• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 John Bull's farm alphabet
 Tabby's tea-fight
 Rover's dinner party
 London characters
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Aunt Louisa's welcome gift : comprising: John Bull's farm alphabet, Tabby's tea-fight, Rover's dinner party, London characters
Title: Aunt Louisa's welcome gift
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053966/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Louisa's welcome gift comprising: John Bull's farm alphabet, Tabby's tea-fight, Rover's dinner party, London characters
Alternate Title: John Bull's farm alphabet
Tabby's tea-fight
Rover's dinner party
London characters
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
Petherick, Horace ( Illustrator )
Henley, Lionel Charles, 1843-ca. 1893 ( Illustrator )
Kronheim, Joseph Martin, 1810-1896 ( Printer of plates )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1885?]
 Subjects
Subject: Wit and humor, Juvenile -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Occupations -- Juvenile poetry -- England -- London   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1885   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations from original designs by Petherick, Henley, &c. ; printed in colours by Kronheim.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053966
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222695
notis - ALG2941
oclc - 65190055

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
    Preface
        Page iv
    John Bull's farm alphabet
        Poem 1
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Plate
    Tabby's tea-fight
        Poem 1
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    Rover's dinner party
        Poem 1
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    London characters
        Poem 1
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








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AUNT LOUISA'S



WELCOME GIFT.

COMPRISING
JOHN BULL'S FARM ALPHABET. ROVER'S DINNER PARTY,
TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT. LONDON CHARACTERS.

WITH
TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

FROM ORIGINAL DESIGNS BY PETHERICK, HENLEY, &c.

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIM.









LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND.
















PREFACE.

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A LL children love the Country, and enjoy
being at a farm; therefore AUNT LOUISA
hopes that they will like to learn their letters
from "JOHN BULL'S FARM ALPHABET."
"TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT," and "ROVER'S DINNER
PARTY," will, she thinks, amuse them; and chil-
dren who live in Town will easily recognize the
"LONDON CHARACTERS."

















JOHN BULL'S FARM ALPHABET.




JOHN BULL'S

FARM ALPHABET.


A's Arable land, for ploughing
and sowing:
Wheat, barley, and oats upon it
are growing.

B3 stands for the Barn where we
all our crops store;
The chickens pick up the fallen
grains at the door.

Stands for our Cows, which give
plenty of milk;
The coat of dear Colly is softer than
silk.

S stands for the Dairy, where
butter we make,
And very great care of our cheeses
we take.























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,E stands for Eggs, which the
poultry-girl finds;
The geese in the meadow this little
lass minds.


F stands for Fowls, of which every
kind,
From Cochin to Bantam, you'll at
our farm find.


G stands for Geese-just see how
they run!
To bite that poor woman they think
will be fun.


H stands for Hay, which we all
like to make;
Even dear little Norman a hayfork
will take.







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I stands for Ice, which the plough-
man must break,
That he for the horses some water
may take.


J's for John Bull, who this pretty
farm owns;
He's watching the women who
pick up the stones.


K's the Knife-cutter which chops
up so neat,
The straw that in winter the cattle
must eat.


L 's for the Lambs, which so
merrily bound,
Vhen spring-time is come, o'er
the daisy-starred ground.
V's for the Milkmaid-a pretty
young lass,
Tripping with pail and stool over
the grass. 3



















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SN stands for the Nag, that trots on
so well,
When John Bull goes to the mar-
ket to sell.


O stands for Oats, which to horses
we give;
The carter is bringing them, here,
in a sieve.


P-'s for the Plough, which must
win us our bread.
By means of the plough all the
nations are fed.


Q stands for Quinces; a nice jam
they make.
Mary would like a fine ripe one to
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Rl stands for Reapers, who cut
down the wheat:
When harvest is over they all
have a treat.

S is the Sow, with her litter of
pigs:
See how she's grunting, and in the
earth digs.

T stands for Turkeys; a fat one
there'll be
When Christmas comes for my
brothers and me.

U is for Useful things, such as the
drill,
The harrow, the pitchfork, and
what else you will.
V is the Vine which grows on the
house wall;
SThe grapes are quite sweet, and
not very small. 5





VI 's the Waggon which bears
the wheat home,
For now near the end of the harvest
we're come.

X is for Xcellent,-such is our
mother,
Our father, our sisters, and dear
little brother.

Yis the Youth who the bird scares
away;
When his work's over he runs off
to play.

Z 's for what Yorkshiremen call
our "zmall things,"
Which, at last, to its ending our
Alphabet brings.


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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT.










TABBY'S TEAFIGHT



ONE evening two Pussies
-A Tabby and White-
Were sitting together
In cosy fire-light;
And, sippi-ng their warm milk,
Enjoyed a good chat,
To which four young kittens
Pleased listeners sat.

Thus spoke Mrs. Whitefur,
While waving her paw:
"Young folks will be young folks,
And I never saw
Any use in being dull:
You know people say
It makes a boy stupid,
All work and no play.
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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT.

"It is so with kittens;
Our duty is clear-
We must give a party
For their sakes, my dear;
And show to all Catland
Their sweet little faces,
And let the dears practise
Their innocent graces."

Mr. Tabby looked pleased:
"I think you are right,
Dear sister," he answered.
"Our friends I'll invite
To what Master Bobby
Now calls a 'Tea-Fight;'
And we'll take care to fix on
A clear moonlight night."

So they wrote out the cards
"Mrs. Whitefur at Home,
Twenty-fourth of December."
"We hope you will come."
This was added by Puff,
-A dear little thing,-
Who hoped her kind message
Might many friends bring.
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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT.

And they hired Puss-in-Boots
To carry them round;
A very good postman
That wise cat was found.
And all the young pussies
He met on the way
Were greatly delighted,
And no one said nay.

One poor lonely Pussy
('T was "Nobody's Cat,")
Had no invitation,
But looking on sat.
While all read their cards out
She mewed piteously;
Puss-in-Boots felt so sorry
He asked her to tea.

At last Christmas week comes:
What pains they all take,
To make creams and jellies,
And mince-pies and cake!
And when all is ready,
I'm bound to confess,
A very long time they
Spent over their dress.
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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT

Puff ties a blue ribbon
Around her white neck;
Black Bell and Brown Bessy
With flow'rs their heads deck;
Tom wears a cocked hat, with
A long waving plume,
And pulls on his boots
With a fret and a fume.

Mrs. Whitefur wears silk,
(Her train very long);
To dress like a kitten
She thinks would be wrong;
So she puts on a cap
"Dolly Varden" they call,
With two ostrich feathers
To make her look tall.

When the guests were all come
They sat down to tea:
A happier party
You don't often see
Tabby cared for them all;
And "Nobody's Cat"
He pressed to eat muffins,
With smiles and a pat.
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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT.

So they ate and they drank,
They mewed and they purred,
And nothing but kindness
And sweet sounds were heard.
And (spite of the fashion)
It didn't seem right
To call Tabby's party
A Pussy's Tea-Fight.

And when tea was over
And guite cleared away,
At Puss in the corner"
They all went to play.
While the old cats played whist,
And the Duchess of Down
Was telling Miss Tabby
The news of the town.

When tired of their playing,
They wanted to dance.
A pretty young "Mademoiselle"
Just come from France,
"A minuet" whispered
"She'd much like to try,"
So Tom and she danced one'
The others stood by.
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TABBY'S TEA-FIGHT.

Then followed round dances,
The Lancers came next;
By some of the figures
Poor Tom was perplext,
But came right at last
In the "Gentlerren's round,"
And quite in his place
By his partner was found.
When with play and with dancing
They all were content,
To Tabby's nice supper
They willingly went;
And when fowls and jellies,
And sweet things were done,
They laughed and pulled crackers
And all had great fun.
At last the sad moment
Of parting had come,
They all said it had been
A charming "At Home."
With smiles and good wishes
They murmured "Good night
We hope you will soon give
Another TEA-FIGHT."
















ROVER'S DINNER PARTY.









ROVER'S DINNER PARTY.




OLD ROVER was a country dog,
He led a single life;
He always said he'd rather not
Be troubled with a wife.

One day beneath the orchard trees
With his friend Don he sat;
And about meets" and sporting news
They had a pleasant chat.

At last Squire Rover said, "I mean,
While you're a guest of mine
To ask the neighbours to the Hall,
With you, friend Don, to dine."

Don wagged his tail, and thanked his friend
With very great delight;
"And may I ask," he, smiling, said,
"What guests you will invite?"
I






ROVER'S DINNER PARTY


"VVell, let me see: there's Mr. Bull,
And Mrs. Bull, his wife;
Jane Bull, and Mr. Newfoundland,
Who saved young master's life.


"For ladies-young and pretty too-
There are Italian pets,
Toy terriers, and Cuba belles,
Who live in first-rate sets.


"And as for sporting characters,
I really needn't say
How many members of the hunt
Have kennels down this way."


Said Don, "A very pleasant set!
It will be quite a treat
So many worthy dogs, dear friend,
At your kind feast to meet."


The invitations were sent out,
And no one can decline
At Rover's hospitable board
With his friend Don to dine.
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ROVER'S DINNER PARTY


A cordial welcome they are sure
At Rover's house to find;
And dogs, like children, love to go
Where friends are always kind.


And now the happy day is come,
The guests are ushered in;
And Rover, very grandly drest,
His friends is welcoming.


First to arrive is Mr. Bull-
He seldom is too late,
Though for his wife, and daughter too,
Sometimes compelled to wait.


Next comes Miss Fanny, dressed in silk,
A gold chain round her neck,
Her black eyes shining like two stars;
With flowers her head is decked.


And by her side a noble dog,
Bearing a glorious name;
From snowy mountains far away,
General St. Bernard came.
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ROVER'S DINNER PARTY


The guests have all at last arrived;
Then loudly sounds the gong,
And to the dining-room, in pairs,
They slowly moved along,


And soon were seated at the feast-
A dinner a la Russe-
The soup and fish were handed round
By footmen grand in plush.


While all the time they ate and talked,
Dessert attention claimed;
And very pretty looked the fruit
In autumn flowers framed.


"I hope," said worthy Mr. Bull,
"You'll not forget, dear host,
To keep our good old custom up,
And let us drink a toast."


Dog Rover nodded an assent,
And rising, said, "I give
The health of our most gracious Queen,
Long may Victoria live I"
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ROVER'S DINNER PARTY


They drank the toast with loyal glee;
And then again began
The laughter low and murmured chat,
Till, shutting up her fan,


Good Mrs. Bull-who by request
Had filled the hostess' place-
A signal gave; the ladies rose
And left the room with grace.


While Rover's friends enjoyed their wine,
The ladies sat together,
And in the drawing-room discussed
Their children and the weather.


And when the gentlemen came in,
Miss Jane Bull sang a song;
While Mrs. Bull told every one,
"She'd not had lessons long."


Good Mr. Bull, and Dean Greyhound,
And Farmer Dinmont Brown,
And Captain Foxfind, to a game
Of whist had settled down.
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ROVER'S DINNER PARTY.


And thus the pleasant evening sped
(Too rapid in its flight),
Until the ladies (with warm thanks)
To Rover bade "Good night."

Then, gathered in the smoking-room
To talk all matters over,
The sporting dogs remained awhile
With "that good fellow" Rover.

How long they sat, and all they said
I shall not stop to say;
But I have heard they left the house
Just at the break of day.






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LONDON CHARACTERS.







LONDON CHARACTERS.


T HESE Characters in any street
Children are sure sometimes to meet:
The BUTCHER-BOY brings on his tray
Our meat for dinner ev'ry day.
And very early we may hear
The MILKMAN'S tin cans rattle near-
A pleasant sound, since we must wait
For breakfast, if the milk is late.
The BAKER brings us nice new bread:
Without it we could not be fed;
White loaves are made of wheat, that grows
In fields, as everybody knows.
"Mew mew !" I heard our Pussy cry-
The CAT'SMEAT-MAN is coming by;
He brings the dogs and cats their food:
They think it very nice and good.
When in the Park we run about,
And roll our hoops, and jump, and shout,
The PARK-KEEPER has us in view,
To see that boys no mischief do.
Where the great river dances by-
All blue and shining as the sky-
If you would like to go afloat,
The WATERMAN will bring a boat.
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LONDON CHARACTERS.

The lady rides down Rotten Row-
The GROOM behind, of course, must go.
How well he sits I I think that I
Could ride as well if I might try.

The DUSTMAN comes with cart and spade-
I should not like his dusty trade;
Yet if he did not come, I fear
We should have fever all the year.

The SHOEBLACK tries his bread to earn,
And would an honest penny turn:
When mud upon our boots leaves stains,
His ready help good payment gains.

NURSEMAID and CHILDREN here are seen,
Sent out to walk where trees are green
And Annie, silly little lass I
Watches the Guardsmen as they pass.

The BEEF-EATER we see to-day,
Wears still the old-fashioned array
He at King Harry's sideboard wore
Within the Tower in days of yore.

This STREET BOY seems a merry lad,
And yet his life is very sad I
He's often hungry, cold, and wet:
He'd better work his bread to get.
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LONDON CHARA CTERS.


When Winter snows are on the ground,
The CHIMNEY-SWEEPER goes his round,
And wakes us from our morning sleep,
By loudly calling, "Sweep I sweep sweep I"

The CABMAN is a useful friend,
Who takes us to our journey's end;
I fear his horse and he together,
Have much to bear in wintry weather.

The ORANGE-GIRL would gladly suit
Every one's taste with golden fruit;
She travels round from door to door,
But sells the most amongst the poor.

The TURNCOCK turns the water on,
And up the house-pipe it has gone;
If he forgot his work to do,
There'd be no bath for me and you.

The NAVVY digs and makes the drains,
As well as roads for railway trains;
The gas and water-pipes he lays,
And sometimes mends the Queen's highways.

The LAMPLIGHTER I love to see:
Without the lamps how dark 't would be I
Like stars they twinkle all about,
Till morning from the sky peeps out.
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LONDON CHARA CTERS.


The BASKET-WOMAN here you see,
Your helper she will gladly be,
And in her useful basket take
Whatever purchases you make.

The MUFFIN-MAN is come; I hear
His small bell tinkle shrill and clear;
Muffins and crumpets nice he brings,
While on the fire the kettle sings.

The SERVANT, looking nice and neat,
Sweeps the dust out into the street,
From doorstep and from pavement too,
And makes them look quite fresh and new.

CHEAP JACK, with laugh and joke, commends
His plates and dishes to his friends;
He says they would be wise to take them,
For nothing they could do would break them.

TELEGRAPH-BOY-you little know
What sudden news of joy or woe
Within your leather bag you bear,
And carry round with haste and care.

The BEADLE really looks quite grand 1
Cocked hat on head, and mace in hand;
In Church he won't allow a noise,
But raps the heads of tiresome boys.
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LONDON CHARACTERS.


The POSTMAN'S "rat-tat" often brings
A letter about pleasant things;
But sometimes dear Mamma looks sad,
And then I know the news are bad.

The FIREMAN comes with ready speed
To help us in our greatest need;
And though the tall flames loud may bellow,
They cannot daunt the gallant fellow.

The RAILWAY PORTER, stout and strong,
Our heavy luggage rolls along;
Without his aid I do not know
How we could on a journey go.

This POLICEMAN keeps the way,
Because the Queen goes by to-day;
I wish he had no other care
Than to keep back the lads who stare.

This GRENADIER is here on guard-
A duty we cannot call hard;
If war should come, though, we should see
What a brave soldier he can be.

Now the NEWSPAPER-BOY runs by,
Uttering his loud and earnest cry-
"The 'Standard i' 'Globe T' Please don't refuse
To buy of me the 'Daily News !"
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LONDON CHARA CTERS.


COMMISSIONAIRE this man we call,
Who, wounded by a rifle-ball,
No longer can a soldier be,
But errands goes quite cheerfully.
"Old clothes I old clothes I" is loudly crying
The OLD-CLOTHESMAN, for bargains trying;
This trade is practised by the Jews,
Who profit make from our old shoes.
The ORGAN-GRINDER you will meet,
With his small ape, in any street.
Poor man I poor monkey I far from home.
Compelled by poverty to roam.
The COSTERMONGER and his ass,
Laden with greens and carrots, pass;
And "Vegetables I" loud he cries,
As he his useful traffic plies.
The ACROBAT, agile and light,
Displays his tricks in children' sight;
He tosses high his golden balls,
But catches each before it falls.
The BILLSTICKER, with brush and paste,
Always appears to be in haste,
But does his work well in the end,
Like every other London friend.




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