• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 A message from the University of...
 The project for the improvement...
 Program to date and future...
 The fellowship program
 Fiscal report to Ford Foundati...
 Fondos Cooperativos
 Budget July 1, 1968 through June...
 Apendix A: Tentative agricultural...
 Apendix B: ICA departamento de...
 Apendix C: Seminars
 Apendix D: Estatutos de la asociacion...
 Apendix E: Report of Dr. Glen J....






Title: Annual report to the Ford Foundation
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053924/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report to the Ford Foundation
Uniform Title: Annual report to the Ford Foundation
Physical Description: 3 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario.
University of Nebraska (Lincoln campus). Mission in Colombia.
Publisher: The Instituto,
Publication Date: 1966-1969.
 Subjects
Subject: Agricultural assistance
Agriculture
Farming   ( lcsh )
Farm life   ( lcsh )
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Caribbean
 Notes
General Note: "Developing agricultural economics in Colombia."
Funding: Electronic resources created as part of a prototype UF Institutional Repository and Faculty Papers project by the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053924
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ocm0518

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Letter of transmittal
        Unnumbered ( 4 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    A message from the University of Nebraska
        Page 1
    The project for the improvement of agricultural economics in Columbia through the Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario
        Page 2
        Background
            Page 2
        Proposed five-year budget for Ford foundation support of agricultural economics in Colombia
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Objectives of the program
            Page 5
        Summary and observations
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 7a
    Program to date and future plans
        Page 8
        Staff
            Page 8
        Consultants
            Page 8
        Agricultural policy - report of Loyd Fischer
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Farm management - report of Daniel Badger
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Marketing transportation research - Report of Max Bowser
            Page 20
            Page 21
        Potato marketing system - report of Chris Andrew
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
        Investments in agricultural infrastructure - report of Gerald Feaster
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
    The fellowship program
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Fiscal report to Ford Foundation
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Fondos Cooperativos
        Page 35
    Budget July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969
        Page 36
    Apendix A: Tentative agricultural economics curricula at National University
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Apendix B: ICA departamento de economia agricola
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Apendix C: Seminars
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Apendix D: Estatutos de la asociacion Colombiana de economia agricola
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Apendix E: Report of Dr. Glen J. Vollmar
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
Full Text

0'ORD
'EOUNDATION








FOR THE PERIOD
JULY 1 1967 THROUGH JUNE 30 1968


INSTITUTE COLOMBIANO AGROPECUARIO
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
MISSION IN COLOMBIA


~~JL x
4U X



































































































































MULTILITH












SECOND ANNUAL REPORT

TO THE.

FORD FOUNDATION







FOR THE PERIOD

July 1, 1967 through June 30, 1968










DEVELOPING

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

IN

COLOMBIA












INSTITUTE COLOMBIANO AGROPECUARIO

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MISSION IN COLOMBIA







APARTADO ABRBO NO. 7084
APARTADO POSTAL NO. 8498
CABLES Y TBLEGRAMASt ICA
BOGOTA COLOMBIA


INSTITUTE
LI_


AGROPECUARIO


AL COOTESTAR CITE8ES STE iUutER


September 1, 1968



Mr. William R. Cotter
The Ford Foundation
Carrera 13 No. 63-39 Off. No. 1003
BogotA

Dear Mr. Cotter:

It gives us pleasure to transmit herewith the second annual report of ICA
to the Ford Foundation covering the periodJuly 1, 1967 through June 30,
1968, on the subject of developing the profession of Agricultural Economics
in ICA, and the National University for the benefit of Colombia.

It was in this period that the program in agricultural economics really got
underway. Some research projects were begun, plans for a graduate
program in agricultural economics were completed; work toward develop-
ing departments in agricultural economics was undertaken and progress
was made toward coordination of teaching programs in agricultural
economics at the University level. Progress was also made in achieving
coordination and cooperation of all agricultural economists in Colombia
through the initiation of an association of that group.

While this period marks the second reporting year of this project, only one
staff member of the Nebraska Mission was on duty during the first year,
and that staff member for a period of only six months. In fact, it was only
during the last month of this fiscal year that the Ford sector of the ICA/
Nebraska Mission became fully staffed.


While we recognize that the development of such
planning and encounters many problems, we are
satisfactory beginning has been achieved.


a program requires much
convinced that a most


Sincerely,


Countersigned:



C. R. Etder tCheof Party
University of Nebraska Mission in Colombia


Jorge Ortiz M6ndez
General Director



Alvaro Gartner N.
Director of Education


COLOMBIANO









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Message from University of Nebraska

Description of Project:
Background
Proposed 5-year Budget
Objectives
Summary and Observations


Progress to Date and Future Plans
I. Staff
II. Consultants
III. Agricultural Policy.- Report of Loyd Fischer
IV. Farm Management Report of Daniel Badger
V. Marketing Transportation Research Report of Max Bowser
VI. Potato Marketing System Report of Chris Andrew
VII. Investments in Agricultural Infrastructure Report of
Gerald Feaster

The Fellowship Program

Fiscal Report to Ford Foundation

Fondos Cooperativos

Budget July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969

Appendix A Tentative Agricultural Economics Curricula at
National University

Appendix B ICA Departamento de Economfa Agrfcola

Appendix C Seminars

Appendix D Estatutos de la Asociaci6n Colombiana de Economfa
Agrfcola


Appendix E Report of Dr. Glen J. Vollmar









A MESSAGE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA


September 1, 1968

Statement by W. E. Colwell, Dean
International Programs, Lincoln

Contributions resulting from an investment of approximately sixty
man months of USA professional agricultural economists time, fifty of
which were financed by The Ford Foundation, are represented in the
report of which this statement is a part.

Considering that six persons initiated their tours of duty during
this period with the inevitably unproductive beginning months, I think
we can all be gratified by the substantial advances that were made during
the year. Credit for moving forward at this highly satisfactory rate is
shared with the small but effective and enthusiastic Colombian economists
who themselves found this to be a period of adjustment and organization.

Then too, the administration of ICA, National University, the Ministry
and the Nebraska Mission all found it necessary to focus and refocus on
principal goals and objectives.

The result of all this is the development of a momentum in agricultural
economics not previously witnessed in Colombia. It is a consolidated effort
that places first emphasis upon the training of professionals and the develop-
ment of institutional structure to accommodate an increasingly important role
of Agricultural Economics in Colombia. The specific accomplishments
detailed in this report provide evidence that the program is well under way.
The Ford Foundation may well derive considerable satisfaction in its contri-
bution to date in the inauguration of this important sector.








THE PROJECT FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

IN COLOMBIA THROUGH THE INSTITUTE COLOMBIANO AGROPECUARIO


Background

The Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA) was informed of the grant
from the Ford Foundation in a letter to the Director General, Dr. Fernando
Pefiaranda, on July 12, 1966. This grant was to provide $800. 000 over a
three year period. The letter outlined arrangements under which the funds
would be paid to the University of Nebraska, who agreed to administer the
grant in behalf of ICA, with the cooperation and assistance of the Mid-America
State Universities Association.

The University of Nebraska Mission in Colombia was created by formal
contract signed in Bogota, on March 7, 1966 with the principal cooperating
agencies in the execution of the proposed program the Institute of Colombian
Agriculture the National University, and the Ministry of Agriculture of
Colombia. The cooperating United States universities of the Mid-America
State Universities Association are: Colorado State University, Kansas
State University, University of Missouri, Iowa State University, Oklahoma
State University and the University of Nebraska.

As a result of the combined efforts of representatives of ICA, the Nation-
al University of Colombia and the University of Nebraska a project proposal
for the development of agricultural economics was developed and formalized
in Lincoln, Nebraska in May 1966 and submitted to the Ford Foundation.

The proposal requested support for a minimum of five years and pro-
vided for a staff of three senior professors: a production economist, an agri-
cultural marketing specialist and a specialist in agricultural policy. In
addition, the proposal provided for three instructorships to be staffed for the
five year period by U. S. senior graduate students who had finished their
preliminary examination for the Ph. D. These assistants were to conduct
their thesis research in Colombia and in addition would assist in other
research and teaching activities as seemed appropriate.

At the same time, it was proposed that three additional agricultural
economics positions would be provided through the AID sector of the program.

A five year budget was proposed for the Ford Foundation support of
Agricultural Economics in Colombia. This budget follows:








THE PROJECT FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

IN COLOMBIA THROUGH THE INSTITUTE COLOMBIANO AGROPECUARIO


Background

The Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA) was informed of the grant
from the Ford Foundation in a letter to the Director General, Dr. Fernando
Pefiaranda, on July 12, 1966. This grant was to provide $800. 000 over a
three year period. The letter outlined arrangements under which the funds
would be paid to the University of Nebraska, who agreed to administer the
grant in behalf of ICA, with the cooperation and assistance of the Mid-America
State Universities Association.

The University of Nebraska Mission in Colombia was created by formal
contract signed in Bogota, on March 7, 1966 with the principal cooperating
agencies in the execution of the proposed program the Institute of Colombian
Agriculture the National University, and the Ministry of Agriculture of
Colombia. The cooperating United States universities of the Mid-America
State Universities Association are: Colorado State University, Kansas
State University, University of Missouri, Iowa State University, Oklahoma
State University and the University of Nebraska.

As a result of the combined efforts of representatives of ICA, the Nation-
al University of Colombia and the University of Nebraska a project proposal
for the development of agricultural economics was developed and formalized
in Lincoln, Nebraska in May 1966 and submitted to the Ford Foundation.

The proposal requested support for a minimum of five years and pro-
vided for a staff of three senior professors: a production economist, an agri-
cultural marketing specialist and a specialist in agricultural policy. In
addition, the proposal provided for three instructorships to be staffed for the
five year period by U. S. senior graduate students who had finished their
preliminary examination for the Ph. D. These assistants were to conduct
their thesis research in Colombia and in addition would assist in other
research and teaching activities as seemed appropriate.

At the same time, it was proposed that three additional agricultural
economics positions would be provided through the AID sector of the program.

A five year budget was proposed for the Ford Foundation support of
Agricultural Economics in Colombia. This budget follows:









PROPOSED FIVE YEAR BUDGET FOR


FORD FOUNDATION SUPPORT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS IN COLOMBIA


June 21, 1968


1966-67 1967-68 1968-69


1969-70 1970-71


Salaries
Three senior staff 1/
Three instructors (postprelim)


Retirement-at 9% of $84, 000
Workmens compensation-at 1. 3% of
$84, 000

Allowances
Senior staff
Transportation of personal car-
at $500
Rental allowance-at $3, 800
Furniture 2/
Rest and recuperation 3/
Education allowance-at $900
Instructors
Transportation of personal car-
at $500
Rental allowance-at $3, 000
Furniture 4/
Rest and recuperation 3/

Travel and Shipping Costs
Senior staff-at $3, 200 per family
per round trip
Instructors-at $800 per family
per round trip

Language training-at $500 per family,
senior staff and instructors

Teaching Equipment

Direct Expenses
Supplies
Communication
Vehicles operating expenses


7,560 7,560 7,560 7,560 7,560

1,092 1,092 1,092 1,092 1,092


1,500
11,400
9,000
500
2,700


1, 500
9,000
6,000
500


-0-
11,400
500
500
2,700


1,500
9,000
-0-
500


1, 500
11,400
3,000
500
2, 700


1,500
9,000
2,000
500


-0-
11,400
500
500
2,700


1,500
9,000
-0-
500


1,500
11,400
3,000
500
2,700


1, 500
9,000
2,000
500


4,800 4,800 4,800 4,800 4,800

1, 200 1, 200 1, 200 1,200 1, 200


3,000

2, 300


1,000
500
500


3,000 -0-


1,000
500
500


1, 000
500
500


1,000
500
500


3,000


1,000
500
500


$60,000
24,000


$60,000
24,000


$60, 000
24,000


$60, 000
24,000


$60,000
24,000










PROPOSED FIVE YEAR BUDGET (continued)


1966-67 1967-68 1968-69


1969-70 1970-71


Fellowships to U. S.
Number 5/
Cost at $7, 200

U. S. Consultants
Man months
Salary at $2, 000
Travel and subsistence


Support for Agricultural Economics
Society and Journal
Books and Journals
Local travel for U. S. Staff-at $1, 000
Automobiles, three at $3, 000
Desk calculators, six-at $1, 000
U. S. travel coordinator and other
MASUA personnel


5 15
36,000 108,000


2
4,000
1,600


1, 000
3,000
6,000
9,000
6,000


2
4,000
1,600


2, 000
2,000
6,000
-0-
-0-


20
144,000


2
4,000
1,600


3,000
500
6,000
-0-
-0-


2,500 2500 2,300


TOTAL DIRECT COSTS

Indirect cost allowance at 15% of
U. S. salaries and consultants


$217,152-$252, 852-$297,152-$284, 552-$220, 552


13,200 13,200 13,200 12,900 12,900


$230, 352-$266, 052-$310, 352-$297,452-$233,452

FIVE YEAR TOTAL $1,337,660


1/ Based on stateside salary plus differentials used by USAID.

2/ Initial purchase per family estimated at $3, 000. Second year upkeep estimated
at $500. Estimated $1, 000 per family in third year for replacement and
upgrading. Fourth year total of $500 for upkeep. Fifth year estimate of $1, 000
per family for replacement and upgrading.

3/ Conform to USAID provision for rest and recuperation.

4/ Same pattern as footnote number 2, but at reduced levels. Figured at $2000 per
family initially.

5/ Total 25 M. S. and 10 Ph. D. candidates.


-4-


20
144,000


1
2, 000
800


3,000
500
6,000
-0-
-0-


10
72,000


1
2,000
800


3, 000
500
6,000
-0-
-0-


1,500 500








OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM


During the first two years of the project, the ICA/Nebraska program
in agricultural economics has been conducted in accordance with the gener-
al objectives as outlined in the proposal dated May 25, 1966; these objectives
are as follows:

"The general objective of this program is to develop Colombian competence
in research and teaching in agricultural economics. This objective will be
accomplished in three segments:
1. The initial emphasis in the program will be on developing research work
in agricultural economics. The topics which appear important include the
following:
a) The organization and operation of Colombian farms, including the
evaluation of crop and livestock alternatives, optimum levels of
variable inputs such as fertilizer, finance, labor utilization, size
of farm and farm planning. Such research would depend heavily
upon data available in the physical and biological departments of
ICA as well as survey data and data available from other sources.
Assistance in statistical design of production research in ICA, and
economic interpretation of research results will be given,

b) The economics of agricultural marketing including market organi-
zations, processing costs and efficiency, transportation, financing,
grading, and distribution. Research would be directed toward both
agricultural inputs (seed, fertilizer, feed, machinery, breeding
stock, chemicals) and agricultural products.

c) The analysis of alternative policies, including the pricing of inputs
and outputs, import and export policy, land policy, credit policy,
public investment in development and policy toward private
investment.

d) The analysis of supply, demand and price relations, and the develop-
ment of outlook information for private and public decision makers.
Such work depends on the availabilities of reliable agricultural
data-prices, production, stocks and consumption. Assistance in
strengthening the collections and processing of such data will proba-
bly be necessary.

2. The second emphasis of the program would be on the developing of a
teaching program and.teaching competence in agricultural economics in
the ICA-National University framework. The subjects developed would
desireably include:
Farm Management
Production Economics
Land Economics
Agricultural Finance








Research Methods and Statistics
Agricultural Marketing
Agricultural Policy
Price Analysis

(This list is not exclusive it represents a minimum. It assumes the
availability of beginning course in micro and macro-economic principles,
and intermediate micro and macro theory, as well as other courses in
trade, economic development, etc. Suitable arrangements will need to
be made in order to provide this type of basic training for agricultural
economists).

3. The third phase of this program will be the general strengthening of
the profession of Agricultural Economics in the country by developing a
Colombian Agricultural Economics Society and Journal. "

Training Program for Colombians in Foreign Institutions

Over the five-year period, the proposal provides for:
1) 40 Bachelor of Science students to be supported while working for
the M. S. Degree.
2) 20 Master of Science graduates to be supported while working on
their Ph. D. Degrees.

Relation to Extension Work

The original proposal was made to Ford Foundation prior to the
time the Extension Service of the Ministry of Agriculture was transferred
to ICA. Even so, Extension work was considered. The proposal states:
"Although the primary mission of this proposal will be directed
at research and residence teaching, the needs and opportunities
for extension work in agricultural economics will be explored.
More specifically toward this end a request is being made for
AID support for two farm management staff members at the
Ph. D. level for research extension work. One would be station-
ed at Tibaitatg. and the other at Palmira. Their function will
be to conduct farm management research particularly involving
technical data from research at the experiment stations, as well
as other sources of data, with particular emphasis on "packaging"
the results of the economics research for extension use".

Summary and Observations

In any educational institution, the development and improvement
of an academic discipline, course of study or a new department is
usually a slow and time-consuming process. An understanding of
objectives must be reached. Staff members must be recruited and
coordinated into the total program. Problems of budget, space,
curricula, areas of emphasis, relationships with other departments








are all difficult of solution.


When viewed in this light, the development of agricultural economics
by ICA and the National University, during the past year and a half must be
considered very satisfactory. There still remain many troublesome
problems to solve and important decisions to be made before the program
can be considered stabilized, but it is important to recognize that much
progress has been made.

On July 1, 1967, the beginning of this reporting period, only one
Nebraska Mission staff member was on duty in Colombia and he had been
here but six months. On July 1, the second senior professor arrived
and it was not.until June 1 of 1968 that the third senior economist of the
Nebraska team began his duties with ICA/National. Two economics post-
prelim instructors arrived during July and August. The third junior
economist arrived on February 17 of this year. All are working on areas
of investigation for their Ph. D. thesis, which had been suggested in the
original proposal.

As of June 30 there were eight agricultural economics fellowship
students studying for advance degrees under the ICA/Nebraska program.
They are financed directly or indirectly with funds from the Ford Foundation
grant. Two of these candidates went to the United States in August, 1967,
two in January, 1968, and four on June 19, 1968. In addition it is expected
that four candidates will leave for advanced training in August, 1968,
including two candidates for Ph. D. degrees.

Of tremendous assistance to the total fellowship program of ICA/
Nebraska has been an agreement whereby funds from Ford Foundation
grant were made available to provide family support for participants
financed under the AID participant sector. The funds are being provided
with the provision, however, that AID will provide funds for the training
of agricultural economists related to this project by an amount equal to
the Ford Foundation family allowances for AID participants. However,
in addition to this matching arrangement, Ford Foundation has also pro-
vided funds amounting to an additional $36, 000 for family support for
AID participant families departing for the U. S. in 1968.

The fellowship program of the Ford Foundation sector has been
conducted in accordance with an agreement formalized on May 6, 1967
between ICA, the Ford Foundation and the University of Nebraska. This
agreement provides basic policies and procedures for Ford Foundation
Fellowships in Agricultural Economics administered by the University
of Nebraska. Details of this agreement are presented in the first annual
report.

On August 1, Dr. Alberto Franco will succeed Dr. Alfredo Carrasco
as head of the department of Agricultural Economics at ICA. Carrasco







I -- t --- j-t~
[fl'
: r r iii Ji j
L~ ti
r~li
i i I ;il'
; i' r




1I )III I ;'1


Left to right Jorge Lopera, Enrique Blair, Americo Costillo, Edgar Villafafie, Gentil Rojas.


Buga, Centro Agropecuario Sena, February 9, 1968. Dr. Jose Vicente Borrero Velasco,
Sectional Chief of SENA in Valle del Cauca explains the objectives of the South Ameri-
can Center of Agriculture Mechanization to the assistants to the Second General Meeting
of ACEA.








has been awarded a fellowship to pursue studies leading to a Ph. D. Degree
in Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska. At that time it is
expected that general objectives and progress will be reviewed by personnel
from ICA, the National University and the University of Nebraska Mission.

Arrangements are virtually complete to initiate the graduate program in
Agricultural Economics in the second semester of this year at ICA. It is
hoped that course offerings at the National University will also be directed
toward the development of an undergraduate department in agricultural
economics at the National University. Tentative curricula for a major in
agricultural economics have been developed.

Providing adequate Colombian agricultural economics staff and
counterparts for Nebraska Mission personnel continues to be a problem.
It is one that can be expected to persist for the next several years until
a sufficient number of Colombians are trained to provide the necessary
research and teaching personnel at ICA and the three branches of the
National University.

PROGRESS TO DATE AND FUTURE PLANS

The Individual Reports of Nebraska Mission Agricultural Economists
In Ford Sector (Reporting Period: July 1, 1967 through June 30, 1968)

I. Staff

1. W. E. Colwell, Director, University of Nebraska Mission.
2. C. R. Elder, Assistant Director.
3. Loyd K. Fischer, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (December 30, 1966).
4. Daniel Badger, Professor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University (July 1, 1967).
5. Peter Hildebrand, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (June 1, 1968).
6. Max Bowser, Instructor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University. (July 19, 1967).
7. Christopher Andrew, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
Michigan State University. (August 25, 1967).
8. Gerald Feaster, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Kentucky. (February 17, 1968).

II. Consultants

During the year, Dr. Glenn Vollmar, Chairman of the Department
of Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska spent two weeks
in Colombia from June 1, to June 12, 1968. During this time, he visited
with members of the agricultural economics departments of ICA and the
three branches of the National University, with administrative officials of
ICA, the Ford Foundation in Colombia and with members of the Nebraska
-8-








has been awarded a fellowship to pursue studies leading to a Ph. D. Degree
in Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska. At that time it is
expected that general objectives and progress will be reviewed by personnel
from ICA, the National University and the University of Nebraska Mission.

Arrangements are virtually complete to initiate the graduate program in
Agricultural Economics in the second semester of this year at ICA. It is
hoped that course offerings at the National University will also be directed
toward the development of an undergraduate department in agricultural
economics at the National University. Tentative curricula for a major in
agricultural economics have been developed.

Providing adequate Colombian agricultural economics staff and
counterparts for Nebraska Mission personnel continues to be a problem.
It is one that can be expected to persist for the next several years until
a sufficient number of Colombians are trained to provide the necessary
research and teaching personnel at ICA and the three branches of the
National University.

PROGRESS TO DATE AND FUTURE PLANS

The Individual Reports of Nebraska Mission Agricultural Economists
In Ford Sector (Reporting Period: July 1, 1967 through June 30, 1968)

I. Staff

1. W. E. Colwell, Director, University of Nebraska Mission.
2. C. R. Elder, Assistant Director.
3. Loyd K. Fischer, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (December 30, 1966).
4. Daniel Badger, Professor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University (July 1, 1967).
5. Peter Hildebrand, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (June 1, 1968).
6. Max Bowser, Instructor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University. (July 19, 1967).
7. Christopher Andrew, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
Michigan State University. (August 25, 1967).
8. Gerald Feaster, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Kentucky. (February 17, 1968).

II. Consultants

During the year, Dr. Glenn Vollmar, Chairman of the Department
of Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska spent two weeks
in Colombia from June 1, to June 12, 1968. During this time, he visited
with members of the agricultural economics departments of ICA and the
three branches of the National University, with administrative officials of
ICA, the Ford Foundation in Colombia and with members of the Nebraska
-8-








has been awarded a fellowship to pursue studies leading to a Ph. D. Degree
in Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska. At that time it is
expected that general objectives and progress will be reviewed by personnel
from ICA, the National University and the University of Nebraska Mission.

Arrangements are virtually complete to initiate the graduate program in
Agricultural Economics in the second semester of this year at ICA. It is
hoped that course offerings at the National University will also be directed
toward the development of an undergraduate department in agricultural
economics at the National University. Tentative curricula for a major in
agricultural economics have been developed.

Providing adequate Colombian agricultural economics staff and
counterparts for Nebraska Mission personnel continues to be a problem.
It is one that can be expected to persist for the next several years until
a sufficient number of Colombians are trained to provide the necessary
research and teaching personnel at ICA and the three branches of the
National University.

PROGRESS TO DATE AND FUTURE PLANS

The Individual Reports of Nebraska Mission Agricultural Economists
In Ford Sector (Reporting Period: July 1, 1967 through June 30, 1968)

I. Staff

1. W. E. Colwell, Director, University of Nebraska Mission.
2. C. R. Elder, Assistant Director.
3. Loyd K. Fischer, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (December 30, 1966).
4. Daniel Badger, Professor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University (July 1, 1967).
5. Peter Hildebrand, Professor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska. (June 1, 1968).
6. Max Bowser, Instructor of Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma
State University. (July 19, 1967).
7. Christopher Andrew, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
Michigan State University. (August 25, 1967).
8. Gerald Feaster, Instructor of Agricultural Economics,
University of Kentucky. (February 17, 1968).

II. Consultants

During the year, Dr. Glenn Vollmar, Chairman of the Department
of Agricultural Economics at the University of Nebraska spent two weeks
in Colombia from June 1, to June 12, 1968. During this time, he visited
with members of the agricultural economics departments of ICA and the
three branches of the National University, with administrative officials of
ICA, the Ford Foundation in Colombia and with members of the Nebraska
-8-








Mission. His report will be found in Appendix E.


William R. Cotter, Colombian Representative of the Ford Foundation,
has been most helpful in programming the work under consideration and
his assistance has been most significant in assisting with the fellowship
program of ICA. In June, 1968, Dr. James Plaxico, head of the Department
of Agricultural Economics at Oklahoma State University, joined the Ford
Foundation staff in Bogota. As he has been familiar with this phase of
the program since its inception, his counsel and advice will be most
beneficial in the months ahead.

Mr. Kenneth McDermott, Rural Development Officer in AID Mission
in Colombia is likewise of great assistance. An agricultural economist
from Purdue University he has had experience in helping to establish an
agricultural economics department in a Brasilian university.

III. Agricultural Policy

Report of Loyd Fischer for Period July 1, 1967 to June 30, 1968

A. Objectives of Assignment
The general objective of the assignment is to upgrade the capacity of
profession of agricultural economics in Colombia.

Subsidiary Objectives are:
(a) Contribute to the development and improvement of teaching and
research at the three campuses of National University and at
Tibaitata, with special emphasis in the areas of agricultural
policy, resource economics, and agricultural finance;

(b) Assist in strengthening library collections and improve the
availability of reading materials to students and faculty;

(c) Locate and identify prospective applicants for fellowships and
assist the applicants in their preparation for graduate training;

(d) Assist in the organization of a Colombian Association of Agricul-
tural Economics.

B. Narrative Activities

1. To improve teaching at National University and ICA.

a. Participated in conferences with the agricultural economists
at each of the campuses of National University and Tibaitata
concerning the courses to be taught, the staff available for
teaching, and the text and reference books needed








b. Assisted in organizing and attended a formal conference of
agricultural economists and administrators of ICA and National
University on October 20. At this meeting, each of the various
institutions presented plans for the development of teaching
programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level. We are
attempting to coordinate and integrate the activities at the various
institutions.

c. Participated in conferences with administrators and professors
of the Economics faculties of National University, Bogota and
the University of the Valley, Cali. Proposals have been made and
some action initiated with respect to cooperation between those
faculties and the agricultural economics faculties of National
University. A formal agreement has been entered into between
National University and the University of Call to develop an
integrated teaching program in agricultural economics. The
details of the arrangements are in the process of being worked
out.

d. Provided counsel and assistance on a continuing basis to
professors at the three campuses of National University with
respect to curriculum development, course content, selection
of texts and reference books and improvement of teaching
methods.
Particular attention has been given to a course "Introduction
to Agricultural Economics" taught by one of my counterparts as
a required course for 4th year economics majors at National
University, Bogota. In addition, developed a new graduate level
course in Agricultural Policy which was scheduled to be taught
the semester starting January 1968. However, lack of demand
resulted in cancellation of the course. Another new graduate
level course "Resource Economics" is scheduled to be taught
the semester beginning August, 1960. Counsel has been given
with respect to a course in "Agricultural Finance" at Palmira.
Efforts are being made to offer a similar course in Bogota and
perhaps also in Medellfn.

e. Assisted Eduardo Chac6n in the teaching of a seminar type
course in Agricultural Policy. About twenty 5th year students
in the Economics. Faculty took this course for credit. However,
the total attendance in the class averaged about 35. Several of
these students are now indicating interest in graduate work in
agricultural economics.

2. To improve library collections and increase availability of
reading materials.


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a. Served on the library committee of the Nebraska Mission.

b. Ordered multiple copies of about 500 titles, primarily from
RTAC, FAO and various Latin-American publishers. These
books are predominantly in Spanish.

c. Distributed reading material, which has been received, to
the three libraries of National University, and to Tibaitata.

d. Conferred on numerous occasions with Mr. David Lee, the
new librarian at Tibaitata, concerning library problems. Mr.
Lee's arrival is a most encouraging development and will
certainly contribute greatly to this objective. Mr. Lee has
asked to become a member of our library committee and has
indicated in other ways a strong desire to be of assistance to
us in every way possible.

e. Ordered quantities of several text-books with the intent to
make these available to students. Among those ordered are
(a) Bishop and Touissaint, Introducci6n al Analisis de Economfa
Agrfcola; (b) Beneke, Direcci6n y Administraci6n de Granjas;
(c) Barlowe, Economfa de los Recursos de la Tierra and (d)
Schickele, Polftica Agricola.

3. Assisted in the identification, screening and placement of
prospective applicants for fellowships.

a. Visited formally and informally on numerous occasions with
professors and students at the three campuses of National
University, the University of the Valle, and Antioquia University
to discuss the fellowship program.

b. Contacted administrators of various institutions (e. g. Caja
Agraria, Banco de la Replblica, Banco Ganadero, Federaci6n
de Ganaderos, Federaci6n de Cafeteros, and INCORA) to
solicit cooperation in our fellowship program. These institutions
were asked (1) to release employees for advanced training and
(2) create positions to which fellowship recipients might be
obligated.
The response from the administrators was universally
favorable. In each case, offers were made to cooperate in the
program. As a result of the contacts made, a list of names of
about 40 potential fellows has been compiled. Efforts are
continuing to process to applications received and locate other
prospects with the final objective of identifying highly qualified
individuals as fellowship applicants.


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4. To improve research and research capacities of ICA staff.

a. Counsel and assistance is being provided on a continuing basis with
respect to the research activities of ICA agricultural economists and
to Max Bowser and Chris Andrew of the Nebraska Mission.

b. Contacted and interviewed individual farmers, located in a
number of areas and producing a variety of products, concerning
their problems of operation. In particular, efforts have been made
to probe into the effect of various public programs and legal
provisions on the operations of the farms. Contacts have been made
with dairy, swine, broiler, egg, cattle and sugar operations.
In addition, reviewed various publications attempting to
ascertain the cumulative effect of various governmental actions
on agricultural development.
This activity has proved rewarding in that insights have
been gained into the institutional framework in which Colombian
agriculture operates. Such insights are essential for teaching
a graduate course in agricultural policy. They are also essential
for counseling individuals in policy making-positions.
On the other hand, this activity has been frustrating in that
few generalizations have become apparent to date. Each operation
seems to have essentially its own economic environment.

c. Considerable time and effort has been expended in developing
and delimiting a research problem for Gerald Feaster. Contacts
have been made and excellent working relationships have been
established with the administrators of INCORA, both in Bogota and
in the field. This agency is well financed and has many projects
of various kinds throughout the country. The projects involve
irrigation, drainage, colonization, parcelization and supervised
credit. The objective of Feaster's project is to make a benefit/
cost analysis of various INCORA activities related to agricultural
development. Specifically the intent is to examine, describe and
appraise one or more INCORA projects with the objective of
determining the desirability and relative effectiveness of alternative
public investments and activities.

d. Research is proceeding on a study of HumanResources in
Agriculture. This is a study instigated by FAO to which one ICA
senior staff member and two junior staff members have been assigned
full time. The study has as its objectives: (1) Determine the
number, age distribution, sex, and levels and kinds of training of
the labor force in farming and supporting activities; (2) Make
projections concerning the needs to the year 1975; and (3) Recommend
policies and actions of the government with respect to development
of human resources and provisions of services and goods to
agriculture.
-12-









Working relationships have been established with various Colombian
agencies, which gather data of this nature. These agencies (i. e. DANE,
INCORA and SENA) have agreed to cooperate in the gathering of data,
as well as made available the information which they already possess.
Numerous problems have arisen in the gathering of information.
However, the study is proceeding satisfactorily and provides an excellent
opportunity to enhance the research capabilities of the Colombians
involved.

e. Provided counsel to Juan Acosta, a counterpart. He conducted a
study which had the objectives of selecting the two most desirable
varieties of barley from a total of eleven possessed by ICA. The
selected varieties will be released for commercial production. He
also reviewed Colombian tax policy with respect to farmers and prepared
a summary.

5. To assist in the establishment of a Colombian Association of Agricultur-
al Economics.

a. Assisted in the planning and conduct of an organizational meeting
held in Manizales on October 6 and 7.

b. Advised the Executive Committee with respect to drafting the
constitution and other organizational matters.

c. Visited a number of Colombian institutions to solicit support for
the Association. Several departmental universities, INCORA, SENA
CVC, Ministry of Agriculture, Bank of the Republic, Caja Agraria,
Banco Ganadero, Federaci6n de Ganaderos, Federaci6n de Cafeteros,
and other institutions were represented among the 100 attendants
at the organizational meeting. The support for the Association
appears to be widespread and strong.

d. Assisted in the planning and conduct of the first substantive
meeting of the Association to be held in Buga, February 9 and 10.
The meeting had as its objective informing the members of the various;
roles of the agricultural economist and the contributions the profession
pan make to the economic development of the country. In attendance
Were about 80 professionals.

C. Projected Plans

Considerable time and effort will be required for the development and
teaching of a graduate level course, Resource Economics, to be presented
in the semester starting August, 1968. This course has not been offered
previously which, of course, makes necessary the development of new
materials and text. Unfortunately not a great amount of satisfactory reading
material is available in the area since most writing in this field reflects U. S.
-13-








conditions and problems.


A major effort will be made to expedite work on Feaster's project.
This is a comprehensive study, which will be difficult to pursue. Data
availability, quantification of intangible benefits, and evaluation of
objectives will pose continual, difficult problems. The excellent cooper-
ation of INCORA personnel is an important asset without which the study
would be impossible.

D. Five-Year Projection

The five-year projection contemplates an effective profession of
agricultural economics in Colombia. The augmentation of course offerings
at National University, the substantial number of attractive applicants
for fellowships; and the initiation of a vigorous association of agricultural
economics all indicate substantial progress toward the ultimate goal.

E. Problems

Working relationships in research between the U. S. staff and
Colombians, both students and staff, have not been well established.
As a consequence, the possibilities for providing in-service training
are not being fully realized.

IV. Farm Management

Report of Daniel Badger for Period July 1, 1967 to June 30, 1968

A. Objectives
In general, my objectives are:

1) To assist in developing an undergraduate program in Agricultural
Economics in the National University and a graduate program in
Institute Colombiano Agropecuario in cooperation with National
University.

2) To assist in developing a research program in Agricultural
Economics by coordinating with Colombian counterparts in such
research and by supervising research projects of some of the
Instructors with Nebraska Mission.

3) To assist in developing an extension program in Agricultural
Economics.

4) To assist in the organization and operation of a Colombian
Association of Agricultural Economists, including the publication
of an Association Journal.


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5) To assist in recruiting and processing fellowship candidates in
Agricultural Economics, and

6) To assist in obtaining books and equipment for teaching, research,
and extension needs in Agricultural Economics.

B. Activities

1. Development of Undergraduate Curriculum

Three formal meetings have been held (in BogotA, Cali and Medellfn),
and many informal discussions have taken place concerning the initiation
of an undergraduate curriculum in Agricultural Economics. I have
worked with representatives of all three branches of Universidad Nacional
and with representatives of Universidad del Valle and Universidad de
Antioquia. Present plans are to begin an integrated program in Cali-
Palmira and in Medellfn beginning in August 1968. Universidad del Valle
and the Palmira branch (Facultad de Agronomfa) of Universidad Nacional
are cooperating in the development of a joint program, as are the Universidad
de Antioquia and the Medellfn branch (Facultad de Ciencias Agrfcolas).
The major accomplishment thus far has been to develop a common curriculum
of courses for all the Universities involved and in obtaining a reduction in
total number of course hours required for the degree. A copy of the
proposed curriculum is attached to this report. It is uncertain at present
if and when the Facultad de Agronomfa in BogotA will offer to students the
opportunity to major in Agricultural Economics.

I have assisted in developing course outlines and in providing text
books and other teaching materials for several existing and proposed
courses in Agricultural Economics.

2. Development of Graduate Curriculum

I have worked with Alfredo Carrasco and Jorge Lopera in developing
course requirements for the new M. S. graduate program in Agricultural
Economics. A copy of the course and other requirements is attached to
this report. Jorge Lopera, my counterpart, taught the first course in
this curriculum in the first semester 1968 (January May). If sufficient
students are available to take classes in the second semester (August -
December), Iplan to teach two graduate courses, Production Economics
and Research Methodology. We have one full time graduate student at
present, plus several staff members from National University and ICA
who are taking courses on a part time basis.

3. Development of Research Program

I have developed research projects in the area of production economics-
farm management for the following enterprises: Potatoes, beef cattle,
-15-









and sheep. We have taken approximately 50 schedules from beef cattle
producers in the Departmentsof Vichada, Meta, C6rdoba, and Cesar.
We hope to obtain about 50 more schedules on beef cattle production.
Max Bowser and several students from Universidad Nacional and
Universidad de C6rdoba have assisted in this phase.

Chris Anrdrew is working with me on the potato study. We have
developed a questionnaire and will pretest it as of June 30. We will
interview about 100 potato producers in the Departments of Boyaca,
Cundinamarca, and Nariflo. Three students from Universidad Nacional
and Jorge Vargas, my counterpart in ICA will assist in the study.

Jorge Vargas is assisting in the sheep study. We have pretested
the production schedule and will interview producers in Boyaca,
Cundinamarca, Nariflo, and possibly Guajira and Antioquia during
July and August. Two students from Universidad Nacional and possibly
two from Universidad de Narifio will assist in this study.

I am supervising the marketing research study of Chris Andrew on
"Barriers to Improved Performance of the Production-Distribution
System for Potatoes in Colombia". Chris Andrew arrived August 25,
1967 and will present the results of this study as his Ph. D. dissertation
at Michigan State University. Chris is making good progress on this
study (see his report).

I am supervising the marketing research study of Max Bowser on
"An Analysis of the Beef Cattle Marketing System in Colombia, 1968-1973".
Max arrived July 19, 1967 after completing his M. S. degree in Agri-
cultural Economics at Oklahoma State University. Max is making good
progress on this study (see his report).

I have provided a little counsel and coordination for Gerald Feaster's
research project. However, Loyd Fischer is the major advisor on
Gerald's study.

I have assisted Chris Andrew in developing a questionnaire for use
by ICA Extension and Agricultural Economics in cooperation with Peace
Corps Volunteers and INA. We mailed 175 questionnaires to Peace
Corps Volunteers working in Agriculture and have received about 50
replies thus far. The questionnaires concern agricultural products
produced in various areas, problems in obtaining price information
and problems in marketing products. A possible objective of this
study is the organization of an agricultural market news reporting
service in cooperation with ICA Extension, the Peace Corps, and INA.

4. Development of Extension Program in Farm Management


To date, we have made very little progress in developing on
-16-









Agricultural Economics Extension program in farm management, primarily
because we have not had a research program to develop materials to
disseminate, and until recently we have not had personnel in Agricultural
Economics designated to work in the Extension area. Luis Avalos has
developed a set of record books for use with producers. Thus far, we
have not been able to. establish a record keeping system. I had one
dairy producer keeping records for me for 4 months (January April)
until he sold his farm. We now have two new staff members in farm
management extension (Jesfs Marfa Sierra and Vicente Fl6rez). In
addition, Jorge Suescfn will return to ICA with his M. S. in Agricultural
Economics from Vicosa, Brazil in August. Thus I hope to be able to
work with these three staff members in developing farm management
materials for extension short courses, bulletins, etc..

5. Organization of Asociaci6n Colombiana de Economfa Agrfcola (ACEA)

I assisted in organizing the Agricultural Economics Association,
beginning with the first meeting of the organizational committee in July
1967. We have had two meetings of the association, the first in Manizales,
October 6-7, 1967 and the second in Buga February 9-10, 1968. From
now on, the Association will meet on an annual basis, with the third
meeting scheduled for February 6-8, 1969, probably in Medellfn.

The proceedings of the Buga meeting have been typed and are ready
for publication into the first journal. A directory of members has been
completed. It is similar to the directory of members of the American
Agricultural Economics Association. This directory will be part of the
first issue of the Journal. Thus far, we have 70 members of the
Association who have paid dues. Approximately 20 more Colombian
professionals have expressed an interest in joining the Association
(by attending either one or both meetings and/or by completing the
directory form) but they have not paid dues. We had an average
attendance of 87 at the Manizales meeting with 96 attending the Banquet.
At Buga, the average attendance was 90 with 106 attending the Banquet.
A copy of the constitution (estatutos) is attached to this report as Appendix
C.

6. Recruitment of Fellowship Candidates

I have assisted in the fellowship phase by recruiting qualified
candidates in the Universidad Nacional and ICA complex as well as in
other official (government) agencies. We have been able to locate some
well qualified candidates for fellowships. The Ford budget includes funds
for 35 fellowships in Agricultural Economics, including funds for 25 students
to be sent within the first three years of the Program. By August or
September 1969, we should have met or surpassed this goal of 25 candidates
for advanced training.
-17-









7. Procurement of Books, Teaching Materials and other Equipment

I have worked with Loyd Fischer in the procurement of text and
reference books for the use by staff and students in Universidad Nacional
and ICA. In addition, we have requested certain equipment for teaching,
research, and extension needs.

8. Other Activities

I have attempted to coordinate the activities of the Nebraska Agricultural
Economics group during the time I served as project leader. I feel we have
made some progress in coordinating the activities of the ICA and Universidad
Nacional Agricultural Economics departments, both internally, and with
other agencies such as Land Tenure Center, ILMA, Ministerio de Agricultura,
etc.

I developed a program of seminars for the staff and graduate students
of ICA and Universidad Nacional and for other interested persons. This
series of seminars began on January 19, 1968 and terminated June 17, 1968.
We had an average attendance of about 20 for these seminars which lasted
from 1. 5 to 2 hours. Mimeographed notices were sent to professional
workers in AID, Planeaci6n, Ministeriode Agricultura, ILMA, Land
Tenure Center, and other for each seminar. A copy of the scheduled
seminar topics and speakers will be found in Appendix D. I feel this was
a successful venture and hope it will be continued.

C. Plan of Work

I plan to devote the remainder of my tour with Nebraska Mission
(until June 30, 1968) to the following:

1. Research Projects

a. Supervise research work of Max Bowser and Chris Andrew
and assist them in writing marketing publications.

b. Develop farm management study on beef cattle and assist in
writing ICA publications.

c. Develop farm management study on potatoes and assist in
writing ICA publications.

d. Develop farm management study on sheep and assist in
writing ICA publications.

e. Assist in development of market news service in cooperation
with Extension, Peace Corps and INA.
-18-









2. Fellowships

a. Complete processing of applications for fellowship candidates
already initiated.

b. Assist applicants in developing proficiency in English and
develop program for students.

3. ACEA

a. Work with Jorge Lopera, my counterpart and Secretary-Treasurer
of ACEA, in developing plans for February 1969 meeting.

b. Assist the new Junta Directiva in future plans for Association.
Four of the existing officers are leaving the country and will be
replaced.

c. Assist in developMent of directory of members and of Journal
of Association.

4. Undergraduate Curriculum

a. Assist in development of common curriculum in Agricultural
Economics in three branches of National University.

b. Assist in developing teaching materials for individual courses,
as requested.

5. Graduate Program

a. Teach course in Production Economics in second semester 1968
if demand warrants.

b. Teach course in Research Methodology in second semester 1968
if demand warrants.

D. A Major Problem

Development of a strong Agricultural Economics program in ICA has
been impeded by the lack of a full time director of the department. The
department director during the period July 1, 1967 June 30, 1968 was
also director of the Agricultural Economics. department in the Facultad de
Agronomfa, Universidad Nacional, Bogota. He also was a member of many
committees in the Facultad and thus was nearly always working on the
National University campus.


-19-










Around June 25, 1968, ICA appointed another part time department
director in Agricultural Economics. He will be able to be in the
department only on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, at least for the
near future, as he continues to work half time in IICA-CIRA and also
is a part time consultant to the Minister of Agriculture.

Nebraska Mission has three U. S. professors and three U. S.
Instructors working in Agricultural Economics in ICA. A fourth
professor is scheduled to arrive soon. To fully implement the potential
of this U. S. input with our Colombian counterparts, we need the
full time presence and assistance of the Colombian department head.

V. Market Transportation Research

Report of Max Bowser, Instructor, for the Period July 19, 1967 to
June 30. 1968

A. Objectives of Assignment

The primary objective of this assignment is to conduct research
on some phase of an agricultural economics topic which is of major
importance to Colombia. I am concentrating my research efforts
toward a marketing transportation study of the beef cattle industry.
This specific research study has been reviewed and approved by ICA
and Nebraska administration.

A second objective is to assist the senior professors in Agricultural
Economics in developing and presenting seminars for both Colombian
and Nebraska Mission staff members and graduate students.

A third objective is to publish the results of my research and to
assist in implementing some of the recommendations through cooper-
ating with the ICA Extension Service.

More specifically the purpose of this research is to analyze the
present system of marketing beef cattle in Colombia and to make
recommendations for improving the existing system. Within the
analysis of the beef cattle marketing system in Colombia there are
six objectives which hopefully will be fulfilled by this study:

1. Determine the domestic market for beef in Colombia;
2. Characterize production areas for beef cattle;
3. Determine marketing costs for beef cattle;
4. Characterize market channels for beef cattle;
5. Characterize differences in breeds marketed; and
6. Analyze the potential export demand for Colombian beef.


-20-








B. Activities

A considerable amount of the first six months in Colombia was spent
learning Spanish.. I attended Spanish classes at Los Andes University,
and in October began an additional hour each day with a tutor.

The National University campuses, faculty members and students
at Palmira, Medellfn and Bogota were visited during the first six
months to familiarize myself with the activities and facilities there and
to discuss the possibilities for obtaining student assistance in collecting
data for my research project.

The process of gathering information about the livestock sector of
the Colombian economy has absorbed most of my time during the report
period. There are many sources of information about the livestock
industry, and data from each of these vary in ease of accessibility,
completeness, and with each other. The Banco de la Repfiblica, Banco
Ganadero, FEDEGAN (Federaci6n Colombiana de Ganaderos), USAID,
Fondos Ganaderos, INDUGAN (Industria Ganadera Colombiana), private
studies, work by fifth year students at the National University and inter-
views with slaughterhouse personnel and finca owners have been the
principal sources of information thus far. Some of these sources
incorporate the use of DANE (Departamento Administrativo Nacional de
Estadisticas) statistics.

Much information has been obtained about the beef cattle industry
in Colombia during this report period but there is still more to be
obtained to complete the study. Data about slaughter numbers, wholesale
prices, consumption and production centers, marketing and producing
procedures, transportation patterns, means of transportation, and the
exportation of beef situation for Colombia are nearing completion. A
reten study of the transportation of cattle into Bogota was completed in
February 1968. Much insight has been gained about the beef industry
in Colombia.

C. Projected Plan of Work

Because my proficiency with Spanish has progressed to an operating
level, I will terminate my formal tutoring in the near future.

Two main areas of work will require my immediate attention over
the next few months. The first is an attempt to calculate the domestic
demand for beef, especially for Bogota. The second is to obtain more
information from the ranchers in the North Coast region of Colombia.
Part of the information obtained from the second area of work.would be
used to estimate the marketing margins which exist between the producers
and thewholesaler.


-21-









A more detailed plan of work for the coming year is as follows:

July November
1. Continue to collect data from the North Coast departments of
C6rdoba, Sucre, Bolivar, Magdalena, and C6sar.

2. Assist students working on cattle studies in the Llanos, Bogota,
and the North Coast.

3. Present a seminar on the preliminary findings of beef cattle
marketing in Colombia at ICA, Tibaitata.

4. Work in the calculation of domestic demand for beef.

5. Attend AAEA meeting in Montana August 17-21, 1968.

6. Continue to collect available secondary source data abott cattle
marketing and transportation.

December February
1. Assemble data previously collected and analyze the beef
marketing situation in Colombia.

2. Put recommendations and results into publication form.

March June
1. Make available results of study to extension personnel and
other Colombians.

2. Assist the agricultural economics department at ICA, Tibaitata
to disseminate marketing training and information to the Colombians.

VI. The Potato Marketing System Research Project

Report of Chris Andrew, Instructor, for period August 26, 1967 to
June 30, 1968

A. Objectives of the Assignment

The assignment involves two primary objectives: (1) to conduct
research in agricultural economics with specific emphasis upon the potato
marketing system and (2) to disseminate the research results to
agriculturally oriented entities and individuals in order to foment change
and development within the Colombian agricultural sector. Further,
the research effort is identified with several Colombian entities and
numerous individuals as a means of stimulating proficiency and
interest in agricultural economics research and market system analysis.


-22-










B. Potato Marketing Research Activities


I arrived in BogotA on August 26, 1967. Prior to my arrival, my
efforts included a review of literature pertaining to the agricultural sector
in Colombia and preparation of a general research proposal. This
proposal, written to be adaptable to study the market system for nearly
any Colombian food commodity, was prepared with two purposes in mind.
It provided the substance for a department seminar as partial fulfillment
of the requirements for a Ph. D. in Agricultural Economics at Michigan
State University. Also, it provided a statement of proposed marketing
research for review by Colombian entities and the Nebraska Mission.

Following arrival, preliminary discussions were held with individuals
in ICA, ILMA, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Agricultural Economics
Department, and the Nebraska Mission staff concerning the general
purpose of the research and a commodity in most need to study. In a
meeting with ICA and Nebraska, it was decided that the research would
involve an investigation of barriers to improved performance of the
production distribution system potatoes.

Based upon this decision further investigation included: review of
the available literature and statistics related to the potato problem, a
meeting with twenty five small potato producers near FacatativA to gain
some preliminary insights into their problem with potato production and
marketing, a visit to the INA potato storage facilities at Choconta, and
further discussions with persons having knowledge about potatoes in
Colombia. Also, Dr. Harold M Riley, thesis advisor from Michigan
State University, consulted with me from the 13th of December to the
20th about data gathering techniques and a proposed sample population.

In January a semi-detailed research proposal was prepared in both
Spanish and English for circulation to institutions and persons interested
in the research activity. This proposal included a tentative methodological
plan and a preliminary thesis outline.

Primary data collection began in January and proceeded to June 30 in
the following manner:

1. Trucker Research. Interviews were taken from the managers
of the ten retenes (truck stops) around BogotA to determine the quantity
of potato trucks passing through each ret6n. .From these interviews
four major retenes were selected for investigation. About 1,100 truckers
responded to a five minute interview. Fourteen National University students
with interests in Agricultural Economics were trained and participated in
the research effort. The data from the preceded schedules has been punched
on IBM cards for further analysis.


-23-








2. Wholesaler Research. A census of potato wholesalers in Bogota was
prepared from which a sample of 62 wholesalers was drawn. A one hour
interview was obtained from each of these wholesalers. Four National
University students from the Economics Department participated in data
collection. These questionnaires were coded and will be key punched.

3. Retailer Research Development of a sampling technique for
potato retailers in Bogota proved to be extremely difficult. It is possible
to list supermarkets and a sample was drawn from the total of sixteen that
sell potatoes. Cooperative food retailing is common but no complete list
of cooperative food retail outlets is available. However, of approximately
75 to 100 about 25 sell potatoes and 15 of these are in the sample. Potatoes
are also sold in very small stores (the size of a two car garage or smaller)
called "tiendas". No information concerning numbers of distribution of
tiendas is available. However, a sample of eighty was drawn by sampling
barrios (small sectors of the city) and city blocks from the barrios.
Interviews will be obtained from tienda owners in these blocks. Another
25 interviews were obtained from persons selling potatoes in market
plazas. All of the above interviews have not been completed. A total
of about 120 retailers are expected to answer the forty five minute
interview. Three National University students in Agricultural Economics are
obtaining the retailer interviews and will work with the producer interviews.

4. Producer Research. The producer investigations have not been
started at this time. The questionnaire is prepared and ready for a pretest.
About 25 producers in the department of Nariflo and approximately 100
producers in Cundinamarca and Boyaca will be interviewed.

5. Consumer Research Interviews will be obtained from consumers
but at present specific plans regarding the sample size and technique have
not been finalized.

C. Projected Plans for the Potato Marketing Research Project

July and August
1. Complete retailer interviews and code the questionnaires.

2. Complete producer interviews and code the questionnaires.

3. Prepare methods for obtaining consumer questionnaires.

4. Prepare detailed thesis outline.

5. Prepare draft of the introduction, methodology and literature
review chapter of the thesis.

6. Begin analysis of trucker and wholesaler data.

7. Attend AAEA meetings in Montana.
-24-









September through December
1. Analyze all data.

2. Complete interviews with market institutions such as INA and
ASCOLPA.

3. Prepare first complete thesis draft for review by Boyacl staff.

4. Revise first draft and prepare another to be sent to MSU.

January and February
1. Possibly go to MSU, at the close of my vacation in Colorado for
a discussion of the thesis draft.

2. Revise second draft based upon the MSU committee suggestions.

3. Present third draft to the examining committee and present the
final oral exam over the thesis.

4. Prepare thesis for final requirements at MSU.

March through July
1. Prepare portions of the thesis for publication by ICA in Spanish.

2. Follow up thesis results by working with Extension and other
institutions to improve the potato production-distribution system.

D. Other Activities

During the past year all four of my MSU Thesis committee members
have visited Bogota. These visits have proven very useful in formulating
the research effort. I expect that at least two of the members will be
consulting with me several times during the following year because of
their work in an MSU agricultural marketing study to be performed in the
Cauca Valley.

In both October and February I assisted the Colombian Agricultural
Economists in their work with ACEA and attended both meetings. I also
attended the Latin American Family Planning Seminar in Manizales
sponsored by Ford Foundation.

Since March, I have been coordinating an effort to investigate the
possibility of developing a market information service for Colombian
agriculture.

An ICA committee has discussed the problem and based upon their
suggestions I prepared a project proposal for a pilot investigation. This
proposal was presented to INA, which now does some price reporting,


-25-









and Peace Corps, on May 28, 1968.


This effort has been discussed with AID and I have corresponded with
AID people who have developed a market information service for Brazil.
The Brazil service is now three years old. We are considering asking
some of these men for .a seminar in Bogota concerning their program.

The departments of Extension and Agricultural Economics of ICA, in
cooperation with the central Peace Corps office prepared and mailed a
questionnaire to each of 175 Peace Corps Volunteers working in agriculture.
This questionnaire is designed to determine some major agricultural and
agriculture economics problems encountered by volunteers. Often we are
called upon to advise Peace Corps Volunteers concerning specific problems
for which we are not well informed due to inadequate economic and
marketing information about the region and so on. Thus I believe this
effort may improve our agricultural economics extension potential both
with the ICA extension program and Peace Corps.

At present we are still receiving the questionnaires and are beginning
the analysis. One Peace Corps Volunteer with a bachelor's degree in
Agricultural Economics and one University of Missouri senior in Agri-
cultural Economics will be analyzing and summarizing the questionnaires.
during July and August.

Both the market information project and the Peace Corps project will
continue through the next year but at present it is difficult to specify to
what degree I can be involved in the work. The thesis research remains
first until it is completed.

VII. Investments in Agricultural Infrastructure

Report of Gerald Feaster, Instructor, for period February 17, 1968
to June 30, 1968

Since my arrival February 17, my efforts have been concentrated toward
language training, orientation and the preparation of a research proposal and
plan. The research proposal is complete and is being reviewed.

The primary objective of the proposed study will be to determine the
impact of investments in agricultural infrastructure via directed coloni-
zation.

A. To evaluate the impact on the individual firm in terms of volume
and costs of production, gross and net income, and private investments.

B. To evaluate investments from a public viewpoint, i. e. in terms of
estimated public benefits and costs. Also to evaluate changes in terms of
volume and composition of aggregate production. To determine the extent


-26-









to which investments (government and private) are using relatively abundant
factors with elastic supply (unskilled labor and primary materials, for
example) as opposed to factors of production with less elastic supply (highly
skilled labor, imported items requiring the use of scarce foreign exchange,
certain types of capital equipment).

C. Ascertain additional investments or public action which will
heighten the impact of the original infrastructural investments. What are
the present bottlenecks and what will be the cost and returns of investments
designed to relieve these bottlenecks?

D. Make estimates of costs and benefits of investments designed to
enlarge present colonization projects in terms of land area and number of
farmers served.

E. Compare alternative types of infrastructure investments, e.g.
extensive versus intensive investment in infrastructure for colonization.

F. On the basis of study results, present a rationale with respect to
investments in agricultural infrastructure in terms of type of investments,
sequence, timing, etc., and its role in agricultural development.

Essentially the research will deal with the economics of investment in
agricultural infrastructure and will be a benefit/cost type analysis of one
or more INCORA colonization zones. INCORA, the Agrarian Reform
Institute, has engaged in a broad spectrum of activities, which in addition
to colonization, includes placing of land titles,parcelization, irrigation and
supervised credit. INCORA has indicated it will cooperate and data from
the Bogota office on infrastructural investments and production in the
colonization zones are being collected. Preliminary data with respect to
road, school, and health clinics have been secured.

Prior to selecting a specific research topic and the geographic area
for the study, I met with personnel from many of the agricultural agencies
in Colombia and visited several agricultural areas in Colombia. Two of the
areas were principally cattle areas, Villavicencio and Honda. Three
INCORA districts were visited, Boyaca, Nariflo and CaquetA. Brief
reports were prepared on each of the INCORA districts. CaquetA will be
the likely study area in that there are at least three distinct colonization
zones, each physically separated from the other and each separated from
developed area-facilitating the isolation of benefits and costs.

Research Plan July 1, 1968 June 30, 1969

July 1 Sept. 30

Collection of data in BogotA INCORA office concerning investments
(kinds and amount) in the colonization zones of La Mona, Valparafso, and
Maguard.
-27-








A. Roads
B. Schools
C. Medical Clinics
D. Animal Multiplication Units
E. Demonstration Farms
F. Cooperatives
G. Salaries and Wages of Zone Personnel
H. Allocation of Administration Costs Bogott and Florencia
I. Other

October 1 November 30

Visit Florencia, La Mona, Valparafso, and Maguarl.

A. Collect additional data on infrastructural investments in colonization
zones.

B. Collect available secondary data in the colonization zone offices
with respect to farm operations:
Production practices, credit extended, production of crops and
livestock farm plans, etc.

December 1 December 30

A. Summarize and classify farm firm data.
B. Determine additional farm firm data that are needed.
C. Prepare a producer questionnaire designed to obtain "missing"
data not available from secondary sources.

January 1 February 30

Questionnaire Survey in colonization areas

A. La Mona
B. Valparafso
C. Maguard

March 1 March 30

On the basis of primary and secondary data prepare farm budgets and
farm growth models for the colonization zones.

April 1 April 30

Summarize infrastructural costs and benefits for each of the zones
using appropriate discounting techniques.

May 1 June 30
Secure information on costs and expected returns on additional
alternative (projected) investments in each of the colonization zones.
-28-








THE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM


Procedure Used in Selection

The student must have the recommendation of his faculty or department.
He must agree to render service to his agency upon his return from graduate
study -- at least two years of service for one fellowship year. This must
be formalized by contract with his institution which may be ICA, the National
University, or another recognized Colombian entity.

English competence must be certified to by the Centro Colombo-Americano,
on the basis of the ALIGU test. This is the same agency which certifies
English competence for AID fellows..

Applicants submit a special form "Formulario Preliminar para Aspiran-
tes" to Dr. Gartner, Director of Education, ICA. Participants are then
selected from among the applicants by a committee consisting of representa-
tives of ICA, the Ford Foundation and the University of Nebraska.

This same procedure is followed in selecting those candidates who
receive AID fellowships under the agreement to supplement the families of
AID participants.

The Present Situation

In the Nebraska Mission Fellowship program no Colombians were sent
to the United States to study for advanced degrees in Agricultural Economics.
prior to July 1, 1967.

As of June 30, 1968, there were eight Agricultural Economics candidates
who had received ICA/Nebraska Fellowships and were studying in the United
States.

Two candidates left for their study institution in August 1967:

Mario Valderrama of ICA, left on August 5, 1967 to pursue studies in
Agricultural Economics for a Master's degree at the University of Nebraska.
He is expected to return to Colombia in June, 1969.

Hector Murcia of the National University, Bogota, also left on August
5 to pursue studies leading to a M. S. degree in Agricultural Economics at
Oklahoma State University. His date for returning to Colombia is January,
1969.

Two candidates left Colombia in January, 1968:

German Bernal of the National University, Palmira, is seeking a M. S.
Degree at the University of Nebraska. He left Colombia on January 23, 1968
and is expected to return January 1, 1970.


-29-









Dario V61ez of the Banco de la Repfiblica is studying toward a Master's
degree at Oklahoma State University. He left Colombia January 21, 1968
and is expected to return on January 1, 1970.

Four candidates left Colombia on June 19, 1968. They are currently
attending the Economics Institute, sponsored by Ford Foundation, in
Boulder, Colorado. They will be enrolled in their respective study.institutions
in the fall of 1968:

Juan Acosta of ICA will pursue studies toward a Master's degree at
the University of Missouri. He is scheduled to return to Colombia in June
of next year.

Luis Avalos of ICA is also scheduled to pursue work toward a Master's
degree at the University of Missouri. His return date is June 1970.

Diego Londoflo sponsored by the National University at Palmira will
work toward a Master's degree at Oklahoma State University. His return
date is June 1970.

Jaime Bernhardt also sponsored by ICA, will attend Iowa State University
working toward a Master's degree. His return date is also June of 1970.

Fellowships have been awarded to four candidates who will be leaving
for their study institutions in August or September, 1968; including two
candidates for the Ph. D. degree:

Alfredo Carrasco, head of the Agricultural Economics at the National
University, Bogota and also head of the Department of Economics at ICA,
will work toward a doctorate at the University of Nebraska. He is scheduled
to return to Colombia in June, 1970.

Eduardo Chac6n sponsored by ICA, is also scheduled to pursue studies
leading to a Doctor's degree at the University of Nebraska. He will return
June, 1970.

Ramiro Orozco of ICA will attend Oklahoma State University to pursue
studies leading to a Master's degree. He will return to Colombia June, 1970.

William P6rez of National University, Bogota has been approved for one
year of study at the University of Paris, France. He will return to the
University in November, 1969.

Luis Obreg6n of the National University at Medellfn has been approved
for a fellowship to study toward a Master's degree at Oklahoma State this fall.
However, there is some question that he will be able to pass his language
requirements so his departure may be postponed until January, 1969.


-30-









Candidates for January 1969

There are already eight potential candidates who will be given consideration
to receive fellowships to leave for the United States in January of 1969. These
candidates will be submitted to the Fellowship committee by September. They are:
DEGREE PROPOSED
NAME SPONSORING AGENCY SOUGHT INSTITUTION
,Jaime Baby Univ. Nacional-Medellfn M. S. Minnesota

Cesar Bonilla CVC M. S. L. S. U.

Jaime Mira CVC M. S. Florida

Mario A. Garcfa Min. of Agriculture M. S. U. of Arizona

Fabian Ramirez Univ. Nacional-Medellfn M. S. Oklahoma State

Rodrigo Tasc6n I. C. A. M. S. Purdue

Jorge Torres Univ. Nacional-Bogota M. S. Kansas State

Jos6 Torres I. F. A. M. S. Missouri

Edierth Restrepo Planeaci6n M. S. Colorado State


Candidates for Fall 1969

In addition, there are several other staff members in ICA and National
University who are candidates for advanced training in Agricultural Economics by
the fall of 1969. These and other applicants will be considered early next year:
DEGREE PROPOSED
NAME SPONSORING AGENCY SOUGHT INSTITUTION
Humberto GonzAlez Univ. Nacional-Medellfn M. S. Florida

Jorge Lopera I. C. A. Ph. D. North Carolina

Jorge Vargas I. C. A. M. S. Oklahoma State

Alfonso Forero I. C. A. M. S. Kansas State

Jesfs Sierra I. C. A. M. S. Purdue

Adriano Garcia Univ. Nacional-Palmira M. S. Florida


-31-









Supplemental Family Allowance for AID Participants


On the basis of a memorandum of agreement among Ford Foundation,
Institute Colombiano Agropecuario, USAID/BogotA, family allowances for
a number of AID participants are being provided by Ford Foundation.
Under this arrangement the participant receives an amount equal to 50% of
his subsistence allowance for those days his wife accompanies him at his
study institution, and 25% of his subsistence allowance per diem for each
of two children for those days they accompany him at the study institution.

Nine families are in the States at the present time who are receiving
this supplement:


Michel Hermelin, Fort Collins, Colorado
Mario Valderrama, Lincoln, Nebraska
Cesar Escobar, East Lansing, Michigan
Fernando Villamizar, Ft. Collins, Colorado
Manuel Grillo, Davis, California
Enrique Rodrfguez, Pullman, Washington
Jos6 E. G6mez, Ames, Iowa
German Dfaz, Columbia, Missouri
Orlando Sanchez, Honolulu, Hawaii


August 14, 1967
September 1, 1967
September 17, 1967
September 2, 1967
September 28, 1967
October 15, 1967
December 9, 1967
March 15, 1968
May 1968


A total of seventeen families have been approved to receive family
supplements for the fall of 1968 or January 1969:


Le6n Reyes
Omar Marfn
Miguel Restrepo
Francisco Herr6n
Jorge Mesa
Abd6n Cortez
Jos6 Jim6nez
Mario Gonzalez
Edgar Ceballos
Pedro Ofioro
C6sar Cardona
Javier Bernal
Alfonso Ruiz
Gonzalo Villa
Leonel Vargas
Alonso Ramos
German Arbelaez


Lincoln, Nebraska
Riverside, California
Stillwater, Oklahoma
Davis, California
Lafayette, Indiana
Lafayette, Indiana
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Stillwater, Oklahoma
Pullman, Washington
Raleigh, North Carolina
Riverside, California
Ithaca, New York
Ames, Iowa
Lincoln, Nebraska
Lincoln, Nebraska
Pullman, Washington
West Lafayette, Indiana


-32-


Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.


and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and


Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.


Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.


and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and


Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.









FISCAL REPORT TO FORD FOUNDATION


Period covered July 1, 1966 through June 30, 1967

Interim Report Number 1
Budgeted
and Paid


Visiting Professor


Short Term Consultants


Fellowships


Library Materials, Teaching
Aids and Equipment

Ag. Econ. Society & Journal

Total Direct Costs

Indirect Costs


TOTAL COSTS


$154,252.00*

5,600.00

36, 000.00


20, 300.00

1,000.00

$217,152.00

13,200.00

$230,352.00


Expenditures

$31,680.88


853.77


-0-


5,343.06


5.25

$37,882.96

1,398.04


Unexpended
Balances

$122,571.12


4,746.23

36, 000.00


14,956.94


994.75

$179,269.04

11,801.96

$191,071.00


* Post differential included in these totals.






The above figures are transposed from the Interim Report Number 1
footnoted as follows: "The undersigned hereby certifies that the information
on the fiscal report is corrected and such detailed supporting information
as the Ford Foundation may require will be furnished at the contractor's
home office or base office as appropriate promptly to Ford on request."



By: r
Carl R. Ys, comptroller
'-/


Date: July 28, 1967








FISCAL REPORT TO FORD FOUNDATION

Period Covered July 1, 1967 through June 30, 1968

Interim Report Number 2


Budgeted for
Above Period

Visiting Professors $145,000.00

Short Term Consultants 8,400.00

Fellowships 142,200.00

Dr. Carrasco, Australia 3,000.00

Library Materials, Teaching
Aids and Equipment 18,000.00

Ag. Econ. Society and Journal 4,000.00

$320,600.00

Uni. of Nebraska Indirect Costs 23, 000. 00

$343,600.00


Expenditures
For Above Period

$ 99,070.77

35.02

20,462.17

2, 262.18


12,957.74

424.57

$135,212.45

6,927.38

$142,139.83


Unexpended
Balances

$ 45,929.23

8,364.98

121, 737.83

737.82


5,042.26

3,575.43

$185,387.55

16, 072.62

$201,460.17


CASH RECONCILIATION


Income to 6-30-68

Expenditures
1966-67 period 39, 281. 00
1967-68 period 142, 139. 83
total expended to date
BALANCE OF CASH ON HAND


$230,252.00




181,420.83
$ 48,831.17


"The undersigned hereby certifies that the information on the fiscal report
is correct and such detailed information as the Ford Foundation may require
will be furnished at the Contractor's Home Office or Base Office as
appropriate promptly to Ford on Request."

By:4VC, L _
SCarl R. Yot, ,Comptroller

Date: October 24, 1968
-34-








FONDOS COOPERATIVOS


MATCHING ICA COLOMBIAN PESOS


During the calendar year of 1966, ICA allocated 200, 000 Colombian
pesos to support the Ford Foundation sector. During the calendar years
of 1967 and 1968 a total of $300, 000 pesos annually were allotted to the
support of the project.

These funds have been used to pay for the travel of Nebraska Mission
personnel in Colombia, and for the maintenance of equipment, and vehicles.
Other funds have been used to pay for contractual services, for secretarial
help, a chauffeur, and for some assistance in providing furniture and office
remodeling at ICA.

The budget for the current calendar year, 1968 is as follows:



FONDOS COOPERATIVOS BUDGET, 1968


Personnel


Miscellaneous Contractual

Transportation

Equipment and Supplies

Unallocated


$84,400.00

40,000.00

65,000. 00

105,000. 00

5,600.00


-35-








AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS PROGRAM IN COLOMBIA

FORD FOUNDATION SECTOR


Budget July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969

Funds Available:

Total for Three Years

Less Expenditures July 1, 1966 through
1968 $181,024.86

Less estimated Encumbrances,
Fellowships, $150, 000. 00;
other encumbrances 160, 000. 00

Total Available

Proposed Expenditures

Visiting Professors

Fischer, 6 months Bowser, 12 months
Badger, 12 months Andrew, 12 months
Hildebrand, 12 months Feaster, 12 months
Driscoll, 10 1/2 months Badger Replacement, 3

Short Term Consultants (3 man months at $2, 800)

Graduate Fellowships for Colombians

12 Two year Fellowships at 7,200 per year

Library Materials, Teaching Aids, Equipment

Support for Ag. Economics Society and Journal

Total Direct Costs

University of Nebraska Overhead

15% of salaries and consultant costs

Total Budget


$800,000.00


340, 024.86

$459, 975.14



$210,000.00




months

$ 8,400.00



$172,800.00

$ 15,000.00

500.00

$406,700.00



$ 32,760.00

$439,460.00


-36-









APPENDIX A

TENTATIVE AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS CURRICULA NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

PROGRAM DE ECONOMIC AGRICOLA PROPUESTO PARA LA FACULTAD
DE AGRONOMIA, UNIVERSIDAD NATIONAL EN BOGOTA, LA FACULTAD
DE CIENCIAS AGRICOLAS, UNIVERSIDAD NATIONAL EN MEDELLIN Y LA
UNIVERSIDAD DEL VALLE Y LA FACULTAD DE AGRONOMIA, UNIVERSIDAD
NATIONAL EN PALMIRA

Semester I T-P Semester II T-P Semester III T-P


Matematicas I 4-3 Matematicas II 4-3 Matematicas III 3-2
o O O
5-0 5-0 5-0

Biologfa 3-3 Sociologfa Gral. 3-0 Suelos 4-2

Qufmica 3-3 Humanidades 3-0 Humanidades 3-0

Ingl6s I 4-2 Ingles II 4-2 Redacc. T6cnica 2-0

Humanidades 3-0 Princ. Economfa 4-0 Desarrollo Socio-
logfa 3-0
17-11 17-5
o o Micro Economfa 4-0
18-8 19-2 19-4
o
21-2
Semester IV T-P Semester V T-P Semester VI T-P


Matematicas IV 3-2 Estadistica I 3-2 Estadistica II 3-2
o
5-0

Ecologfa 3-2 Cultivos I 4-2 Cultivos II 4-2

Org. y Adm6n de Polftica Monetaria Contabilidad 3-2
Empresas 3-0 y Fiscal 3-0

Macro Economfa4-0 Zootecnia I 3-2 Econ. de Produc. 3-0

Mecanizaci6n 3-2 Mercadeo 3-2 Zootecnia II 3-0
Agrfcola
16-6 18-8 16-6
O
18-4
-37-








APPENDIX A (cont.)


Semester VII T-P Semester VIII T-P Semester IX T-P


Extension 3-2 Prog. Lineal 3-0 Polftica Agraria 3-0

Adm6n Rural 3-2 Met. de Inv. 3-0 Economla Colom. 4-0

Economfa de los Finanzas Agfco- Desarrollo Econ. 4-0
Recursos 4-0 las 3-0

Comercio Interno Proyectos y Eval. Seminario 2-0
3-0 de proyectos 2-0

AnAlisis de Prec3-0 Trabajo Invest. 0-5 Trabajo 0-5

Electiva 3-0

16-4 14-5 13-5


-38-









APPENDIX B

ICA DEPARTAMENTO DE ECONOMIC AGRICOLA

Program de studios tendientes a obtener el tftulo de

Magister en Economfa Agricola


El program de studios se compone de cursos requeridos, cursos
electivos y tesis para completar un total de 52 cr6ditos, de los cuales
30 correspondent a cursos requeridos. Los restantes 22 cr6ditos deberan
ganarse con cursos electivos y con la tesis.

Cursos Requeridos Cr6ditos

Ec. 501 Sociologfa Rural 3

Ec. 502 Economfa Agrfcola 3

Ec. 505- Mercadeo Agrfcola 3

Ec. 509 Teorfa Econ6mica: Microeconomfa 3

Ec. 510 Polftica Agricola 3

Ec. 511 Economfa de la Producci6n 3

Ec. 513 M6todos de Investigaci6n en Economfa 2

Ec. 514 Teorfa Econ6mica: Macroeconomfa 3

Ec. 515 Desarrollo Econ6mico 3

Ec. 699 Seminario 1

Ec. 601 Correlaci6n y regresi6n 3

30


-39-











Cursos Electivos

503 Administraci6n de fincas

506 T6cnicas de Comunicaci6n Agrfcola

508 Desarrollo Rural

512 Economfa de los Recursos

516 Cr6dito Agrfcola

517 Economia Matematica

518 Andlisis de precious Agrfcolas

698 Problemas Especiales

503 Programaci6n para Computadores

602 T6cnica de Muestreo

699 Seminarios


APPENDIX B (cont.)

Cr6ditos

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

1-3

2

3

1


PodrAn tomarse otros cursos con el consentimiento del Profesor
consejero.

Examen Comprensivo

Para ser admitido como candidate al tftulo de Magister el aspirante
deber. presentar un examen comprensivo de conocimientos de Economfa
y Economfa Agrfcola. El Departamento reglamentara la forma y 6poca
de presentaci6n de dicho examen.

Tesis

El estudiante deberl presentar un trabajo de tesis y sustentarlo ante
un comit6 examinador designado por el Departamento. Por este trabajo
se podrAn otorgar de 8 a 12 cr6ditos de acuerdo con el criterio del pro-
fesor consejero.


-40-








APPENDIX C

SEMINARS FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
STAFF AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
ICA-NATIONAL UNIVERSITY BOGOTA

Seminars will be held in the Conference Room at Edificio Principal
ICA-Tibaitatd at 3:00 p. m. on the following dates:
Monday, January 15, 1968

Some Agricultural Policy Goals and Existing Government Institutions
for Colombian Agriculture.
Dr. Loyd K. Fischer, Nebraska Mission, ICA and National University.

Monday, January 22, 1968

Some Reflections on the Historical Development of Colombian Agriculture.
Dr. Al Berry, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

Monday, January 29, 1968

The Status of Farm Management Teaching in Developing Areas.
Some Reflections from the Agricultural Development Council Seminar in Hawaii
Dr. Herman Felstehausen, Land Tenure Center, University of Wisconsin.

Monday, February 5, 1968 open

Monday, February 12, 1968

Some Reflections on the Role of Agricultural Economists in the Economic
Development of a Developing Country.
Dr. Larry Witt, International Programs in Agricultural Economics, Michigan
State University and Past President, American Farm Economic Association.

Monday, February 19, 1968 open

Monday, February 26, 1968

Insecurity of Land Tenure in Colombia.
Dr. Joe Thome, Dr. Jos6 Marfa Franco, Dr. Lufs Ar6valo, Land
Tenure Center, University of Wisconsin.

Monday, March 4, 1968

How Research in Agricultural Economics Can Contribute to the National
Plan for Economic Development.
Dr. Stuart Harris, Harvard Advisory Group to Planeaci6n, Bogota.


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APPENDIX C (cont.)


Monday, March 11, 1968

Research Methodology in Agricultural Economics Some Basic
Concepts.
Dr. Dan Badger, Nebraska Mission, ICA and National University.

Monday, March 18, 1968

The Land Grant University System Its Role in Agricultural
Economic Development.
Dr. Ken McDermott, Rural Development Officer, AID, BogotA.

Monday, March 25, 1968

The Role for Agricultural Economics in the Extension and Applied
Research Fields of a Regional Development Corporation:: The CVC Example.
Mr. Nelson Suarez, Chiei Agricultural Planning Division, CVC, Cali.

Monday. April 1, 1968

Some Results of Research on Decision Making of Large Landholders
in Valle and Meta.
Mr. James Grunig, Land Tenure Center, University of Wisconsin.

Monday, April 8, 1968

The Role of Agrarian Reform in Agricultural Economic Development.
Dr. Peter Dorner, Director, Land Tenure Center, University of
Wisconsin, Madison.

Monday, April 15, 1968 open

Monday, April 22, 1968

Import substitution Policies for Wheat and Vegetables.
Mr. Bruce Palmer, Cargill, Inc. representative, Bogota, Colombia.

Friday, April 26, 1968

Some Problems in Obtaining Data on Agricultural Production and
Prices.
Dr. Jerry Trant, Rockefeller Foundation, Universidad del Valle, Cali.

Monday, April 29, 1968 open

Monday, May 6, 1968 open

-42-








APPENDIX C (cont.)

Monday, May 13, 1968

Agriculture in The Economic Development Plan.
Dr. Tomas L6pez, Head, Agricultural Sector, Planeaci6n Nacional,
BogotA.

Monday, May 20, 1968

Major Problems in Agricultural Marketing in Colombia.
Dr. Karl Wierer, FAO working in ILMA, BogotA.

Monday, May 27, 1968

Agricultural Production in Colombia.
Dr. Jay Atkinson, USDA, cooperating with Ministry of Agriculture,
Bogota.

Monday, June 3, 1968

Some Preliminary Findings on the Present Production Distribution
System for Potatoes in Colombia.
Mr. Chris Andrew, Nebraska Mission, ICA.

Monday, June 10, 1968

Some Reflections on the Agricultural Economics Program in Colombia.
Dr. Glen Vollmar, Chairman, Department of Agricultural Economics,
University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Monday, June 17, 1968

The Role of INCORA in Economic Development.
Dr. Ernesto Vl6ez Koppel, Head, Division of Agricultural Development,
INCORA, Bogota.

Monday, June 24, 1968 open


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APPENDIX D

ESTATUTOS DE LA ASOCIACION COLOMBIANA DE

ECONOMIC AGRICOLA

CAPITULO PRIMERO

Constituci6n Objeto Duraci6n Domicilio

ARTICULO PRIMERO. Bajo la denominaci6n de "ASOCIACION COLOMBIANA
DE ECONOMIA AGRICOLA" se constitute una agrenhiaci6n professional apolftica,
aut6noma e independiente, de carActer privado y sin Animo de lucro pero con
patrimonio propio.. ARTICULO SEGUNDO. Es objeto de esta Asociaci6n: t)
Promover el desarrollo de la ciencia de la Economfa Agrfcola. b) Fomentar
la aplicaci6n de los resultados de la investigaci6n en los aspects de la produc-
ci6n y la organizaci6n agropecuaria. c) Promover el mejoramiento de las
condiciones econ6micas y sociales del sector agropecuario del pafs. d) Pro-
pender por 6i mejoramiento clentffico, cultural, social, y econ6mico de sus
miembros. ARTICULO TERCERO. La Asociaci6n sera de duraci6n ilimitada
y tendra por domicilio legal la ciudad de Bogota. ARTICULO CUARTO. La
Asociaci6n podrd considerar, promover, y aprobar la constituci6n de seccionales
regionales, en cualquier lugar de la Rep(blica.

CAPITULO SEGUNDO

De los Miembros

ARTICULO QUINTO. Podran ser miembros de n(fmero de la Asociaci6n todos
aquellos profesionales vinculados a la Economfa Agrfcola dn sus distintas ramas,
que acepten el present reglamento y no esten legalmente impedidos para ejercer
su profesi6n. PARAGRAFO. Podran tambi6n ser miembros de la Asociaci6n
todos aquellos estudiantes de Oltimo afio de carreras relacionadas con la Economfa
Agrfcola en universidades debidamente aprobadas. ARTICULO SEXTO. Para
ingresar como miembro active de la Asociaci6n el interesado deberi presentar a
la Junta Directiva una solicitud por escrito, acompafiada de su curriculumm vitae",
en los formularios que la Asociaci6n suministraraP para tal fin. ARTICULO
SEPTIMO. La Junta Directiva estudiari la solicitud de admisi6n y decidirt por
unanimidad sobre la aceptaci6n o rechazo del candidate. PARAGRAFO. La
Junta Directiva se reserve el derecho de comprobar los datos aportados por el
aspirante en su solicitud de ingreso, y de indagar su condici6n moral, social y
ciudadana. ARTICULO OCTAVO. Son deberes y derechos de los miembros:
a) Pagar la cuota de ingreso fijada; b) Abonar las cuotas de sostenimiento que
determine la Junta Directiva. PARAGRAFO. La Asamblea General como maxima
autoridad se reserve el derecho de modificar las cuotas establecidas de acuerdo
con el present artfculo, en caso de que las consider inconvenientes para los
intereses de los afiliados; c) Pagar las cuotas extraordinarias que establezca
la Asamblea General; d) Observar las disposiciones de los Estatutos, y acatar
las Resoluciones de las Asambleas Generales y de la Junta Directiva; e) Podran
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elegir y ser elegidos para los cargos directives, de administraci6n y de
fiscalizaci6n, siempre que est6n a paz y salvo con la Asociaci6n; f) Debe-
rAn obtener la credencial que los acredita como miembros de la Asociaci6n
Colombiana de Economfa Agrfcola; g) Presentar a la Junta Directiva
proyectos sobre asuntos que se considered de inter6s personal, general o
ciatffico en las Asambleas, seminaries y conferencias organizadas por la
Asociaci6n; h) Solicitar convocatorias de Asambleas Generales Extraordi-
narias en los casos que corresponda. ARTICULO NOVENO. Los Miem-
bros de la Asociaci6n se catalogaran asf: a) Miembros de nimero o
activos. PARAGRAFO. SerAn miembros de ndmero o activos aquellos
que ingresen a la Asociaci6n con arreglo a los artfculos Quinto y Sexto de
los presents Estatutos. b) Miembros Honorarios. PARAGRAFO. Seran
miembros honorarios las personas nombradas con tal carActer por la
Asamblea General en vista de sus servicios o actos extraordinarios en
favor de la Economfa Agrfcola o de la Asociaci6n. c) Miembros Institu-
cionales. PARAGRAFO. PodrAn ser miembros institucionales aquellas
entidades cuyo campo de acci6n se relaciona con la Economfa Agrfcola
que asi lo solicitaren y que sean aceptadas por la Junta Directiva y paguen
las cuotas a ellas asignadas. Los miembros institucionales podran hacerse
representar en las Asambleas Generales con derecho a voz en las mismas.

CAPITULO TERCERO

Del Patrimonio

ARTICULO DECIMO. El Patrimonio de la Asociaci6n se compone de :
a) el valor de la cuota de ingreso de los afiliados. b) las sumas prove-
nientes del pago de las cuotas ordinarias y extraordinarias. c) las dona-
clones o auxilios que a favor de la Asociaci6n vote el Congreso, las
Asambleas departamentales, los Cabildos, o cualquier entidad o persona
natural o jurfdica. d) los Gtiles, bienes muebles o inmuebles que hayan
sido adquiridos por la Asociaci6n por compra o por obsequio. ARTICULO
UNDECIMO. Todos los ingresos en dinero y en cheques se consignaran en
cuenta bancaria a nombre de la Asociaci6n, bajo la responsabilidad del
Tesorero, debiendo ir firmados los cheques respectivos, conjuntamente
por el Presidente y Tesorero de la Junta Directiva. De la misma manera
se haran los giros sobre dicha cuenta bancaria. ARTICULO DUODECIMO.
La Asociaci6n no reconocerg a sus afiliados utilidades, intereses o dividen-
dos de ninguna especie, comoquiera que no persigue animo de lucro. Tam-
poco devolvera a sus miembros el valor de los aportes recibidos.

CAPITULO CUARTO

De la Junta Directiva

ARTICULO DECIMOTERCERO. La Junta Directiva de la Asociaci6n quedari
integrada asf: Un (1) Presidente, Un (1) Primer Vicepresidente, Un (1) Segun-
do Vicepresidente, Un (1) Fiscal, Dos (2) Vocales. PARAGRAFO. Los

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miembros de la Junta Directiva seran elegidos por la Asamblea General
de entire los miembros de nimero que est6n a paz y salvo. ARTICULO
DECIMOCUARTO. Los miembros de la Junta Directiva durarIn en sus
funciones un (1) afio y podrAn ser reelegidos. ARTICULO DECIMOQUIN-
TO. Las resoluciones de la Junta Directiva se tomaran por simple mayo-
rfa de votos, salvo en las que tratan sobre admisi6n de nuevos miembros.
En caso de empate decidira el voto el Presidente. Tres (3) miembros
forman quorum. ARTICULO DECIMOSEXTO. Son funciones de la Junta
Directiva: a) Atender a la march de la Asociaci6n y hacer cumplir los
reglamentos. b) Considerar y resolver todo document que imported
obligaci6n de pago o contrato que obligue a la Asociaci6n por sumas de
hasta diez mil pesos ($10, 000. 00). c) Resolver sobre la aceptaci6n o
rechazo de quienes deseen ingresar como socios. d) Estudiar todos
aquellos negocios, solicitudes, etc., de carActer gremial. e) Convocar
todas las Asambleas ordinarias y extraordinarias, conferencias o semi-
narios que consider oportuno. f) Redactar el informed annual de labores
para acompafiar el balance, los cuales deberan ser presentados a la
Asamblea General. g) Expedir el reglamento de la Asociaci6n. h)
Reunirse por lo menos una vez por semestre para considerar los asun-
tos de la Asociaci6n, previa citaci6n que haga el Secretario. i) Nom-
brar y despedir los empleados que autorice el reglamento. ARTICULO
DECIMOSEPTIMO. El Presidente es el representante legal de la
Asociaci6n y son sus deberes y atribuciones: a) Vigilar el fiel cumpli-
miento de los reglamentos y el buen funcionamiento de la Asociaci6n.
b) Presidir las Asambleas Generales y las sesiones de la Junta Direc-
tiva, y ordenar los debates. c) Resolver los asuntos de carIcter urgen-
te, dando cuenta a la Junta Directiva en la primera reuni6n que se
celebre. d) Firmar los documents que importen obligaci6n de pago,
o contratos que obliguen a la Asociaci6n y esten autorizados por la
Junta Directiva. e) Poner el visto bueno a los balances. f) Autorizar
gastos hasta por la suma de un mil pesos ($1, 000. 00),de este valor en
adelante, los gastos deberan ser autorizados por la Junta Directiva o la
Asamblea General. ARTICULO DECIMOOCTAVO. El primero y segun-
do Vicepresidente en su orden reemplazan al Presidente en caso de
acefalfa, ausencia, o impedimento de 6ste. ARTICULO DECIVIONOVENO.
Son deberes y atribuciones del Fiscal: a) Controlar los actos de los
miembros de la Asociaci6n en su calidad de afiliados. b) Supervisar
el manejo de los fondos, haberes e inversiones, y de todas las pertenen-
cias de la Asociaci6n. c) Convocar a la Asamblea General cuando la
Junta Direetiva deje de reunirse de acuerdo con lo estipulado en los
presents estatutos. ARTICULO VIGESIMO. Son deberes y atribuciones
de los Vocales cumplir con todas las comisiones que les asigne el
President y asistir a todas las reuniones de la Junta Directiva.


-46-








CAPITULO QUINTO


Del Secretario Tesorero

ARTICULO VIGESIMOPRIMERO. La Asociaci6n tendrd un Secretario
Tesorero, quien serA un funcionario de caracter administrative, de libre
nombramiento y remoci6n por la Junta Directiva. ARTICULO VIGESIMO-
SEGUNDO. Son deberes y atribuciones del Secretario Tesorero: a) Re-
frendar los documents relacionados con la Asociaci6n y autorizados por
el President. b) Cuidar del archive de la Asociaci6n y redactar las
Actas y memories. c) Actuar en las sesiones de la Junta Directiva.y de
las Asambleas y llevar los libros de Actas correspondientes. d) Llevar
la correspondencia de la Asociaci6n y un libro de registro de los miembros,
anotAndose en 61 los ingresos y retires de socios. En este ultimo caso
anotarl los motives del retire. e) Ser depositario del patrimonio material
de la Asociaci6n y promover las relaciones pfblicas de la misma. f) Re-
caudar las cuotas ordinarias y extraordinarias que deben pagar los miembros.
g) Recibir los obsequios y donaciones a favor de la Asociaci6n. h) Llevar
personalmente la contabilidad de la Asociaci6n. i) Mantener al dfa las
operaciones financieras de la Asociaci6n. j) Rendir cuentas mensualmente
a la Junta Directiva o cuando 6sta lo consider convenient, a las Asambleas
Generales ordinarias y a las extraordinarias que asf lo soliciten.

CAPITULO SEXTO

De la Asamblea General

ARTICULO VIGESIMOTERCERO. La Asamblea General constitute la
maxima autoridad de la Asociaci6n y sus decisions en asuntos relacionados
con el objeto de la misma tienen fuerza de ley para todos los afiliados.
ARTICULO VIGESIMOCUARTO. La Asamblea General podra reunirse para
sesiones ordinarias y extraordinarias en los casos previstos en le present
reglamento. ARTICULO VIGESIMOQUINTO. Las Asambleas deberan
wrificarse en el dfa y a la hora fijados siempre que se encuentren presents
la mitad mas uno del total de los afiliados. Si transcurrida una hora despu6s
de la fijada para la reuni6n no se ha conseguido ese quorum, la Asamblea
se celebrara con los afiliados presents, y sus decisions seran igualmente
vAlidas. ARTICULO VIGESIMOSEXTO. La Asamblea General ordinaria se
reunird una vez en el primer trimestre de cada afio. ARTICULO VIGESIMO-
SEPTIMO. La Asamblea General podra reunirse en forma extraordinaria
cuando asf lo crea convenient la Junta Directiva, la mitad mas uno de los
afiliados o el Fiscal, debiendo hacerse la convocaci6n dentro de un plazo de
quince (15) dfas contados a partir de la fecha en que fuere hecha la petici6n.
ARTICULO VIGESIMOOCTAVO. Las Asambleas ordinarias serAn convocadas
por escrito, por lo menos con quince (15) dfas de anticipaci6n a la fecha desig-
nada para verificarla, comunicando la ciudad, sitio, hora y orden del dfa a
cada uno de los afiliados. ARTICULO VIGESIMONOVENO. Quince (15) dfas
antes de realizarse la Asamblea General ordinaria la Junta Directiva pasarA
a cada uno de los afiliados un ejemplar del informed que 6sta debe presentar
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al cierre de la vigencia. ARTICULO TRIGESIMO. En las Asambleas
Generales los afiliados tendran derecho tnicamente a su voto personal,
no pudiendo votar en representaci6n de ningfln otro miembro de la
Asociaci6n. ARTICULO TRIGESIMOPRIMERO. Todo afiliado podra
presentar cualquier proposici6n o proyecto al studio de la Junta
Directiva, la cual decidira sobre su inclusion en el orden del dfa de
la Asamblea. ARTICULO TRIGESIMOSEGUNDO. Las resoluciones de
la Asamblea se adoptarAn por simple mayorfa de votos. PARAGRAFO.
Para la reform de Estatutos y decisions que impliquen obligaci6n
econ6mica para los socios se requieren las dos terceras parties de los
votos siempre y cuando est6n presents en la Asamblea por lo menos. la
mitad de los miembros inscritos en la Asociaci6n. ARTICULO
TRIGESIMOTERCERO. Los miembros de la Junta Directiva y el
Secretario Tesorero no pueden votar en la aprobaci6n de balances ni
en las resoluciones referentes a su responsabilidad. ARTICULO
TRIGESIMOCUARTO. Es de competencia de la Asamblea General
ordinaria: a) Elegir los miembros de la Junta Directiva. b) Considerar
el informed y balance general de cuentas que debera presentar la
Junta Directiva saliente. c) Deliberar y resolver sobre asuntos que
figure en el orden del dfa. PARAGRAFO. El Presidente nombrara
escrutadores que verifiquen y escruten las votaciones que se realicen.
ARTICULO TRIGESIMOQUINTO. Elecci6n de la Junta Directiva. La
elecci6n de la Junta Directiva se hard por votaci6n secret, sin que se
oponga al sistema por aclamaci6n, y en el siguiente orden: a) Votaci6n
y escrutinio para Presidente. b) Votaci6n y escrutinio para Primer
Vicepresidente, c) Votaci6n y escrutinio para Segundo Vicepresidente.
d) Votaci6n y escrutinio para Fiscal. e) Votaci6n y escrutinio para
Primer Vocal. f) Votaci6n y escrutinio para Segundo Vocal. ARTICULO
TRIGESIMOSEXTO. Las Deliberaciones de la Asamblea se consignaran en
un libro de Actas, las cuales deberdn ser firmadas por el Presidente y el
Secretario.

CAPITULO SEPTIMO

De las Sanciones

ARTICULO TRIGESIMOSEPTIMO. Son sanciones de la Asociaci6n: la
amonestaci6n, la suspension del caracter de miembro de la misma, y la
expulsion, de abuerdo con el reglamento que se expedira. Las dos primeras
se impondran por la Junta Directiva y la iltima por la Asamblea General.

CAPITULO OCTAVO

Disoluci6n de la Asociaci6n

ARTICULO TRIGESIMOOCTAVO. La Asociaci6n Colombiana de Economfa
Agrfcola podra disolverse: a) Porque asf lo resuelva la Asamblea General
con el voto de las dos terceras parties de los miembros inscritos. b) Por
las causes que la ley sefiala. ARTICULO TRIGESIMONOVENO. En caso de


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disoluci6n, la Asamblea General decidira a qu6 instituci6n de beneficiencia
pasard el patrimonio de la Asociaci6n. Es fiel copia tomada de su original
en le Libro de Actas de la Asociaci6n.


GUILLERMO A. GUERRA E.
C. C. No. 509686 de Medellfn
President


JORGE LOPERA PALACIOS
C. C. No. 8222748 de Medellfn
Secretario Tesorero


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APPENDIX E

Report: Consultation Trip to Colombia
Glen J. Vollmar, Chairman
Department of Agricultural Economics
June 1-12, 1968

I. Schedule for the Period

June 1 Travel, Arrived in Bogott late evening

June 2 Fischers' home

June 3 Nebraska Mission Staff Meeting
Project Leaders Meeting
Discussion with Director Colwell
Discussion with Agricultural Economics Staff
Lunch and discussion with Mr. Carrasco, National University
Evening at Hobbs' home with Agricultural Engineers

June 4 Discussion with Dr. Ken McDermott, AID, Rural Development
Officer
Met with Dr. Gartner and Dr. Fonseca
Evening at Fischers' home

June 5 Discussion with Agricultural Economics group, U. S. and
Colombian, at Tibaitata
Traveled to Palmira and Cali with Dr. Badger. Met with
Burdette and Jerry Trant, Rockefeller group
Dinner with Del Valle staff members and fellowship candidates

June 6 Discussion at Palmira with Dean Gonzalez, Roger Burdette
and Ron Stoller
Met and talked with fellowship candidates
Traveled to Medellfn with Dr. Badger. Discussion with
Dean Hernandez, Bill Collins (Ag. Engi ) and Ag. Economics
staff.
Dinner with fellowship candidates

June 7 Discussion with Dean HernAndez and Medellfn Agricultural
Economics Staff
Returned to Bogota for discussion with Dr. Flowerday in p. m.
Discussion with Dr. Plaxico, Ford Foundation

June 8 Discussion with Director Colwell
Agricultural Economics Dinner at Badgers'

June 9 Badgers'


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APPENDIX E (cont.)


June 10 Met with Dr. Gartner and Dr. Fonseca
Discussion with Nebraska Mission Instructors and staff
Gave Seminar
Dinner at Andrew's

June 11 Discussion with Dr. Colwell, Mr. Elder
Meeting of Ag. Economics group
Lunch with Mssrs. Carrasco and Chac6n
Met with Bishop Sambrano at Obispado de Facatativd

June 12 Return Trip. Departed 10:00 a. m.

June 13 Arrived in Lincoln 3:00 a. m.

II. Comments

In the relatively short time period that the program has been
underway, the team of agricultural economists have done some
excellent work. Agricultural Economics is now a topic of discussion
among Deans, and other Colombian officials and from all indications,
they look forward to increased agricultural economics teaching, research,
and extension activities and a general increase in strength of the
Nebraska program in this area over the next few years. Dr. Steiner
and Dr. Hildebrand are recent additions to the staff. Dr. Driscoll will
arrive later in the summer upon completion of his Ph. D. degree at
Oklahoma State.

I was impressed by the fellowship candidates who have been contacted
for graduate study. The students that I met on this trip seemed to be of
the caliber and had the other attributes of individuals who will do well with
graduate programs. We need to exert a little caution in terms of making
sure that candidates understand that they are not on the way to graduate
study until final selection, funds, language, graduate school acceptance
and other considerations have been definitely agreed upon. The agricultural
economics group has done, in my opinion, an excellent job discussing and
getting candidates interested.

A career in Agricultural Economics has been started in Medellfn. Dr.
Steiner's arrival came at an appropriate time and he will be of considerable
assistance to the Medellfn staff with their teaching. It may be necessary to
give Dr. Steiner and the Medellfn staff some help in terms of one of the
Bogota staff or Burdette (Palmira) spending perhaps a day a week in Medellfn.
This was discussed with Dr. Gartner, Dr. Fonseca and others and would be
satisfactory if it needs to be done.

The undergraduate career at Palmira and Bogota are making slow
development progress. It was recommended that the Nebraska Mission


-51-








APPENDIX E (cont.)

group attempt to work closer with the new staff at the National University,
Bogota so that enough strength can be developed in teaching potential
whereby a career can be started. At Palmira, progress is being made
in integrating the Agricultural Economics work with Del Valle. The
graduate program at National University, Bogota is making progress.

Research in Agricultural Economics is well underway. The three
Nebraska instructors are making a real contribution with their work
and with the contacts made with the Colombian researchers.

The Agricultural Economics group has made considerable progress
in developing and getting current Agricultural Economics books and
other materials in Spanish. Burdette and Garcia of Palmira are making
progress with a marketing text. One of the Medellfn staff is writing a
production economics text in Spanish.

The Association of Colombian Agricultural Economics has held two
meetings and their first Journal is in process. I think that the operating
committee structure probably needs to be strengthened and encouraged so
that in the future, the organization can carry itself with decreased detailed
work from our staff. The organization has a good start and the Nebraska
Mission staff should be complimented for their efforts here.

In order for Dr. Badger to spend his second year with the teaching
and research in farm management and production economics which is now
underway, Dr. Hildebrand will assume agricultural economics project
leader duties as of July 1, 1968.

I would hope that at least some staff in agricultural economics will be
able to spend more than a two-year tour with the program. It seems to
me that the second year and beyond would be the most productive for the
program. Also, short assignments, perhaps a month or two, for staff
who return to the U. S. would be productive for the program in some
instances.


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