• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I: Arthur and the...
 Chapter II: The little bird's...
 Chapter III: Edith's bird...
 Chapter IV: The girl and the...
 Chapter V: The swallow's farew...
 Chapter VI: The skylark
 Chapter VII: Shut up in a cage
 Chapter VIII: The stolen baske...
 Chapter IX: The bird in the...
 Chapter X: The skylark's song
 Chapter XI: Willie's robin
 Chapter XII: The wounded bird
 Back Cover






Title: The swallow and the skylark
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053979/00001
 Material Information
Title: The swallow and the skylark
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1885
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1885   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053979
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225031
notis - ALG5303
oclc - 65190056

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
    Chapter I: Arthur and the swallow
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Chapter II: The little bird's song
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter III: Edith's bird baskets
        Page 5
    Chapter IV: The girl and the swallow
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter V: The swallow's farewell
        Plate
        Page 1
        The singing bird
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
        The little bird's morning ramble
            Page 5
            Page 6
        The pet bird
            Page 7
            Page 8
    Chapter VI: The skylark
        Plate
        Page 1
        The little lark
            Page 2
            Page 3
    Chapter VII: Shut up in a cage
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Chapter VIII: The stolen basket
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Chapter IX: The bird in the woods
        Page 8
    Chapter X: The skylark's song
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Chapter XI: Willie's robin
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter XII: The wounded bird
        Page 5
        Page 6
        The little bird
            Page 7
            Page 8
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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THE SWALLOW
AND


THE SKYLARK.




1.-ARTHUR AND THE SWALLOW. 7.-SHUT UP IN A CAGE.
2.-THE LITTLE BIRD'S SONG. 8.-THE STOLEN BASKET.
3.-EDITH'S BIRD BASKETS. 9.-THE BIRD IN THE WOODS.
4.-THE GIRL AND THE SWALLOW. 10.-THE SKYLARK'S SONG.
5.-THE SWALLOWS FAREWELL. 11.-WILLIE'S ROBIN.
6.-THE SKYLARK. 12.-THE WOUNDED BIRD.















ARTHUR AND THE SWALLOW.





aonbo r n:
T. NIELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.
1885.











ARTHUR AND THE SWALLOW.

ONE spring, two swallows built their nest just over the
window of a room where a little boy named Arthur
slept.
It was Arthur's great delight to watch the swallows
flying about-out of the nest and in again, out and in,
all day long.
No one touched the nest; and all the long summer
the swallows made it their home.
At last the days began to grow shorter, the cold
weather came, and the birds flew away to another land.
Arthur looked in vain for his little friends. His
mother told him that they had gone to a warmer land
far over the sea, but that they would come back when
spring returned.
Often, during the long cold winter, did Arthur look
up at the empty nest; and he felt glad to think that
his little friends were safe from the frost and the snow.
Winter passed away; and when the warm sun
began again to shine, flocks of swallows were seen
everywhere.






2 ARTHUR AND THE SWALLOW.

At last two swallows found their way to the window.
They were Arthur's old friends, and they knew the
old nest again.
In the morning Arthur's mother told him to get up
and open the window, to welcome the swallows back
to their old home.
In the picture you can see him at the open window.
He and one of the swallows seem as if they were
talking together.
ARTHUR.
"Dear little swallow,
Your long journey o'er,
How happy I am
To see you once more!

"Say who, in the far land,
Taught you to know
That spring time was here,
And when to go."

BIRD.
"It was God that taught me,
For he knoweth best
The time to wander
And the time to rest.

"The same God that loves you
Careth for me;






THE LITTLE BIRD'S SONG. 8

'Tis he guides the swallow
O'er land and o'er sea.
"All the long summer
I'll stay with you here,
In my nest by your window,
With nothing to fear.
"But before winter comes,
With frost and with snow,
Away to the South
Again I must go."

Arthur one day asked his mother where the
swallows got their food; and she told him that the
food of the swallow consists of little flies that it catches
in the air as it skims along with open mouth.
In winter no insects are found in the air, on
account of the cold. Then the swallow has to go to
the warm lands of the South for its food.



THE LITTLE BIRD'S SONG.

A LITTLE bird, with feathers brown,
Sat singing on a tree;
The song was very soft and low,
But sweet as it could be.






4 THE LITTLE BIRD'S SONG.

The people who were passing by,
Looked up to see the bird
That made the sweetest melody
That ever they had heard.















Why, father," little Gracie said,
Where can the birdie be ?
If I could sing a song like that,
I'd sit where folks could see."

"I hope my little girl will learn
A lesson from the bird,
And try to do what good she can-
Not to be seen or heard.






EDITH'S BIRD BASKETS. 8

"This birdie is content to sit
Unnoticed on the spray,
And sweetly sing his Maker's praise
From dawn to close of day.

So live, my child, all through your life,
That, be it short or long,
Though others may forget your looks,
They'll not forget your song."


EDITH'S BIRD BASKETS.

ONE cold winter day some hungry birds came hopping
near a window, and a little girl called Edith saw them.
Her brother opened -Y ___-
the window, and she threw j-
out some crumbs of bread. V IM
The hungry birds flew to
them, and soon ate them U
all up.
Next day Edith's
mother bought three small baskets and gave them to
her. They were tiny baskets, each no bigger than a
little cup.






6 THE GIRL AND THE SWALLOW.

Edith helped to fill the baskets with seeds and with
crumbs of bread. Then she went to see her mother
hang them on the branches of a tree near the window.
It was not long until the birds came and ate out
of the baskets, while Edith stood at the window watch-
ing them.
Edith filled the baskets every day, and the birds
came to the tree all the winter through.
They grew so tame that they would fly down and
hop about her feet without fear.
At last spring came, and the birds flew away.
The snow was off the ground, and the little creatures
could now find plenty of food for themselves in the
woods and the fields.
Edith was glad that she had helped the birds
through the long cold winter. She took down the
baskets from the tree, and laid them aside till winter
should come again.


THE GIRL AND THE SWALLOW.

SWALLOW.
I'M very glad to get here;
I only came to-day:






THE GIRL AND THE SWALLOW. 7

I was, this very morning,
A hundred miles away.
LITTLE GIRL.
Oh, what a long, long way to come!
How tired you must be!

SWALLOW.
Oh no! I'm fond of going far;
It is the best for me.
LITTLE GIRL.
You left us last September;
And, pray, where did you go?

SWALLOW.
I went South for the winter-
I always do, you know.

LITTLE GIRL.
The South? How do you like it?

SWALLOW.
I like its sunny skies-
Among the orange blossoms
I caught the nicest flies;
But when the spring had opened
I wanted to come back.






8 THE GIRL AND THE SWALLOW.

LITTLE GIRL.
You're just the same old swallow-
Your wings are just as black.
Your little last year's nestlings,
Do tell me how they grow.

SWALLOW.
My nestlings are great swallows,
And mated long ago.

LITTLE GIRL.
And will you build, this summer,
Among the flowers and leaves?

SWALLOW.
No; I have taken lodgings
Beneath the stable-eaves:
You'll hear, each night and morning,
My twitter in the sky.

LITTLE GIRL.
Your song is always welcome;
And now, good-bye.

SWALLOW.
Good-bye.







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THE SWALLOW'S FAREWELL.

Now Summer days are done,
Autumn is nearly gone,
Winter is coming on
With ice and snow.
Over the sea in bands,
Away to far-off lands,
Where warmer breezes blow,
Now we must go.

Farewell, ye meadows green,
Where we've so happy been;
Farewell the tall old trees,
Now brown and bare:
Leave we the warm old nest,
Dearer than all the rest,
In other lands to stray,
Far, far away.

Ah! but when to this shore
Sweet Spring returns once more,





2 THE SINGING BIRD.

Back then our way we'll wing
Swift o'er the main;
Then in the snug old nest,
Dearer than all the rest,
Happy again we'll dwell,-
Till then Farewell.


THE SINGING BIRD.

LUCY and George and Fanny had a bird given them,
in a fine large cage. It was a bullfinch, very young
and very tame.
During fine weather the children kept the bird in
their own summer-house in the garden, and spent
much of their time with it.
One day George said to his sisters, "Let me tell
you of a plan I have thought of for pleasing mamma.
She has never heard our bird sing. I think I could
teach him to sing that pretty tune she taught us-the
one that she learned from her own mother.
"If I succeed, we shall hang up Dicky at her
window on her birth-day, and he will wake her by
singing her favourite tune! "
Lucy and Fanny liked the plan very much; so the






THE SINGING BIRD. 8



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children spent more time than ever with their pet.
George played slowly on his whistle the song they
wished Dicky to learn.
wished Dicky to learn.






4 THE SINGING BIRD.

But Dicky was very naughty. Sometimes he would
sit on his perch looking very cross, with all his feathers
stuck out like a frill, and his head on one side.
George, with great patience, played the tune over
and over again. At the end, Dicky would sometimes
give a sort of little chirp, as much as to say, Ah!
That was all.
At other times he would not listen at all, but would
sing his own song-sweet enough, to be sure, but not
the one they wanted.
He will never learn it! said little Fanny one day.
"There are now only ten days before mamma's birth-
day, and I have not yet heard him sing a note of the
tune."
The next day, as the children were going to the
garden, they heard their favourite tune warbled in a
low, sweet strain, from the summer-house.
"He knows it at last!" said George. The rogue!
he has been waiting till he could sing it well."
Lumps of sugar were then given to Dicky as a
reward. On the morning of mamma's birth-day the
children had the delight of seeing how pleased she was
when she was awakened by her favourite tune from
the sweet.snging bird.






THE LITTLE BIRD'S MORNING RAMBLE. 5


THE LITTLE BIRD'S MORNING RAMBLE.

ONCE there was a little bird that lived with his mate
in an old apple tree. One day he said, "I will fly
away to the fields." So, telling his mate to keep the
eggs warm, he bade her good morning-
And rolled up his feet in his feathers so neat,
And spread out his wings very wide;
So merrily now he soars up from the bough,
Till he comes to a little brook's side.

He went and dipped his bill into the water and
drank-

And he said, How good it does taste, I declare!
I will come and drink here every day;
And my lady shall come-yes, my lady so fair-
For I gladly will show her the way."

Then he hopped along to a pool, where he saw-

A frog like an arrow dart swiftly along,
Another went by, then another;
And their children, the tadpoles, came wagging their tails,
And each one looked just like his brother.

"What queer things," said he, "paddling them-
selves along with their tails!" And while he was
watching them, up came-






6 THE LITTLE BIRD'S MORNING RAMBLE.

A party of minnows, some large and some small,
And they looked very playful and shy.
The bird said, Good morning!" They darted away,
And never looked up in his eye.

"Shy little fellows these," said he. "Just as if I
should want to harm them! I mean to go and bathe
in a part of the brook where it is not so deep." So he
hopped on till he came to a place where the water was
very low, and in he plunged-

Said the bird, "What good fun to bathe here in the sun,
And to spatter the water so high!
My mate shall come down here and wash herself too,
Ere the sun has gone down in the sky."

Then he came out and shook the water from his
wings; and going on, he soon came to a field where
there was a man ploughing-

And said, "Oh, he's ploughing up worms all for me!
I think he's a very kind man.
I will pick up my dinner, then sing in his ear
The prettiest song that I can."

And the little bird picked up one or two worms,
and then, perching himself on a tree near, he sang one
of his sweetest songs.






THE PET BIRD. 7

"He could not help liking that song, I am sure!"
To himself then the little bird said.
And he picked up a worm to bear home to his mate,
And swift o'er the tree-tops he sped.

And soon he was back by the side of his mate;
and, dropping the food into her mouth, he told her
that he would keep the eggs warm while she went to
the brook to drink and to bathe.



THE PET BIRD.

A LITTLE boy named Frank had a pet bird called
Dicky. The bird was very tame; and when the door
of his cage was opened, he used to come out and hop
about the room.
Here he is on the table. ,
Frank and his sister are
standing quietly watching
him. Do you see them ? i -
They have put some ..
crumbs into a little basket,
and the bird will soon pick them up and fly back to
his cage.





8 THE PET BIRD.

Dicky is very fond of a bath. Frank knows this,
and he sometimes places a dish of water on the table.
Dicky at once jumps into the dish, and Frank
laughs to see him splashing the water about with his
wings.
In the morning, before the children are awake, he
often sings a sweet song, as if to tell them it is time to
get up.
When they take their breakfast they never forget
to give Dicky some crumbs, or a little bit of sugar.
When the children wish to give their pet an extra
treat, they go into the fields and gather a handful of a
kind of weed of which they know him to be fond.
Dicky's cage hangs near the window; for all birds,
except the owl, like the bright light of day.
Do you know that Dicky taught little Frank and
his sister two very useful lessons? I will tell you
what they were.
First, his fondness for his bath taught them to
keep themselves neat and clean. Secondly, his sweet
songs taught them always to be cheerful and happy.
































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THE LARK.

THREE boys, Dick, Sam, and Ned, went out to play in
the fields, and fine fun they had.
As they sat down to rest for a short time, they
heard a lark sing.
"How well he sings!" said Dick. "He must be
quite close to us, I think," said Sam. I should like
to see him," said Ned.
"There he is, then," said Sam; so you can soon
have your wish."
"Where?" said Ned; and up he sprang, just in
time to see the lark as he rose once more high in the
air. See, there he is, as he sings his sweet song to
the boys.
Just then Dick saw that Ned had a small stone in
his hand. Dick tlhougiht that he meant to throw it at
the poor lark. So he said, "Ned, do you mean to
throw that stone at him ?"
"Yes; why not? What harm would there be ?"
said Ned; "I want you to see how well I can aim."
"For shame, Ned!" said Dick. "Throw down






2 THE LITTLE LARK.

the stone. Why should you want to kill the poor
bird, that sings so sweet a song to us ? If you like, I
will soon show you that I can aim quite as well as you
can. But I should not like to aim to do ill." This
made both Ned and Sam laugh; and Ned threw down
the stone.
The lark went on with his song. Ned said, "I do
like to hear the lark sing; how glad I am that I did
not try to kill him."

THE LITTLE LARK.
I HEAR a pretty bird, but hark!
I cannot see it anywhere:
Oh! it is a little lark,
Singing in the morning air.
Little lark, do tell me why
You are singing in the sky ?

Other little birds at rest
Have not yet begun to sing;
Every one is in its nest,
With its head beneath its wing:
Little lark, then, tell me why
You sing so early in the sky?






THE LITTLE LARK.

You look no bigger than a bee,
In the middle of the blue;
Far above the poplar tree,
I can hardly look at you:


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Little lark, do tell me why
You are mounted up so high ?-


'Tis to sing a merry song
To the pleasant morning light:






4 SHUT UP IN A CAGE.

Why stay in my nest so long,
When the sun is shining bright ?
Little lady, this is why
I sing so early in the sky.

To the little birds below,
Here I sing a merry tune;
And I let the ploughman know
He must come to labour soon.
Little lady, this is why
I am singing in the sky.



SHUT UP IN A CAGE.

"I AM a little bird shut up in a cage. Not long ago
I was flying about in the woods as happy as the day
was long; but now I feel sad
i I i Iand lonely.
"Let me tell you how I
"*I came to be here. One day one
': .of my wings had been hurt, and
I was not able to fly.
A boy, who was passing on his way home from






SHUT UP IN A CAGE. 8

school, saw me lying on the ground; and he jumped
over the fence, and soon got hold of me.
"I tried to get away, but with my wounded wing
I could not fly. The boy took me home with him,
and put me into this cage; so here I am.
"I daresay he does not mean to be unkind; but I
wonder how he would like to be shut up, and never
allowed to go out to play with other little boys.
When I was living in the woods, I had a merry
life among the trees; and I had friends, too, as merry
as myself.
"Oh, it was a pleasant life! There were plenty
of berries on the bushes, and we had everything that
birds could wish to make us happy.
"There was a nice spring of clear water, too, near
the wood, where we used
to go to drink. The boys
knew the place, and called
"it the 'Birds' Spring.'
You might often have
seen quite a number of us
there at one time, sipping and drinking the clear
water.
Oh, how I wish that some one would tell the






6 THE STOLEN BASKET.

little boy to let me go back to my old home in the
woods!"
The boy had fallen asleep on his chair, and had
been dreaming. He thought he heard the bird saying
all this; but it was only a dream.
When he awoke he looked about with surprise,
and there he saw the little bird, sitting sad and lonely
as before.
What do you think he said? Well, he said,
"Though I have only been dreaming, still my dream
has put a good thought into my mind.
"I shall wait till the little bird's wing is well, and
then set it free." And so he did, and he felt all the
happier for the good deed he had done.



THE STOLEN BASKET.

Two little workers once set to work to make a little
basket for eggs.
One of them went out to gather straws and twigs,
and the other stayed at home to twist them into the
form of a basket.
After many days of hard work the basket was





THE STOLEN BASKET. 7

made. The little workers lined it with a soft lining,
as smooth as silk.
When the work was done, the tiny basket was
very pretty; and
the two busy work- '-. ..
ers who had made
it were as happy
as they could be. .
Then they put
four eggs in it; and Y
lovely eggs they
were, all deep
blue, with spots of p
black.
One day two j ,,
boys passed the
place where these ip-
little workers lived,
and as they peeped in they saw the basket. As there
was no one near, these naughty boys stole it and
carried it off.
They took the eggs out of it, and then they broke
the basket to pieces and threw it away.
When the two little workers came home and saw






8 THE BIRD IN THE WOODS.

that their basket and their eggs were gone, they cried
as if their hearts would break.
Now, the boys who took the
/ basket were robbers! Is it not
S /, wrong to rob? You say, "Oh,
yes; it is very wrong!
And was it not wrong, even
though the owners of the little
basket were only birds, the
basket their nest, and the place where they kept it
a bush ?


THE BIRD IN THE WOODS.

I WOULD not in a cage be shut,
Though it of gold should be;
I love best in the woods to sing,
And fly from tree to tree.














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THE LARK'S SONG.

FOUR little children once went with their father and
mother for a few weeks to the south of England.
It was in the spring time-in the month of April;
and the place to which they went was at the sea-side.
It was fine bright weather, and the sea looked
beautiful. It was a pretty sight for the children, to
see the waves dancing in the bright sunshine.
Ships, with their white sails, were often seen far
out at sea; and little boats were all day long sailing
about near the shore.
The children were never tired of watching them, or
of playing on the shore and looking at the waves as
they rolled in on the beach.
Near at hand there were hills which were covered
with grass to the very top. Around these hills there
were pretty green lanes or roads, where plenty of wild-
flowers grew.
In the green lanes and in the fields there were lots
of lovely primroses. The children took little baskets
with them, and brought them home full every day.






WILLIE'S ROBIN.



WILLIE'S ROBIN.

SOFT and quiet, soft and slow,
Down it falls, the feathery snow,
On the lane and on the hedge,
And on Willie's window ledge;





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On the roof above his head,
And his little garden bed,
And the steps where Robin comes
Every day for Willie's crumbs;





4 WILLIE'S ROBIN.

Nay, while Willie lies asleep
In his little crib, 'twill keep
Falling, falling, soft and slow,
All night long, the pretty snow.

And to-morrow, at sunrise,
When my Willie opes his eyes,
Field and garden, road and street,
Will be one great snowy sheet;
Every shrub, and hedge, and tree,
All as white as white can be.
And down flying from the bower,
Shaking from his twig a shower
Of white snow-flakes, we'll behold
Willie's Robin,-oh, so cold!
Shall we let him hungry go
Back again across the snow?

No, no! Willie's glad to share
Half his bread with Robin there;
Would without his breakfast go
Rather than treat Robin so,
Who about our house so long
Hopped, and sang his cheerful song.






THE WOUNDED BIRD. a

So to-morrow, when he comes,
Tapping, tapping for his crumbs,
Robin shall get such a store,
He'll be full-fed all day o'er;
Chirping, "Thank you," then he'll go
Flying off across the snow.



THE WOUNDED BIRD.

ONE day Frank saved a poor bird which puss had
caught in the garden.
Puss ran off as soon as she saw Frank coming.
She dropped the bird
from her mouth.




thing! Do you see it ".
in the picture ?
We put it in a cage, but it did not seem happy in
its prison home.
We kept it for some weeks, and then we took it
out to the garden to set it free.






6 THE WOUNDED BIRD.

We lifted up the door of the cage and stood at a
little distance, to see what the bird would do.
Oh, it was a pretty sight to see how happy it was.
It sat for a moment at the door, and then flew to the
branch of a tree in the garden.
It turned its little head to us, as if to say, Good-
bye; and then, spreading its wings, it mounted into
the air and flew away to the woods.
About a week after this, Frank and I were sitting
Sat a window which looked into the
garden.
Suddenly we heard a bird sing-
ing among the trees. On looking
out we saw that our little friend
had come back to us.
-Frank took the empty cage to
the garden. He put seed and water into it, and said,
"Perhaps the bird will know its old home again."
We sat and watched, and soon saw our little friend
fly down to the cage. It went in and helped itself to
the food which Frank had put there.
We did not wish to make it a prisoner again, but
to teach it to come back to us without fear whenever
it pleased.






THE LITTLE BIRD. 7

All the summer through, the cage was left in the
garden with plenty of food in it, and a little glass of
water.
We often saw
our little friend
come back and go

door to its meals.
One day it
brought another
bird with it, and
they both played about the cage in the garden for
hours, hopping in and out, and eating the food we had
put there.
We were very glad to see the birds. They were
free to come and go as they pleased. Many a sweet
song they sang to us as we sat at the garden window
in the long days of that happy summer.



THE LITTLE BIRD.

A LITTLE bird, one day in June,
Beneath my window sang a tune;






8 THE LITTLE BIRD.

Sweet and simple was the song,
And its burden all day long,
Cheep, cheep, cheep!

Then a while he went away,
But came again another day.
This time a little mate he brought,
And to her his song he taught,
Cheep, cheep, cheep!

Now the two birds built a nest;
And the pair seemed doubly blest
When some little birds had they,
And the pretty things could say,-
Cheep, cheep, cheep!




























































AlA










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