• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Copyright
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Materials and methods
 Green bean
 Lima bean
 Edible soybean
 Green pea
 Southern pea
 Summary
 Reference






Title: Seasonal response of vegetable crops for selected cultivars in North Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054295/00001
 Material Information
Title: Seasonal response of vegetable crops for selected cultivars in North Florida
Physical Description: 30 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Halsey, L. H ( Lawrence Henry ), 1915-
Kostewicz, S. R
Publisher: Vegetable Crops Dept., Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subject: Horticultural crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 30).
Statement of Responsibility: L.H. Halsey, S.R. Kostewicz
General Note: "Vegetable crops research report 1-1976."
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "March 1976."
General Note: "This work was supported by funds from the IFAS Rural Development Center."
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054295
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70328136

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Materials and methods
        Page 2
    Green bean
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Lima bean
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Edible soybean
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Green pea
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Southern pea
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Summary
        Page 29
    Reference
        Page 30
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





Vegetable Crops


Research Report 1-1976



Seasonal Response
of Vegetable Crops
for Selected Cultivars
in North Florida

I. Legumes


Vegetable Crops Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611


L. H. Halsey
S. R. Kostewicz


This work was supported by funds
from the IFAS Rural Development Center.


March 1976














Seasonal Response of Vegetable Crops for Selected
Cultivars in North Florida. I. Legumes

by
L. H. Halsey and S. R. Kostewicz--


Reports of warm season vegetable crop performance in north Florida have

been for crops produced in traditional spring and fall growing periods, limited

mostly to late March and early April and to August plantings. Yield trials of
legumes have included green bean and southern pea primarily with little infor-

mation available on lima bean or green pea, as reported by Bryan, Halsey, Valli
and Young (1-5). They concluded that acceptable yields of leguminous crops could

be obtained from spring plantings made as soon as danger of frost declined and

in late summer if adequate time was allowed to ensure harvest before killing

frost occurred.

The objectives of the work reported here were to generate data on the re-

sponse of various leguminous crops to a series of plantings over the entire

warm-season growing period. Production potential of each of the crops at seasons

other than the traditional early spring and late summer plantings was evaluated.
Cultivar response within each crop was also determined.





I/Associate Professor, Horticulture and Assistant Extension Vegetable Specialist,
Vegetable Crops Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611.
The authors wish to acknowledge the valuable technical assistance rendered by
C. Lamar Bryant in the development and conduct of the work reported here.













MATERIALS AND METHODS

Plantings of green bean, lima bean, edible soybean, green pea and southern

peas were made at three-week intervals at the Horticultural Unit near Gainesville,

from March 19 September 5, 1974, and at one-month intervals from March 19 -

September 23, 1975. This period includes the entire frost-free growing season

in an average year. Two cultivars of each crop were included at earlier plantings,

with a third cultivar added to most of the later plantings. The soil was fumigated

with MC-33 for control of soil-borne pests. Fertilizer of 6-8-8 (plus minor elements)

analysis was incorporated at the time of bedding at 1200 Ibs per acre rate. Supple-

mental applications of potassium were made after blooming at intervals of 7-10 days

to off-set loss by leaching. The crops were irrigated during periods of low rain-

fall. For pest control a program of spraying was maintained as nearly at 7-day

intervals as weather permitted.
Green beans were harvested at the snap stage of maturity. Pods of all other

legumes were harvested at the green-shell stage of maturity. Multiple harvests

were made of all types except soybeans, which were harvested once. With the other

crops, harvests were made one, two, or three times weekly as the pods developed.

Successive blooming of the peas and beans required numerous harvests over exten-

ded periods of time. Yields were adjusted to per-acre equivalents of marketable

grade (individual plot size was 4' x 30' in 1974 and 4' x 20' in 1975).

















GREEN BEAN

1974. With early plantings of green bean, 'Sprite' was better than 'Miami'.

However, all through the summer, 'Sprite' plants were so seriously affected by
bean rust (Uromyces phaseoli) that no yields were obtained until plantings of

August and September. Although 'Sprite' was superior to 'Miami' in the spring,
the reverse was true in the fall.
1975. Yields were lower than in 1974. The effect of rust on all cultivars

was less severe than in 1974, with at least some yield obtained from 'Sprite'.
'Harvester' yields were much higher than the other cultivars only in late

summer. 'Blue Lake 47' responded very favorably to conditions of the May 21

planting. 'Miami' was relatively consistent at most planting times.
Time required to reach maturity was relatively consistent with all plant-

ings. Harvest period was variable and not related to time of planting in 1974,
but more consistent in 1975, as shown by the more lengthy harvest period in
early and late plantings.









Table 1. Performance of green bean
cultivars for sequential
planting in 1974.


Date of
planting_
*Mar. 19
*Apr. 9
*Apr. 30
May 21
Jun. 12
Jul. 2
Jul. 22
*Aug. 12
*Sep. 5


Yield--Bushels per Acre
Ili ami Sprite


226
219
107
229
119
102
77
110
229


281
242
**
**
**
**
**
42
144


Days to Mature
59 57
56 52
40 **
42 **
57 **
48 **
51 **
53 56
56 56


*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aiig.
*Sep.


Days Harvest Period
10 12
8 12
14 **


Number of Harvests
*Mar. 19 4 5
*Aor. 9 4 5
*Apr. 30 2 0
May 21 5 0
Jim. 12 2 0
Jul. 2 4 0
Jul. 22 3 0
*Aug. 12 6 4
*Sep. i 5 5


*Traditional planting
north Florida area.


months for


**No yield.






















GREEN BEAN
Miami -m-,-.
Spri te mm




9 9 3 2

P 3 A I -D
I i i I

*I I j i


MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL AUG SEP
19 9 30 21 12 2 22 14 5
PLANTING DATE


Fi. 1_: Effect of planting date
cultivars in 1974.


on yield of green bean


250

200
ou
< 150
LaJ
1 100
UJ

S50

0


1974










Table 2. Performance of green bean cultivar for sequential
planting in 1975.

Yield--Bushels Per Acre
Date of Sprite Miami Harvester Blue Lake Eagle
planting 47 57


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


223 -**
85 62
47 44
** **
** **


Days to Mature
69 ** **
66 *
** 51 "-*
** 50 59
62 50 69
63 **' **
49 ** **

Days Harvest Period
7 ** **
24 ** **
** 24 k.'
*A 14 5
7 6 10
19 ** **
11 ** **

Number of Harvests
2 **
1 ** **
**: 7 **
*' 4 2
2 2 2
6 ** **
** **


*Traditional planting months for north Florida areas.
**No yield.
























GREEN BEAN
Spri te aI -- I
Miami -
Harvester wQ--
Blue Lake 47 -i -
Blue Lake S7 rfwwi
Eagle ,s****


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP
19 22 21 17 22 19 23
1975 PLANTING DATES



Fic. 2. Effect of planting date on yield of green bean
cultivars in 1975.


S200i
= 0

u 150

,.0
S100
















LIMA BEAN
1974. The production of lima beans was at good levels for all cultivars

through almost all of the cropping season with 'Jackson Wonder' consistently

better. Late summer yields declined, with that of Sept. 5 severely limited

by cold weather. The yields of the May 12 planting were reduced due to insect

damage to foliage.

1975. As with 1974 there was a gradual decline in yield through the
summer. Yields of the August planting for 'Jackson Wonder' and 'Thorogreen'

were similar to early spring production, with good response of 'Jackson Wonder'

in spite of the hot weather.

Time required for maturity was more variable than with green bean indica-

ting a greater response to changes in the environment. Midsummer plantings

in 1974 and early plantings in 1975 showed strong ability of the lima bean

plants to make successive crops through successive bloomings, as indicated

by the longer harvest periods and higher yields.











Table 3. Performance of lima bean cultivars for
sequential planting in 1974.

Date of Yield--Bushels per Acre
planting Jackson Wonder Fordhook 242 Thorogreen
*Mar. 19 194 261 **
*Apr. 9 304 227 **
*Apr. 30 346 270 **
May 21 181 150 **
Jun. 12 440 397 143
Jul. 2 364 344 167
Jul. 22 157 213 33
*Aug. 12 208 179 125
*Sep. 5 57 24 52

Days to Mature
*Mar. 19 84 84 **
*Apr. 9 63 63 **
*Apr. 30 76 76 **
May 21 86 86 **
Jun. 12 67 71 77
Jul. 2 69 69 69
Jul. 22 55 60 55
*Aug. 12 72 72 72
*Sep. 5 74 74 74

Days Harvest Period
*Mar. 19 45 45 **
*Apr. 9 14 14 **
*Apr. 30 55 55 **
May 21 39 39 **
Jun. 12 91 87 90
Jul. 2 70 70 78
Jul. 22 67 66 12
*Aug. 12 40 40 40
*Sep. 5 13 13 13

Number of Harvests
*Mar. 19 6 8 **
*Apr. 9 3 3 **
*Apr. 30 7 8 **
May 21 4 5 **
Jun. 12 14 14 12
Jul. 2 12 12 11
Jul. 22 10 10 3
*Aug. 12 6 6 6
*Sep. 5 3 3 3

*Traditional planting months for north Florida areas.
**Not planted.





-10-


LIMA BEAN
I J Lr, k I W d u sam i


500 U II UIIUc V
Fordhook 242
Thorogreen r'wraw
400


. 300
a-
200


100


0
MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL AUG S
19 9 30 21 12 2 22 14
1974 PLANTING DATE



Fig. 3. Effect of planting date on yield of lima bean
cultivars in 1974.


m


EP
5





-11-


Table 4. Performance of lima bean cultivars for
sequential planting in 1975.

Date of Yield--Bushels Per Acre
planting Jackson Wonder Fordhook 242 Thorogreen


352
212
148
156
101
209


Days to Mature


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
.Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.


*Mar.
*Apr,
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.


*Mar.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
*Aug.


*Traditional planting months for north Florida areas.


Days Harvest Period
110
52
66
16
7
1

Number of Harvests
9
12
10
4
2
1




-12-


500


LIMA BEAN
Jackson Wonder .i -.
Fordhook 242
Thorvnnran r T


w u
S400 -

-300- l
m H
200- q "

S01 !
100- I Ij


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG
19 22 21 17 22 19
1975 PLANTING DATES




Fig. 4. Effect of planting date on yield of lima bean
cultivars in 1975.




-13-


EDIBLE SOYBEAN

1974. Yields of edible soybeans were low at the first planting,
increased sharply through the third planting, then decreased gradually

to nearly the original low by the ninth planting.

1975. Yield pattern was very similar to 1974, with the April plant-

ing the best, and declining thereafter. 'Verde' was generally the lowest,

while the other three cultivars were variable in response to planting time.


Table 5. Performance of edible
in 1974.

Soybean Yields
Date of Bushels per acre
planting Early Green Verde
*Mar. 19 95 104
*Apr. 9 287 174
*Apr. 30 396 372
May 21 381 317
Jun. 12 325 319
Jul. 2 298 280
Jul. 22 229 189
*Aug. 12 193 171
*Sep. 5 177 114


soybean cultivars for sequential planting


Soybean
Days to harvest
Early Green Verde
78 84
66 66
74 75
77 77
66 66
72 72
73 78
71 71
66 73


Harvests
Days harvest period
Early Green Verde
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1


*Traditional planting months for


north Florida areas.


I





-14-


500


400


EDIBLE SOYBEAN
Early Green i-rem
Verde
Disoy v wa


c 300

-1 200

100


0
MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL AUG SEI
19 9 30 21 12 2 22 14 5
1974 PLANTING DATE



Fig. 5. Effect of planting date on yield of edible
soybean cultivars in 1974.





-15-


Performance of
for sequential


edible soybean cultivars
planting in 1975.


Date of Yield-,Bushels per Acre
planting Early Green Emerald Kanrich Verde
*Mar. 19 149 ** 205 132
*Apr. 22 210 256 185 210
May 21 165 218 152 140
Jun. 17 223 167 180 130
Jul, 22 160 112 175 139
*Aug. 19 200 132 120 149

Days to Mature
*Mar. 19 84 ** 84 84
*Apr. 22 76 85 76 79
May 21 75 82 68 75
Jun. 17 71 77 71 71
Jul. 22 79 83 72 78
*Aug. 19 70 70 70 70


*Traditional
areas.


planting months for north Florida


**No planting.


Table 6.




-16-


EDI
500 V
E
K
S400 E


S300

| 200 3 _
c-

100


0
MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG
19 22 21 17 22 19


1975


BLE SOYBEAN
erde i-i
early Green -
:anrlch WArr
emerald imm


PLANTING DATES


Fig. 6. Effect of planting date on yield of edible
soybean cultivars in 1975.


_ ...





-17-


GREEN PEA

1974. The yield of green pea declined rather rapidly for successive

plantings during the spring, with no plantings during the summer. Plants

were small and very few pods were set in the April plantings. Only 'Little

Marvel' produced any pods in the August 14 planting. 'Little Marvel' re-

quired less time to develop.

1974-75. Production through the fall months was relatively low, with

greatly increased yields starting with November plantings. 'Wando' and 'Green'

Arrow' were better than 'Little Marvel' and usually required longer to reach

first harvest.

1975. As in the previous warm season no plantings were made in May -

August period. Yields in early spring and fall were low with 'Wando' showing

better.





-18-


Table 7. Performance of
for sequential


green pea cultivars
planting in 1974.


Date of Yield--Bushels per Acre
planting Little Marvel Wando Green Arrow
*Mar. 19 69 213 **
*Apr. 9 55 58 **
*Apr. 30 49 73 **
May 21 ** ** **
Jun. 12 ** ** **
Jul. 2 ** ** **
Jul. 22 ** ** **
*Aug. 14 10 *** ***
*Sep. 5 32 155 133


Days to Mature
70
87
56
**
**
**
**
***
74

Days Harvest Period
17


**
**
**
***
32


*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.



*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.



*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Traditional planting months
Florida areas.
**No planting.
***No yield.


Number of Harvests
6
5
3
**
**
**
**
6
7


21


24
6
**
**
**
**
1
32


**
**
**
**
**
**
**
***
74


**
**
**
**
**
**
**
***
32


**
**
**
**
**
**
**
***
7


for north




-19-


GREEN PEA
Little Marvel ,,E-mi
Wando -r
Green Arrow Aw"ar


MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL
19 9 30 21 12 2 22
PLANTING DATES


14 5


Fig. 7. Effect of planting date
cultivars in 1974.


on yield of green pea


250

200 -

LU
"150
-J
u-i
Il00 -
mC

50 -


II


1974




-20-


Table 8. Performance of green pea cultivars
for sequential planting in 1974-75.


Yield--Bushels per Acre
Little Marvel Wando Green Arrow


50
50
7
112
86
159
130
102


41
102
42
164
170
235
214
149


97
65
122
114
85
78
72
71


22
63
20
11
28
28
14
8


Days to Mature
97
65
122
114
85
78
72
71


Days Harvest Period
46 22
28 63
7 20


Sep.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.


Sep.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
>Feb.


Sep.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.


suitable for planting.


Date of
planting*
Sep. 25
Oct. 14
Nov. 4
Nov. 25
Dec. 16
Jan. 6
Jan. 27
Feb. 17


Number of Harvests
5 4
5 7
? 4
5 6
i 4
5 4
5 3
3 2


*All dates





-21-


GREEN PEA
Little Marvel ,lm
250 Wando
Green Arrow w -m


200 -


150
..J
3b
100 -


50 -

50


1974-75


SEP OCT NOV NOV DEC JAN JAN FEB
25 14 4 25 16 6 27 17
PLANTING DATES


Fig. 8. Effect of
cultivars


planting date on yield of green pea
in 1974-75.




-22-


Table 9. Performance of green pea cultivars
for sequential planting in 1975.


Yield--Bushels per Acre
Little Marvel Wando Green Arrow


*
*
*
9

Days to Mature
55
59
*


*
*
75 .


Days Harvest Period


* *
* *
6 6


Number of Harvests
3
S2
r*
r *
r *
*
1


*No planting.


Date of
planting
Mar. 19
Apr. 22
May 21
Jun. 17
Jul. 22
Aug. 19
Sep. 23


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.
Sep.


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.
Sep.


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.
Sep.


--





-23-


GREEN PEA
Little Marvel i.
Wando
Green Arrow


APR MAY JUN JUL AUG- SEP
22 21 17 22 19 23
PLANTING DATES


Fig. 9. Effect of
cultivars


planting date on yield of green pea
in 1975.


250

S200


150

100

50


0


1975




-24-


SOUTHERN PEA

1974. Yields of southern pea were good through the July 2

planting, with highest values for the April 30 planting (third

planting). Plantings 6, 7, and 8 were less, while no. 9 was

quite low due to cold.

1975. Southern pea yields were similar to those of 1975

for spring and early summer, but better than 1974 for late

summer plantings. Very little difference between cultivars

was evident, except for the May planting.

Time required for maturity was reasonably .uniform except

for the effect of cool weather on the September planting.

Southern peas blooming period was rather lengthy with lengthy

harvest periods required at nearly all planting times.




-25-


Table 10. Performance of southern pea culti-
vars for sequential planting in 1974.

Yield--Bushels per Acre
Date of Purple Hull Knuckle Zipper
planting Pinkeye Purple Hull Cream
*Mar. 19 378 ** 372
*Apr. 9 313 ** 424
*Apr. 30 539 ** 485
May 21 295 337 414
Jun. 12 274 289 343
Jul. 2 206 118 151
Jul. 22 167 246 240
*Aug. 12 239 362 157
*Sep. 5 65 100 17


Days to Harvest


*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar.
*Apr.
*Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Jul.
*Aug.
*Sep.


*Mar. 19
*Apr. 9
*Apr. 30
May 21
Jun. 12
Jul. 2
Jul. 22
*Aug. 12
*Sep. 5


Days Harvest Period
** 29
** 41
** 39
23 23
28 26
6 16
10 12
25 25
8 16

Number of Harvests
** 9
** 14
** 13
11 11
8 9
3 5
5 6
7 6
2 2


*Traditional
areas.


planting months for north Florida


**No planting.





-26-


SOUTHERN PEA
P. Hull Pinkeye ,aa,
Zipper Creamaas
Knuckle P. Hull '-re



.i .


r r; _


MAR APR- APR
19 9 30


21 12 2
PLANTING DATE


22 14 5


Fig. 10. Effect of planting date on yield of
cultivars in 1974.


southern pea


500


400
LUi

: 300
0.
- 200


m 100


0



1974
















Table 11. Performance
vars for sequential


of southern pea culti-
planting in 1975.


Yield--Bushels
Purple Hull Zipper
Pinkeye Cream


271
223
127
169
202
294


per Acre
Knuckle
Purple Hull
345
294
187
173
244
300


Days to Mature
82
66
58
59
59
65


Days Harvest Period
11
23
10
26
17
18

Number of Harvests
5
5
5
7
5
5


Date of
planting
Mar. 19
Apr. 22
May 21
Jun. 17
Jul. 22
Aug. 19


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.


Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.


_





-28-


SOUTHERN PEA
Zipper Cream ow ai
P.H. Pinkeye s
Knuckle P.H. ,A


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG
19 22 21 17 22 19
PLANTING DATES


Fig. 11. Effect of planting
cultivars in 1975.


date on yield of southern pea


' 400


" 300

200
^ 200
cQ


1975





-29-


SUMMARY

The pattern of response of the legumes to climatic differences associated

with dates of planting were varied and sometimes inconsistent. Acceptable

yields of green bean were obtained from 'Miami' in 1974 during the off-season

(May-July) while 'Sprite' produced nothing. In 1975 both cultivars were rela-

tively low in yield throughout the test. 'Blue Lake 47' and 'Harvester' per-

formance indicate potentials that need further study.

With lima bean in 1974, the 'off-season' yields were roughly similar to those

of traditional planting dates, with 'Jackson Wonder' a bit more responsive in the

hot weather. The yields in 1975 for the 'off-season' period were lower, although

still at acceptable levels.

The yield pattern of edible soybean was consistently high for both years

for the hot weather periods, with early and late planting date production

depressed by cool temperature and/or daylength effects.

From the results of plantings of green pea in 1974 and 1975 it was evident

that the temperature restraints were severe, with only a limited range suitable

for good production. Plants of green pea failed to develop in the hot weather

'off season.'

Southern pea production was limited to some degree by hot weather during

the 'off-season,' but yields were at acceptable levels for all plantings except

that of Sept. 5, 1974, which was limited by cold temperatures.






-30-


Literature Cited

1. Bryan, H. H. 1966. Effect of plastic mulch on the yield of several
vegetable crops in North Florida. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 79:
139-146.

2, Halsey, L. H. 1957-64. Florida Agricultural Exp, Sta. Ann. Reports.
1957-1964.

3. Valli, V. J., H. H. Bryan, H. W. Young and D. R. Davis. 1965. The
effect of shade on the bioclimate and production of vegetable crops.

Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 78: 95-101.

4. Young, H. W. 1961. Production of spring vegetables under shade. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 74: 209-216.

5. Young, H. W. 1962. Time of planting and harvesting of tender vegetable

crops in the Quincy, Florida area, Proc, Fla. State Hort. Soc. 75: 218-220.




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