. A total of 76 faculty members have
current contracts or grants with international components. There are a total of 157 active
grants with international objectives, 23 of which are supported by international funds; total
funding of currently active grants is about $8 million. An impressive number of faculty
members also have proficiency in foreign language (135) published in a refereed
international journal last year (418), and participated in an international congress in the
current academic year (127). These numbers reflect an internationally recognized faculty,
many of whom have traveled abroad to study or conduct research or have held Fulbright or
similar awards and hold scientific positions in other countries (Table 1).

Florida and other areas in the world are faced with complex problems due to large increases
in demands for natural resources and energy, high population growth rates, and food security
and safety concerns. Such problems require interdisciplinary approaches that integrate
technological, environmental, social, and political components for developing acceptable and
sustainable solutions. IFAS encourages its faculty to engage in interdisciplinary research and
has identified major program imperatives that prioritize and help focus its research agenda
(Source: Putting Florida FIRST; http://floridafirst.ufl.edu). These program imperatives not
only serve to prioritize resources to solve state problems, they also lead to international
recognition and opportunities for faculty to become international leaders in these areas.
These program imperatives are:

Water Management, Quality, and Allocation
Plant, Animal, and Human Protection from Pests
Managing Urban, Rural, and Human Impacts on Natural and Coastal Ecosystems and
Resources
Global Competitiveness of Current and Emerging Agricultural and Natural Resource
Products
Food Technologies: Safety, Nutrition, and Product Development
Human Resource Development: Families, Children, and Communities









IFAS has defined its key scientific capabilities, which serve to advance these major program
imperatives. These key scientific areas include biotechnology, information technology,
systems approaches, precision technology and remote sensing, and process technology.
These scientific areas provide capabilities for integration of knowledge and tools to produce
products and address the complex problems that we face. These cornerstone scientific
capabilities define areas of competency that also lead to international research opportunities
for faculty. Many of the current international contracts and grants are focused on these
program imperatives and make use of the key competencies.

Gaps, Needs, Opportunities in Research Programs. IFAS researchers are already actively
participating in the international scientific community, bringing considerable international
recognition to themselves and to the University of Florida and IFAS. However, there is an
opportunity to considerably expand this participation in the future. The current situation is
that faculty members develop programs, build interdisciplinary teams and submit grant
proposals in response to funding opportunities. There are outstanding examples where this
has been done (e.g., in water resources management, agroforestry, IPM, biotechnology,
agricultural systems analysis, etc.). However, the institutional support for such initiatives has
been permissive but passive. This approach allows faculty members to excel through
attracting grants, but it lacks an institutional effort that capitalizes on successes to create
stronger, more sustainable programs. It allows freedom for faculty, but may lead to
inefficient competition when cooperation among faculty could lead to greater opportunities
and impact. There is a need for IFAS administration to identify International Program
Priority Areas that represent the strengths of its faculty and to support these areas in pursuing
international research, teaching, and extension opportunities. These program areas would
bring recognition of the strengths of IFAS faculty as new international opportunities arise.
Although many faculty members in IFAS are recognized as international leaders in their
specific fields, it may not be easy to select only a few high priority areas. Nonetheless if
IFAS is to compete with other major universities for prestigious awards and funding
opportunities, it should identify and support these International Program Priority Areas. A
clear set of criteria is needed for defining such program areas, and these are likely to evolve
over time.

IFAS could play a key role by promoting these areas to clientele and those who fund
international research and development worldwide. Annual priorities for support should
target international funding opportunities in addition to state needs, recognizing the
complementarity of the state needs in the program imperatives with those of other regions of
the world. New faculty positions could be prioritized to build critical masses of expertise in
the International Program Priority Areas.

IFAS,could also create funds for bringing in distinguished international researchers to help
develop new program thrusts, work with faculty and students at UF, and therefore bring
greater recognition to UF in priority areas and create opportunities for further cooperation
and funding. These funds could be used on a competitive basis. Funds could also be made
available for IFAS researchers to spend time in the world's best laboratories in selected
areas, increasing their capabilities by working with the most prominent scientists in selected
areas worldwide.










Instruction/Teaching


Mission. The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) offers students a high-
quality education that results in knowledge and skills for employment, productive
citizenship, and life-long learning. CALS is an educational leader in the areas of food,
agriculture, natural resources, and life sciences as they relate to human resources, the
environment, and communities. CALS students are taught by a distinguished faculty who
have been educated at some of the best universities in the world. Our faculty are recognized
nationally and internationally for their teaching, research, and extension expertise. As a
college known for its student-centered focus, CALS prides itself on educating society ready
graduates.

International Opportunities in Teaching Programs. In 2000-2001 IFAS had 152 faculty FTE
devoted to teaching. (Source: IFAS Planning and Budget, FTE, FTE Requests 2001-2002
FTE Deans 8/2/2001). Undergraduate and graduate students have a variety of opportunities
for international activities through both required and elective courses. Students in CALS are
required to complete six hours of international diversity as part of their university General
Education requirements. The graduate and undergraduate curricula in CALS have recently
been reviewed for international content. Thirty-one undergraduate courses and 37 graduate
courses in CALS were identified as having substantial international focus or content. In
addition to study abroad opportunities offered through the UFIC, CALS undergraduates can
participate in five college-level study abroad programs.

Graduate globalization occurs most commonly through individualized field study supporting
theses and dissertations, much of which occurs via the student advisors' research projects that
have international components. More than 160 faculty members are engaged in such
research. Twenty-eight percent of our graduate students are from other countries. CALS
graduate students also take advantage of opportunities to attend international research
conferences using travel funds provided through IFAS.

During the last two years CALS has been increasing the opportunities for students to have
meaningful international experiences. In response to recommendations from a Faculty Task
Force Report on Enhancing the Undergraduate Experience in the College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences (CALS), several initiatives aimed at increasing awareness of and opportunities
for international experiences among our students were implemented. This college level
initiative is known as GLOBAL GATORS
(http://cals.ufl.edu/GlobalGators/GlobalGators.htm). Where possible, college level activities
have been linked to larger IFAS-wide cooperative agreements and memoranda of
understanding, including IFAS research, extension, and academic programs.

CALS appointed a faculty Globalization Coordinator in 2001 to serve as a liaison between
CALS, the University of Florida International Center (UFIC), and the IFAS Office of
International Programs (IP). The Globalization Coordinator serves as a central contact for
faculty interested in starting international study tours or classes. The Coordinator will
coordinate one college level study tour a year and provide information for faculty interested








in developing new study abroad initiatives. CALS has worked to enhance its long standing
academic relationships with the Ogranization for Tropical Studies in Costa Rica and the
Panamerican School of Agriculture (la Escuela Agricola Panamericana, EAP) in Honduras
(Zamorano). New cooperative agreements with Escuela de Agricultura de la Region Tropical
Humeda (EARTH University) in Costa Rica and Escuela Superior Polit6cnica del Litoral
(ESPOL) in Ecuador were established in 2000.


Gaps, Needs, and Opportunities for Teaching Programs. Due to initiatives over the last two
years, students in CALS now have additional opportunities for international experiences
through CALS. There is a need for CALS to continue in this direction by continuing to
support the Globalization Coordinator and efforts for communicating and promoting
international opportunities to students, and enhancing the international environment and
curriculum for students unable to travel abroad.

CALS must continue to promote and communicate the importance of international
understanding and involvement in order to develop society-ready graduates. The CALS
Globalization Coordinator provides faculty leadership for this effort and serves to
institutionalize this on-going activity. CALS must continue to recruit outstanding
international students as well as faculty who can offer diversifying perspectives and
experiences to CALS students. CALS should seek opportunities to promote distance
education and joint degrees with international institutions. CALS should continue to promote
and take advantage of existing UF study abroad opportunities but also continue efforts to
develop college major specific, short term international study tours. Effective use of the
GLOBAL GATORS web site will enhance communication of both. Graduate and
undergraduate curricula should be further reviewed to identify opportunities for new courses
with significant international content. Additional IFAS funding should be provided for
graduate students seeking support for attending international meetings. Incentive programs
such as the CALS minigrant program supporting teaching activities should highlight
international initiatives for selection.


Extension (Service/Outreach)

Extension Mission. The University of Florida Extension mission is to provide scientifically
based agricultural, human and natural resources information and expertise to the State's
citizens. Extension programs strengthen decision-making capabilities, knowledge
applications, economic security, environmental stewardship and leadership skills for all
citizens. Issues addressed are of local, regional, state and national priority and are identified
through community and university involvement. The University of Florida Extension works
cooperatively with county, state and federal government agencies.

IFAS Extension must be global in its perspective in order to develop comprehensive (or
holistic) educational programs on behalf of the people of Florida. Because of the rapidly
developing economic and environmental global interconnectedness, a worldwide perspective
on issues and events that significantly impact the state and its people is needed. International
experience for county and state Extension faculty is vital for increasing faculty knowledge,








expertise, and exposure to "new" information and technology, which then may be used to
enhance national, state, and local priorities and programs.

Extension International Activities. In 2000-2001 IFAS had 420 Full Time Equivalent (FTE)
Extension faculty members. (Source: IFAS Planning and Budget, FTE, FTE Requests 2001-
2002 FTE Deans Appr, pba:se 8/2/2001).The University of Florida Extension faculty is
diverse with faculty from every ethnic, gender, and racial background. Some faculty
members speak two or more languages and already have substantial international experience.
Clientele see this diversity as an institutional strength since it broadens our knowledge and
experience base. At present the University of Florida Extension does not have an
International Liaison for Extension Programming. However, over the years numerous
Extension faculty have organized or participated in short-courses, workshops, field
demonstrations, and seminars targeting international clientele. Clientele include host country
academic, extension, and professional institution or government agency faculty as well as
local producers. Programs have been held in the U.S. and numerous countries in Central and
South America, the Caribbean, Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Program areas have included post harvest handling, marketing, sustainable production
practices for agronomic and horticultural crops, food processing, natural resource
conservation practices, livestock management, extension methodology, pest management,
computer applications development, and marine science. Recently there have been several
international in-service training programs offered to extension faculty involved in citrus
production. This type of training is valuable for exposing extension faculty to new
information and technologies that may have applicability to the Florida industry.

Gaps, Needs and Opportunities for Extension Programs

At present, extension activities are not well coordinated or even recognized beyond the unit
in which the activities take place. Traditionally, Extension faculty have not been encouraged
to participate in international activities due to the mission of extension, which is to serve the
clientele of Florida. Extension has had to carefully inform clientele about these activities so
that there was not a perceived conflict with its mission within Florida. There are major
benefits that accompany extension faculty participation in international activities. These
include faculty better able to develop innovative programs with more than parochial
perspective and impact and faculty better prepared to participate in and learn from
international experiences. Faculty would also be better prepared to respond to the needs of
Floridians of diverse cultural, economic and social backgrounds. Extension faculty would be
more prone and better equipped to advise Florida residents based on their knowledge of
competing markets and innovations occurring overseas. Local Florida programs and people
would benefit through professionals better prepared to serve local needs as they would have
an increased understanding of how international issues affect daily life and how county and
state issues and society link with the global economy.. Improved contact between extension
faculty and international programs may provide new and innovative information and/or
technology for use at the national, state, and local levels. Furthermore, it would give
extension faculty a chance to grow professionally and personally and to view one's work and
career from different perspectives.








Some IFAS extension faculty are already participating in international activities bringing
them and the University international recognition. However, IFAS could foster greater
access to, coordination of, and recognition of international extension programming by
establishing an International Extension Liaison, whose role would include public relations
with State clientele, development of international institution-to-institution networks, and
development of funding opportunities. At present, international extension programs are
developed by individual faculty and only occasionally by a team. Unfortunately this
approach lacks the institutional support to develop more sustainable programs. As stated in
the research section, there is a need for more active support from the administration to build
effective, sustainable international extension programs capable of providing information and
transferring technology to local, state, and international clientele. In addition to the need for
an International Extension Liaison, there is need for an international certificate program on
extension methodologies for international clientele, an international training program for
extension faculty, and establishment of an international training certificate program for local
clientele. This last program could be developed and offered as an international outreach
program for clientele in Florida.








Recommendations for Expanding International Opportunities for
Students and Faculty in IFAS

Critical Analysis, Gaps, Opportunities

In order to evaluate what gaps exits within the international program of IFAS and what
opportunities could be captured, the committee reviewed the international programs of other
AAU universities that are renowned for their international activities: University of Illinois,
Michigan State University, Comell University, Ohio State University, UC-
Davis, Texas A&M, Penn State and the University of Minnesota. The international
agriculture/natural resources programs of these institutions were reviewed with an eye to
what they are doing in areas of interest to IFAS. Additionally, we considered the goals and
recommendations in the reference, NASULGC Strategic Vision Committee, Commission
on International Affairs. 2000. Expanding the International Scope of Universities.
NASULGC, Washington, D. C.". The following is a summary of the programs that are
unique, and of the programs that might help fill gaps in the IFAS portfolio of international
activities. Each item is followed by a recommendations) that the committee feels would
capture the opportunity.

Student Globalization

These recommendations are advanced based on the IFAS goal of having 50% of all IFAS
undergraduates having an international experience as part of their degree program.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Foreign Experiences

1. Study Abroad is a mechanism used by all universities to give undergraduate
students an international experience. It gives a student a global perspective of
his/her discipline and an appreciation of the culture and problems of other
countries. To paraphrase Mark Twain, it is difficult to discriminate against a
people with whom you have lived and worked.

Recommendation 1: Develop a list of study abroad opportunities that would be
meaningful for IFAS students and then (1) develop those programs that do not
exist and (2) advertise (disseminate) these opportunities that do exist and their
potential benefits to the students

2. Short-term trips are becoming an increasingly popular alternative to study
abroad because they expose the student to an international environment but are
not so intrusive to a 4-year undergraduate program. Study trips of one to 2
weeks, to as long as a summer, allow the student to incorporate an international
experience into their degree program and future career path.

Recommendation 2: Develop a long-term plan in IFAS of short-term trips for
undergraduates so that an entering freshman can plan the location and type of








trip they wish to take during their junior or senior year. Explore possibilities of
corporate funding to support student travel abroad.

3. Internships assist a student in making career choices while giving valuable
experience in an international environment.

Recommendation 3: Develop a mechanism for encouraging students to compete
in the International Internship Program of the Foreign Agriculture Service of the
USDA or the Communication for Agriculture Exchange Program.

4. Recommend foreign language courses. Several years ago the faculty in IFAS
decided to drop the foreign language competency requirement for our students. Today
we have no requirement at the graduate level. At the undergraduate level we require
two courses in technical writing. The task force feels that this substitution discourages
our students from acquiring language capabilities. We therefore make the following
recommendation.

Recommendation 4: Provide undergraduate students with two options, allowing
them to select between taking the two technical writing courses currently required
of all undergraduates or completing two semesters of study of a foreign language.

Opportunities for Graduate Student Foreign Experiences

Foreign experiences are more difficult for graduate students who are not working on an
international topic. They are often on campus for less time than an undergraduate and, if on
assistantship, have their job obligations to meet. If faculty members become more
internationally active, then the opportunities for graduate students will most likely increase
also. However, the major universities that were evaluated did note programs they used to
help graduate students develop international experiences.

1. Support for international meetings. Graduate students who attend and present
their research at international meetings not only expose themselves to a greater
peer group in their discipline, but also enhance the international reputation of
IFAS.

Recommendation 5: Provide travel support for graduate students to attend an
international meeting to present research results.

2. Support for international research. A number of graduate students could do a
portion of their research overseas, but the cost of travel and living expenses are
not part of the grants that support their assistantship. Overseas work would
introduce them to new laboratories, procedures, different ways of doing similar
methodology, and different ecosystems.

Recommendation 6: Provide funding to graduate students for short research visits
overseas to enhance their research topic or learn new methodology in a unique
laboratory.









3. Support for Graduate Seminars in International Topics. Another option is to bring
foreign expertise to IFAS by way of experts for a series of seminars or
workshops.

Recommendation 7: Develop a "foreign lecturer series" that is managed by
graduate students for the benefit of graduate students.


Degree or Certification/Certificate Programs in International Agriculture and Related Areas

Undergraduate and Graduate programs at prestigious universities are, with more frequency,
developing degree or certification programs. These programs can be research, teaching or
extension based. A survey of what is offered at other schools included International Minors
in Agriculture (Penn State); International Agriculture Major (Cornell U); Master of
Professional Agriculture (Cornell U); and a M.S. in International Agriculture (UC-Davis).

Recommendation 8: Develop "international" options in the undergraduate and
graduate programs. These may be a mixture of Degree and Certification /Certificate
programs along with Specializations or Minors. A committee to provide a long-range
plan for international qualifications for students would be useful.

Internationalization of IFAS Curriculum

Penn State advertises that approximately 30% of all general education courses contain at
least 25% international content. A student can become familiar with the world through
classes and the experiences of their professors.

Recommendation 9: Determine the international content of core courses in IFAS
programs and, if lacking, develop a plan to increase this so that 45% of IFAS courses
have at least a 25% international component.

Faculty Globalization

International Experiences for Faculty

A university is only as international as is its faculty. A global university needs to have a
faculty that is global in its research, teaching, consulting and extension. IFAS faculty does
not take full advantage of sabbatical leaves that could be used to gain these experiences.
Penn State repeatedly ranks first in the number of faculty members selected as Fulbright
Scholars. IFAS does not currently have a Fulbright Scholar, has only had 3 in the last 4 years
and has only 14 of the UF-wide 200 Fulbright Scholars. Also, short-term visits that are used
to develop contacts and research programs provide an international component without the
time required by other means. Some barriers to faculty development leaves are the problems
involved with leaving their research/teaching/extension program for 6 months or more; as
well as the monetary difficulty of supporting two households during leave.








Recommendation 10: Develop a mechanism to encourage overseas sabbaticals and
encourage IFAS faculty to apply for competitive leave support such as Fulbright
Scholarships with the goal of having 3 current Fulbright Scholars among the IFAS
faculty at anyone time.

Assistance to Faculty in Developing International Research, Teaching and Extension
Programs

Nothing will be done to internationalize research, teaching and extension programs without
adequate funding. Texas A&M distributes $20,000 per year to faculty in support of travel to
conduct scholarly activities overseas. It also provides $5,000 grants to curriculum
development to add international courses or international dimensions to courses.
Furthermore, it assists 10 faculty per year to establish contacts with scholars in Mexico
during a 10-day seminar in Mexico. Penn State has evening seminars for faculty on how to
add an international dimension to courses as well as funding to internationalize classes.
Michigan State uses a seed money program where 62% of the revenue generated by
international work is used to support continued international development in the departments;
1/3 is used for scholarships while 1/3 is used for overseas travel. Likewise, Cornell provides
travel grants and seed money, especially to young/new faculty to develop an international
perspective to their programs.

Recommendation 11: Develop a seed money program within IFAS that can be used
for the development of international research, teaching and extension projects. The
seed money would be used for a variety of scholarly activities. In order to fund such a
program, it would be most useful to develop a relationship with large donor
institutions (e.g., Foundations) in order to secure endowments and gifts in support of
this work.. A seed money program should be on the order of $100,000 that would
provide 20 $5,000 grants.

Another limitation to faculty involvement in international research, teaching and extension is
that building on the successes of other faculty is difficult since there is no tracking
mechanism on international successes. Most work is individual faculty based and is not
programmatic.

Recommendation 12: Work with the Faculty Accountability System (FAS) system
to build in international program reporting and use the information to develop a
programmatic approach to IFAS international programs that provides faculty basic
information of international activities, projects and contacts.

The prevailing perception that international work may not lead to quality (peer-reviewed)
publications and could therefore be disadvantageous for the tenure and promotion process
(and therefore for younger faculty) needs to be dispelled.

Recommendation 13: Recognize the benefits of international work in tenure and
promotion process by giving due credit to research contacts, collaborative research
proposals, graduate student recruitment, and such other benefits that could be derived
from international work.









Although extension experience in international settings could often times be different from
that of the domestic scene, working with international extension professionals will be a
rewarding experience.

Recommendation 14: Encourage IFAS faculty to collaborate with overseas
professionals in extension activities including development of extension materials,
development and delivery of short courses, and training of trainers.

University Level Integration of Faculty Positions in International Teaching, Research, and
Extension

It appears that those universities that have international programs well integrated across the
university are the most successful. University of Illinois uses an International Council that is
made up of members from departments that engage in international work. This Council
allocates and monitors International positions at that university.

Recommendation 15: Work with the other units of UF to most efficiently plan and
allocate international positions to IFAS that minimize overlap and maximize meeting
an interdisciplinary need.

Providing International Opportunities to Extension Faculty

Extension faculty could see considerable increases in opportunities for international activities
in the future. IFAS can better position itself and its faculty to take advantage of these
opportunities by developing programs and positions now. A program Liaison is needed to
facilitate the development of international extension programs and projects. In addition, UF-
IFAS Extension could lend its extension expertise by offering training to international
clientele in extension philosophy and programming, offering State and County faculty
training in international extension, and offer a course for Florida clientele on the
interdependence of the U.S. in global economic, social and political issues so they gain a
greater understanding of the importance of international programs.

Recommendation 16: Establish an International Extension Program Liaison with the
IFAS International Program Office. This person would provide a cohesive program
for international activities for extension faculty and communicate opportunities and
priorities to faculty. This person would also need to play a role in public relations to
make sure that the value of these activities would be clearly presented to the state
clientele and help integrate extension, research and teaching programs. Specific
Liaison services could be:
Offering In-Service training on matters of policy and politics in cooperating
countries and language training
Forming cooperative agreements with national and international institutions
involved in international extension;
Developing funding mechanisms and opportunities for international extension;
Developing interdisciplinary and multi-institutional cooperation projects;
Improving our telecommunications capabilities for distance education programs;








-Supporting the necessary infrastructure for greater development of UF Extension
Internet sites;
Developing programs that offer Extension faculty plus one or more students
opportunities to work on international extension assignments of various durations;
Developing institutional recognition for international extension activities.

Recommendation 17: Establish an International Extension Certificate program on
Extension Methodologies for International Clientele. Many international cooperators
greatly appreciate extension programs based upon the US Land Grant model and want
to emulate them in their own countries. Thus, a course will be developed to teach
international clientele the extension mission and philosophy and methods for building
and operating a successful extension program. Topics that will be covered include:
extension models and delivery methodologies, principles of extension and informal
education, culture, available resources, funding support, issues and problems to be
addressed, disciplinary expertise, educators' roles and responsibilities (including joint
appointments), characteristics of targeted clientele, geographic area, availability of
volunteers, etc.

Recommendation 18: Continue to develop and expand the International Extension
Training Program for extension faculty. This training program is aimed at county and
state extension personnel in Florida, but may be expanded to other states over time. It
focuses on international issues, recognizing the interdependence of Florida and the
USA in global agricultural, economic, social, and political matters. The overall
purpose of this program is to increase international awareness, understanding, and
involvement that will lead to integrating international components into ongoing
extension programs.

Recommendation 19: Establish an International Extension Training Certificate
Program for Extension Clientele. A Short course on International Extension Systems
would be developed and offered as an international outreach program for local
clientele in Florida. The course would address the interdependence of the U.S. in
global economic, social and political developments and issues, help clientele respond
to the needs of individuals and communities impacted by cultural diversity and global
interdependence. This program would improve county programs by helping clientele
apply new knowledge and increased cultural sensitivity to local problems and
programs. It would also provide Extension Clientele with the opportunity to become
involved in international activities and projects as well as U.S. development
education efforts.

Assistance to Foreign Researchers/Professors








A problem with hosting foreign visitors for short periods of time is that housing in
Gainesville and in other cities where our RECs are located is so difficult to acquire at a
competitive price. UI has an office that helps with housing visitors, while Texas A&M
provides short-term housing. The University of Minnesota has an International Service and
Travel Center.

Recommendation 20: Consider the possibility of either providing short term housing
or developing a relationship with a housing program in Gainesville and at the RECs
that will provide this for visiting scholars on a short-term basis and affordable cost.
Consider the possibility of developing an International Service and Travel Center that
would assist both faculty and visitors.

Support International Priority Program Areas

There is a need for greater support from IFAS administration for developing strong
international programs in areas that bring global recognition and opportunities to the
university. The goal should be as follows. When any of the priority program areas is
mentioned anywhere in the world, IFAS should be thought of as the institution with the
greatest expertise in that area. This approach would help define IFAS internationally and
provide a competitive advantage for attracting human and financial resources in priority
areas. This may not be easy, since many programs in IFAS are well known and respected
worldwide. However, if IFAS is to compete with other major universities for prestigious
awards and funding opportunities, it should identify and support these International Program
Priority Areas.

Recommendation 21: Identify International Program Priority Areas that represent the
strengths of its faculty and priorities of IFAS, and support these areas in pursuing
international research, teaching, and extension opportunities. These program areas
would bring recognition of the strengths of IFAS faculty as new international
opportunities arise. New faculty positions could be prioritized to build critical masses
in these areas. A clear set of criteria is needed for such program areas, and these are
likely to evolve over time.

Evaluation

IFAS needs to routinely evaluate and measure the impact of its international programs and
efforts so that it can assess progress toward goals and modify priorities as new opportunities
arise and as old programs fulfill their goals. This could best be done via internal and external
processes to ensure accountability and objectivity in looking backward and forward.
Recommendation 22: Periodically evaluate its international efforts based on:
Faculty reports of accomplishments;
Funding of international activities;
Number of faculty and students participating in international activities;
Student reports of accomplishments following international experiences;
Longitudinal evaluation that examines the impact of international involvement
across teaching, research and extension programs;
International review and advisory board.









International Alumni


IFAS has had many students from overseas who have graduated and returned to their home
countries where many have excelled in various positions. Many UF graduates are in high-
level positions in research, education, government and private institutions. Apparently, no
attempt has yet been made to keep a current list of these graduates and their positions.

Recommendation 23: Develop a list of alumni from IFAS along with their current
contact information and positions. Build a "community" of IFAS alumni by providing
information on IFAS activities on a routine basis, such as sending newsletters via email,
and by soliciting their input on issues that may affect future international opportunities
for students and faculty.









APPENDIX I

Documentation of information in Table 1:

"International Education Current Status Data Form":


These notes are numbered to correspond to those items in Table 1. Each numbered item has information on
Current and 5-yr Goal levels of activity. This appendix documents how the current numbers were obtained and
provides information on assumptions and methods for estimating 5-yr Goals.


General College Information reflecting the current status of Internationalization

1. Current. UF International Center, Lynn Frazier, summary for CALS =1, additional info from survey of IFAS
units as compiled by John Hall
5-yr Goal. The goal is to increase the current level by about 50%.
2. Current. IFAS International Programs. Of the 35 current cooperative agreements (Appendix II), five are
considered to be institutional in that administrative support is used to support these cooperative efforts.
5-yr Goal. The goal is to have 12 institutional cooperative agreements supported with a total of 40, counting
those initiated and supported by individual or small groups of faculty.
3. Current. UF 2001-02 Undergraduate Catalog
5-yr Goal. We do not recommend making language a requirement. However, we do recommend making
foreign language training an option to fulfill undergraduate requirements. See Recommendation #??
4. Current. Academic Personnel database.
5-yr Goal. Increase of approximately 10%.
5. Current. CALS student data base maintained by Phil Achey.
5-vr Goal. Increase of approximately 50%.
6. Current. Same as #5.
5-yr Goal. Increase of approximately 80%. The difference between 5-year goals for items 5 and 6 reflects
the UF/IFAS emphasis on increasing graduate enrollment.
7. Current. UF International Center, Lynn Frazier.
5-yr Goal. Increase of nearly 100%. This will include students who participate in short study tours, which
will be emphasized as a primary mechanism for study abroad experiences within CALS.
8. Current. UF International Center, Barbara Wilkie. This number includes International Scholars (exchange
visitors on a J-1 visa) and Post Does. May include some of the same people counted as post does in # 9 below.
No way to determine.
5-yr Goal. Increased of approximately 10%.
9. Current. UF International Center, Barbara Wilkie. See note above
5-yr Goal. Increased of approximately 10%.









Faculty Activities for the IFAS. This unit has 934 full time budgeted faculty members. Please note that
"current" indicates AY 2000-2001 data.

10. Current. This information was not readily available in any form. The International Programs Office worked
with IFAS Sponsored Programs and Division of Sponsored Research to try to identify the information.
Sponsored Programs had recently compiled a list compiled of all contract and grant activity, however, the list
did not designate international or international components. International Programs reviewed the list noting any
titles that distinctly mentioned foreign countries or international focus. Then, we went through all Travel
Authorization Requests, which include an account number. Any account number used for International Travel
was then cross checked against the basic list compiled by IFAS Sponsored Programs.
5-yr Goal. Approximately double the current number.
11. Current. Because these are not "sponsored programs" the information was not available through process
noted in #10.
5-yr Goal. Based on IFAS commitment to international activities; At least 5 competitive start-up grants for
faculty.
12. Current. Same as #10
5-yr Goal. Roughly double current number of grants supported by foreign funds. Depends on availability.
13. Current. Division of Sponsored Research Database, currently active grants.
5-yr Goal. Double current level.
14. Current. Same as #10
5-yr Goal. Roughly double current number.
15. Current. This number is based on the response to an International Programs IPAT Survey (IPAT). Of 336
responses to the survey 166 indicated foreign activity in the last year. This may under represent current activity.
5-yr Goal. Double current number. Promotion and tenure of faculty require international activities and
recognition. All new faculty need international activity.
16. Current. UF International Center
5-vr Goal. Triple current number. We assumed that this is cumulative, so we would aim for 36 additional
awards in the next 5 years. This is in contrast to other items which reflect one-year amounts.


International research/scholarship expertise:

17. Current. Survey of Department Chairs and Unit Directors.
5-yr Goal. We hope to increase the number of faculty with foreign language skills by new hires and by
foreign language training program. A realistic increase over the current number in five years is from 20-30.
18. Current. Same as #17.
5-vr Goal. Maintain about same level.
19. Current. Same as #17.
5-yr Goal. Approximately double current level.
20. Current. Same as #17.









5-yr Goal. Increase current level by about 50%.
21. Current. Same as #17.
5-yr Goal. Approximately double current level.
22. Current. IFAS Faculty Accomplishment System database reported 418 IFAS faculty who published in one
or more refereed journals in 2001. Most refereed journals in the US are recognized as international journals in
agriculture and natural resource areas. This would include all state, REC and county faculty in IFAS.
5-yr Goal. 100% of research faculty should be publishing in recognized international journals, since this is
critical in their promotion and tenure. Our goal is to increase the current number by about 20%.

23. Current. Same as #17.
5-yr Goal. Maintain about the same level.
24. Current. UFIC, Michael Parsons.
5-yr Goal. More than double current level.
25. Current. Review of Travel Authorization Requests (TAR) to identify foreign travel to conferences.
5-yr Goal. Double current levels.
26. Current. Review of Travel Authorization Requests (TAR) (as in #25).
5-vr Goal. Double current levels.



Teaching and Curriculum

27. Current. UF 2001-02 Undergraduate Catalog.
5-yr Goal. No change recommended; this appears to be adequate.
28. Current. UF 2001-02 Undergraduate Catalog; specific course descriptions were reviewed by a team of
three to determine which courses, in the team's opinion, met these criteria.
5-yr Goal. Increase of approximately 30%.
29. Current. Survey of IFAS Units; this survey was completed by e-mail in the spring of 2002.
5-vr Goal. Double; this includes short term study tours which will be emphasized within CALS as a major
mechanism for increasing student study abroad opportunities.
30. Current. Same as #29.
5-yr Goal. Same as #29.
31. Current. Same as #29.
5-yr Goal. Same as #29.
32. Current. Same as #29.
5-yr Goal. No change foreseen.
33. Current. CALS student data based maintained by Phil Achey.
5-yr Goal. Increase of approximately 20%, reflects UF/CALS emphasis on increased graduate enrollment.
34. Current. Same as #29.
5-yr Goal. Same as #33.
35. Current. Same as #29.









5-yr Goal. Reflects emphasis on graduate enrollment in UF/CALS and IP emphasis on strengthening the
breadth and depth of cooperation between institutions involved in cooperative agreements.
36. Current. UF 2001-02 Graduate Catalog; specific course descriptions were reviewed by a team of three to
determine which courses, in the team's opinion, met these criteria.
5-yr Goal. Increase of approximately 10%; lower than the recommended goal for undergraduate courses
because a high percentage of graduate courses already have a significant international component.
37. Current. CALS -- all such programs must be administered through the College.
5-yr Goal. Same as #35.
38. Current. Same as #37.
5-yr Goal. Same as #35.
39. Current. Same as #37.
5-yr Goal. Same as #37.


Service and Outreach


40. Current. Same as #17
5-yr Goal. Assume increase of 20%
41. Current. Same as #17
5-yr Goal. Maintain current level.
42. Current. Same as #17
5-yr Goal. Double current effort.
43. Current. Same as #17
5-yr Goal. Maintain current activity.
44. Current. Same as #17
5-yr Goal. Increase about 10%.








APPENDIX II
IFAS Cooperative Agreements

Below are listed the current agreements grouped by geographic region that are documented
in the IFAS International Programs Office. Many of these agreements are automatically
renewed, so their ending dates may be earlier than the current date.

South America

1. Argentina, INTA (Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria), 12/15/93-6/30/98
Jones, J. W., Agricultural and Biological Engineering.

2. Brazil, BAHIA (Universidade Federal da Bahia), 03/06/01-03/05/06
Comerford, N., Soil and Water Science

3. Brazil, FCAP (Faculdade de Ciencias Agrdria do Pari), Belem, Para, 05/20/94-06/30/96
Zarin, D., School of Forest and Resource Conservation

4. Brazil, FESURV (Funda9go de Ensino Superior de Rio Verde), 02/09/01-06/30/06
Datnoff, L., Plant Pathology, Everglades REC-BelleGlade

5. Brazil, UFV (Universidade Federal de Vigosa), Minas Gerais, 03/19/99-03/18/04
Comerford, N., Soil and Water Sciences

6. Brazil, UNICAMP (Universidade Estadual de Campinas), 07/05/89-indefinite
Bucklin, R., Agriculture and Biological Engineering

7. Brazil, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, 4/1/97-3/31/02
Datnoff, L., Plant Pathology, Everglades REC-BelleGlade

8. Colombia, CIAT (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical), 04/20/01-03/01/06
Pefia, J., Entomology and Nematology, Tropical REC Homestead

9. Colombia, Universidad de Caldas, 02/11/02 06/30/06
Pefia, J., Entomology and Nematology, Tropical REC Homestead

10. Ecuador, ESPOL (Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral), 09/01/99-06/30/04
Hildebrand, P., Food and Resource Economics

11. Ecuador, INIAP, 02/01/98 01/31/03

12. Uruguay, INIA (National Institute of Agricultural Research), 11/20/00-06/30/05
Cantliffe, D., Horticultural Sciences

13. Venezuela, INIA (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agricolas), 11/27/00-06/30/05
Ferguson, J., Horticultural Sciences









14. Venezuela, Universidad Bicentenaria de Aragua, 04/15/00-06/30/05
Chynoweth, D., Agricultural and Biological Engineering

Caribbean

15. Caribbean, UWI/CARDI (University of the West Indies /Caribbean Agricultural
Research and Development Institute), 07/20/94-07/1/97
Davis, C., Food and Resource Economics

Mexico and Central America

16. Costa Rica, EARTH (Escuela Agricola de la Region Tropical Humida), 05/01/00-
6/30/05
Sartain, J., Soil and Water Science

17. Honduras, EAP (Escuela Agricola Panamericana), 11/9/93-6/30/03
Luzar, J., Administration College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

18. Honduras, EAP (Escuela Agricola Panamericana), 3/5/96-none
Luzar, J., Administration College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

19. Mexico, ITESM (Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey), 05/24/99
Zazueta, F., Agricultural and Biological Engineering

20. Mexico,PNIC (Parque Nacional Isla Contoy) Quintana Roo, 04/02/01-12/01/03
Mazzotti, F., Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, Ft. Lauderdale-REC

21. Mexico, RBSK, ASK (Reserva de la Biosfera Sian Ka'an, Amigos de Sian Ka'an),
04/02/01-12/01/03
Mazzotti, F., Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, Ft. Lauderdale-REC

22. Mexico, Universidad Aut6noma Chapingo, 07/1/92-06/30/97
Nair, P.K., School of Forest Resources and Conservation

23. Mexico, Universidad Veracruzana, 09/05/01-05/31/03
Kidder, G., Soil and Water Science

24. Mexico, University of Colima, 07/22/00-06/30/05
Smart, G., Entomology and Nematology

25. Mexico, Government of the State of Yucatan
Gholz, H., School of Forest Resources and Conservation, 03/26/85 indefinite

Europe

26. Czech Republic, Czech University of Agriculture, 12/6/99-6/30/04








Rechcigl, J., Soil and Water Science, Gulf Coast REC- Bradenton


27. Poland, Agricultural University of Poznan, 6/95-6/2000
Wright, D., Agronomy, North Florida REC-Quincy

28. Portugal, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, 10/1/91-9/30/96
Teixeira, A., Agricultural and Biological Engineering

29. Spain, Escuela Tecnica Superior Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad de Madrid,
07/22/00- 06/30/10 Ward, R., Food and Resource Economics

South East Asia

30. India, Bangalore University, 05/01/00-06/30/05
Shiralipour, A., Crop Physiology, Center for Natural Resources

31. India, ICFRE (Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education), 05/25/01-06/30/06
Nair, P.K., School of Forest Resources and Conservation

32. India, SVU (Sri Venkateswara University) 9/25/95 -automatic renewal
Smith, W., School of Forest Resources and Conservation

33. New Zealand, NZ FRI (New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Ltd.), 05/16/95-present
Jokela, E., School of Forest Resources and Conservation

34. Vietnam, University of Agriculture & Forestry, Ho Chi Minh City, 04/27/01-06/30/06
Holsinger, M., Ornamental Horticulture, Sarasota County- District IV

Africa

35. Kenya, ICRAF (International Center for Research in Agroforestry), 12/28/00-06/30/05
Gladwin, C., Food and Resource Economics




APPENDIX 7


University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Office of the Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources
International Programs


June 15, 2001


Response to request for information:
Congressional Directive regarding Support for Foreign Extensions Systems
submitted to: Mike McGirr, CSREES/SERD/IP
submitted by: Peter Hildebrand, Director, International Programs, IFAS, University of Florida


1. A brief description of efforts that your university has undertaken to support
the establishment of extension systems in other countries;

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida has had a long
history of working with other countries in the understanding, establishment and support of
extension systems. This has been accomplished through long-term, institution building projects
as well as shorter-term technical assistance. Significant individual efforts have also taken place
in countries are no reflected in the list below, including Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Nova Scotia, Saudi
Arabia, South Africa and Thailand.

Country Dates Project/Program
Belize 1987-1991 Extension dairy advisor to the Macal Agricultural
Cooperative Society in Belize.

Cameroon 1991 1993 Agricultural Education Project, Phase II, Dschang,
Cameroon Develop an Agricultural Institution of higher
learning that also serves the country's citizens through
research and extension.

Cameroon 1982-1992 Cameroon Agricultural Education project, Phase I.
Develop an agricultural university based on the US Land-
Grant University model to carry out teaching research and
extension.

Cameroon 1980 82 Develop a plan to design an agricultural university on the
lines of a US land grant university-including research,
teaching and extension.

Caribbean 1994- present Cooperative Agreement with the Department of
Agricultural Economics and Extension (DAEE) of the
Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences University of
the West Indies (UWI) and Caribbean Agricultural
Research and Development Institute (CARDI) focusing on
collaborative research and outreach.









Central and 1975 -78 Define socio-economic problems in terms of transferring
South America and adopting technology faced by potato farmers in
and the developing countries.
Caribbean

Ecuador 1999 -Present Cooperative agreement with Escuela Superior Politecnica
del Litoral (ESPOL) will provide opportunities for helping
ESPOL do more extension outreach. They want to interact
with UF, particularly for assistance in setting up and
training in Extension Program systems.

Ecuador 1998 2003 Program for the Modernization of Agricultural Services, or
PROMSA for its Spanish acronym, is a partnership of The
University of Florida and two nongovernmental
organizations, PROEXANT AND IDEA. The partners
administer the implementation of a national extension
system for Ecuador that utilizes the private sector to
provide assistance to commercial farmers. PROMSA is
funded by a loan to Ecuador from the InterAmerican
Development Bank.
The design was based on a careful review of a variety of
systems throughout Latin America. It blends public and
private organizations and funding in a performance-based
extension system. Traditional extension systems in the
United States and in other countries measure success based
on such inputs as the number of contacts between
extension agents and farmers. The system for Ecuador
emphasizes farmers' productivity.

Ecuador 1988 90 Rural Technology Transfer System Phase II, Promoted
agricultural and livestock development and production,
emphasizing technology transfer aspects to increase
production and rural income

Ecuador 1981 1988 Rural Technology Transfer System, Phase I. Promoted
agricultural and Livestock development production,
emphasizing technology transfer aspects to increase
production and rural income.

El Salvador 1992 Provided technical support for USAID Protection of the
Natural Resources of El Salvador Project including
institutional strengthening for government in research and
extension.
Ghana 1966-1967 UF Dean of Extension worked with the University of
Legon, outside of Accra to develop extension there.
Haiti 1986-1992 Conducted agricultural research and assisted non-








governmental organizations in developing systems and
approaches to extend results to farmers living in and near
the Macaya Biosphere Reserve.

Jamaica 1978 Reviewed and made recommendations to the Jamaica
School of Agriculture regarding research, extension and
community services.

Jamaica 1965-68 Provided assistance to the Government of Jamaica in
development of an extension program for local farmers in
areas of dairy production, vegetable handling and
marketing, and small machinery design.

Malawi 1993-1996 Assisted the Agriculture Sector Assistance Program of the
Government of Malawi in the implementation of policy
reforms in the Agricultural Sector. This included
Extension Outreach.
Mexico Present Cooperative Agreement to assist the Universidad
Veracruzana to develop curriculum, including extension.
They have expressed significant interest in developing an
extension program.

Nicaragua 1999 2001 Numerous IFAS faculty are working through International
Programs to provide a variety of expertise to Nicaragua's
agricultural sector, including extension. The beneficiaries
of the program are the small holders in Nicaragua. The
program is a joint venture among USAID, Nicaragua's
Ministry of Agriculture (MAG-FOR), and the University
of Florida and is funded through a USAID contract with
ALO. Workshops have included, but are not limited to,
"Rehabilitation Through Extension" following the
devastation of Hurricane Mitch. Short Course:
"Production, postharvest handling and marketing of
vegetable crops." (offered once at U.F.; once in Managua)

Nicaragua 1968 1971 Worked with Nicaraguan Government to
reorganize Ministry of Agriculture, including
Extension.


Panama 1971 Assisted the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock
to evaluate agricultural research and education
program. This included technology generation and
extension. Worked with Deans of Research,
Extension and Teaching in the University of
Panama School of Agriculture.





































2. Which countries have expressed an interest in the development of an
extension system (whether or not you have provided assistance);

Other than those mentioned above:
Belize, Brazil, Costa Rica, Honduras, Lithuania, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine

Brazil: requests from three state extension services for input.

Costa Rica, Honduras, and Belize: The Department of Agricultural Education and
Communication plans to increase international training opportunities through the creation
of an international center in Costa Rica. The professional development and training
center proposed by the department would be based at the InterAmerican Institute for
Cooperation in Agriculture (IICA) in Costa Rica. It would serve extension specialists
from Florida and throughout Latin America by providing opportunities for training,
exchange, and collaboration with peers in different Central American countries. As of
this time, countries identified to be involved include: Costa Rica, Honduras, and Belize.
There may be other CA countries as this project develops.

Costa Rica: The Dean for Extension at an institution visited requested long-term
assistance in the development of their Extension System.


Portugal 1995 As part of the cooperative agreement with ESB/UCP in
Porto, Portugal assisted in developing an extension
program for the institution Universidade Catolica
Portuguesa(ESB/UCP), but not for the country of Portugal
as a whole.

Vietnam Present Cooperative Agreement with the University of Agriculture
and Forestry in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: This
agreement will entail student exchanges, cooperative
faculty projects and faculty exchanges between the two
institutions covering a wide range of activities including
extension.
Vietnam 1967 1975 Technical advice and assistance to the National
Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and ensure
basic economic and rural development in Vietnam.

Vietnam 1965 Trained Agricultural Development Officers in extension
and outreach.

Zaire 1990 Applied Agricultural Research and Outreach -RAVII -
provided technical support to the National Applied
Research and outreach service of the Ministry of
Agriculture of Zaire.










Mexico: A project involves UF/IFAS Extension, Texas Extension and Mexico. This
Fund For Rural America project would involve an exchange program for extensionists
and extension stakeholders. The focus of the project is on economic development in rural
areas through international education and involvement.

Russia: A third potential project derives from a visit to Russia made during May with
Extension and Communication professionals about training and support in both of these
areas.

3. What resources are available or would be needed to adequately support
such efforts; and,

Resources available include:
Faculty and staff expertise
Applicable resources/training materials that could be used in training
efforts
County Extension faculty members are willing to be trained to assist.
Travel & per diem expenses may be available from federal govt./state
agencies.

Resources needed include:
Time and resources for faculty and staff to devote to this work (in some cases,
adjustments may need to be made within the actual appointment to free up
time to do international work).
Students and/or support staff to support faculty international involvement
Funding for an International Extension Training program for county extension
faculty $50,000 to $75,000 annually.
Travel support, funding for travel, lodging and per diem of county extension
faculty. Dollars needed depends on numbers of Faculty, location and length
of stay.
Funding for faculty of other countries to visit our faculty in Florida. $ depend
on number of people able to come to Florida. Funds for travel, lodging and
per diem and possibly for training materials and other resources.
translation services
Funding for equipment, supplies and materials for training.



4. What, if any, legislative changes would be required to facilitate the
expansion of extension systems to other nations.

Greater overall support for international work is needed on all levels
(legislators, administrators, peers, stakeholders and the public) to move our
international agenda forward to include extension. Much of this will come
about with a more thorough understanding of the two-way benefits from









international involvement. All parties need to fully understand why we should
be involved internationally and, once this occurs, it will help with realizing
and increase in overall support.
* Legislative changes also need to include providing support in relation to the
needed resources mentioned in #3 above.
* Funding issues.







/ L UNIVERSITY OF

-FLORIDA

E X T E N S I O N
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


District Directors Office
30 Research Road
Quincy, FL 32351
(850) 875 -7137
294-7137 Suncom
(850) 875-7148 FAX



Date: November 7, 2000

To: Christine Waddill, Dean for Extension
Larry Arrington, Associate Dean for Extension

From: Pete Vergot, District I Extension Director

Proposal: International Training Program


Attached is the proposal for a University of Florida Extension International Training Program
you asked me to develop for presentation to Vice-President Mike Martin. During Dr. Martin's
last statewide interactive faculty meeting, he stated for "University of Florida Extension to be
world class, we need to be in the world". Having had some international experience and coming
from a department whose faculty had a number of years of international experience, I can agree
with Dr. Martin.

There are two things that I note.
#1. There have been few requests for District I county faculty to be involved in international
Extension activities.
#2. I have seen few international visitors to county offices in District 1.
As an Extension Agent I believe that I professionally grew from having been a part of a
statewide Extension International Training Program.

I have attached a draft of an outline and tentative budget. I would hope that we could pursue this
so that we can place and offer this through our regular professional development series and begin
February 2001. I would be more than glad to meet with you to discuss this further and to present
a proposal to Dr. Martin.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.









Outline of:
University of Florida Extension International Training Program


Session one:


Orientation
Three days understanding campus-based international activities.
Objective One: To understand IFAS International department to discuss activities
of currently involved in international experiences
Objective Two: To discuss with departments hosting international visitors from
other extension services.


Session Two: Exploring Different Cultures

This session will be based around a three-day visit to the Seminole Indian Reservation in
South Florida.
Objective One: Gain firsthand knowledge and experience in working with
understanding different cultures
Objective Two: To formulate strategies on how extension currently works with
people from different cultures

Session Three: Preparing for the First International Experience
Objective One: Preparing for international extension experience
Objective Two: What to expect during the international experience
Objective Three: Returning and reporting

Session Four: Fourteen-day International Experience


Session Five:


Two-day Reporting and Wrap-up
Objective One: Individuals share experiences from their international
experience
Objective Two: Faculty develop a personalized plan for sharing international
experience
Objective Three: Faculty report in teams
Objective four: Faculty prepare for hosting international visitors and the process
repeats itself


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.








Possible Future Funding Sources


#1. The hosting and training of international visitors, if developed correctly, will provide for
funds to partial funding to continue the professional development for extension faculty

#2. Salary savings from faculty members involved in extended international experiences
in cooperation with USAID and other NGO's.

#3. SHARE or other grant funds


Budget


Participant
And Trainers


Participant Materials
In-state Travel and Per Diem
International Experience Per Diem
International Experience Travel
Appreciation Gifts
Visiting Instructors


$ 200
$1,000
$ 900
$1,000


Total


Total

$ 3,000
$17,000
$15,300
$17,000
$ 500
$ 2,000


$ 54,800


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.







UNIVERSITY OF

(FLORIDA

E X T E N S I O N
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


District Directors Office
30 Research Road
Quincy, FL 32351
(850) 875 -7137
294-7137 Suncom
(850) 875-7148 FAX


November 7, 2000

TO: Board/Provost Appointed University of Florida Extension Faculty

FROM: Dr. Pete Vergot, III, International Extension Training Program Director

RE: 2000 2001 International Extension Training Program
Applications due February 5, 2001


You are especially invited to apply for the 2001 2002 International Extension Training
Program. Please consider joining the program by filling out the attached form and returning it
before February 5, 2001. Applicants should have at least five years of experience in Extension
and not be within five years of retirement.

The training will be offered as a series of four three-day workshops and a two-week international
field experience. It will focus on the global economy and social changes reflective of a post
cold-war period.

This is an in-service professional development activity funded through University of Florida
Extension. Spouses are encouraged to participate but at their own expense. Faculty selected are
asked to make a strong commitment of time, to be present at all sessions, and to be involved in a
reading and study program.

The selection process will consist of the following steps:

1. Review by District Directors for availability and professional interests.

2. Review by training program Director and Program Deans to relative commitment of
candidates based on personal objectives and intended application of training experience.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.







3. Random selection from an eligible pool of candidates to achieve a balanced yet
heterogeneous group across areas of expertise.

4. Confirmation from those invited to participate, reflecting county and office support.

5. The first session will take place in the Gainesville area, April 9th 11th all participants
must be able to attend this session.

A key element in the selection process will be the candidate's ability to predict how the training
experience will be used in the candidate's own professional career, and how it will be applied to
benefit clientele in Florida.
Details about the program are included in the enclosed materials. We encourage everyone
eligible to apply.








































The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.








University of Florida Extension
International Training Program
2001 2002


University of Florida Extension is proud to begin a program to provide professional development
opportunities for Extension faculty in International Extension work. Funding for the training is
through University of Florida Extension. In the 2001 2002 program year, ten faculty members
will be selected for the training program.


Program Goals

As a professional development opportunity, the University of Florida Extension International
Training Program seeks to:

* Prepare University of Florida Extension faculty to develop International outreach programs
for local clientele.

* Recognize the interdependence of the U.S. in global economic, social and political
developments and issues.

* Be better able to respond to the needs of individuals and communities impacted by cultural
diversity and global interdependence.

Recognize ways to provide international trade and development education programs to
University of Florida Extension clientele.

* Involve University of Florida Extension clientele in understanding how international
linkages/interdependencies affect our daily lives.

* Provide University of Florida Extension Faculty with the opportunity to become involved in
overseas projects and U.S. development education efforts.

* Improve local county programs by helping University of Florida Extension Faculty apply
their expanded knowledge and increased cultural sensitivity to local problems and programs.








The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.








Topics


Proposed topics for this year's training program include:

* International Development Programs. What are some of the current issues in international
development? What are the different goals and programs of agencies such as the U.S.
Agency for International Development, the World Bank, the United Nations Food and
Agriculture Organizations, and various private voluntary organizations such as Partners of
the Americas? How are Extension and University of Florida involved with these
organizations?

* Extension in the World. How do Extension Services in other countries differ from those in
the U.S.? What is Extension's role in working with these other systems? How can we in
Florida benefit from the experience of other countries?

* Designing International Extension Programs. What should be considered in designing
International Extension Programs? How can we learn what local systems need and what
resources they have? What are some of the challenges and dangers in transferring
technologies and techniques from one culture to another? How can interactions between two
cultures benefit each?

* Sustainable Development. What is meant by sustainability? What do agriculture,
environmental, human development, and business development efforts have in common?
What lessons abroad can be applied in Florida?

* Living and Working in Another Culture. How might the expectations of Extension
counterparts and clientele in another culture be different from our own? What might it be
like to live and work in another culture? How will spouses and children fit in? How can
what we've learned internationally be helpful in working with different cultural groups in our
own counties?

* Developing International Programs at the County Level. How can the experiences of the
training program be useful at the county level? Why is local international programming
important? What resources are available to help develop international programs?

* Clarification of the Goals and Purposes of University of Florida and Extensions'
Involvement in International Activities. The interdependence of industrialized,
developing, and newly industrialized countries in the global economy; issues of marketing,
market development, international trade policy; issues of technology transfer and appropriate
technology; and the role of U.S. professions, institutions and PVO's in foreign
assistance/development cooperation programs.





The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.







Eligibility


University of Florida Extension (provost-appointed) personnel at the state and county level
presently employed by University of Florida with at least three years experience in Extension
and not within five years of retirement are eligible.

The characteristics of staff asked to participate include:

1. Maturity and a strong background of successful Extension experiences.

2. Ability to cope with the multiple demands of the training program and Extension
assignment.

3. Demonstrated empathy and the understanding necessary to work with other cultures
abroad or domestically.

4. Commitment to expand and apply the training experience and personal expertise to
programs and activities abroad or domestically.

5. Reflection of a positive image as a representative of University of Florida and Extension.


Requirements and Commitment

There will be limited direct costs to the participants or their county. The Program will cover all
major costs of the International Travel. Participants are asked to request a commitment from
their counties to cover travel in Florida and share the time involvement between their official
professional role and their own professional development.

During each year, up to eight days of personal time and nine to fifteen days of professional in-
service time may be required. Spouses are encourage to participate but at their own expense.

Time

A two-year period, March 2001 December 2002

Commitment

Approximately nine days in 2001 and sixteen days in 2002

A) 2001 Three sessions, three days each.
B) 2002 Two weeks of international field training and a two-day
debriefing/planning/evaluation session.




The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.







Expected Benefits

For University of Florida Extension Personnel:

* An exciting opportunity to test oneself and grow personally and professionally.

* Continuing contact with international issues and programs.

* A chance to view one's work and career from different perspectives.

* Experience developing resource materials for international programs.

For the University of Florida Extension System:

* Faculty better prepared to respond to international program involvement, to the needs of
people of diverse cultural, economic and social situations.

* A cadre of professionals with increased energy and commitment to improve University of
Florida Extension efforts domestically and internationally.

For Local Florida Programs and People:

* Professionals better prepared to serve local needs.

* Increased understanding of how international issues affect daily life.

* Resource information concerning county linkages with the global economy.

Format

Workshops, seminars, field experience to a developing country, individualized study, special
projects.

University of Florida Extension International Extension Training Program
Dr. Pete Vergot, III, District I Director
30 Research Road
Quincy, FL 32351
Email vergot@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
(850) 875-7137
FAX (850) 875-7148


C:\A AMy Documents 2000\International_Training 10-9-2000.doc



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to
race, color, sex, age handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORKS IN AGRICULTURE, FAMILY & CONSUMER SERVICES, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA AGRICULTURE AND MECHANICS UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.






S UNIVERSITY OF
.' FLORIDA
International Extension
EXTENSION
EXTENS N Training Program
institute of Foodand Aginltura Sencs Application
Application


Name:

Program Area:

County/Department:

Mailing Address:

Telephone: ( ) Fax: ( )
Suncom:

E-mail Address:

Years of Employment with University of Florida Extension:

International Experience: Yes No
If yes, describe



Foreign Language Capability? List and Rate Level of Proficiency:


Technical or Subject Matter Expertise:


Experience with Involving Clientele in International Programs/Activities/Issues (Please give
examples):







Please prepare a brief narrative response for the following questions:

1. What are your reasons for wanting to participate in the International Extension
training?





2. In what way do you anticipate being involved internationally?





3. How do you think your Extension clientele will benefit from your participation?





4. What international issues currently concern clientele in your county?






5. What are your preliminary ideas for programs/activities within your present
assignment in which you could develop a focus to improve international
understanding?







RETURN TO:
Dr. Pete Vergot III, International Extension Training Program
University of Florida District Directors Office
30 Research Road
Quincy, FL 32351
Vergot(mail.ifas.ufl.edu
(850) 875-7137 Fax: (850) 875-7148


C:\A AMY DOCUMENTS 2000\INTERNATIONAL EXTENSION TRAINING PROGRAM APPLICATION.DOC








FORM 4. PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
PROGRAM YEAR 1999
(to be completed by the District Director with input from CED and Program Dean)
Name:
County/Position:

CMP's: CMP CMP

CMP CMP

Category I Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
I. PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY
A. Professional Development (Formal, Informal, In-Service) (Participates in in-service training as enrolled, implements
professional improvement plan, attends a minimum of 6 days training/year.)
1. Professional and scientific meetings

2. Formal course work

3. In-service training

4. Other professional development
B. International (N/A)
C. Recognition/Involvement in Professional Associations (Participation and Recognition) (Active involvement
through membership, committees, and leadership position in professional and discipline organizations.)
1. Honors and Awards

2. Membership and Activities in the Profession

D. Individual Professional Goal Development (Develops and accomplishes a minimum of one professional capacity building
goal.)

E. Long Range Faculty Goal


Category II Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
II. FACULTY'S PROGRAM SUPPORT
A. Publications (Publications are appropriate in quantity and quality for the faculty's rank and/or for progress toward next highest
rank)

B. Intellectual Property (N/A)

C. Presentations (Presentations at professional conferences and meetings.)

D. Other Creative Works


-1-








Category III Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
IIn INTERDISCIPLINARY SUPPORT

A. Contributions to Interdisciplinary Projects

B. University Governance and Service

C. Consultations outside the University (N/A)

D. Editor of Scholarly Journal, Service on Editorial Board (N/A)

E. Service to Schools (other than 4-H Youth Development)

F. Involvement in the 4-H Youth Program (Minimum 5% of days (11) expended in proactive 4-H/Youth program activities.
What was faculty role?)
Category IV Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
IV FINANCIAL SUPPORT
A. Obtains Extramural Resources (Seeks outside funding and in-kin contributions to supplement and compliment state and
local funding)
1. Grants/Contracts
2. In-Kind
3. Share

Category V Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
V. PROGRAM PLANNING
A. Functioning Advisory Committee(At least two meetings/year, rotation plan, geographical, socioeconomic and racial
representation, officers, minutes to CED, DED.
1. Number of people on committee?
2. Does it represent the enthic, socioeconomic and geographical demographics of the county/programs?
3. Rotation plan concisely described?
4. Are there officers to run the meetings with your assistance?
5. Are minutes sent to CED/DED?
6. Dates that the meetings were held?
B. Interaction with Specialists and Design Teams (State specialists involved in county major program development and/or
delivery. County faculty
involvement on state design
team when asked)
C. Rational/Objective Statements (Situational statements reflect and are supported by local needs and data with
specific/client centered/quantifiable program objectives.)

Category VI Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
VI. COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM DELIVERY/CONTACTS
(STATISTICAL REPORT) (Employs use of individual and group instruction, mass media, materials and volunteers as primary
program delivery methods to educate clientele groups. Teaching evident.)
A. Individual: E-mail, letters= ; Office visits= ; Telephone calls= ; Visits to clientele =
B. Group: Learning events= ; Participants= ; Instruction hours=
C. Mass Media: Times used= ; Contacts= ; Web page hits=
D. Materials: Prepared= ; Direct Mailings= ; Other distribution=


-2-








E. Volunteers: Number= ; Training hours= ; Volunteer hours= ; Contacts=

F. Educational Program Quality (The total program shows planning, delivery, follow-up, agent teaching and appropriate days
expended in county major programs.)
G. Linked With Other Agencies/Organizations (Cooperates with other organizations and agencies in planning,
implementing, and evaluating programs. Identify primary linkages.)
H. Conforms to Affirmative Action and ADA Guidelines (Parity (-4%) of minority populations is achieved, reasonable
accommodation policy is articulated, non-discriminatory publication statement and meeting announcements used.)

Category VII Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
VII. PROGRAM IMPACT AND EVALUATION:
A. Program Objectives Accomplished (Attainment of objectives identified in POW are documented)

B. Evaluation process (es) employed (Educator planned and conducted evaluations for each plan of work objective. One
CMP was selected for formal evaluation. Evaluation data was used to show/report quantifiable social, economic, or environmental
impacts.
C. Success Stories (One or more written/documented success stories. The best success stories will be about how a single family or
individual benefitted socially or economically from being a regular participant in your educational activities)

D. Outcome Measures
1. Customer Satisfaction/Surveyed
2. Knowledge Gained
3. Certification
4. Practices Changed
5. Social, economic and/or environmental Changes

E. Marketing of Programs and Accountability to Customers/Funding Partners (External relations with
governments, agencies, customers, and clientele regarding programs, the county office, and the Florida Cooperative Extension Service)

Category VIII Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
VIII. ESSENTIAL EXTENSION EDUCATION SKILLS:
A. Team Player (Cooperation with other faculty and staff in office,district and state; participation in office, district, state
meetings, and activities.)
B. Effective Communication With CED, DED (Interacts regularly with co-workers, CED and DED through written and
verbal contact. Provides meeting announcements, advisory minutes, newsletters, etc. on regular basis.)
C. Professional Conduct (Maintains a positive working relationship with clientele and cooperative extension staff. Responds
positively to counsel. Attends county, district, and state faculty/administrative functions.)
D. Timely and Quality of Reporting (Timeliness, accuracy, and completeness of state and county reports expected.)
E. Computer and Technology Literacy (Evidence and expansion of working knowledge and use of e-mail, www, pc based
s
0
f
t
w
a
r
e

a
p


-3-






















Category IX Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
IX. PROGRAM LEADERSHIP & COORDINATION
(Program Leaders/Coordinators Only. Meeting regularly with staff, coordinates program reports, assists CED in specific program area and
total program development)
A. Programmatic Leadership Activities
B. Administrative Activities
Category X Appraisal
Exceeds Achieves Improvement Needed
X. CED PROGRAM LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION
A. Overall Advisory Committee (At least two meetings/year, rotation plan, geographical, socioeconomic and racial
representation, minutes to DED.)
B. Budget (Planning, Management) (Submits a county budget on a timely basis, work with appropriate county staff, seek
and manage financial resources for faculty, equipment, operation and facilities.)
C. Communication and Relationship with County Government (Inform BOCC and "County Administrator" of office
activities and programs at least on an annual basis. Attend appropriate county meetings, involvement of individuals from county
government on advisory boards and in programs/activities as appropriate (except where prohibited by county government).
D. Guidance, Mentoring and Retention of Faculty (CED meets with new faculty monthly, follows through on mentoring
process, reviews POWs, ROA's, promotion/permanent status packets, professional develop enrollments and counsels both faculty and
staff.)
E. Personnel Management in the County Extension office (Fills positions consistent with UF procedures on a timely
basis with input from local advisory groups, addresses personnel issues in a timely manner, completes evaluation and other documents in
a timely manner. Appoints acting leadership when extended absence from office.)
F. Communicates regularly with faculty and staff (Hold monthly staff meetings.)
G. Marketing of the Total Extension Program (Provides leadership for IFAS/County public relations effort in the county.)
H. Affirmative Action Leadership for County Programs (Monitors and is aware of all affirmative action rules,
maintains files, submits timely reports, ensures proper placement of "and justice for all" posters, discusses AA with staff and advisory
committees, uses non-discriminatory and ADA statement on all written materials, ensures equal access for groups associated with
extension, provides plan for improvement for all FCE and 4-H clubs not meeting civil rights guidelines.)


XI. OTHER COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS:

XII. OVERALL RATING
1 = not acceptable
2 = needs improvement
3-5 = achieves expectations
6-7 = exceeds expectations


-6-









Not Acceptable

1
I


Needs Improvement

2


Achieves Expectations

3 4 5

1 I I


Exceeds Expectations

6 7


Mitch/evaluati/form4performanapprl999.wpd


-7-





Pete Vergot III District I Extension Director, 04:25 PM 10/27/00 -0400, County Faculty :.. Page 1 of 1


Date: Fri, 27 Oct 2000 16:25:42 -0400
From: Pete Vergot III District I Extension Director
Subject: County Faculty info for IPAT
To: Dan Cantliffe
Cc: Peter Hildebrand ,
"\"Pete Vergot District 1 Extension Director"
Organization: University of Florida Extension
X-VMS-To: IN%"djc@GNV.IFAS.UFL.EDU" "Dan Cantliffe"
X-VMS-Cc: IN%"hildebrand@fred.ifas.ufl.edu" "Peter Hildebrand",
IN%"vergot@mail.ifas.ufl.edu" "Pete Vergot District 1 Extension Director"
X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.73 [en] (Win98; I)
X-Accept-Language: en,pdf

Dan
I have attached 3 files

The first is a proposal I sent to the Deans office a while back. It is a
training proposal for Extension Faculty something that I proposed last
year.

The second attachment is the application for the faculty for the
project.

The 3rd attachment is the tool used by DEDs evaluating County Faculty

let me know if I can assist.
Pete


Pete Vergot
District I Extension Director
University of Florida Extension
vergot@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
850- 875-7137


L International Training 10-27-2000.doc


U International Extension Training Program Application.doc


U-A form4performapprl999R.doc


Printed for Dan Cantliffe


11/7/00




APPENDIX 8


IFAS Faculty
International Activity since 1993
Survey Results








Prepared for:
International Programs Action Team (IPAT)
Chair, Dan Cantliffe



Prepared and Submitted by:
IFAS International Programs
Office of the Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

September 12, 2001




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