• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 History of the Gulf Coast Research...
 List of program leaders
 Support staff
 Tour 1: Vegetable crop improve...
 Tour 2: Vegetable crop protect...
 Tour 3: Vegetable crop production...
 Acknowledgement
 Back Cover






Group Title: Vegetable field day, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Title: Vegetable field day
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00054244/00014
 Material Information
Title: Vegetable field day
Series Title: Research report - Gulf Coast Research and Education Center ; BRA 1997-6
Physical Description: v. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Maynard, D. N. ( Editor )
Waters, W. E. ( Editor )
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Bradenton, Fla.
Publication Date: 1997
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Cultivated -- Field experiments -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plants, Protection of -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Varieties -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: 30th (1973); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 43rd (1999).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00054244
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62706005
lccn - 2005229077

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Introduction
        Page 1
    History of the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
        Page 2
    List of program leaders
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Support staff
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Tour 1: Vegetable crop improvement
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Tour 2: Vegetable crop protection
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Tour 3: Vegetable crop production and variety evaluation
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Acknowledgement
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Back Cover
        Page 59
        Page 60
Full Text


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203

42nd VEGETABLE FIELD DAY

Wednesday, May 14,1997


Field Day Coordinator: Don N. Maynard

Moderator: Don N. Maynard, Extension Vegetable Specialist


AM 8:15

9:00

9:10



9:30

11:00

PM 12:30


1:30


Registration

Welcome Comments W. E. Waters, Center Director

Outlook for Florida Agricultural Research, Extension
& Teaching Programs in the Future-Dr. Jim Davidson,
VP for Agriculture & Natural Resources, IFAS

First Tour (Choice of Tour 1, 2, or 3)

Second Tour (Choice of Tour 1, 2 or 3)

LUNCH

Faculty will be available for individual discussions


Three tours will be available:


(1) Vegetable Crop Improvement
(2) Vegetable Crop Protection
(3) Vegetable Crop Producton
and Variety Evaluation


For individuals with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact Dr. W. E. Waters at the
above address (941/751-7636) within 72 hours prior to the field day so that proper consideration may be
given to the request.










TABLE OF CONTENTS




Page

Introduction................................................................................ ............ 1

History of GCREC Bradenton................................................................ 2

List of Program Leaders................................................. ....................... 3

Support Staff................................. ......................... 5

Tour 1: Vegetable Crop Improvement.......................... ........ ....... 8

Tour 2: Vegetable Crop Protection.................................. 18

Tour 3: Vegetable Crop Production and Variety Evaluation................ 36

Acknowledgement/Grantors................................................................. 49







INTRODUCTION


On behalf of the faculty and staff, I want to welcome each of you to the Gulf Coast
Research and Education Center, at Bradenton, Florida. This Center began in 1925 as the
Tomato Disease Laboratory (a one-faculty facility in Palmetto), and the first ornamental
programs began about 17 years later. This Center, with the affiliated unit in Dover, is a
Research and Education unit of the University of Florida's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.

In Bradenton, we have 3 grant-supported scientist positions, three state extension
specialist positions, and 14 state research and extension scientist positions from various
disciplines of training who participate in all phases of vegetable and ornamental
horticulture. This interdisciplinary team approach, combining several research disciplines
and a wide range of industry and faculty contacts, often is more productive than could be
accomplished with limited investments in independent programs.

The primary mission of the Gulf Coast REC at Bradenton and Dover is:
To develop and disseminate new scientific knowledge and technology on
commercial ornamental, strawberry, and vegetable crops which will allow Florida
agriculture to remain efficient and economically competitive with other regions of
the world.

To assist the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus departments, and other
research centers with extension, undergraduate and graduate student training, and
cooperative research for the benefit of Florid's consumers, producers, and students.

Program Areas Emphasized:
1. Genetics, plant breeding and variety development/evaluation, with special
emphasis on tomato, strawberry, calabaza, caladium, gladiolus, and other flower
crops.
2. Integrated biological, chemical, and cultural pest management in bacteriology,
entomology, nematology, mycology, virology, and weed science.
3. Soil and water management and natural resource protection.
4. Production, culture, management, and pre- and postharvest physiology of
ornamental, strawberry, and vegetable crops.
5. Leadership in floriculture, vegetable, and water management for state extension
programs in southwest Florida.
6. Graduate student training and special undergraduate courses.
7. Advancement of fundamental knowledge of disciplines represented by faculty.

Information presented in this publication summarizes the active research projects on
vegetable crops. We sincerely appreciate your interest and support of these research
programs, and continuously solicit you suggestions for improvement of research and
extension programs.


Will E. Waters






HISTORY OF THE GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER

The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center originated in the fall of 1925 with the
construction of the Tomato Disease Laboratory.

Tomato Disease Laboratory: A 20 acre tract of Manatee County-owned property in
Palmetto was made available with the cooperation of the Manatee Board of County
Commissioners. Operational and construction money and equipment were supplied by
local growers. The primary objective of the laboratory was to formulate a control of
nailhead spot of tomato. Later studies emphasized the breeding for resistance to
Fusarium wilt and the control of tobacco mosaic in tomatoes. In 1937, with expansion of
the vegetable industry in Manatee County and surrounding areas, the State Legislature
authorized new facilities for the research program.

Vegetable Crops Laboratory: In August, 1938, the Manatee County Commissioners
donated 80% of the purchase price of a 106 acre tract in east Bradenton. The expanded
facility and diversified vegetable crop research led to the establishment of the Vegetable
Crops Laboratory. Following this relocation, horticultural, entomological, and soil studies
were initiated on tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, sweet corn, and other vegetables. Since the
laboratory was located in a region where gladiolus was grown for winter flowers, the scope
of the laboratory was broadened in 1942 to include disease problems confronting gladiolus
growers.

Gulf Coast Experiment Station: In March, 1957, the State Board of control elevated the
status of the Vegetable Crops Laboratory to a branch station and renamed it The Gulf
Coast Experiment Station. Investigations were begun on chemical weed control,
nematodes, and other soil-borne pests. In 1954, the ornamental program was broadened
to include chrysanthemums and other commercial cut-flowers. In 1959, a 200 acre tract
was acquired 8 miles east of Bradenton along State Route 70 and the Caruso Road. All
of the vegetable experimental field program were moved to this new location.

In 1965, after construction of office and laboratory facilities, farm buildings, greenhouses,
and a residence, all research programs were conducted on this new farm.

Agricultural Research & Education Center-Bradenton: In 1971, the Gulf Coast
Experiment Station was renamed Agricultural Research and Education Center to
emphasize the programs of both research and education.

Gulf Coast Research & Education Center: In 1984, to reflect the regionality of the
research and education programs at Bradenton, IFAS and the State Board of Regents
renamed the center the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center.

Current programs are in progress and production problems associated with vegetables and
ornamentals and strawberries grown on the sandy soil of Florida.

The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center has administrative and research
supervision over a satellite station, GCREC-Dover (formerly the Strawberry and Vegetable
Field Laboratory). The Dover station is the hub of strawberry research in Florida, including
breeding, horticultural, and pathological studies.







GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
BRADENTON, FLORIDA

Program Leaders. Appointment Date. and Area of Specialization


Waters, W. E.


Bell, M. L.


Csizinszky, A. A.


Dean, D. E.



Gilreath, J. P.


Harbaugh, B. K.


Howe, T. K.


Hunter, W. B.


Jones, J. B.


Maynard, D. N.


McGovem, R. J.


Polston, J. E.


Price, J. F.


1960. Professor, Center Director. Administration, soil and
plant nutrition, and ornamental horticulture.

1997. Assistant Professor. Environmental
Horticulturist/Extension Floriculture Specialist.

1976. Associate Professor. Production systems, crop
management and post-harvest studies on vegetable crops.

1994. Postdoctoral Research Scientist. Methodology for
screening and development of germplasm for resistance to
sweetpotato whitefly and tomato mottle virus.

1981. Associate Professor. Weed control of vegetable and
ornamental crops.

1975. Professor. Production, harvesting and marketing
systems for ornamental crops.


1979. Coordinator, Research Programs/Services.
evaluations for ornamental and vegetable crops.


Variety


1995. Post-doctoral Research Scientist. Ecology and control
of viral diseases of vegetables.

1981. Professor. Ecology and control of bacterial diseases of
ornamental and vegetable crops.

1985. Professor. Extension educational programs and
research on vegetable crops.

1996. Associate Professor. Etiology and control of diseases
of ornamental crops.

1991. Associate Professor. Ecology and control of viral
diseases of vegetables and ornamentals.

1978. Associate Professor. Identification, biology and control
of insects and mites of ornamental and strawberry crops.






Schuster, D. J. 1975. Professor. Identification, biology and control of insects
and mites of vegetable crops.

Scott, J. W. 1981. Professor. Tomato cultivar development and genetics.

Somodi, G. C. 1986. Assistant-In Plant Pathology. Ecology of bacterial
pathogens of ornamental and vegetable crops.

Stanley, C. D. 1979. Professor. Soil-water relations for ornamental and
vegetable crops.

Wilfret, G. J. 1969. Professor. Breeding and development of new cultivars
of cut flowers and other ornamental crops.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center-Dover. Florida

Chandler, C. K. 1987. Associate Professor. Strawberry breeding and
development of new varieties of strawberry.

Legard, D. E. 1995. Assistant Professor. Etiology and control of strawberry
and vegetable diseases.


Albregts,


Burgis, D.


Engelhard


Geraldsor


Jones, J. I


Overman,


Marlowe, (

Woltz, S.


Emeritus Faculty Gulf Coast Research and Education Center

E. E. 1967. Professor. Production, soil and plant nutrition of
strawberry and vegetable crops.

S. 1946. Professor. Vegetable production, weed control and
growth regulators.

I, A. W. 1966. Professor. Etiology and control of diseases of
ornamental crops.

, C. M. 1951. Professor. Soil nutritional problems and their
relationship with cultural methods for vegetable production.

P. 1958. Professor. Etiology and control of diseases of
vegetable crops.

A. J. 1945. Professor. Etiology and control of nematode- incited
diseases of ornamentals and vegetables.

G. A., Jr. 1976. Professor. Vegetable production and Extension.

S. 1953. Professor. Physiological and nutritional disorders and
diseases of vegetables and ornamental crops.







Administrative and Professional Staff

Max Beeler Coordinator, Research Programs/Services
Frederick Snyder Business Manager


University Support Personnel


Office Staff:


Nancy Kost
Tracey Revels
Gena Smoot
Patricia McClain
Debbie Smelser


Program Assistant
Senior Word Processing Operator
Accountant
Senior Secretary
Secretary


Richard Thomas
Charles Pratt
Donald Ness
John Lehman


Engineer
Maintenance Specialist
Maintenance Mechanic
Agricultural Assistant


Mark Knowles
Todd Test
Joyce Jones
Lamar Parrish
Hector Ortiz
Gerald Groover


Farm Supervisor
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Agricultural Assistant
Agricultural Assistant


Agricultural & Engineering Assistant Staff:


Dagmar Taborsky
Jan Watson
Osbaldo Toribio
Timothy Davis
Guillermo Alverio
Brian Neumann


Senior Agricultural Assistant
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Engineering Technician
Engineering Assistant


Service Staff:


Farm Operations Staff:







Technical Staff:


Renata Zalewski
Danuta Bois
Kevin Heame
John Hogue
Richard Kelly
Curtis Nagle
Karen Pearce
Teresa Seijo
Emily Vasquez
Nancy West
Audrey Wittman


GCREC-Dover Staff:

Annie Turgeau
Alicia Whidden
James Sumler, Jr.
Kelly Burke
Larry Smith
Frederick Wenzel
Gaylin Bryson


Chemist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Laboratory Technician


Secretary
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Biological Scientist
Farm Supervisor
Senior Agricultural Assistant
Agricultural Assistant








TOUR 1 VEGETABLE CROP IMPROVEMENT


Page TOPIC



10 Bush Tropical Pumpkin Selections D. N. Maynard

11 Diploid Watermelon Variety Evaluation D. N. Maynard

13 Tripoid Watermelon Variety Evaluation D. N. Maynard

15 Breeding Tomatoes for Horticultural Traits J. W. Scott
Blossom-end Scar Smoothness
Parthenocarpy
Cherry Tomatoes
Extended Shelf Life
Heat Tolerance
Ornamental Tomato Breeding
Hybrid Evaluation

17a Tomato Fruit Quality J. W. Scott, E. A. Baldwin, R. L. Shewfelt

17c Advanced Tomato Inbred Trial J. W. Scott








BUSH TROPICAL PUMPKIN SELECTIONS
D.N. Maynard

Location: Block J, Lands 4, 5


Objective:


Entries:





























Procedure:


Summary:


To select lines of inbred bush tropical pumpkins for increase for use as fixed
varieties or hybrid parents.


G38-1
G38-2
G38-3
G38-4
G38-5
G38-6
G38-7
G38-8
G38-9
G38-10
G38-11
G38-12
G38-13
G38-14
G38-15
G38-16
G38-17
G38-18
G38-19
G38-20
G38-21
G38-22
G38-23
G38-24
G38-25
G38-26
G38-27
G38-28


G38-29
G38-30
G38-31
G38-32
G38-33
G38-34
G38-35
G38-36
G38-37
G38-38
G38-39
G38-40
G38-41
G38-42
G38-43
G38-44
G38-45
G38-46
G38-47
G38-48
G38-49
G38-50
G38-51
G38-52
G38-53
G38-54
G38-55
G38-56


G39-1
G39-2
G39-3
G39-4
G39-5
G39-6
G39-7
G39-8
G39-9
G39-10
G39-11
G39-12
G39-13
G39-14
G39-15
G39-16
G39-17
G39-18
G39-19
G39-20
G39-21
G39-22
G39-23
G39-24
G39-25
G39-26
G39-27
G39-28


Beds were prepared on 4 March, 1997. Fertilization included 6 Ib. 0-20-
0/100 linear bed feet (Ibf) incorporated and 17 Ib. 18-0-25/100 Ibf banded.
Total fertilizer applied equals 148-60-206 Ib N-P205-K20/acre. The beds
were fumigated with methyl bromide: chloropicrin 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 Ibf.
The beds are on 9 ft centers and in-row spacing is 4 ft. Each entry is grown
in 5-plant plots. Selections will be made on the basis of fruit and vine
characteristics.

This project is part of a long term cooperative research effort to improve
tropical pumpkin calabazaa) varieties and production practices.








DIPLOID WATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION
D.N. Maynard

Location: Block J, Lands 8, 9, 10 (ditch rows)


To evaluate diploid watermelon varieties for fruit yield and quality.


Entry
1. ACX 5404
2. ACX 5407
3. ACX 5408
4. ACX 5411
5. ACX 5413
6. ACX 5443
7. ACX 5445
8. ACX 5451
9. Carnival
10. Ferrari
11. Fiesta
12. Mardi Gras
13. Royal Sweet
14. RWM 8007
15. RWM 8032
16. Sangria
17. SSC 460068
18. SSC 460083
19. Starbrite
20. Starfire
21. Stargazer
22. Stars-N-Stripes
23. Starset
24. SXW 0086
25. SXW 5022
26. SXW 5041
27. WM 8036
28. WM 8052
29. 94-52
30. 95-03
31. 96-29
32. SF 662
33. SF 829
34. LF 1390
35. LF 1402
36. LF 1832


Objective:

Entries:


Lot Number
196
106
66
126
86
56
206
216
CV6413
31812-05070
CV6148
CV6164
0461857
CV6165
CV6307
CV5178B
95P13

PJF7009
GXT7400
WCT417
WDT104
WCT418



WV6191
N96F3015X3022
5711-M1
5710-M1
5737-M1


Source
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Rogers
Shamrock
Rogers
Rogers
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Shamrock
Shamrock
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Rogers
Rogers
Sakata
Sakata
Sakata
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track








Procedure:







Summary:


Beds were prepared on 29 January, 1997. Fertilization included 6 Ib
0-20-0/100 linear bed feet (Ibf) incorporated and 17 Ib 18-0-25/100 Ibf
banded. Total fertilizer applied equals 148-60-206 Ib N-P205-K20/acre. The
beds were fumigated with methyl bromide:chloropicrin 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 Ibt.
The beds are on 9 ft centers and in-row spacing is 3 ft. The watermelons
were direct-seeded on 17 February 1997 with 6 plants per plot and 3
replications per entry.

Diploid watermelon variety trials have been conducted here since 1991.
Yields have ranged from 245-439 cwt/acre in 1996 to 637-1026 cwt/acre in
1993. Based on results of these trials, the following 'Allsweet' type and
blocky 'Crimson Sweet' type varieties are expected to perform well in Florida:
'Fiesta', 'Regency', 'Royal Star', 'Royal Sweet', and 'Sangria'. 'Mardi Gras',
'Carnival', and 'Royal Flush' performed well in the 1996 GCREC trials and
should be considered in planning for the 1997 season. 'Starbrite' has
performed well in past trials and seed is being advertised for the 1997
season.








TRIPLOID WATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION
D. N. Maynard

Location: Block J, Lands 8, 9, 10 (center rows)


To evaluate triploid (seedless) watermelon varieties for yield and quality.


Lot Number


Source


A22-1
B22-3
Crimson Trio
Favorite Ball
F464
Genesis
Monarch
Premier
RWM 8008
RWM 8009
Scarlet Trio
Shadow
SSC 460072
Summersweet 5244
Summersweet 5544
Sunrise
SXW 0037
SXW 1003
SXW 1025
SXW 3022
SXW 3053
SXW 4016
SXW 5001
Tri-X-313
92-08
95-11
95-14
96-57
855
1004
1174
1273


CV6575


31712-05136
26901
31748-15901
CV6305A

CV5428SY


5103TR002296T
4074TR001438T









5749-M2
5748-M3
5750-M3
6358-M3


CFREC
CFREC
Rogers
cdm Fast Track
American Sunmelon
Shamrock
Shamrock
Shamrock
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
American Sunmelon
Shamrock
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
American Sunmelon
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
American Sunmelon
Sakata
Sakata
Sakata
Sakata
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track
cdm Fast Track


Objective:

Entries:


Entry








Procedure:









Summary:


Beds were prepared on 29 January, 1997. Fertilization included 6 Ib 0-20-
0/100 linear bed feet (Ibf) incorporated and 17 Ib 18-0-25/100 Ibf banded.
Total fertilization applied equals 148-60-206 Ib N-P205-K20/acre. The beds
were fumigated with methyl bromide:chloropicrin 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 Ibf. The
beds are on 9 ft. centers and in-row spacing is 3 ft. The watermelons were
seeded on 2 February 1997 in No. 150 Todd planter flats and transplanted
to the field on 4 March 1997. There are 6 plants per plot and 3 replications
per entry. Diploid watermelons planted on either side of the triploids serve
as pollenizers.

Seedless watermelon variety trials have been conducted at this location
each spring season since 1988. The highest yields ranged from 507
cwt/acre in 1996 to 1161 cwt/acre in 1993. In spring 1996, the highest yield
was considerably less than the 811 cwt/acre average yield in the previous
eight years.

Based on results of these trials, varieties, in alphabetical order, that appear
to have considerable potential for commercial production in Florida include
'Crimson Trio', 'Genesis', 'King of Hearts', 'Millionaire', 'Scarlet Trio',
'Summer Flavor 5032', 'Summer Sweet 5244', and 'Trio-X-313'. 'Tiffany' was
not included in this trial, but has performed well in several past trials.







BREEDING TOMATOES FOR HORTICULTURAL TRAITS


J. W. Scott

Location: Block J, Lands 12-14, 18


Objective:


Crop:

Operation:


To develop improved tomato breeding lines useful for the Florida tomato
industry.

Tomato, transplanted March 3 and 4, J 18 on March 24

A) Blossom-end scar smoothness: Lines are in land 12. Breeding for smooth
blossom-end scars is done by use of three different blossom-end
morphology genes which cause immature fruit to have nippled blossom ends
but which are smooth without nipples at maturity. Previous research
indicated that hybrids between parents with different genes are smooth
without the chance of undesirable nipples in ripe fruit. Thus, the genes are
being incorporated by modified backcrossing into advanced parental lines.
Thereafter, the lines can be intercrossed in various hybrid combinations.

B) Parthenocarpy: Lines are in lands J12 and J13. Plants with this trait set
fruit without seed under stress environments, thus it is a characteristic used
to expand the fruit setting ability of tomatoes. The trait works best under
cool conditions but also has application to high temperature conditions.
Emphasis is placed on obtaining large fruited types with good firmness.
Progress has been slow, but work to develop a breeding line with good
parthenocarpic expression and horticultural type continues.

C) Cherry tomatoes: These are in land J13. A small cherry tomato breeding
program is maintained with the goal to release breeding lines to the seed
trade. Emphasis is placed on obtaining sweet flavor. Some cherry work is
carried out in all breeding projects.

D) Extended Shelf Life: Lines are in land J13. Two strategies are being
employed to obtain this characteristic. One involves use of the ripening
inhibitor gene (rin). When hybrids are made between lines with this gene
and normal tomatoes, the shelf life is increased allowing for shipment at
harvest stages beyond mature-green. This is the type of tomato presently
being grown in Mexico. The other approach is to breed for a greater level
of firmness which I refer to as ultra-firmness. Ultra-firm lines tend to have
bland flavor, but not the undesirable aftertaste of rin hybrids. Improved
flavor with ultra-firmness is a goal of this work.

E) Heat tolerance: Lines are in lands J13 and J14. Heat tolerant lines are
selected in the summer but assayed in the spring to evaluate the overall








adaptability of the lines. Growth in the spring gives a better indication of
blossom scar smoothness, fruit size potential, and to verify ability to set fruit
in cold weather. This is a large breeding project.

F) Ornamental Tomato Breeding: Cooperator is Brent Harbaugh. Plants are
in land J18. Present miniature-dwarf lines were derived from crosses of red
and gold fruited mini-dwarfs with a high sugar line. Selections are for good
horticultural type and sweet flavor. Lines are also being grown in pots in a
greenhouse to assess their performance. Release of red fruited and a gold
fruited variety with sweet-balanced flavor is possible in fall, 1997.

G) Hybrid evaluation is in J18 and N6 with smaller amounts scattered in A18,
B10, A13, A30. Many hybrids are being advanced to the F2 generation as
part of backcrossing programs or to recombine desirable traits for new
parents. Some F,'s are being evaluated as possible finished varieties for
release, or to assess combining ability of parents being considered for
breeding line release.








TOMATO FRUIT QUALITY


J. W. Scott, E. A. Baldwin1, and R. L. Shewfelt2

Location: Block 0, Lands 9, 10 (back)


To compare sugars, acids, and volatiles with experienced and consumer
taste panels in order to better understand the chemistry of good fruit flavor.

Tomato, transplanted March 6, 1997


Operation: Field No.


Pedigree


Comments


A.Replicated


Solar Set
Olympic
XPH 10047
FTE 30
Fla. 7060
Fla. 7692B
Fla. 7692D
Line A
Line B
Line C
[7482B x (7344 x 7402)]-
BK-3-2-1-1
<7060 x {[7060 x (7060 X
BR200)] x 7324}-BK-3>


Asgrow
Peto

non og
og
rin/+ from Kedar
rin/+ from Kedar
rin/+ from Kedar
Ultrafirm, 96E311S

7060 rin/+


B. Observation


[(7182 x 7340) x 7614]-BK-1-1
(7415 x 7411)-BK-2-2-1-1
(7599 x 7617)-BK-1-3
(7455 x 7479B)-1-2-2
[7421 x (7420 x 7314)]-BK-3-3
[7213B x (7182 x 7340)-BK-1
=1]-BK-2-1-2-1-1-1
(7420 x 7413)-3-1-1-SBK-1
(7547 x Pearson Nr)-1-1


Smokey
Smokey
Smokey
Smokey
Vegetative
Brassy

Brassy
Brassy


'USDA, Winter Haven, FL.
2University of Georgia, Athens, GA.


Objective:


Crop:


97E201S
97E202S
97E203S
97E204S
97E205S
97E206S
97E207S
97E208S
97E209S
97E210S
97E211S

97E212S


97E221S
97E222S
97E323S
97E224S
97E225S
97E226S

97E227S
97E228S








Pedigree


97E229S 7752-BK-2 Orangy
97E230S [7599 x (7344 x 7402)]-BK-1 Orangy
-2-1-1
97E231S BW-Medicine
<7418 x {7241 x [(7060 x H7998) x 7165A]M3}-BK-
2-1-1-1 =SBK>-BK-SBK-1-1
97E232S BW-Acrid
[7475x (7312Cx<7166x {7117x[6204x(6204xH7997)]
B}-BK-1 -2=SBK>)]-BK-1 -2-SBK-1

Replicated trial is a completely randomized block design with 3 blocks and
8 plants per plot. There is 1 plot of 10 plants for the observation lines.
Replicated entries will be tested in blind tests in the field to select diverse
types for detailed analysis. Various comparisons will be made including
comparing the best rin/+ hybrid to Florida varieties and comparing volatiles
in 7692 with and without the crimson gene (og). The observation lines have
been selected for off-flavors and we hope to analyse these to discover a
chemical reason for the off-flavor.


Comments


Field No.








ADVANCED TOMATO INBRED TRIAL


J. W. Scott

Location: Block 0, Lands 9, 10 (front)


Objective:


Crop:


To compare "Elite" breeding lines for possible release or distribution to the
seed industry.

Tomato, transplanted March 6, 1997


Operation: A. Heat Tolerant (HT) Group:
Field No. Pedigree


97E101S
97E102S
97E103S
97E104S
97E105S
97E106S
97E131S


Fla. 7718
Fla. 7719
Fla. 7654
Fla. 7722B
Fla. 7766
Fla. 7324
Fla. 7757


Comments


Globe shape, og
n-4, og
Fusarium race 3 resistant
HT control (Equinox parent)
HT


B. Heat Tolerant Bacterial Spot Resistant Group:


Fla. 7767
Fla. 7768
Fla. 7769
Fla. 7527
Fla. 7770
Fla. 7479B


HT
HT
HT
HT
HT
HT, resistant control


C. Jointless Group


Fla. 7771
Fla. 7510
Fla. 7647
Fla. 7772
Fla. 7773
Fla. 7774
Fla. 7731-BK-4
Fla. 7775
Fla. 7598
Colonial


HT
HT
HT control
Fusarium race 3 resistant, og, n-2
Fusarium race 3 resistant, og, n-2
Fusarium race 3 resistant, og, n-2
Fusarium race 3 resistant, og
Fusarium crown rot resistant, n-4
n-2, og
Control


97E107S
97E108S
97E109S
97E110S
97E111S
97E112S


97E113S
97E114S
97E115S
97E116S
97E117S
97E118S
97E119S
97E120S
97E121S
97E122S








D. Globe Shape, etc.


97E123S
97E124S
97E125S
97E126S
97E127S
97E128S
97E129S

97E130S
97E131S
97E132S
97E133S
97E134S
97E135S
97E136S


Fla. 7776
Fla. 7777
Fla. 7692B
Fla. 7656
Fla. 7778
Fla. 7613
NC 84173-BK-1-
SBK
Fla. 7060
Fla. 7757
Fla. 7779
Fla. 7780
Fla. 7781
Equinox
Agriset 761


Each group (A-D) is planted in a completely randomized block design with
3 blocks and 10 plants per plot. HT = heat tolerant. All bacterial spot
resistant lines are to race T1. The better lines per group will be harvested
for yield, color, and firmness data.


n-2
n-2
Fusarium race 3 resistant
Fusarium race 3 resistant
n-4
Control
Control

Control
HT, n-4
HT, n-4
HT
Fusarium crown rot resistant, og
Control
Control








TOUR 2 VEGETABLE CROP PROTECTION

Page TOPIC


20 Evaluation of Transgenic Tomatoes for Resistance to TMoV J. E. Polston,
W. B. Hunter, E. Hiebert and J. W. Scott

21 Control of Bacterial Speck On Fresh-Market Tomato with Biocontrol Agents -
J. B. Jones and M. Wilson

22 Survey of Natural Enemies of the Pepper Weevil D. E. Dean &
D. J. Schuster

23 Evaluation of Insecticides for Pepper Weevil Control D. J. Schuster

24 Evaluation of Insecticides for Armyworm, Leafminer and Tomato Pinworm
Control D. J. Schuster

25 Evaluation of Insecticides for SLWF Control D. J. Schuster

26 Soil Fumigant and Herbicide Combinations for Tomato J. P. Gilreath,
J. P. Jones, & J. W. Noling

27 Release of Exotic SLWF Parasites D. J. Schuster

28 Inheritance of Tomato Mottle Virus (TMoV) Resistance -
P. D. Griffiths and J. W. Scott

29 Evaluation of SLWF Thresholds for Irregular Ripening D. J. Schuster

30 Effect of Fumigant/Herbicide Residues on Double-Cropped Cucumbers
Following Fall Peppers J.P. Gilreath, J.P. Jones, & J.W. Noling

32 Breeding Tomatoes for Disease Resistance J. W. Scott

33a Tomato Mottle Virus (TMoV) Resistance Trial J. W. Scott and D. J. Schuster

33b Tomato Mottle Virus (TMoV) Inoculation Experiment -
P. D. Griffiths and J. W. Scott

34 Control of Bacterial Spot on Fresh-Market Tomato with Bacteriophage and
a Nonpathogenic Strain of the Bacterial Spot Pathogen -
G. C. Somodi, J. B. Jones, and L. Jackson






EVALUATION OF TRANSGENIC TOMATOES
FOR RESISTANCE TO TMoV
J. E. Polston, W. B. Hunter, E. Hiebert and J. W. Scott


Block A, Lands 11, 12, 13

Evaluate Florida breeding lines transformed with TMoV replicase-associated
protein gene for resistance to infection by TMoV.

Tomato, Fla. 7324, Fla. 7613, VF36 transplanted March 11, 1997


Parents: Fla. 7324, Fla. 7613, VF36

Lines: Non-transformed parents:
Fla. 7324
Fla. 7613
VF36

R, Generation:
S97/02 S97/10 (8 lines)

R2 Generation:
S97/18 S97/25 (8 lines)


R3 Generation:
S97/26 S97/78 (37 lines)


Procedure:


Summary:


1 to 20 plants per line


10 to 40 plants per line, replicated in plots
of 10 plants per plot, randomized
incomplete block design of plots

16 to 40 plants per line, replicated in plots
of 10 plants per plot, randomized
incomplete block design of plots


Parent of R, plants was the transformed plant derived directly from tissue
culture. This is the first evaluation of these transformed plants.

The parents of R2 generation plants were selected in greenhouse trials.
These plants are being screened for resistance.

Parent plants of R3 lines were selected from a field trial last season.

All plants were inoculated at the four leaf stage for approximately 10 days
using a population of viruliferous whiteflies (density 5 to 10 whiteflies per
seedling). Inoculated seedlings were transplanted to the field on March 11.
To insure continuous virus pressure, no insecticides were applied to manage
whitefly populations.

Plants are being selected for high levels of resistance to infection by TMoV.
In the last trial there was still segregation for resistance. In addition, some
variation in horticultural characteristics among lines was observed in the last
trial. These characteristics are again being evaluated in a separate trial this
season.


Location:

Objective:


Crop:








CONTROL OF BACTERIAL SPECK ON FRESH-
MARKET TOMATO WITH BIOCONTROL AGENTS

J. B. Jones and M. Wilson

Block A, Lands 17, 18


To determine the impact of bacterial antagonists and bacterial strains
which are associated with systemic induced resistance to the
bacterial speck pathogen ( Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato) on
control of bacterial speck of tomato.


Tomato, cv. Walter


Treatments:


Procedure:


1. Disease check
2. Kocide 101 + Dithane M-45
3. Seed biocontrol agent #1
4. Seed biocontrol agent #2
5. Foliar biocontrol agent #1 (Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae
strain Cit7)
6. Seed biocontrol agent #1 + foliar biocontrol agent #1
7. Seed biocontrol agent #2 + foliar biocontrol agent #1
8. Foliar biocontrol agent #2
9. Seed biocontrol agent #1 + foliar biocontrol agent #2
10. Seed biocontrol agent #2 + foliar biocontrol agent #2

Two bacterial antagonists were applied to the seed and then to the
seedling flats prior to transplanting. The tomato transplants were set
in the field and then two foliar bacterial antagonists were applied
weekly. The plants were inoculated with the bacterial speck
pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Disease severity
ratings were made to determine percent defoliation resulting from
bacterial speck.


Location:

Objective:


Crop:







SURVEY OF NATURAL ENEMIES OF THE PEPPER WEEVIL


D. E. Dean & D. J. Schuster


Location: Block B-east


Objective:


Crop:

Operation:


Summary:


Monitor the presence and abundance of naturally occurring parasites
attacking the pepper weevil (PW).

Wild and cultivated pepper

Flower buds and fruit of various wild and cultivated types of small-fruited
peppers are being collected periodically, returned to the laboratory and
observed for emergence of the PW and parasite species. Weevil and
parasite specimens are being preserved and sent to taxonomic experts for
identification.

The only parasite that has been collected in any number is Catolaccus
hunter Crawford. This is the same species that has been recovered in
previous surveys in Florida. Of 424 insects emerging from 1166 fruit
collected, 65% were the PW and 35% were C. hunter. Other parasite adults
reared from the PW infested buds and fruit include unidentified braconi and
chalcid species.







EVALUATION OF INSECTICIDES FOR PEPPER WEEVIL CONTROL
D. J. Schuster


Location: Block B, Land 2


Objective:


Crop:

Treatments:


Evaluate new insecticides and biopesticides for management of the pepper
weevil (PW) on pepper

Pepper, cv Camelot; Transplanted March 10

1. Check
2. AC 303,630 2SC (0.3 Ib ai)
3. AC 303,630 2SC (0.2 Ib ai)
4. Imidan 70WP (1.0 Ib ai)
5. Imidan 70WP (1.5 Ib ai)
6. Monitor 4EC (0.5 Ib ai) + Vydate 2L (1.0 Ib ai)
7. Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)*
8. Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)* + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
9. Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)* + Cell-U-Wett (4.0 oz)*
10. Provado 1.6F (0.047 Ib)
11. Provado 1.6F (0.047 Ib) + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
12. Provado 1.6F (0.047 Ib) + Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)* + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
13. Provado 1.6F (0.047 Ib) + Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 pt)* + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
14. Provado 1.6F (0.023 Ib) + Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)* + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
15. Provado 1.6F (0.023 Ib) + Mycotrol ES9601 (1.0 qt)* + Silwet (6.0 oz)*
16. Raven (3.0 qt)*


*Amount of product


Operation:








Summary:


Plots are single rows 14 ft long replicated four times in a randomized
complete blocks design. Treatments were begun April 2 and are being
applied weekly per acre at 60 psi with a 2.5 gal, hand-held C02-powered
sprayer delivering 100 gpa. At least one harvest will be completed and all
fruit with PW oviposition scars only and fruit with internal damage due to PW
larval feeding will be counted and weighed. If armyworm larvae are present,
each fruit will also be examined and scored for presence and severity of
damage.

The efficacy of AC 303,630 against the PW is unknown. Imidan is registered
for control of the boll weevil, a closely related species, on cotton. Mycotrol
WP combined with Provado and Silwet demonstrated efficacy against the
PW in a trial last spring. The present trial is evaluating a liquid formulation
of Mycotrol alone, combined with two adjuvants and combined with Provado
and Silwet. Provado alone was only marginally efficacious against the PW.
Raven is a Bacillus thuringiensis product that has efficacy against the
Colorado potato beetle and may have efficacy against the PW.








EVALUATION OF INSECTICIDES FOR ARMYWORM, LEAFMINER AND TOMATO
PINWORM CONTROL

D. J. Schuster


Location: Block B, Land 3


Objective:


Crop:

Treatments:


Evaluate new and old insecticides for management of armyworms,
leafminers and tomato pinworms on tomato.

Tomato, cv. Agriset 761; Transplanted March 12

1. Check
2. AC 303,630 2SC (0.3 Ib ai) + Silwet (0.05%*)
3. AC 303,630 2SC (0.2 Ib ai) + Silwet (0.05%*)
4. Agrimek 0.15EC (0.01 Ib ai)
5. DPX MP062 30WDG (0.065)
6. DPX MP062 30WDG (0.045)
7. Lannate LV 2.4SL (0.9 Ib ai)
8. MK-244 5SG (0.0075 Ib ai)
9. MK-244 5SG (0.0075 Ib ai)*
10. Spinosad NAF-315 2SC (0.089 Ib ai)
11. Spinosad NAF-315 2SC (0.067 Ib ai)
12. Spinosad NAF-315 2SC (0.089 Ib ai)*
13. ICIA 0321 1CS (0.025 Ib ai)
14. ICIA 0321 2.09CSCS (0.025 Ib ai)
15. Warrior 1EC (0.025 Ib ai)


*Amount of product v/v.
"Applied 10-11 days


Operation:









Summary:


Plots are single rows 18 ft long replicated four times in a randomized
complete block design. Treatments are being applied weekly per acre at 60
psi with a 2.5 gal, hand-held CO2-powered sprayer delivering 60 to 120 gpa
(increases as plants grow). If armyworm larvae are numerous enough, at
least one whole plant or timed count of 10 plants per plot will be completed.
At least one harvest will be completed and all fruit not damaged and those
damaged by armyworm and tomato pinworm larvae will be counted and
weighed. If appropriate, at least one tomato pinworm and one leafminer
timed count will be completed.

AC 303,630, MK-244 and Spinosad have demonstrated good efficacy
against lepidopterous larvae, including the tomato pinworm. The latter two
products have also demonstrated efficacy againts leafminers.







EVALUATION OF INSECTICIDES FOR SLWF CONTROL


D. J. Schuster


Location: Block B, Lands 4 & 5


Objective:



Crop:

Treatments:


Operation:














Summary:


Evaluate new and old insecticides alone or combined for management of the
silverleaf whitefly (SLWF), irregular ripening (IRR), geminivirus (TMoV),
Liriomyza leafminers (LM) and tomato pinworm (TPW) on tomato.

Tomato, cv. Agriset 761; Transplanted March 12


1. Check
2. Admire 2F (0.0225 gm ai/plant*)
3. CGA-293343 2SC (0.01125 gm ai/plant*)
4. CGA-293343 2SC (0.008 gm ai/plant*)
5. CGA-293343 25WG (21 mg ai/acre)
6. Oil (0.25%*) + Tween 80 (0.01%**)
7. Oil (0.125%*) + Tween 80 (0.01%**)
B. Oil (0.0625%") + Tween 80 (0.01%**)

*Applied to soil three weeks after transplanting.
*Amount of product based upon v/v.


Plots consist of three 18 plant rows 27 ft long replicated four times in a
randomized complete block design. Foliar treatments were begun March 26
and are being applied weekly on a per acre basis at 200 psi with a self-
propelled high clearance sprayer delivering 60-120 gpa (increases as plants
grow). At least two counts of crawlers, sessile nymphs and pupae of the
SLWF will be made at about 8 and 12 weeks after first application. Weekly
counts of crawlers, sessile nymphs and pupae of the SLWF will be made for
treatments 1-5 beginning the week of April 7. All plants in each plot are
being inspected weekly for TMoV symptoms. The plastic soil mulch is being
marked with paint for those showing definite symptoms. At least one harvest
will be completed and at least 50 red ripe fruit per plot will be rated 1-4 for
external symptoms of IRR. If populations warrant, one timed count of tomato
pinworm leafmines and leafrolls and one timed count leafminer leafmines will
be completed.

Admire is a systemic insecticide applied to the soil at transplanting to give
6-8 weeks of control of the SLWF. CGA-293343 is a new systemic
insecticide that is being compared to Admire for residual control of the
SLWF. The oil used in this trial has indicated repellency and residual
toxicity to SLWF adults in laboratory studies.






SOIL FUMIGANT AND HERBICIDE COMBINATIONS FOR TOMATO
J. P. Gilreath, J. P. Jones, & J. W. Noling

Location: C 6 and 7


Objective:


Crop:

Treatments:
Fumigant


Evaluate combinations of herbicides and alternative fumigants for control of
soilborne pests.

Tomato, cv. Sunpride; transplanted 17 February 1997


Rate
InaIl rr Ih /IA


Application
MAthnri


Herbicide


1. None(UTC)
2. Methyl Bromide/
Chloropicrin (67/33)
3. Chloropicrin
4. Vapam

5. Telone C-17
6. Telone C-35
7. TeloneC-35
8. Telone C-35
9. Chloropicrin
10. Vapam
11. C-17
12. C-35


0
350 lb.

350 lb.
100 gal.

35 gal
12 gal.
18 gal.
24 gal.
350 Ib.
100 gal.
35 gal.
24 gal


n/a
inject

inject
spray on bed,
rototill, press, cover
inject
inject
Inject
Inject
Inject
Spray, rototill
Inject
Inject


none
none

Tillam 4 Ib.a.i./A
Tillam 4 Ib.a.i./A

Tillam 4 Ib. a.i./A
Tillam 4 Ib. a.i./A
Tillam 4 Ib.a.i./A
Tillam 4 Ib.a.i./A
Devrinol 2 Ib.a.i./A
Devrinol 2 Ib.a.i.
Devrinol 2 Ib.a.i./A
Devrinol 2 Ib.a.i./A


Procedure:











Summary:


Herbicides were sprayed on the surface of prebeds and incorporated with a
rototiller on 23 January. Fumigants were applied on 23 or 24 January after
herbicide application and beds were covered with black polyethylene mulch
immediately. Transplants were set 3 weeks after fumigation. Weeds
emerging through the mulch film and plant holes are counted 3, 6, and 9
weeks after application. Soilborne diseases are being monitored on a
weekly basis. Rootknot nematode populations are being monitored in soil
samples at the middle and end of the season. Fusarium wilt and rootknot
nematode galling severity will be determined at the end of the crop. Tomato
plant vigor and fruit production will be determined at appropriate intervals.

Telone C-17 continues to be the most promising replacement for methyl
bromide; however, it, like the other alternative fumigants, does not control
nutsedge and many other weeds in the bed. Tillam herbicide has performed
well for nutsedge control in previous seasons and Devrinol has provided fair
control. Assessment of Devrinol was included because the current Tillam
label is somewhat unclear for hand transplanted tomatoes and it is important
to not rely only on one chemical in the future. Crop response has been good
with all of the alternative fumigants and Telone C-17 + Tillam has produced
yields comparable to methyl bromide. Overall, Telone C-17 has provided the
best nematode control of the various alternatives and excellent soilborne
disease control and is compatible with existing application equipment.


I IIYIIVY
\CIFI VI IY.lr\l IIYIIVY







RELEASE OF EXOTIC SLWF PARASITES


D. J. Schuster


Location: Block B, Land 6A


Objective:


Crops:


Treatments:


Operation:









Summary:


Release and establish two species of exotic species of parasites of the
silverleaf whitefly (SLWF).

Cabbage, collards, cucumber, eggplant, okra, yellow squash, and zucchini
squash; Planted and transplanted March 31

Eretmocerus nr. mundus collected in Spain (APHIS no. M92014)
Encarsia nr. hispida collected in Brazil (APHIS no. M94056)

Plots consist of three beds 37 ft long in a single row/bed except for cabbage
which is a double row. Plants of all crops are spaced at 18 inches except
cabbage and collards which are 12 inches. Plants of tomato cv. Lanai
infested with parasitized SLWF were planted in the beds between crops to
serve as reservoirs of the SLWF as well as of the parasites. Leaves
containing SLWF nymphs and/or pupae will be collected periodically and
held in the laboratory for SWLF and parasite emergence. All whitefly and
parasite adults will be collected and counted. Parasites will be mounted on
microscope slides for identification.

Both parasite species have been released at GCREC for the last year but
have been recovered in very low numbers relative to native parasite species.
More E. nr. hispida have been collected than E. nr. mundus.








INHERITANCE OF TOMATO MOTTLE VIRUS (TMoV) RESISTANCE

P. D. Griffiths and J. W. Scott

Location: Block B, Land 9


To determine factors controlling resistance derived from L. chilense
accession LA 1932.

Tomato, transplanted March 31, 1997


Operation: Field No.


97E401S
97E402S
97E403S
97E404S
97E405S
97E406S
97E416S


Abbreviate Pedigree

744-BK
7324
(7324 x 744-BK)
[744 x (7324 x 744-BK)]
[7324 x (7324 x 744-BK)]
(7324 x 744-BK)-BK
(7324 x 719)-SBK


Comments

P1
P2
F,
BCP,
BCP2
F2
F2 (from 719)


Completely randomized block design with 4 blocks; 401-403 have 1 plot of
10 plants/block, 404 & 405 have 2 plots of 25 plants/block, and 405 & 406
have 4 plots of 20 plants/block. Plants were inoculated with viruliferous
whiteflies for 14 days before transplanting. They will be rated for severity of
symptoms three times during the season. The data should indicate the
mode of inheritance to assist our breeding efforts. Tissue samples from F2
plants will be analysed for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD's)
to locate markers linked to resistance genes which will accelerate future
breeding work considerably.


Objective:


Crop:








EVALUATION OF SLWF THRESHOLDs FOR IRREGULAR RIPENING


D. J. Schuster


Location: Block C, Lands 12-14


Objective:


Crop:

Treatments:


Evaluate silverleaf whitefly (SLWF) thresholds for irregular ripening (IRR) on
tomato using two insect growth regulators.

Tomato, cv. Agriset 761; Transplanted March 12

1. Spray V-71639 when there are >2 nymphs or pupae/leaflet.
2. Spray V-71639 when there are >1 nymph and pupa/leaflet.
3. Spray V-71639 when there are >5 nymphs and pupae/10 leaflets.
4. Spray Applaud when there are >2 nymphs or pupae/leaflet.
5. Spray Applaud when there are >1 nymph and pupa/leaflet.
6. Spray Applaud when there are >5 nymphs and pupae/10 leaflets.
7. Apply Admire* at transplanting.


*Applied at 0.05gm/plant.


Operation:












Summary:


Plots consist of three 20 plant rows 30 ft long replicated four times in a
randomized complete block design. Treatments were begun April 2 and will
be continued as above. Applications of V-71639 and Applaud will be applied
at 200 psi with a self-propelled high clearance sprayer delivering 60-120 gpa
(increases as plants grow). Weekly counts of sessile nymphs and pupae of
the SLWF are being made on terminal leaflets and then the area of leaflets
is being measured. Weekly counts of SLWF adults on the terminal three
leaflets of 20 leaves are being made on 10 plants from the middle row of
each plot. When thresholds are equalled or exceeded either V-71639
0.86EC (30 gm ai) or Applaud 70WP (0.25 Ib ai) will be applied. Red ripe
fruit will be harvested weedly and will be rated 1-4 for external symptoms of
IRR and 1-5 for internal symptoms.

Previous field research has indicated a positive linear relationship between
the number of SLWF nymphs and pupae and external symptoms of IRR.
Insect growth regulators previously have demonstrated efficacy against
immature lifestages of the SLWF; however, no information is available
regarding the density of SLWF at which applications are necessary in order
to avoid IRR. Counting nymphs is time consuming; therefore, the
relationship between the number of adults observed in leaf turns and IRR
will be determined and compared to the relationship between the number of
nymphs and IRR.








EFFECT OF FUMIGANT/HERBICIDE RESIDUES ON DOUBLE-CROPPED
CUCUMBERS FOLLOWING FALL PEPPERS

J. P. Gilreath, J. P. Jones, & J. W. Noling

Location: C-21 and 22


Determine if residues of promising herbicide/fumigant combinations pose a
significant threat to spring cucumbers grown following fall applications and
to determine if residual nematode control is adequate for a second crop.

Cucumber, cv. Lightning, seeded


Treatments: Fumigant


1. None(UTC)
2. Methyl Bromide/
Chloropicrin (67/33)
3. Chloropicrin
4. Vapam
5. Telone C-35
6. Telone C-17

11. None (UTC)
12. Methyl Bromide/
Chloropicrin (67/33)
13. Chloropicrin
14.Vapam
15. Telone C-35
16. Telone C-17

21. None (UTC)
22. Methyl Bromide/
Chloropicrin (67/33)
23. Chloropicrin
24. Vapam
25. Telone C-35
26. Telone C-17

31. None (UTC)
32. Methyl Bromide/
Chloropicrin (67/33)
33. Chloropicrin
34. Vapam


Rate
(aal or lb./A)


0
350 lb.

350 Ib.
100 gal.
24 gal
35 gal.

0
350 Ib.

350 Ib.
100 gal.
24 gal.
35 gal.

0
350 Ib.

350 lb.
100 gal.
24 gal.
35 gal.

0
350 Ib.

350 Ib.
100 gal.


Objective:



Crop:


Herbicide


None
None

None
None
None
None

Devrinol
Devrinol

Devrinol
Devrinol
Devrinol
Devrinol

Dual
Dual

Dual
Dual
Dual
Dual

Tillam
Tillam

Tillam
Tillam









35. Telone C-35
36. Telone C-17


24 gal.
35 gal.


Dual was applied at 2 Ib.a.i./A
Devrinol was applied at 4 Ib.a.i./A.
Tillam was applied at 4 Ib.a.i./A.


Procedure:


Herbicides and fumigants were applied 14 and 15 August 1996, respectively.
Pepper was grown in the fall, then beds and middles were sprayed twice with
paraquat to kill off the pepper crop and weeds this spring. 'Lightning'
cucumbers were seeded into the beds in the old pepper holes on the east
side of the bed on 18 March 97. The number of emerged plants in each plot
was counted three weeks after seeding and plants were thinned to one per
hill at that time. Crop vigor was estimated visually and cucumber yield was
determined over seven harvests.


Summary: Results of a previous experiment indicated that herbicide residues were not
a problem under the conditions of a spring/fall double crop, but nematodes
were. None of the fumigants controlled rootknot nematodes for the entire
crop cycle, except methyl bromide, although methyl bromide did not always
control rootknot for the second crop.


Tillam
Tillam








BREEDING TOMATOES FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE


J. W. Scott

Location: Block J, Lands 14-17, Block B, Lands 12-16


Objective:


Crop:

Operations:


To develop breeding lines and varieties resistant to pathogens or insects
which are of concern to the Florida tomato industry.

Tomato, transplanted March 3, 4, TMoV on March 17, 1997

A) Bacterial Spot Resistance: Cooperator is J. B. Jones. Lines are in J14
and 15. It has been difficult to evaluate lines with race 1 resistance due to
the prevalence of race 3 for the past 5 years. The best lines are screened
for hypersensitivity in a growth chamber and for horticultural type in the field.
This year F='s with resistance to race T1 and T3 are being grown for the first
time after several years of backcrossing T3 resistance into heat tolerant, T1
resistant lines. The best of these may be released by 1998. Most lines have
only T1 resistance with the best of these selected as parents for
incorporation of T3 resistance.

B) Bacterial Wilt Resistance: Cooperator is J. B. Jones. Lines are in J16.
This disease causes major losses in humid tropical regions and in north
Florida. It has been difficult to obtain breeding lines with resistance equal
to the accessions used as sources of resistance. Tolerant lines have been
intercrossed in attempts to attain improved levels of resistance. This
includes crosses with Hawaii 7997 our major source of resistance. Once
again, the inoculation has caused much plant death in most lines. This has
been a very difficult disease to work with.

C) Fusarium Wilt Race 3 Resistance: Cooperator is J. P. Jones. These lines
are in J16 and J17. There are increasing acreages around Florida and
elsewhere which are having problems with this disease. Several inbreds are
being trialed in the Advanced Inbred trial and are possible in the near future.

D) Fusarium Crown Rot Resistance: Cooperator is J. P. Jones. These lines
are in J17. This disease has been a problem primarily in southwest Florida
as well as several areas around the world. Jointed and jointless inbreds are
being tested in the Advanced Inbred trial for possible release in 1998. A
group of F2's with resistance from L. pennellii accession LA 1277 are also
being evaluated, these have had 3 crosses to tomato lines.

E) Tomato Mottle Virus Resistance: Cooperators on this project are Dave
Schuster and Jane Polston. Breeding lines are in lands B12-16. Resistance
has been introgressed from seven accessions of the wild species L.







chilense. Plants at the two-leaf stage were placed in greenhouses with
viruliferous silverleaf whiteflies for two weeks and then were transplanted to
the field where whiteflies were allowed to thrive. Plants are rated for virus
symptoms two times during the year and selections of the best resistant
plants will be made. Most lines now have resistance derived from LA 1932
or LA 1938. Emphasis is placed on obtaining determinate plants with normal
leaf size.

F) Silverleaf Whitefly (SLWF) Resistance: Cooperator on this project is Dave
Schuster. This project is in land B11. Resistance is derived from L. pennellii
accession LA 1340. Lines are at the F, generation after two crosses to
tomato. They were advanced for four generations by single seed descent
and are each replicated three times. Selections for SLWF resistance are
based on the time the plants are free of TMoV virus which is carried by the
SLWF. Thus, selections of virus free plants or those with only late infection
are made. The material is quite wild at this stage, much breeding work
remains.








TOMATO MOTTLE VIRUS (TMoV) RESISTANCE TRIAL


J. W. Scott and D. J. Schuster

Location: Block B, Land 11


Objective:


Crop:


To compare germplasm for resistance with emphasis on some horticulturally
"advanced" types.

Tomato, transplanted March 12, 1997


Operation: Field No.


Abbreviated Pediaree


Comments


(LA 1938 x Tyking)F4
(LA 1938 x Tyking)F4
(LA 2779 x LA 1932)F4
(LA 1938 BC4) F5
(LA 1932 BC4) F6
(LA 1938 BC3) F7
744-6-9
(LA 1932 BC4) F7
699 "0"
699 "2"
736
690 Flo
E854-103
E854
TY 52
Solar Set


Nice seg from 699


From LA 1938
From LA 1938
From LA 1938
0 in F96, from LA 1938
Seln. of 854, LA 1932
Orig. 854, LA 1932
TY-1 Gene -- Zamir
Susceptible control


Completely randomized block design with 4 blocks and 8 plants per plot.
Plants were inoculated with viruliferous whiteflies for 14 days in a
greenhouse prior to transplanting. This trial will help to identify our best
sources of resistance to use in future breeding work.


97E301S
97E302S
97E303S
97E304S
97E305S
97E306S
97E309S
97E310S
97E311S
97E312S
97E313S
97E314S
97E315S
97E316S
97E317S
97E318S








TOMATO MOTTLE VIRUS (TMoV) INOCULATION EXPERIMENT

P. D. Griffiths and J. W. Scott

Location: Block B, Land 10


Objective:

Crop:

Operation:


To determine optimum inoculation procedures for TMoV infection.

Tomato, transplanted April 7, 1997


Field #


97E451 (L1)
97E452 (L2)
97E453 (L3)


Pedigree

7324
744-Bk
690 F,1


Source of Resistance


Susc. control
From LA 1932*
From LA 1938*


*LA numbers are accessions of L. chilense.

Completely randomized block design with 4 blocks and 8 plants per plot
examining the effects of whitefly inoculation time and speedling tray size on
TMoV symptom expression and severity. T1, T2, T3, and T4 = inoculation
of 0, 1, 2, and 3 weeks, respectively. S1 and S2 = speedling cell size of 1.5
and 2.0 inches, respectively. Plants will be rated for TMoV symptoms three
times during the season.








CONTROL OF BACTERIAL SPOT ON FRESH-MARKET TOMATO WITH
BACTERIOPHAGE AND A NONPATHOGENIC STRAIN
OF THE BACTERIAL SPOT PATHOGEN

G. C. Somodi, J. B. Jones, and L. Jackson


Block P, Land 6


To determine the impact of bacteriophages specific to the bacterial
spot pathogen (Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria) and a
nonpathogenic strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on control of
bacterial spot of tomato.


Tomato, cv. Walter


Treatments:








Procedure:


1. Bacteriophage + nonpathogenic bacterium applied 2-3 times
per week and Kocide 101 + Dithane M-45 applied weekly.
2. Bacteriophage + nonpathogenic bacterium applied 2-3 times
per week
3. Bacteriophage applied 2-3 times per week
4. Nonpathogenic bacterium applied 2-3 times per week
5. Kocide 101 + Dithane M-45 applied once per week.
6. Control

The bacteriophage alone or in combination with the nonpathogenic
strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria were applied in the
overhead irrigation water to seedlings in the trays daily. The copper-
mancozeb mixture was applied twice per week to the seedling trays.
The center plant in each tray was inoculated with a pathogenic
tomato race 3 strain of the bacterial spot pathogen approximately 1
week after treatments began. The tomato transplants were set in the
field and then bacteriophage and nonpathogenic bacterium were
applied initially three times per week and then twice per week.
Disease severity ratings were made to determine percent defoliation
resulting from bacterial spot.


Location:

Objective:


Crop:








TOUR 3 VEGETABLE CROP PRODUCTION AND
VARIETY EVALUATION



Page TOPIC



38 Evaluation of the 'Earth Box' for Vegetable Production A. A. Csizinszky

39 Sequential Cropping of Vegetables in Compost Amended Soil with Micro
Irrigation A. A. Cszinszky

40 Plum Tomato Cultivar Trial T. K. Howe and A. A. Csizinszky

41 Antitranspirant Spray Studies on Microirrigated Tomatoes A. A. Cszinszky

42 Plum Tomato Cultivar Trial T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

43 Bell Pepper Cultivar Trial T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

45 Eggplant Cultivar Trial T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

46 Heirloom Tomato Observation Trial T. K Howe and C. S. Vavrina

47 Tomato Cultivar Trial T. K Howe, J. W. Scott, and W. E. Waters









EVALUATION OF THE 'EARTH BOX' FOR VEGETABLE PRODUCTION


A. A. Csizinszky


Location: Block L, Land 2


Objective: To investigate the potential of 'Earth Box' for the sequential production of
vegetables.

Treatments: A. Growth media
1. Soil
2. Soil + artificial medium
3. Growth medium only
B. Shading
1. South side of the box shaded
2. South side of the box unshaded

Operation: Tomatoes and bell peppers were grown in the Fall 1996 in the boxes.
Immediately after harvest the plants were cut off at soil level and a short-
season cabbage, cv. Tastie, was planted in the boxes. After the cabbage is
harvested, cucumber will be seeded in the boxes. Fertilizer rates, irrigation
practice, crop mange and yields will be discussed at the site.









SEQUENTIAL CROPPING OF VEGETABLES IN
COMPOST AMENDED SOIL WITH MICRO IRRIGATION

A. A. Csizinszky

Location: Block L, Land 2

Objective: To investigate yield potential of vegetables with small amounts of compost
in the mulched bed.

Treatments: Compost rates at O, 5 and 10 t/A

Operation: In Fall 1996 (Sept.-Dec.) Tomatoes and bell peppers were grown in trickle-
irrigated plots that received the equivalent of 5 t/A and 10 t/A compost. The
compost was placed in an 8- to 10-inch wide band on the false-bed.
Superphosphate and micronutrients for both crops were applied pre-plant
from dry fertilizers banded on the top of the compost layer. One third of the
N and K were applied pre-plant from dry fertilizers and the remaining N and
K were injected from a liquid source with the irrigation during the season.
After harvest, both tomato and pepper plants were cut off at soil level and a
short season 'Tastie' cabbage was planted in the beds. Nutrients (N and K)
for the cabbage were applied from a liquid fertilizer injected with the
irrigation. After harvest, cucumbers were planted in the beds. Plants were
trellised and fertilized from liquid sources. Yields and crop management of
all three crop will be discussed at the site.








PLUM TOMATO CULTIVAR TRIAL


T. K. Howe and A. A. Csizinszky

Location: Block L, Land 8


To evaluate yield and horticultural characteristics of cultivars of plum tomato
grown with mircoirrigation.

Plum tomato; transplanted February 25; single row; 18 inch in-row spacing;
5-foot bed spacing; staked.

Replicated, harvested entries:


Hybrid 882
Supra
Marina
Veronica


Petoseed
Rogers
Sakata
Sakata


Border rows = Puebla (Petoseed)


Procedure:


Fruit from plants in the replicated trial will be harvested as mature green or
beyond and the fruit sized as for fresh market. Yields will be computed by
weight for each harvest and for the entire season. Subjective evaluations
of entries will be made for plant size, uniformity and habit, foliage cover, fruit
color and shape, incidence of diseases or insect pests, and general
adaptability to Florida production.


Objective:


Crop:








ANTITRANSPIRANT SPRAY STUDIES ON MICROIRRIGATED TOMATOES


A. A. Csizinszky


Location: Block L, Land 8


Objective: To evaluate the effect of 'Vapor Gard' antitranspirant sprays on tomato fruit
size and yields with two micro (trickle) irrigation rates.

Treatments: A. Irrigation rates
1. Low = 75% of the daily open pan evaporation (PE)
2. High = 100% of daily PE
B. Pre-plant antitranspirant spray
1. Seedlings sprayed with 'Vapor Guard' in the greenhouse before
transplanted in the field
C. Antitranspirant spray frequencies in the field
1. Water only (control)
2. Sprayed once with antitranspirant
3. Sprayed twice with antitranspirant
4. Sprayed three times with antitranspirant

Operation: 'Agriset 761' tomato seedlings were set in the field at 18-in. Within the row
spacing on Feb. 25. Irrigation tube (T-tape, 8-in emitter spacing, 0.66 gal.
per min. per 100 ft at 8 psi) was placed 4 in from the bed center to the south
side. Phosphorous at 0.8 Ib (P205)/100 Ibf from a 0-20-0 superphosphate
was placed in a 6-in wide band on the false bed. Part of the N (at 1 lb/100
Ibf) and K20 (at 2 lb/100 Ibf) were applied pre-plant from a dry 15-0-30
fertilizer, placed in a narrow, 2-in deep furrow 2 in from the trickle tube on
the south side of the bed. The remainder of the N (2 lb/100 Ibf) and K20 (4
lb/100 Ibf) will be applied from a liquid fertilizer, injected with the irrigation
during the season. Plant growth and nutrient concentrations in the soil and
in the plants will be measured periodically. Yield, fruit size and weight, will
be evaluated in multiple harvests.







PLUM TOMATO CULTIVAR TRIAL
T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

Location: Block O, Land 13


To evaluate yield and horticultural characteristics of cultivars and advanced
breeding material of plum tomato.

Plum tomato; transplanted February 24; single row; 24 inch in-row spacing;
5-foot bed spacing; staked.

Replicated, harvested entries:


Agriroma
Plum Dandy
Hybrid 882
Puebla
RPT 1570
Supra
Marina
Veronica


Agrisales
Ferry-Morse
Petoseed
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Sakata
Sakata


Observational, unharvested entries:


NC 96102
NC 96200
NC 9688
NC 96161
PSR 628495
HMX 4878
LDB 958054
LDB 958057
LDB 958060
LDB 958061
LDB 958064
LDB 958077
LDB 958078
LDB 958079
Black Plum


Procedure:


NCSU
NCSU
NCSU
NCSU
Petoseed
Harris Moran
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Daehnfeldt
Tomato Growers Supply


Fruit from plants in the replicated trial will be harvested as mature green or
beyond and the fruit sized as for fresh market. Yields will be computed by
weight for each harvest and for the entire season. Subjective evaluations of
observational entries will be made for plant size, uniformity and habit, foliage
cover, fruit color and shape, incidence of diseases or insect pests, and
general adaptability to Florida production.


Objective:


Crop:








BELL PEPPER CULTIVAR TRIAL


T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

Location: Block O, Land 14


To evaluate yield and horticultural characteristics of cultivars and
advanced breeding material of bell pepper.

Bell pepper; transplanted February 27; double rows; 11 x 10 inch plant
spacing; 5-foot bed spacing; unstaked.

Replicated, harvested entries:


ACX P206
ACX P207
ACX P210
ACR 2011
ACR 2021
Enterprise
XPH 12205
XPH 12222
XPH 12250
XPH 12259
XPH 12260
XPH 12261
Bonita
Boynton Bell
Emerald Isle
Hialeah
Pimlico
PR93-2-1
X3R Aladdin
X3R Camelot
X3R King Arthur
X3R Wizard
4153 VP red
5044 VP yellow
5051 VP yellow
Admiral
Commandant VP
Hybrid 860
PP 3135 VP
Sentry VP
Valencia


(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)

(BLS 1,2,3)



(BLS 2)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2,3)
(BLS 1,2)
(BLS 1,2,3)

(Phytophthora)
(BLS 1,2,3)


Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
Ferry-Morse
Harris Moran
Harris Moran
Harris Moran
Harris Moran
Pepper Research
Petoseed
Petoseed
Petoseed
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers


Objective:


Crop:







SPP 6112
CA 46 (red)
CA 64 (red)
CA 67 (red)
CA 74 (red)


(BLS 1,2,3)


Procedure: Fruit will be harvested as appropriate for green, fresh market consumption.
Yields will be computed by weight for each harvest and for the entire season.
Subjective evaluations will be made for plant size, uniformity and habit,
foliage cover, fruit color and shape, and incidence of diseases or insect
pests.


Sakata
Shamrock
Shamrock
Shamrock
Shamrock








EGGPLANT CULTIVAR TRIAL


T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters

Location: Block O, Land 15


To evaluate yield and horticultural characteristics of cultivars and advanced
breeding material of eggplant.


Eggplant; transplanted February 28; single row;
5-foot bed spacing; staked.


24 inch in-row spacing;


Replicated, harvested entries:


Classic
Sonata
Special Hibush
Epic
PX 894
Agora
Santana
Neon
Kiko


Procedure:


Harris Moran
Harris Moran
Harris Moran
Petoseed
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Shamrock
Asgrow


Plants will be harvested as appropriate for fresh market consumption. Yields
will be computed by weight for each harvest and for the entire season.
Subjective evaluations will be made for plant size, uniformity and habit,
foliage cover, fruit color and shape, and incidence of diseases or insect
pests.


Objective:


Crop:








HEIRLOOM TOMATO OBSERVATION TRIAL


T. K. Howe and C. S. Vavrina


Location: Block O, Land 15


To evaluate market potential and horticultural characteristics of cultivars and
advanced breeding material of various heirloom tomato cultigens.

Tomato; transplanted March 10; single row; 24 inch in-row spacing; 5-foot
bed spacing; staked.

Observational, unharvested entries:


Aunt Ruby's German Green
Garden Peach
Mary Ann
Green Zebra
Nebraska Wedding
Flamme
Black Prince
Cherokee Purple
Lemon Boy
Eva Purple Ball
W424
W844413
W481


Procedure:


Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Tomato Growers Supply
Fast Track
Fast Track
Fast Track


Fruit will be judged for appropriateness for fresh market consumption.
Subjective evaluations will be made for plant size, uniformity and habit,
foliage cover, novelty value, fruit color and shape, and incidence of diseases
or insect pests.


Objective:


Crop:








TOMATO CULTIVAR TRIAL


T. K. Howe, J. W. Scott and W. E. Waters

Location: Block O, Lands 16 and 17


To evaluate yield and horticultural characteristics of cultivars and advanced
breeding material of fresh market tomato.

Tomato; transplanted February 24; single row; 24 inch in-row spacing; 5-foot
bed spacing; staked.

Replicated, harvested entries:


ACR 6503 (XLT)
ACR 6504 (XLT)
Agriset 761
Equinox
Solimar
Sunpride
XPH 10047
BHN 22
Flavor More 223 ESL
NC 9547 (Fusarium race 3)
Sanibel (nematode resis, j2)
Merced
Sun Leaper
Suncrest (FT 4029)
Affirm (STM 2101)
STM 5206
SR 4201
Sunre 6631
Sunre 6633 (rin)
Fla. 7658 (Fusarium race 3, heat tol)
Fla. 7578 (Fusarium race 3, heat tol)
Fla. 7699 (Fusarium race 3, heat tol)


Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Agrisales
Agrisales
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow
BHN Research
Ferry-Morse
NCSU
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Rogers
Sakata
Sakata
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
UF
UF
UF


Observational, unharvested entries


ACX 12 (XLT)
ACR 6501 (XLT)
ACR 6502 (XLT)
Agriset 775
Solar Set
Sunbeam
XPH10069


Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Abbott & Cobb
Agrisales
Asgrow
Asgrow
Asgrow


Objective:


Crop:








XPH10070
XPH10091
W 439 (LSL)
W 481 (LSL)
830201 (LSL)
Flavor More 210 ESL
Flavor More 215
Tastiball (LSL)
Tastirock (LSL)
NC 96378
NC 96393
NC 9559 (ESL)
NC 96399
Captiva (PS 843294)
FTE 30
FT 3260
FT 4012
STM 5207
Leading Lady
SR 3702
SR 4088
Sunre 6629
Fla. 7712
Fla. 7713
Fla. 7714
Fla. 7734
Fla. 7749
Fla. 7750
Fla. 7754
Fla. 7760
Fla. 7761
Fla. 7762
Fla. 7763
Fla. 7764
HMX 2824
SMX 007
Spica


Procedure:


Asgrow
Asgrow
CDM Fast Track
CDM Fast Track
CDM Fast Track
Ferry-Morse
Ferry-Morse
Mauser
Mauser
NCSU
NCSU
NCSU
NCSU
Petoseed
Petoseed
Rogers
Rogers
Sakata
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
Sunseeds
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
UF
Harris Moran
Mauser
Daehnfeldt


Fruit from plants in the replicated trial will be harvested as mature green or
beyond and the fruit sized as in commercial practice for fresh market. Yields
will be computed by weight for each harvest and for the entire season.
Subjective evaluations of observational entries will be made for plant size,
uniformity and habit, foliage cover, fruit color and shape, incidence of
diseases or insect pests, and general adaptability to Florida production.






ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF INDUSTRY SUPPORT
FOR THE RESEARCH AND EXTENSION PROGRAMS AT
THE GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
Bradenton, Florida

The effectiveness of the research and extension programs at the Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center in Bradenton has been greatly enhanced by the excellent support from
various segments of the agribusiness industries and producers, both locally and nationally.
This support, in the form of financial grants-in-aid, supplies, services, or equipment,
supplements existing state funds and makes each research project at the Center far more
productive than could be realized otherwise. We sincerely appreciate your participation
in these research programs and are pleased to acknowledge your support.

Listed below are the names of agencies, firms, or individuals who have contributed
significantly to the research programs during the past two years. We trust that our records
are complete and say again, 'Thank you for your confidence."


Abbott & Cobb, Inc.
Abbott Laboratories
Acadian Seaplants Limited
Agdia Inc.
AgGuard Inc.
Agr Evo
AgriPhi, Inc.
Agrisales Inc
Agway Inc.
Allied Technologies Inc.
American Cyanamid
American Floral Endowment
American Nursery Labels
American Seed Research Foundation
American Sunmelon
American Takii
Artesian Farms
Asahi Chemical Manufacturing Comp
Asgrow Seed
Ball Seed
Ball Flora Plant
Barnes & Thornburg
BASF Inc.
Bates & Sons & Daughters
Bayer Corporation
Bedding Plants
Benary Seed Growers Limited

Ernst Benary of America, Inc.
Bermuda Government
Biofac, Inc.
Biosys


Feasterville, PA
North Chicago, IL
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Elkhart, IN
Orlando, FL
Tifton, GA
Logan, UT
Plant City, FL
Elizabethtown, PA
Tampa, FL
Princeton, NJ
Glen Carbon, IL
Port Orange, FL
Washington DC
Hinton, OK
Salinas, CA
Ruskin, FL
NARA PREF., Japan
Kalamazoo, MI
West Chicago, IL
West Chicago, IL
Indianapolis, IN
Res. Triangle Park, NC
Lake Placid, FL
Atlanta, GA
Lansing, MI
Hannover, Munden,
Germany
Sycamore, IL
Hamilton HM CX, Bermuda
Mathis, TX
Columbia, MD






Bio Works Inc.
Bodger Seeds Ltd.
Bunting Biological
Ceder Chemical Co.
Church & Dwight Co.
Crop Genetics International
Daehnfeldt, Inc.
Dean for Research Office -
Project Enhancement Award
Deseret Farms
Dorsing Seed
Dover Hardware
Dow Elanco
Dow Elanco
Dow Elanco
DNA Plant Technologies, Inc.
DuPont de Nemours & Co., Inc.
Ecke Poinsettias
Ecogen Inc.
Eden BioScience Corp.
Elf Atochem North America, Inc.
Elsberry Farms, Inc.
Elsberry Greenhouses
Express Seed Co.
Ferry-Morse Seed Company
Florida Dept. of Agriculture
Florida Foundation Seed Producers
Florida Fruit & Vegetable Assoc.
Florida Nurserymen & Growers Assoc.
Florida Ornamental Growers Assoc., Inc.
Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc., Inc.
Florida Strawberry Festival
Florida Tomato Committee
Florida Watermelon Assoc.
FMC Corporation
FNGA Manasota Chapter
Four-Star Farms
Glades Crop Care
Fred C. Gloeckner Foundation
Goldsmith Seed, Inc.
Grace-Sierra
W.R. Grace
Great Lakes Chemical Corp.
Griffin Corp.
G. S. Grimes Seeds
Happiness Farms, Inc.
Harllee Farms
Harllee-Gargiulo, Inc.
Harloff Farms


Geneva, NY
South El Monte, CA
Oxnard, CA
Memphis, TN
Princeton, NY
Columbia, MD
Albany, OR

Gainesville, FL
Ruskin, FL
El Centro, CA
Dover, FL
Winter Haven, FL
Plant City, FL
Midland, MI
Oakland, CA
Wilmington, DE
Encinitas, CA
Langhorne, PA
Poulsbo, WA
Philadelphia, PA
Ruskin, FL
Ruskin, FL
Oberlin, OH
Modesto, CA
Tallahassee, FL
Greenwood, FL
Orlando, FL
Orlando, FL
Sun City, FL
Plant City, FL
Plant City, FL
Orlando, FL
Marianna, FL
New York, NY
Sarasota, FL
Manatee County, FL
Jupiter, FL
Harrison, NY
Gilroy, CA
Milpitas, CA
Columbia, MD
Sarasota, FL
Valdosta, GA
Concord, OH
Lake Placid, FL
Palmetto, FL
Palmetto, FL
Manatee County, FL






Helena Chemical
HMS Soil Fumigation, Inc.
Hunsader Brothers
IMC Vigoro
ISK Biosciences Corp.
ISK Biosciences
Kennco Manufacturing, Inc.
Koppert Biological Systems

Laminations, Inc.
Manatee Fruit Company
McClure Farms
Meister Publishing Company
Merck Agmet
Mikkelsons
Monsanto Agricultural Products Co.
Mycogen
Natural Industries
NOR-AM Chemical Co.
North American Film Corp.
North American Strawberry Growers Res. Foundation
Novartis Crop Protection
Novo Nordisk Entotech, Inc.
Nunhems Seed
Oglevee Products, Inc.
Orban's Nursery
Pacific Farms
Pan American Seed Co.
Parkesdale Farms, Inc.
Pepper Research Inc.
Petoseed Co., Inc.
Pine Island Organics
Plant Farm, Inc.
Plants, Inc. of Sarasota
Plants of Ruskin
Producers Fertilizer Co.
Reasoner's Tropical Nurseries, Inc.
Rhone-Poulenc Chemical Co.
Rio Colorado Seeds Inc.
Rogers Seed Company
Rohm & Haas Company
Roquette Corp.
Rotem-Amfert-Negev
Royal Sluis, Inc.
S & G Seeds, Inc.
Sakata Seed America, Inc.
Samen Mauser America, Inc.
Sandland Farms
Sankyo Comp LTD


Tampa, FL
Palmetto, FL
Bradenton, FL
Winter Haven, FL
Marietta, GA
Ponte Vedra Beach,FL
Ruskin, FL
Berkel EN Rodenrijs,
The Netherlands
Scranton, PA
Palmetto, FL
Parrish, FL
Willoughby, OH
Three Bridges, NJ
Astabula, OH
Tangerine, FL
San Diego, CA
Houston, TX
Cordova, TN
Valrico, FL
West Paducah, KY
Greensboro, NC
Davis, CA
Lewisville, 10
Connelsville, PA
Bradenton, FL
Parrish, FL
W. Chicago, IL
Plant City, FL
Belle Glade, FL
Saticoy, CA
Pine Island, FL
Sarasota, FL
Sarasota, FL
Ruskin, FL
Palmetto, FL
Oneco, FL
New Brunswick, NJ
Yuma, AZ
Gilroy, CA
Philadelphia, PA
Gurnee, IL
Ashdod, Israel
Salinas, CA
Downers Grove, IL
Morgan Hill, CA
El Centro, CA
Parrish, FL
Chuo-Ku, Japan






Sanwa Growers Inc.
O.M. Scott & Sons
Seed Growers LTD
Shamrock Seed
SHARE Program
Sluis & Groot
Southern Agricultural Chemicals Co.
Southwest FL Water Management Dist.
Speedling, Inc.
Albert & Helen Stankie
Sumitomo Corp. of America
Sun Seed Co.
Suncoast Greenhouses
Sunseeds Company
Swartz-Taylor Farms
Swartz-Strano Farms
Taylor & Fulton Greenhouses & Farms
Taylor & Fulton Packing House
Terra Asgrow
Todd International
TOMEN AGRO Inc.
Transagricola, SA
Tropicana Products, Inc.
UCB Chemicals
Uniroyal Chemical Co.
United Agricultural Products
Universal Enterprises
USDA Florist and Nursery Crops Laboratory
USDA-Tropical & Subtropical Agric.
USDA-Horticultural Sci. Institute
V-J Growers Supply
Vacumet Corp.
Valent U.S.A. Corp
John C. VanDiepen
Vaughans Seeds
Vilmorin Inc
Walden-Sparkman, Inc.
Waller Flowerseed
Whisenant Farms
Whitmire Research Labs Inc.
Yoder Brothers Inc
Zeneca


Wimauma, FL
Marysville, OH
Hannover, Germany
Salinas, CA
Gainesville, FL
Fort Wayne, IN
Rubonia, FL
Brooksville, FL
Sun City, FL
Ft. Pierce, FL
San Francisco, CA
Pleasanton, CA
Seffner, FL
Morgan Hill, CA
Sarasota, FL
Sarasota, FL
Ellenton, FL
Palmetto, FL
Ellenton, FL
Apollo Beach, FL
San Francisco, CA
Navarete, Dom. Rep.
Bradenton, FL
Smyrna, GA
Raleigh, NC
Tampa, FL
Sarasota, FL

Washington DC
Beltsville, MD
Apopka, FL
Wayne, NJ
Tallahassee, FL
Felton, CA
Downers Grove, IL
Empire, CA
Dover, FL
Guadalupe, CA
Parrish, FL
St. Louis, MO
Barberton, OH
Wilmington, DE


Note: The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.








Vision

The vision for the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(UF/IFAS) is to increase and strengthen the knowledge base and technology for:

* EXPANDING the profitability of global competitiveness and sustainability of the food,
fiber and agricultural industries of Florida.

* PROTECTING and SUSTAINING natural resource and environmental systems.

* ENHANCING the development of human resources.

* IMPROVING the quality of human life.




Mission


The mission of UF/IFAS is to develop knowledge in agricultural, human and natural resources
and to make that knowledge accessible to sustain and enhance the quality of human life.





Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Bradenton
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203





Manuscript Preparation Credit: Patty McClain
GCREC Bradenton


University of Floridalnstitute of Food and Agricultural ScienceseCooperative Extension ServiceOChnstne Taylor Stephens, Dean
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Flonda, Richard L. Jones, Dean
for Research, publishes this information to further programs and related activities, available to all persons regardless of race, color,
age, sex, handicap or national origin. For information about alternate formats, contact the Educational Media and Services Unit,
University of Florida, PO Box 110810, Gainesville, FL 32611-0810 This information was published April 1997 as Bradenton
GCREC Research Report BRA 1997-, Florida Agricultural Expenment Station.




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