• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 A strange friendship
 A rabbit's curious home
 Our wild birds
 Waiting
 The clever fox
 Towzer
 Tom he was a piper's son
 Riddle me
 The lighthouse donkey
 "I will!" in the right place
 The drinking trough
 The pass of splugen
 Spring song
 "Whatever is it?"
 An interesting anecdote of the...
 In September
 A slice of the moon
 Buttercups
 Winter!
 Salisbury Cathedral
 To a friend
 Puppies and tortoise
 Dress making
 Sleep, like baby
 Angry words
 Home politeness
 The dancing school
 Grandmothers
 Going to the ball
 Maiden fair
 At school
 The scramble for sugar-plums
 "Happy be thy dreams!"
 The less
 A little alphabet of prayer for...
 The pilgrims at Plymouth rock
 How quarrels begin
 A proud mother
 An unforgiving dog
 If we would
 Feeding the ducks
 My friend Neptune
 The new baby
 Jack was nimble and Jack was...
 The lazy cat
 The history of Jack and the...
 The story of Ali Baba and the forty...
 The story of the three bears
 Harry's sum
 Little Maggie
 Little Silverhair not a moment...
 The kangaroo and young
 Old mother Hubbard
 The history of Jack and the...
 The story of Ali Baba and the forty...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Christmas tree
Title: The Christmas tree
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053776/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Christmas tree stories and pictures for the little ones
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill, ports ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Worthington, R ( Publisher )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Méaulle, F ( Fortuné ), b. 1844 ( Engraver )
Sears, Matthew Urlwin, b. ca. 1800 ( Engraver )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1885
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Holidays -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: profuselu illustrated.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Meaulle, Dalziel and E. Sears after Weir.
General Note: Contains poetry and prose.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053776
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223121
notis - ALG3369
oclc - 10981441

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    A strange friendship
        Page 1
        Page 2
    A rabbit's curious home
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Our wild birds
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Waiting
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The clever fox
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Towzer
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Tom he was a piper's son
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Riddle me
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The lighthouse donkey
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    "I will!" in the right place
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The drinking trough
        Page 22
    The pass of splugen
        Page 22
    Spring song
        Page 23
        Page 24
    "Whatever is it?"
        Page 25
    An interesting anecdote of the late president Garfield
        Page 26
    In September
        Page 27
    A slice of the moon
        Page 28
    Buttercups
        Page 28
    Winter!
        Page 29
    Salisbury Cathedral
        Page 30
    To a friend
        Page 31
    Puppies and tortoise
        Page 32
    Dress making
        Page 33
    Sleep, like baby
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Angry words
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Home politeness
        Page 37
    The dancing school
        Page 37
    Grandmothers
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Going to the ball
        Page 39
    Maiden fair
        Page 39
        Page 40
    At school
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The scramble for sugar-plums
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    "Happy be thy dreams!"
        Page 49
    The less
        Page 49
        Page 50
    A little alphabet of prayer for Christian children
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The pilgrims at Plymouth rock
        Page 53
        Page 54
    How quarrels begin
        Page 55
        Page 56
    A proud mother
        Page 57
        Page 58
    An unforgiving dog
        Page 59
    If we would
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Feeding the ducks
        Page 61
    My friend Neptune
        Page 62
    The new baby
        Page 63
    Jack was nimble and Jack was quick
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The lazy cat
        Page 66
    The history of Jack and the bean-stalk
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The story of Ali Baba and the forty thieves
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The story of the three bears
        Page 75
    Harry's sum
        Page 76
    Little Maggie
        Page 77
    Little Silverhair not a moment stayed
        Page 78
    The kangaroo and young
        Page 79
    Old mother Hubbard
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The history of Jack and the bean-stalk
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The story of Ali Baba and the forty thieves
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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SCHRISTMAS TREE


STORIES AND PICTURES FOR THE
LITTLE ONES

















1885








A STRANGE FRIENDSHIP.

CORRESPONDENT reports a very curious
friendship between a cat and a hen. The
hen, last summer, was sitting upon seven
eggs, and during her solitary confinement
formed an acquaintance with the cat, who, doubt-
less, was prowling around with no good intent. The
new acquaintance became a bosom friend, and when
the hen left her eggs to seek for food, her place was
taken by the cat, who remained until she returned.
In due time the little chicks appeared, but even then
pussy did not consider her duties at an end, for she
continued to watch over the brood until they left the
mother hen. Whenever the hen happened to leave
her brood for a while, the cat was there to watch over
them, and scare away the rats and mice, and prevent
the chicks from straying far. Even when the chick-
ens arrived at an edible age, the cat still treated them
as friends, and never in any way attempted to devour
or ill-treat her foster children.



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A RABBIT'S CURIOUS HOME.

SHAVE often heard of rabbits rearing their
young in strange places, but the following
fact seems to me most extraordinary: An
official on the London and Northwestern
7 Railway, in the Midland counties, had con-
stantly noticed a rabbit passing to and fro on the rail-
road track. Curious to know where it came from,
he examined the locality, and eventually discovered
beneath a "railway-sleeper" a nest of four young rab-
bits. Continuing his observations, he noticed that
whenever the parent rabbit left her young, she care-
fully closed the aperture with sand and small stones.
Considering that during the day some dozens of trains,
often heavily laden, passed over this identical sleeper,
I think you will agree with me that in choosing such
a place wherein to give birth to its young, the mother
acted in a very curious manner.


























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OUR WILD BIRDS.

R. SMILES, in his charming life of Ed-
ward, the Scotch naturalist, relates how,
when he went down to the seaside to
drown himself, he had thrown off his hat, coat,
and waistcoat before rushing into the sea, when
a flock of Sanderlings lit upon the sand near
him. They attracted his attention; some were
running to and fro, some piping their low, shrill
whistle, whilst others were probing the wet sand
with their bills as the waves receded.
But amongst them was another bird, longer
and darker, one apparently of different habits
to the others. Desirous of knowing something
of the nature of this bird, he approached the
Sanderlings. They rose and flew away. He
followed them. They lit again; and again he
observed them as before. Away they went, and
he after them, and at length he was stopped at
Don mouth stream.
In his intense interest in the birds, and love
of nature, he had forgotten all his miseries.
The story shows how kindly God watches over
us, even when we least remember it, and may
make even little unknown birds the means of
protecting and saving life.
























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WAITING.

I ITING for master to come down the stair,
Are "Noble" and "Floss," and his favor-
ite mare-
"Brenda" the gentle, with skin soft and gray,
"Waiting the signal, "Now off and away."

Noble stands holding the whip and the rein,
His gaze fixed on Brenda, who tosses her mane;
"While dear little Floss sits quietly by,
"Winking and blinking her liquid brown eye.

Master's so kind to them-nothing to fear
Have horse or dogs when his footsteps they hear;
Look how they're waiting with eagerness there,
RIeady to go with him everywhere.

And what a pleasure it is when these three
There on the staircase their kind master see;
Now he is mounted, the waiting is o'er-
Floss, Brenda, and Noble race off from the door.





































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THE CLEVER FOX.



TNE summer's day on the banks of the river
Tweed, in Scotland, a fox sat watching
a brood of wild ducks feeding in the river.
Presently a branch of a fir tree floated in their
midst, which caused them to rise in the air,
and after circling round for some time, they
again settled down on their feeding ground.
At short intervals this was repeated, the
branch floating from the same direction, until
the ducks took no further notice of it than
allowing it to pass by. Mr. Reynard noticed
this; so he got a larger branch than the others,
and crouching down among the leaves, got
afloat, and coming to the ducks, who took no
notice of the branch, he seized two of the
ducks, and then allowed himself to be floated
to the other side, where, we suppose, he had
a repast.






















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TO WZE R.



TOWZER was our big mastiff, a grand,
fine-looking fellow, who kept watch
and ward for us in the yard outside the house,
a very terror to all the folks who had no
business about the place, and whose con-
sciences were therefore likely to be tender;
and rather a terror, now and then, even to
the people whose real business it was to
come. Once, I remember, when a new post-
man brought the letters, he was so frightened
at the. sight of Towzer, who was always un-
chained, that he took to his heels as fast as
he could, and threw all our letters down in
the road outside the gate, where we after-
wards found them.
But Beauty, our new dog, was not fright-
ened at him, that is, after the first few days,
-which was of course quite right, as you
will remember in the fairy-tale.







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TOM HE WAS A PIPER'S SON.

H OM he was a piper's son,
He learned to play when he was young,
But all the tune that he could play,
"Was Over the hills and far away,"
Over the hills and a great way off,
And the wind will blow my top-knot off.
Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they stopped to hear him play,
"Over the hills and far away."
Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
Whenever they heard they began for to dance,-
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him
prance.
As Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began for to play;
So Doll and the cow danced "the Cheshire
round,"
Till the pail was broke, and the milk ran on
the ground.
He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe and she used her legs;
She danced about till the eggs were' all broke,
She began for to fret, but he laughed at the joke.



























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RIDDLE me, riddle me ree, an owl sat up on a tree,
And he says to himself, says he, Oh dear! what a fine bird I be!

LITTLE Tom Tucker sings for his supper;
What shall he eat ? white bread and butter.
How shall he cut it without e'er a knife ?
How will he be married without e'er a wife ?

JACK SPRATT could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean;
And so, betwixt them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

RIDE a cock-horse to Coventry Cross,
To see what Emma can buy;
A penny white cake I'll buy for her sake,
And a twopenny tart or a pie.





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THE LIGHTHOUSE DONKEY.
HARDLY know how to tell Things had thus gone on very pros
my story in proper terms, it perously for some time, though living
is so exceedingly immoral- was a little scanty for the donkey, as
showing as it does the suc- the island produces little but sea-birds,
cess of envy, malice, and all uncharita- which lay their eggs on the ledges of
bleness; how a cruel, premeditated, and rock all round, which are so narrow
unprovoked murder may be committed that if a human hand attempts to lift
without any punishment, and the mur- an egg, it is impossible to replace the
derer live on respected and apparently round and slippery thing once more,
contented (though we must hope suffer- and it rolls into the sea. Yet here, on
ing internal agonies in his conscience). a margin of two inches or so, the Guille-
I must begin, however, at the beginning. mots maybe seen sitting each on her
There is a lighthouse built upon a single long, bluish egg, their little white
rocky islet jutting out into the stormy stomachs bolt upright, in rows close
Irish Sea, surrounded with dangerous together, but apparently quite comfort-
reefs, where vessels of old were contin- able. The gulls and razorbills take
nally wrecked, and even now come often it easier, and squat less stiffly over
to grief. It is joined to the mainland the two eggs which they lay. The
by a small suspension bridge, and can clamor of the clouds of birds, all
only be reached by a staircase of some talking at once, is deafening. The col-
three hundred rude steps winding down ony is most regular in its habits; it
the face of the cliffs, the rocky ledges in appears on the island always on the
one place little better than a ladder, same day in February-having previ-
while on both sides the precipices rise ously sent an ambassage of select birds
five hundred feet sheer out of the sea. about a fortnight before to see that the
Upon this island live the lighthouse- rock is still in its right place-that their
keeper, his wife, and donkey, and up sea-side lodgings, food, etc., are all in
and down this path these three pass readiness. After their young ones are
every week to get their provisions at the fledged, the birds all leave the cliffs on
nearest little town, some three or four the same day in August, and their chil-
miles away. At the top of the rock is dren are not allowed to return to the
a shed where a small cart is kept to community, it is said, until they are two
which they harness the donkey-make years old.
their expedition-and return along the The birds are preserved with almost
craggy, steep mountain road behind the religious veneration; in a fog, when the
promontory. When the party reach light is invisible, and the bell, which is
the top of the steps, the cart is put supposed to sound a distance of two
again into the shed, the goods are bound miles, is unheard in the thick air, the
on the donkey's back, who, with much noise of the birds gives warning of the
neatness and despatch, proceeds to step dangerous coast at hand.
with his load carefully down the stairs Nothing could exceed the peace and
and then up again into the island, car- harmony of the island. The gulls and
trying everything safely into his home. the donkey did not in any way interfere


/ *









THE LIGHTHOUSE DONKEY.-Continued.

with each other. He was happy both in reefs, the gulls hovering above him
the society of the summer and the soli- ready to fall on him and banquet upon
tude of the winter; when, in an evil his remains!
moment, the lighthouse-keeper took it An attempt was next made to bring
into his head to add a pony to the in a she-goat; but the donkey was so
establishment, which was brought down much the stronger and most astute of
the endless steps with a great expendi- the two, that she was obliged to be car-
ture of trouble. ried away almost immediately, or it was
The donkey was hurt as to his feel- clear she would have soon shared the
S ings as well as in his stomach. Clearly pony's fate, and the donkey now reigns
there was not room or a living for two; undisputed lord of the situation.
the blades of grass were already so I saw the murderer, standing quietly
scanty that he had to eke out his din- munching an indescribable something,
ner with potato parings, etc.,-indeed, apparently with much enjoyment, un-
he ate everything that the pigs (if they der the shelter of a low wall overlook-
had existed) would have taken. What ing the restless foaming waters far be-
had this wretched beast (he thought) neath. But although he seemed to be
to do in his territory ? infringing on his ruminating sternly, it did not appear
rights takingthe bread out of his very to be on his crimes. I thought he had
mouth? He was naturally excessively a very bad expression of face, and that
cross, and gave way to his temper, and his eye was wicked ; but as I was above
cross, and gave Way to his temper, and a
plagued and tormented the miserable a quarter of a mile away, on the top of
the cliffs, this may have been the effect
pony out of his very life. Still the ob-
of a vivid imagination.
durate lighthouse-keeper would not rid of a vivid imagination.
What is certain is, that he is Ivery
him of his enemy, and the donkey began
S to see that there would be no end to his handsome of his kind-large and pros-
annoyance except through his own ex- perous-looking, and certainly does not
ertions. pine under the remorse which, accord-
ing to all codes, human or beastly, a
Ore day (prompted, doubtless, by the well-regulated donkey ought to feel for
devil-at least he would have laid the this his most abominable and wicked
blame there) he suddenly crept up close action.
to the pony's side, seized him traitor- The accompanying picture gives a
ously with his teeth by the scuff of the portrait of the murderer-if Madame
neck, dragged him to the edge of the Tussaud should desire to add him to
rocks, turned round, and kicked him her collection of such persons.
nearer and nearer to the precipice (but
-a little way off), and at last fairly pushed
him into the breakers below. It was all LEAVE your grievances, as Napoleon
too quickly done for a rescue; the light- did his letters, unheeded for three
House man, from the top of his tower, weeks, and it is astonishing how few
helpless to interfere, saw the poor pony, of them, by that time, will require
still alive, floating out to sea over the heeding.



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"I WILL!" IN THE RIGHT PLACE.

SSIE DENNIS is the little hard to get it for him. Suppose I ask
mother of the family, four in Ben to take care of baby," as he was
number. I cannot think what still called, though more than two years
her father would do without old; "and then perhaps some one may
her. As for Ben, the eldest, you will have a little work for me to do, or an
see, by-and-by, that he thinks much more errand to run. I must begin by putting
of his own comfort than that of any one by a penny now and then."
Else. So away trotted Jessie with Bobbie,
Two years before this tale commences, and soon found Ben sitting on a rock
Mrs. Dennis died rather suddenly. Dur- by the sea-shore.
Sing her lifetime no cottage home in the "Will you take care of baby for an
S- village was more happy and comfortable hour or two, Ben "
than hers; she was an industrious, "Not I! little nuisance! He will be
S/ thrifty woman, and earned a good deal getting in the sea and drowning him-
by working in many ways. But since self. He's never good when he's with
her death Jessie has often to go hungry me."
to bed, and but for her bright, deter- Bobbie lowered his brows and made
mined spirit, always thinking, "I must a very determined face at his brother,
not give up, I will try!" they would cuddling up close to Jessie.
:'. have no home at all, except in the work- "Oh! I'm sure, Ben, he's a very good
S house. boy; you don't understand him; if
S The father is a clever man at his trade, you'd only just speak kindly he'd do
a carver in stone; but often away from anything you tell him. I wanted, to
home for weeks together; and since his earn a few pence if I could, Ben, and I
wife's death, frequently forgets to bring can't if you will not take care of baby;
back much of his earnings to his little I want some money so very much for
daughter, so she has to be very careful something."
and having. "I don't see it; why should I be
Father! Willie wants to have a nursery-maid? I've my own affairs to
flute; can't you buyhim one? He does attend to."
sing so sweetly, and last week he tried "Have you some work to do, really?
old Colin's flute and managed it beauti- I thought you were only loitering here
S fully." by these, or I would not have asked
""Flute, indeed! What rubbish next? you."
It's all I can do to clothe and feed you." "Mind your own business !"
Willie's anxious little face clouded So Jessie had to take baby home, and
S oer; his love for music was remarka- content herself with knitting; she made
ble in so young a child; and Jessie had socks and stockings, a luxury they
r always encouraged him, by teaching could not indulge in themselves now
the little fellow all the songs and hymns mother was dead; but Jessie sold them
she learned at school, to a lady, who was a very kind friend
"Never mind! thought Jessie; "we to her. When Ben was left alone he
shall, have one some day. I will try began to think, and wondered what










" I WILL!" IN THE RIGHT PLACE.-Continued.
Jessie so specially want- gets the prayer her mother taught her,
ed money for;, but he "Make me, dear Lord, to remember
could not guess. His others, and forget myself."
mind was uneasy. And after a while the dark cloud
SHe could well passes over. Dennis has work again,
have taken care Ben ceases to be so peevish, and Jessie
of Bobbie, still puts by her pence to buy a flute
a n d had for her darling Willie.
nothing At last she confides in her friend, and
"the coveted instrument is purchased;
although unknown to Jessie, the lady
adds a considerable sum to her hard-
earned store.
Willie sits on an old basket, and as-
tonishes the folks as they pass with his
sweet melodies, while Jessie stands knit-
ting, her heart brim full of happiness
and wonder.
A voice calls her from the cottage:
S" it is Ben. "A sk W illie to com e and
(CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE.)
whatever to do; in fact, though a
clever, active boy, he was selfish
and idle. He jumped up at last
and determined to mount the cliff,
so that he might watch Tom
Briggs' boat come in. A false step,
a horrible feeling that he was fall-
ing, and in a moment he was lying
at the foot of the cliff, with a bro-
ken leg.
Poor Jessie's pa- ---i----
tience is now taxed -
to its utmost. Ben
is a most trouble- _
some invalid; baby
has often to be left
alone, which he re- --
sents by crying, and
the father is out of
work. But still the
tired child works
on, and never for-








"*I- WILL!" IN THE RIGHT PLACE.-Continued.

play a bit to me. And I say, Jessie, do in the suburbs. You will generally find
you know I have been thinking a good a trough outside a public-house in the
deal lately, and I want to be a better country, at which all animals may have
boy when I get up again. I have seen a mouthful of water.
you working all day long and never
complaining; if you had lectured me THE PASS OF SPLUGEN.
S I shouldn't have cared, but you were By EDWABDWILLETT.
kind like mother used to be, even when (6s Mustranon on preceding page.
I was cross, and somehow I thought if HE little river tumbles down
she was watching, what would she think The hill and giant mountains,
of me From where its furthest source
But Ben could get no further, he hid is found
is face down in the bed, and the sobs In snow and icy fountains.
would come, do what he might.
It rattles gaily on its way,
*As down the pass it dashes,
And sends up airy clouds of spray,
THE DRINKING TROUGH. Through which the sunlight flashes.
S"Drink, pretty creature, drink I"
IN this hot weather it is a great boon Up there it turns a clumsy wheel,
to all the poor animals in the fields and To help the honest miller;
in towns to have plenty of water. We Then, after filling tubs with meal,
should all see that if we keep animals, It gets a little stiller.
-be they dogs, or cats, or birds, or
horses,-that they all have plenty of It comes from where the hunter bold
water, or they will suffer acutely. Were The agile chamois chases,
any of you young people ever really To where the girls drive goats to fold,
thirsty -I do not mean just heated, Or weave such lovely laces.
"arid feeling that a glass of water would
be acceptable, but I mean the real burn- The man who drew his childish breath
ing thirst that sometimes may be ex- Among those rocks and mountains,
perienced; then you will feel as poor Remembers till his day of death
animals, which are driven quickly along Their icy springs and fountains.
a hot road, pulling a heavy cart. Fancy
v being whipped up a hill with a piece of Thogh it may be his lot to roam
iron in your mouth, and steaming all In many lands, yet never
S over, and all this time unable to ask for Will he forget his mountain home,
a drink of water. Perhaps when the The Pass, the rushing river.
horse stops to taste it, the unfeeling
driver will whip him and make him go
S- on again. Some kind-hearted people CHARACTER is like cloth. If white, it
have put up drinking-troughs for ani- can be dyed black; but once blackened,
Imals in London, and in several districts it cannot be dyed white.

*'Il








"*I- WILL!" IN THE RIGHT PLACE.-Continued.

play a bit to me. And I say, Jessie, do in the suburbs. You will generally find
you know I have been thinking a good a trough outside a public-house in the
deal lately, and I want to be a better country, at which all animals may have
boy when I get up again. I have seen a mouthful of water.
you working all day long and never
complaining; if you had lectured me THE PASS OF SPLUGEN.
S I shouldn't have cared, but you were By EDWABDWILLETT.
kind like mother used to be, even when (6s Mustranon on preceding page.
I was cross, and somehow I thought if HE little river tumbles down
she was watching, what would she think The hill and giant mountains,
of me From where its furthest source
But Ben could get no further, he hid is found
is face down in the bed, and the sobs In snow and icy fountains.
would come, do what he might.
It rattles gaily on its way,
*As down the pass it dashes,
And sends up airy clouds of spray,
THE DRINKING TROUGH. Through which the sunlight flashes.
S"Drink, pretty creature, drink I"
IN this hot weather it is a great boon Up there it turns a clumsy wheel,
to all the poor animals in the fields and To help the honest miller;
in towns to have plenty of water. We Then, after filling tubs with meal,
should all see that if we keep animals, It gets a little stiller.
-be they dogs, or cats, or birds, or
horses,-that they all have plenty of It comes from where the hunter bold
water, or they will suffer acutely. Were The agile chamois chases,
any of you young people ever really To where the girls drive goats to fold,
thirsty -I do not mean just heated, Or weave such lovely laces.
"arid feeling that a glass of water would
be acceptable, but I mean the real burn- The man who drew his childish breath
ing thirst that sometimes may be ex- Among those rocks and mountains,
perienced; then you will feel as poor Remembers till his day of death
animals, which are driven quickly along Their icy springs and fountains.
a hot road, pulling a heavy cart. Fancy
v being whipped up a hill with a piece of Thogh it may be his lot to roam
iron in your mouth, and steaming all In many lands, yet never
S over, and all this time unable to ask for Will he forget his mountain home,
a drink of water. Perhaps when the The Pass, the rushing river.
horse stops to taste it, the unfeeling
driver will whip him and make him go
S- on again. Some kind-hearted people CHARACTER is like cloth. If white, it
have put up drinking-troughs for ani- can be dyed black; but once blackened,
Imals in London, and in several districts it cannot be dyed white.

*'Il























SPRING SONG.

EASON of pleasures, Bees to the bowers
Boon thou art here, Merrily throng,
Scattering treasures, Sipping the flowers,
Crowning the year. Murmuring song ;
Dances each fountain, Heav'nward ascending
Rivulets sing; Odors arise;
Valley and mountain Breezes descending
Greet thee, 0 Spring I Float from the skies.

Gentle gales lightly One thither rushes,
Fan the warm beam, Lightly it flies,
Golden flies brightly 'Tis in the bushes,
Sport on the stream; Fading in sighs;
Birds flutter o'er us, Now hither winging,
All the woods ring- 'Tis in my breast,
Nature in chorus Muses all singing,
Greets thee, 0 Spring. Say I am blest I

Yesterday, sisters,
Who should appear
Wafted on zephyrs,
Beauty came here I









































































































































i; U


















'bWUTE~VI l8 ,Ir9*
A L ALIGoRY.
'a PRC ile goldfinches thought it good fan,
With their mother's permission, tohazard a run
Away from their nest, neathh the sweet-scented ihay,
To taste all the joys of the fair summer day.
They, peeped and they pried with each little.black eye,
And looked up with awe at the far-away sky;
When all of a sudden, they started with fear,
And close to each other in terror drew near;
For they spied on the ground a most horrible thing I
At the end of its tail wis a terrible sting;
An'd a pair of fierce eyei started out of its head
And its body was hairy, iiciiiing to red t
, What is it I" they cried-" Whate'er can it be I
Such a Lerce-looking creature we never did see !"
Then panting -with terror, straighi homeward they hied,
And told their adventure. Their parent replied-
"1 My children, no cause had your iosoms for fen
From your vivid description, 'tils perfectly clear -
"Twas'a poorharmless liifer--an innocent beast
On whom .Uri relations with eagerness feast.
Fdr the future be wiser, nor rashly conclude
That a thing mud be evil, if awkward and rud.
Reniember that ignorance oftentimes flies
What.wisdom regards with benevolent eyes.
ROUP4 QVIDDIf






































-1' :-- '
























"AN INTERESTING ANECDOTE OF THE LATE PRESIDENT GARFIELD.

I recall an incident which has been related else- gathered about them-for they were to spend the
where, and which speaks for itself. Our classmates, night there-our classmate, taking a Testament from
many of them, had been spending a Fourth of July his pocket, said to his companions : Boys, I read a
on the top of Grey Lock Mountain, having an up- chapter every night simultaneously with my mother.
roariously good time," as college boys are apt to do If you please, I will read it aloud." And afterwards
when let loose for a day's recreation. As night he asked the oldest of them to lead in prayer.
S'V















IN SEPTEMBER.
WrITrH this quiet vale, where all is hushed and still
Save chirping birds and leaves that rustle as they fall,
Walking at eve beneath the shadow of the hill,
I meditate in peace how God's love circles all.
The heather blooms on, yonder mount, the gorse's fire
Spreads o'er the rodk-strewn slopes in golden glory bright
And in the fading light the vane that crowns the spire
Gleams like an evening star against the coming night.
The autumn days have come; in dusky glen and glade
The hazel-nuts tell of the browning of the sun;
The berries, black and ripe, hang in the copse's shade,
And whisper unto me, "The summer-time is done."
From off the distant sea there comes a soft, sweet breeze
That lingers gently toying with the russet grass,
ItD-akes a few brown withered leaves from off the trees,
And then up to the moors it doth in musio pass.
It bears upon its wings the odour of the waves-
The long, lone wash of waters, restless day and night,
That sweeps unconsciously above a thousand graves,
Nameless and flowerless, and out of human sight,
But watched of God. Ah, yes His ever-present love
Ne'er sleeps or doth forget, like this weak love bf ours.
Is thy day dull P God sendeth sunshine from above.
Is thy life parched beneath the heat ? He sendeth showers.
Art thou athirst or faint P His healing waters flow.
Whate'er He aendeth, know'thou, whatsoever it be,
Sunshine or summer rain, or even wintry snow,
It is what thou dost need-it is the best for thee.
And so go on thy way in peace, thy heart at rest,
"Walking within the circle of thy Father's will;
He cannot do aught for thee that is not the best,
And when the waves surge round He will say, "Peace I be
still."
So, softly as this evening hour fades into night,
And dusky gloaming comes now lingering daylight goes,
Trusting in Him who is both Way and Truth and Light,
Thalife shall slowly glide unto its quiet close.
"JAMES BoWKZR.









A SLICE OF THE MOON.

,' W ^ R1HERE are you going; my
. ) W? little man?"
"Going to the moon, sir,. if I
r can."
1 t "When you get there, what will
.4).. M v you do ?"
"With. my big knife I'll cut him
in two.'
"-" How will you get there, my
S- little man ?"
By bean-stalk train; sir, if I can.
I'll take to the rail, and keep to
the tr ck
:,, -- ,,,i Securely laid down by the world-
: ... ."' ,' renowned Jack"

I wish you success, then, my little man;
Pray bring me a moonbeam, if you can,
A slice of the cheese so rich and so green,,
The best and the biggest that ever was seen."


BUTTERCUPS.
SOLLY and Milly were good little A buttercup Dolly plucked. "Now I
girls : will see
Milly had straight hair, and Dolly had If Ada and Milly love butter," said
curls. she.
SInto the meadows they went one fine So she held neathh their chins the
day bright flower, and, behold,'
With Ada their nurse, for a good Their chins looked. as yellow and
game of play. shining as gold.
Plenty of buttercups were to be Ah, butter you love!" "Yes," said
S seen, Milly, I do,
Shining like stars 'mid. the grass long And toffy and candy, and alllgooQw
and greer. things too."









A SLICE OF THE MOON.

,' W ^ R1HERE are you going; my
. ) W? little man?"
"Going to the moon, sir,. if I
r can."
1 t "When you get there, what will
.4).. M v you do ?"
"With. my big knife I'll cut him
in two.'
"-" How will you get there, my
S- little man ?"
By bean-stalk train; sir, if I can.
I'll take to the rail, and keep to
the tr ck
:,, -- ,,,i Securely laid down by the world-
: ... ."' ,' renowned Jack"

I wish you success, then, my little man;
Pray bring me a moonbeam, if you can,
A slice of the cheese so rich and so green,,
The best and the biggest that ever was seen."


BUTTERCUPS.
SOLLY and Milly were good little A buttercup Dolly plucked. "Now I
girls : will see
Milly had straight hair, and Dolly had If Ada and Milly love butter," said
curls. she.
SInto the meadows they went one fine So she held neathh their chins the
day bright flower, and, behold,'
With Ada their nurse, for a good Their chins looked. as yellow and
game of play. shining as gold.
Plenty of buttercups were to be Ah, butter you love!" "Yes," said
S seen, Milly, I do,
Shining like stars 'mid. the grass long And toffy and candy, and alllgooQw
and greer. things too."






































STERN Winter-most unwelcome guest!- 'And there they gather moss to form
The earth in whitest robes has drest; Their children's bed all soft and warm,
And hast'ning through the crunching snow, And dried up twigs to make a blaze
With tinkling bells, the sledges go. That cheers the hearth with kindling rays.

The leafless wood looks drear and sad, Their treasures next the ashes yield,
No birds sing now with voices glad ;- And hot potatoes lie revealed,
But boys are romping far and wide, Which little hungry mouths invite,
And o'er the ice delight to slide. With dainty smell and welcome sight.

When on the panes with frost encased, Lord! all Thy ways are great and good!
The mimic fir-trees may be traced, Thou giv'st e'en orphaned birds their food-
In spite of biting cold and snow, Thy blessing and Thy fostering care
I oor housewives to the forest go. Alike the hut and palace share 1









SALISBURY CATHEDRAL.




a NE of the
M finest spec-
imens of
early English arch-
itecture is the Salis-
bury Cathedral. It
was built in the
fifteenth century.
It is in the form of
a double cross, and
perfect in its plan
and proportions.
"The singular, uni-
formity displayed in
its design and style,
the harmony which
pervades its several
parts and propor-
tions, and the strik-
ing air of brightness,
simplicity and ele-
gance that reigns
throughout the
whole, all conspire
to invest it with a
charm peculiarly its
"own, whilst the great elevation of its spire renders it without excep-
tion the most lofty building in England. The spire is the most elegant
.in proportions, and is 400 feet from the pavement.
/1.
























TO A FRIEND,
Who gave Me a Group of Weedsand
Grasses.

[AFTER A DRAWING OF DCRER.]

I RUE as the sun's own work,
V but more refined,
It tells of love behind the
artist's eye,
Of sweet companionships with earth
and sky,
And summers stored, the sunshine of
the mind:
What peace I sure, ere you breathe, the
fickle wind
Will break its truce and bend that
grass-plume high
Scarcely yet quiet from the gilded fly
Thatflits a more luxurious perch tofind:
Thanks for a pleasure that can never pall,
A serene moment deftlycaught and kept
To make immortal summer on my wall;
Had he who drew such gladness ever
wept ?
Ask rather couldhe else have seen at all,
Or grown in Nature's mysteries an
adept ? J. LOWELL
































IF,-

PUPPIES AND TORTOISE.
SSIGHT most strange and wonderful
Three little puppies saw-
A creature out of shell of horn
Popped out a head and claw.








152 Worthington's Annual.

fine clothes, will it not take all the
i' girls' time to dress and undress them ?
S,, They love their dolls, but they have
Other things to do, and we do not think
That they are so silly as to play with
S.them all the tim e.
_- I 01 -.- I ".* .i

II SLE, Sleep, Little Baby.
S-SLEEP, little baby of mine,
"1 l'.' Night and the darkness are near,
i'Ii But Jesus looks down
Through the shadows that frown,
SKEAnd baby has nothing to fear.

SShut, little sleepy blue eyes;
Dear little head, be at rest;
4 aI Jesus, like you,
Was a baby once, too,
And slept on his own mother's breast.

Sleep, little baby of mine,
u aSoft on your pillows so white;
___ Jesus is here,
-a_ _. __er To watch over you, dear,
-- And nothing can harm you to-night.

S-0- O, little darling of mine,
What can you know of the bliss,
The comfort I keep,
Awake and asleep,
Because I am certain of this ?
Dress Makir/g. KNOWLEDGE, truth, love, beauty, good-
FLORENCE has a sewing party. She ness, faith, alone can give vitality to the
has invited her five little friends to spend mechanism of existence; the laugh of
the afternoon with her, and help make mirth that vibrates through the heart, the
Dolly some new dresses. Ada has tears that freshen the dry waste within,
brought along her doll, and they will the music that brings childhood back, the
make a new dress for her, too. Such prayer that callS the future near, the
fittings, and cuttings, and bastings, and doubt which makes us meditate, the death
trying on and taking off! When they which startles us with mystery, the hard-
have used up all the bits of silk and ship which forces us to struggle, the anx-
cambric, the velvets and laces and other iety that ends in trust, are the true nour-
materials, the dollies will have so many ishment of our natural being.








152 Worthington's Annual.

fine clothes, will it not take all the
i' girls' time to dress and undress them ?
S,, They love their dolls, but they have
Other things to do, and we do not think
That they are so silly as to play with
S.them all the tim e.
_- I 01 -.- I ".* .i

II SLE, Sleep, Little Baby.
S-SLEEP, little baby of mine,
"1 l'.' Night and the darkness are near,
i'Ii But Jesus looks down
Through the shadows that frown,
SKEAnd baby has nothing to fear.

SShut, little sleepy blue eyes;
Dear little head, be at rest;
4 aI Jesus, like you,
Was a baby once, too,
And slept on his own mother's breast.

Sleep, little baby of mine,
u aSoft on your pillows so white;
___ Jesus is here,
-a_ _. __er To watch over you, dear,
-- And nothing can harm you to-night.

S-0- O, little darling of mine,
What can you know of the bliss,
The comfort I keep,
Awake and asleep,
Because I am certain of this ?
Dress Makir/g. KNOWLEDGE, truth, love, beauty, good-
FLORENCE has a sewing party. She ness, faith, alone can give vitality to the
has invited her five little friends to spend mechanism of existence; the laugh of
the afternoon with her, and help make mirth that vibrates through the heart, the
Dolly some new dresses. Ada has tears that freshen the dry waste within,
brought along her doll, and they will the music that brings childhood back, the
make a new dress for her, too. Such prayer that callS the future near, the
fittings, and cuttings, and bastings, and doubt which makes us meditate, the death
trying on and taking off! When they which startles us with mystery, the hard-
have used up all the bits of silk and ship which forces us to struggle, the anx-
cambric, the velvets and laces and other iety that ends in trust, are the true nour-
materials, the dollies will have so many ishment of our natural being.













~~Ii

















iii I1









iii!










A-


~~~~~~~~~4 /c---- ; --~&--~ = ,


































iw, rn lte bs..
WALTER MACPARREN.















. I I I -1
n ndant nspressivo. __








An- gry words are light ly spo- ken In a rash and thoughtless
Love is, much tco pure and hoe- ly, Friendship is too sa cred















hour, Brightest links of life are brok.- en By their deep in si- dious
far, For a mo-ment's reckless fol ly Thus to de so late and










power. Hearts in spired by warm est feel ing Ne'er be :fore by an- ger
mar. Ang ry words are light ly spok en, Bitt'rest thoughts are rashly




F- Ir r \rr r r I I--
Cres.
_j= r r '+ -" .. / + t- r I 6 :





stirred, Oft are rent past hu- man heal ing By a sin gle an gry
tirr'd; Bright-est links of life are bro ken By a sin gle an gry
I I F




K I I F--9




word.
word.




I PI
J' i I I I -,fra1








214 Worthington's Annual.

her teacher from behind her fan
to see if she is being observed,

gracefully. These are theyoung-
T est now on the floor, and some
of them seem quite too young
for dancing. But this is not a
ball-room, but only a lesson-
room. The lesson lasts perhaps
an hour, and is given in the
afternoon, so that the little ones
may not get tired, and may have
an early supper and go to bed
when all good little girls should.
Their parents are waiting for
Horee Po niter ltess. the smaller girls, to see that they get
Hme Pliteess home safely.
THE boy who is polite to father and
mother is likely to be polite to everybody
else A boy lacking politeness to his par- GrarldMIothers.
ents may have the semblance of courtesy GRANDMOTHERS are very nice folks,
in society, but is never truly polite in They beat all the aunts in creation;
spirit, and is in danger, as he becomes They let'a chap do what he likes,
fartiiliar, of betraying his real want of And don't worry about education.
courtesy.
We are all in danger of living too much I am sure I can't see it at all,
for the outside world, for the impression What a poor fellow ever could do
which we make in society, coveting the For apples and pennies and cakes,
good opinion of others, and caring too lit- Without a grandmother or two.
tle for the opinion of those who are in a And if he is bad now and then,
sense a part of ourselves. And makes a great racketing noise,
We say to every boy and girl, to culti- They only look over their specs
vate the habit of courtesy and propriety And say, Ah, boys will be boys !
at. home-in the kitchen as well as in
the parlor, and you will be sure in other Life is only short at the best;
places to deport yourself in a becoming Let the children be happy to-day."
and attractive manner. Then they look for a while at the sky,
And the hills that are far, far away.
Quite often, as twilight comes on,
The Dancing School. Grandmothers sing hymns very low
THESE little girls shown in the opposite To themselves, as they rock by the fire,
engraving are taking their first lessons in About heaven, ad where they shall go.
the art of dancing. Those in the fore- And then a boy, stopping to think,
ground are now going through a pretty Will find a hot tear in his eye,
figure, while the others are resting and To know what will come at the last-
looking on. One shy little one watches For grandmothers all have to die.








214 Worthington's Annual.

her teacher from behind her fan
to see if she is being observed,

gracefully. These are theyoung-
T est now on the floor, and some
of them seem quite too young
for dancing. But this is not a
ball-room, but only a lesson-
room. The lesson lasts perhaps
an hour, and is given in the
afternoon, so that the little ones
may not get tired, and may have
an early supper and go to bed
when all good little girls should.
Their parents are waiting for
Horee Po niter ltess. the smaller girls, to see that they get
Hme Pliteess home safely.
THE boy who is polite to father and
mother is likely to be polite to everybody
else A boy lacking politeness to his par- GrarldMIothers.
ents may have the semblance of courtesy GRANDMOTHERS are very nice folks,
in society, but is never truly polite in They beat all the aunts in creation;
spirit, and is in danger, as he becomes They let'a chap do what he likes,
fartiiliar, of betraying his real want of And don't worry about education.
courtesy.
We are all in danger of living too much I am sure I can't see it at all,
for the outside world, for the impression What a poor fellow ever could do
which we make in society, coveting the For apples and pennies and cakes,
good opinion of others, and caring too lit- Without a grandmother or two.
tle for the opinion of those who are in a And if he is bad now and then,
sense a part of ourselves. And makes a great racketing noise,
We say to every boy and girl, to culti- They only look over their specs
vate the habit of courtesy and propriety And say, Ah, boys will be boys !
at. home-in the kitchen as well as in
the parlor, and you will be sure in other Life is only short at the best;
places to deport yourself in a becoming Let the children be happy to-day."
and attractive manner. Then they look for a while at the sky,
And the hills that are far, far away.
Quite often, as twilight comes on,
The Dancing School. Grandmothers sing hymns very low
THESE little girls shown in the opposite To themselves, as they rock by the fire,
engraving are taking their first lessons in About heaven, ad where they shall go.
the art of dancing. Those in the fore- And then a boy, stopping to think,
ground are now going through a pretty Will find a hot tear in his eye,
figure, while the others are resting and To know what will come at the last-
looking on. One shy little one watches For grandmothers all have to die.








214 Worthington's Annual.

her teacher from behind her fan
to see if she is being observed,

gracefully. These are theyoung-
T est now on the floor, and some
of them seem quite too young
for dancing. But this is not a
ball-room, but only a lesson-
room. The lesson lasts perhaps
an hour, and is given in the
afternoon, so that the little ones
may not get tired, and may have
an early supper and go to bed
when all good little girls should.
Their parents are waiting for
Horee Po niter ltess. the smaller girls, to see that they get
Hme Pliteess home safely.
THE boy who is polite to father and
mother is likely to be polite to everybody
else A boy lacking politeness to his par- GrarldMIothers.
ents may have the semblance of courtesy GRANDMOTHERS are very nice folks,
in society, but is never truly polite in They beat all the aunts in creation;
spirit, and is in danger, as he becomes They let'a chap do what he likes,
fartiiliar, of betraying his real want of And don't worry about education.
courtesy.
We are all in danger of living too much I am sure I can't see it at all,
for the outside world, for the impression What a poor fellow ever could do
which we make in society, coveting the For apples and pennies and cakes,
good opinion of others, and caring too lit- Without a grandmother or two.
tle for the opinion of those who are in a And if he is bad now and then,
sense a part of ourselves. And makes a great racketing noise,
We say to every boy and girl, to culti- They only look over their specs
vate the habit of courtesy and propriety And say, Ah, boys will be boys !
at. home-in the kitchen as well as in
the parlor, and you will be sure in other Life is only short at the best;
places to deport yourself in a becoming Let the children be happy to-day."
and attractive manner. Then they look for a while at the sky,
And the hills that are far, far away.
Quite often, as twilight comes on,
The Dancing School. Grandmothers sing hymns very low
THESE little girls shown in the opposite To themselves, as they rock by the fire,
engraving are taking their first lessons in About heaven, ad where they shall go.
the art of dancing. Those in the fore- And then a boy, stopping to think,
ground are now going through a pretty Will find a hot tear in his eye,
figure, while the others are resting and To know what will come at the last-
looking on. One shy little one watches For grandmothers all have to die.
































.;iid 1 Y















J;-=~=



3~=i-11TIM

4 (ji-~=~==
----------- ~ 110







A--

ol `==-Jiiv, P.---- --




~ I~E ~ -- wo



MOMS- -






I 8 P'orthington's Annual.





















Going to the Ball..
HERE'S Master Tom and sister Kate; The fancy ball to which they're going
They're going to the ball; Is held but once a year;
If they tarry till they're late, By all they say and all their showing,
They' cannot go at all. It must be very queer.
Kate is dressed in silk and laces, I fear that Kate's a little vain
And Tom in velvet fine; Of her new dress to-night;
Just to see their smiling faces Tom says it will be sure to rain-
Is worth your while and mine. Then 'twill be ruined quite.


Maidern Fair.
BLESSINGS on thee, maiden fair, But, maid, not all thy beauty lies
With wealth of flowing, golden hair, In golden hair and lustrous eyes;
Ruddy cheeks and laughing eyes, These but attract, but cannot bind;
As clear and bright as summer skies. 'Tis in the heart truecharms we find
No gem of art, no jewel rare, There is a beauty of the heart,
With woman's beauty can compare; A well of beauty in the soul,
'Tis now and ever was the theme That to the features will impart
Of poet's verse and artist's dream. Sweet graces which we all extol.






I 8 P'orthington's Annual.





















Going to the Ball..
HERE'S Master Tom and sister Kate; The fancy ball to which they're going
They're going to the ball; Is held but once a year;
If they tarry till they're late, By all they say and all their showing,
They' cannot go at all. It must be very queer.
Kate is dressed in silk and laces, I fear that Kate's a little vain
And Tom in velvet fine; Of her new dress to-night;
Just to see their smiling faces Tom says it will be sure to rain-
Is worth your while and mine. Then 'twill be ruined quite.


Maidern Fair.
BLESSINGS on thee, maiden fair, But, maid, not all thy beauty lies
With wealth of flowing, golden hair, In golden hair and lustrous eyes;
Ruddy cheeks and laughing eyes, These but attract, but cannot bind;
As clear and bright as summer skies. 'Tis in the heart truecharms we find
No gem of art, no jewel rare, There is a beauty of the heart,
With woman's beauty can compare; A well of beauty in the soul,
'Tis now and ever was the theme That to the features will impart
Of poet's verse and artist's dream. Sweet graces which we all extol.









































































'Ol
\'



















AT SCHOOL.



ANNOT you do your sum, dear?
Does it make you cry?
Move higher: let me come dear;
And see if I can try.


" Give the pencil here, dear;
Write this 'three' once more;
You have not made it clear, dear:
It runs right through the 'four!'


"Let us take this line, dear;
It will soon be done:
Fifteen are six and nine, dear,-
Five, and carry one.


Here are four and seven, dear,
Count up on your slate:
Yes, they make eleven, dear;
Now add figure eight.


























STO
ELL
















-77

















"There! I see you smile, dear;
There I take a kiss:
You'll help me a while, dear,
For helping you in this."


Right, you little kind one!
Love will perish never:
Years to come will find one
Clinging to you ever.

Jennett Humphreys.






















THE SCRAMBLE FOR SUGAR-PLUMS.


S* ARK that burst of silver laughter
Ringing up to beam and rafter!
How one's heart leaps and rejoices
At the music of those voices!
SHow one's eyes enjoy the sight
Of such innocent delight!
Laugh and scramble, shout and play,
Happy children, while you may:
Life soon loses its completeness,
Sugar-plums their pristine sweetness,
Dolls their charm, and nuts their savor,
And ginger-beer its champagne flavor.
Laugh, ye little lads and lasses:
Soon, too soon, your childhood passes;
Soon, too soon, you will be soiling
Hands and souls with baser toiling.
Just as you for sweetmeats scramble,
We for worldly prizes gamble:
Rank and title, place and power,
Fame, the triumph of an hour,


















Gold that fetters, love that changes,
Friendship that a word estranges,
Fashion, pleasure, empty station,
Beauty, homage, admiration,-
These profane and hollow joys
Are our sugar-plums and toys;
Slow to win, and hard to hold,
Dearly bought and dearly sold,
Seeming sweet, and tasting bitter,
Paint and tinsel, paste and glitter,
Fair without, and foul within,.
Dust and ashes, tears and sin!
Alas! I wish, but wish in vain,
That I were a child again.

Amelia B. Edwards














Jill!
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"HAPPY BE THY DREAMS "


Pi HE quiet drollery of this pic- part in his training is not to cherish in
ture, in which an elderly gen- him simply what is most attractive to
tleman of a past generation, ourselves, or what feeds our own and
who has come to the river's his vanity, but rather to study his
bank intent on fishing, and is fairly future needs, and to help him to sup-
caught napping by a party of pre- ply what is most lacking. It is where
sumptuous little pigs, is very amus- he is deficient, not where he excels,
ing. There is every appearance that that our earnest efforts are demanded.
the sleeper, fatigued with his labors Not until parents realize this so fully
of the fishing rod, and with the as to identify with it their highest in-
heat of a summer afternoon, has terest and pleasure in their charges
fallen into a brief state of blessed will promising children fulfill their
oblivion, leaving his fishing-basket, promises, and the question no longer
with the proceeds of his skill, to the be asked, "What has become of them?"
rapacious attack of those unconscion-
able four-footed gluttons. He will be
considerably surprised at waking, THE LESSON.
roused by the parting grunt of the LrrLE one, little one,
nearest porker, to find that he has They say life is hard:
been so impudently robbed of the fine Thou'lt hear this old story
roach, which he had intended carry. From preacher and bard.
ing home, to be cooked in the daintiest Little one, listen!
possible manner. I'll tell thee a way
STo make thy life easy
THE TRAINIG OF CHLDnRE.--t is Through night and through day.
true that many things are suitable for
manhood that are not for childhood; Little one, little one,
but this is not the case with mental Deep in thy heart
and moral qualities. If it were, there Is a voice true and tender,
could be no such thing as consistent Unspoiled and apart.
preparation for a good and useful life. It speaks to thee ever-
Every quality that the man or woman Darling, obey !
needs is incipient in the child, and Then life will be easy
needs development and exercise. Our Through night and through day.









"HAPPY BE THY DREAMS "


Pi HE quiet drollery of this pic- part in his training is not to cherish in
ture, in which an elderly gen- him simply what is most attractive to
tleman of a past generation, ourselves, or what feeds our own and
who has come to the river's his vanity, but rather to study his
bank intent on fishing, and is fairly future needs, and to help him to sup-
caught napping by a party of pre- ply what is most lacking. It is where
sumptuous little pigs, is very amus- he is deficient, not where he excels,
ing. There is every appearance that that our earnest efforts are demanded.
the sleeper, fatigued with his labors Not until parents realize this so fully
of the fishing rod, and with the as to identify with it their highest in-
heat of a summer afternoon, has terest and pleasure in their charges
fallen into a brief state of blessed will promising children fulfill their
oblivion, leaving his fishing-basket, promises, and the question no longer
with the proceeds of his skill, to the be asked, "What has become of them?"
rapacious attack of those unconscion-
able four-footed gluttons. He will be
considerably surprised at waking, THE LESSON.
roused by the parting grunt of the LrrLE one, little one,
nearest porker, to find that he has They say life is hard:
been so impudently robbed of the fine Thou'lt hear this old story
roach, which he had intended carry. From preacher and bard.
ing home, to be cooked in the daintiest Little one, listen!
possible manner. I'll tell thee a way
STo make thy life easy
THE TRAINIG OF CHLDnRE.--t is Through night and through day.
true that many things are suitable for
manhood that are not for childhood; Little one, little one,
but this is not the case with mental Deep in thy heart
and moral qualities. If it were, there Is a voice true and tender,
could be no such thing as consistent Unspoiled and apart.
preparation for a good and useful life. It speaks to thee ever-
Every quality that the man or woman Darling, obey !
needs is incipient in the child, and Then life will be easy
needs development and exercise. Our Through night and through day.























































SI
1W lif
,-2








































t- ''-- --l =













LITTLE ALPHABET
OF PRAYER
FOR
CHRISTIAN CHILDREN.
(From the Psalms.)

A asE, Thou Judge of the world; arise, and help us.
B ow down Thine ear, and hear me.
Consider my calling.
D eal Thou with me, 0 Lord God, according unto Thy mercy.
E nter hot into judgment with Thy servant.
F orsake me not, 0 God.
G o not far from me; give ear unto my prayer.
SH ave mercy upon me, 0 Lord; have mercy upon me.
I ncline Thine ear unto my calling.
J udge me, 0 Lord, according to Thy righteousness.
SK nit my heart unto Thee.
L ead me forth in Thy truth, and teach me Thy statutes.
M ake me a clean heart, 0 God.
N ever leave me, nor forsake me.
0 order my steps in Thy word.
P wonder the voice of my humble desires.
Q quicken me, 0 Lord, for Thy Name's sake.
R member me, 0 Lord.
My voice shalt \ how Thou me the way that I should walk in.
Thou hear
T each me Thy way.
betimes, 0 Lord. U nto Thee will I cry, 0 Lord, my strength.

V isit me with Thy salvation.
W e wait for Thy loving-lkndness, 0 Lord.
X cellent is Thy Name, 0 Lord, in all the earth.
Y ea, my songs will I make of Thy Name.
S/ Z ion heard of it and rejoiced. Alleluia.
9i,


















C.~**

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HOW QUARRELS BEGIN.
"`i -pWNY~B~U~- 'f ~~:










THE PILGRIMS AT PLYMOUTH ROCK.

N the autumn of 1620 the May- their long and perilous voyage, a few
flower, a small ship of 180 tons should be "not well affected to unity
burden, and of the short and and concord."
clumsy model of that time, At length, in November, the expanse
was buffeting the rough waves of the of troubled waters was broken by a
stormy Atlantic. She bore a precious range of low sand-hills ; and, barren and
freight-101 men, women, and children, cheerless as it appeared, the sight of
dissenters from the Church of England, land was hailed with joy and thanks-
flying from religious persecution in giving by the tempest-tossed Pilgrims.
their native land to seek a home in the They had purposed settling near the
wilderness of the New World, where mouth of the Hudson, but the ignorant
they could worship God as conscience self-will of their captain brought them
dictated, and plant the seeds of civil to the inhospitable shores of Cape Cod.
liberty. The billows ran high, and After sailing along the cheerless coast for
threatening clouds hung darkly over the two days, they rounded the extremity of
trackless waste of waters. The imagina- the cape, and anchored in the harbor on
tion might easily see in those clouds the its inner side, where the low sand-hills
spirits of persecution, with threatening protected them from the stormy winds.
gestures, driving the fugitives on their Cheerless as seemed the shores to which
stormy way; and faith could picture they had been brought, the leading
the angels of peace before them beckon- men of the little company landed to
ing them on to the Promised Land. examine the place, the gentle slope of
Weeks and months passed-some- the beach compelling them to wade
times with sunshine to cheer the voya- from their boats through the icy waters,
gers, but oftener with clouds and and thus to contract the seeds of dis-
storms to try the steadfastness of their ease as their first experience in the New
purpose,-and the lonely ship still World. Desolate and uninviting sands
sailed-slowly on where sea met sky on offered them no place for a settlement,
every side. The days grew short and and it was determined to explore the
cold, and head-winds seemed striving to coast in a shallop for a more hospitable
drive them back from the shores they region. But the shallop needed repairs,
sought. But, trusting in God, they fal- and sixteen weary days were occupied
tered not, and bore the ills of their long with this work, while the cold increased
and close confinement with steadfast for- and winter came on apace.
titude. Sickness was there: and death
compelled them to commit the remains GooD DEEDs.-An action to be
of one of their number to the deep. "good" needs three things. It must be
But despair and discontent never came done from a right motive, from an
to disturb the peace or waste the "honest and good heart." It must be
strength of the leaders, though it is not well done and thorough. And last, is
strange that, with all the discomforts of must be done to the glory of God.




























































-\ - -









HOW QUARRELS BEGIN.



O boys were returning home. from
school talking together, when one of
them said, I wish I had all the pas-
ture land in the world."
The other said, "I wish I had all
the cattle in the world."
"What would you do then?" said his
friend.
Why, I would turn them into your pasture
land."
"No, you wouldn't," was the reply.
"Yes, I would."
"But I wouldn't let you."
"I wouldn't ask you."
"You shouldn't do it."
"I should."
"You shan't."
"I will."
And with that they began to fight. And was
not the cause of the boys' fight a specimen of
the way in which quarrels begin amongst peo-
,ple who ought to be wiser ?





















































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"''--
,II. .ic.--,

-- ----r















1, /


Pc










A PROUD MOTHER.






--~-------~-; -----































"* S LUCK, cluck!" said the hen, Again the proud hen cried out, "Cluck,
S as with eager pride, cluck, cluck l"
She walked 'mid. her wee yel- Do not any distance go;
"low brood. Keep very near me, if you would not be
" What a family fine I there are none O'ercome by any foe."
like mine, So off they go o'er the grass so green,
And all of them strong and good." And a happier family never was seen.




























--


---- :---


------ ------
r--Til
--=---------- -- --
--



--- -----=-- ----


L--== _- ---- -1
























I_-==_










AN UNFORGIVING DOG.

m TOUCHING instance of dig- Do not forget that if you accomplish
nity and self-respect in a New- a little every day it will amount to a
foundland dog occurred not good deal in a year. If you pursue
long ago, on board the ship some study, or read one hour every day
Alexandra, and is related by a passen- in the year, you will have acquired an
ger. He belonged to an acquaintance amount of knowledge in three hundred
who was obliged to remain in Naples and sixty-five days that will surprise
on account of illness, but sent her ser- you. Bear this in mind now, early in
vant home with her baggage and per- the year, and let nothing prevent you
sonal property, including this dog. He from taking advantage of it.
was- a great pet with his mistress, and
when he was brought on board immedi- A SISTER'S LOVE.-Who can tell the
ately took a great fancy to this gentle- thoughts that cluster around the word
man, and showed great pleasure when sister? How ready she is to forgive the
noticed by him. "At last," says he, errors, to excuse the foibles of a brother.
"I found he was bringing fleas from She never deserts him. In adversity she
the steerage, and one day, with a de- clings closely to him, and in trial she
cided voice and manner, I ordered him cheers him. And when the bitter voice of
away. He looked at me as if he could reproach is poured in his ears she is ever
not have understood me rightly; but I ready to hush its harsh tones, and turn
repeated the'order, and he dropped his' his attention away from its painful notes.
head, and slowly and sadly walked off.
After this I could not get him to take
the slightest notice of me. If I coaxed if we would but check the speaker
and petted him ever so much he only When he spoils his neighbor's fame;
looked sadly away, and kept as much If we would but help the erring,
as possible out of my path.- I would Ere we utter words of blame;
have given much to have talked, so that If we would, how many might we
he might have understood me, or to have Turn from paths of sin and shame.
had any wag of his tail in token of his
having forgotten my harsh manner; but Ah, the wrongs that might be righted
to the end of the voyage he was unre- If we would but see the way !
lenting and unforgiving." Ah, the pains that might be lightened
Every hour and every day,
S ------- If we would but hear the pleadings
Of the hearts that go astray.
TIME is lent to us to be laid out in
God's service, to His honor, and we In each life, however lowly,
cannot be too diligent in it, if we con- There are seeds of mighty good;
sider that time is precious, short, pass- Still, we shrink from souls appealing
ing, uncertain, irrevocable when gone, With a timid "if we could;"
and that for which we must be account- But a God who judgeth all things
able. Knows the truth is, "if we would."


< '










AN UNFORGIVING DOG.

m TOUCHING instance of dig- Do not forget that if you accomplish
nity and self-respect in a New- a little every day it will amount to a
foundland dog occurred not good deal in a year. If you pursue
long ago, on board the ship some study, or read one hour every day
Alexandra, and is related by a passen- in the year, you will have acquired an
ger. He belonged to an acquaintance amount of knowledge in three hundred
who was obliged to remain in Naples and sixty-five days that will surprise
on account of illness, but sent her ser- you. Bear this in mind now, early in
vant home with her baggage and per- the year, and let nothing prevent you
sonal property, including this dog. He from taking advantage of it.
was- a great pet with his mistress, and
when he was brought on board immedi- A SISTER'S LOVE.-Who can tell the
ately took a great fancy to this gentle- thoughts that cluster around the word
man, and showed great pleasure when sister? How ready she is to forgive the
noticed by him. "At last," says he, errors, to excuse the foibles of a brother.
"I found he was bringing fleas from She never deserts him. In adversity she
the steerage, and one day, with a de- clings closely to him, and in trial she
cided voice and manner, I ordered him cheers him. And when the bitter voice of
away. He looked at me as if he could reproach is poured in his ears she is ever
not have understood me rightly; but I ready to hush its harsh tones, and turn
repeated the'order, and he dropped his' his attention away from its painful notes.
head, and slowly and sadly walked off.
After this I could not get him to take
the slightest notice of me. If I coaxed if we would but check the speaker
and petted him ever so much he only When he spoils his neighbor's fame;
looked sadly away, and kept as much If we would but help the erring,
as possible out of my path.- I would Ere we utter words of blame;
have given much to have talked, so that If we would, how many might we
he might have understood me, or to have Turn from paths of sin and shame.
had any wag of his tail in token of his
having forgotten my harsh manner; but Ah, the wrongs that might be righted
to the end of the voyage he was unre- If we would but see the way !
lenting and unforgiving." Ah, the pains that might be lightened
Every hour and every day,
S ------- If we would but hear the pleadings
Of the hearts that go astray.
TIME is lent to us to be laid out in
God's service, to His honor, and we In each life, however lowly,
cannot be too diligent in it, if we con- There are seeds of mighty good;
sider that time is precious, short, pass- Still, we shrink from souls appealing
ing, uncertain, irrevocable when gone, With a timid "if we could;"
and that for which we must be account- But a God who judgeth all things
able. Knows the truth is, "if we would."


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FEEDING THE DUCKS.

SICKY, dicky, ducky,
Black bills are lucky,
Blue bills are bonnie,
White bills are funny,
Red bills are sweetest,
Brown bills are neatest.
All kinds of colors
On the ducks' bills;
All kinds of fodder
Each gizzard fills.
Grandmamma comes,
Pan full of crumbs,
Dicky, dicky, ducky,
Now you are lucky.
Gobble as fast as you can,
Till you have emptied the pan.
Quack, quack, gobble, gobble,
Then away to the duck pond wabble.


NIV~






























MY FRIEND NEPTUNE.
ILLIE is tired after trundling his hoop for
more than an hour, and now with his fine
old dog, he lies down by the side of a
stream, under the shade of a young oak
tree, while Neptune drowsily glances at the
dragon-flies that dance in the sunlight.














THE NEWT BABY*'

HMay, what is this,
That opens its eyes,
And calls for a kiss-
Such a sweet surprise

It isn't a rabbit,
And can't be a mouse,
And how didit get here,
In mamma's own house ?

Now, don't make a noise, Rob,
And worry the dear;
A sweet little sister,
A baby is here.

And mamma has told me
It came all alone,
To be our sweet darling,
Our pet and our own.












JACK was nimble and Jack was quick,!

And Jack could jump over a candlestick,

But Jack his labour would often snirk,

And Jack loved play, but he hated work,

And so Jack's mother, a widowed dame,

To want and poverty quickly came,

And one day sent her heedless lad,

To sell the very last cow she had.


He climbed up the beanstalk hand ove
A rogue of a butcher met him now, hand,
And for a few beans he bought the cow, / And came to a strange and unknown
Which beans Jack's mother, in grief / land.
and woe, / A fairy met him and told him a tale,
Threw into the garden, not thinking How Jack's father had dwelt in a lovely
they'd grow. vale,
Until a great giant fierce and bad,
Next morning Jack was surprised to see, Until a great giant fierce and bad,
Had slain him and robbed him of al)
A beanstalk had grown up gallantly.
he had.




f~Z~ir 5-~i~iANN&,i







i7Y



































fen, ack,



and bold,t As soon as the giant his supper
Determined to get back his father's had done,
oHe counted his pounds o'er one
by one,
To tho giant's castle he straight Then sat by the fire, and sodly
went up, slept,
And the giant's wife let him in to While Jack from his place of con-
sup, cealment crept.














And reached with the bags of gold the door, A dog snarled at him as he went on,
Whence his mother had fled many years before. But Jack to ol0 Towzer threw a bone.


































THEELAZY CAT.



love lit-tie nsa-.sy, .her cost is so warm, And
21 '








if.I don'thurt her, sh'll do me noharm.l',l .sit by the fire and






ten.
S&er. _dim. eritard.

) r w .. I -
-give her some food, And Pus sy.will love :me, be cause I am good.



.... P P
S;, I '." I "1 a do


























THE HISTORY

OF


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.
With Twenty-Two Plotures by Thomas r Dalde.

Oa frequent cause of'deep He who commits an evil
distress, deed,
Is found in children heed. Is like a man who sows bad*.
lessness. seed;
Children whobrisk, andblithe, He may be sure that, quick
and gay, orslow,
Will sport and gambol all the That seed will burst and sprout.
day; and grow.
Who pierce a mother's fond Thus when you read how all
heart through, vain,
And know or care not what The thievish- giant strove for
thLy do; -. gain,
Such children soon the time This maxim in your memory.,
will see, 'keep,
When they'll repent right W#at a man sozoeAt A s8hall
bitterly rea .

































ALI BABA was a poor, poor woodman, One day Ali Baba was out in the forest,
Dwelling somewhere out in the east. Cutting down wood, poor toiling slave,
But he had a rich brother Cassim, When he discovered a troop of robbers,
Worth twenty thousand pounds at least. Who cried "Open Sesame to get into a cave.












I









When they were gone, thought Ali Baba, When he brought the gold to his wife home,
Why should not I cry Open Sesame" too-- She-never thinking what she was about-
And he found the cave full of gold and silver, Sent to brother Cassim's to borrow a measure
And came away as rich as a Jew. To measure the gold and the silver out.

































A piece of gold that stuck to the measure But cunning Cassim forgot Open Sesame"-
Soon showed Master Cassim the state of the case; Was caught in the cave to his great distress;
He made Ali Baba'tell him the secret 'The robbers found him and cut him in pieces,
About the "Open Sesame," and point out the place. Which cured him of his covetousness.
























Ali Baba went in search of Cassim, Meanwhile the robbers held a council,
When that greedy person so long did roam; Determined to find who'd stolen their pelf;
He found him like an orange cut up into quarters The captain, disguised as a good oil merchant,
Put him together and brought him home. Determined to settle the matter himself.





























He got safe home, to his mother's relief, And also the giant's wondrous hen,
For she lay pining and sick with grief. That laid eggs of gold again and agaih.
















But another time the giant was sharp, The giant ran himself out of breath,
For Jack went and stole iis golden harp, And here you see how he met his death.


Jack ran to the bean-stalk hard and fast,
And reached the foot of the plant at
S last.
Then quickly he cut the bean-stalk down,
I And it fell with the giant who clung
thereon, l
That the monster with shattered head,
SLay in the garden still and dead.
SAnd the Fairy said, "Jack you've your
own again,
For justice is done, and the robber
slain."














THE STORY

OF


ALI BABA

AND'



THE FORTY THIEVES.
With Seventeen Picrures by John Absolon.


HMns a pretty story, That the man who's greedy,
Written long ago- Never is at rest,
And what may it tell us? Thinks his brother's portion
Listen, you shall know. Always must be best.

Tis designed to teach yott- That the grasping miser
Goods obtained by wrong Never can enjoy
Don't enrich the finder- Wealth he is unable
Will not prosper long. 'Wisely to employ.

Better to be needy, And be ne'er ungrateful'
Quite of wealth bereft, For a service done-
Than to bask in riches, Or an act of kindness,
Produce of a theft. Or a favour won.

From rich brother Cassim, Think of Ali BAba,
And his wretched fate, And how well he knew
You may learn a lesson 'o rear with honour
Worthy to relate. Service good and true.






























R-
I W4I












THERE once was a forest, and dwelling there, One day, when the sun shone on every place,
Were a great and a small and a middle-sized Bear; Said the middle Bear, washing the little Bear's face,
They'd a bed and a chair and a pot for their tea, It's such a fine day-such beautiful weather,
And they lived all together in harmony.' Suppose we go out for a walk, all together."



























The three Bears scarcely were out of sight, She'd been searching the wild wood through and'through
When there came through the wood a maiden bright, For cowslips, wild roses, and violets blue;
Dancing and singing, with never a care, And now with heat and with thirst opprest,
A sweet pretty child, little Silverhair. She was looking about for a place to rest.

And thus she arrived q.ite unawares,
At the family house of these three fine Bears.



---------














S-1













She peeped through the window, and cried "Dear me, In the house she found the tables and chairs,
What beautiful place is this I see ?" And the three porridge-pots of the absent Bears.








f K. 0


She sat herself down in the little Bear's chair, The chair gave way and she came to the ground,
And ate up his porridge for her share; And then. on the fragments danced a round.











Then to the bedrooms up she crept, She suddenly woke with a start and a cry,
And on the little Bear's bed she slept; For there was the little Bear standing by.






























He came to the house of Ali Baba, He'd got the very talkative cobbler Much to the horror of All Baba,
Who very kindly asked him to stay; Who'd sewn up Cassim, to show him the way. When she took him to peep in the pan;























The robbers were found concealed in oil jars, By the slave Morgiana boiled, to a man.

And for the fiitless robber captain, And quite stone dead he fell on the carpet,
She to punish him laid a plan- -1,, Proving that robbers get punished at last.
She danced a dance in theEastern fashion,
And then she to'sing a song began. So by the death of the.robber captain
Ali Baba's fortune was made and won,
Pretending she still was only acting, And to reward this Motgiana
ithadagger she stab'd him as she passed H-" He married her right dff hand to his sot.,











S" THE

STORY OF

THE
THREE

BEAR S.

When you are in p stranger's house, Don't touch, dear children, the pretty things,
Be it mansion of man or bear, That you may find stored up there.


















With Twenty-Thb Pictaw by W. areyW.








































HARRY'S SUM.


"THIs difficult sum won't come right!" "No, no! "cried his master, who heard;
Cried poor little Harry one day; That won't do at all, my dear boy;
"I wish I might put it aside, While Alfred was hard at his work,
And go out with Alfy to play." I saw you at play with a toy."









































LITTLE MAGGIE.


SHE has fat little dumpy fingers, She is a plump little darling,
And two such droll little thumbs, So loving, so merry, so nice,
And eyes as black as any sloe, As I gaze I often think her
But as big as two large plums. M y Bird--of Paradise.





















NI











Little Silverhair not a moment stayed, Here you see little Silverhair,
But straight for the open window made- Who thinks she's pursued by an angry bear;
She sprang through the window and ran away, See how fast through the wood she flies,'
While the Bears gazed after her in dismanv Another tii she will be more wise.























Here's Silverhair on the little Bear's bed, Here the three famous Bears are found,
With a blue-bottle buzzing around her head; All of them dancing A merry go round,
Very cozy she looks at present, After all," they say, "she was very fair ;
But her waking up will not be so pleasant. So success to little Silverhair.







































THE KANGAROO AND YOUNG.

THa kangarooo carries her children in a bag formed by a hole in hei
skin until they are old enough to walk; and the little things seen very
happy there, and sometimes as their mother moves along over the grass
you may see them nibbling it as they move along.



































Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone;
But when she came there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.













She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
The poor dog looked dead.


She went to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor dog was laughing.


She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back
He was smoking a pipe.


She went to the ale-house
To get him some beer,
But when she came back,
The dog sat in a chair.


She went to the tavern
For white wine and red,
But when she came back
The dog stood on his head.












She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat,
But when she came back
He was feeding the cat


She went to the barber's
STo buy him a w ig,
But when she came back
He was dancing a jig.


She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
SHe was riding a goat.


S She went to the cobler's
To buy him some shoes,
SBut when she came back
He was reading the news.





F












She went to the sempstress
To buy him some linen,
But when she came back
The dog was a-spinning.


She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dress'd in his clothes.


The dame made a courtesy,
The dog made a bow;
The dame said "Your servant,"
The dog said Bow wow."


This wonderful dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight;
He could sing, he could dance,
He could read, he could write.


She gave him rich dainties
Whenever he fed,
And erected a monument
When he was dead
























































WHO SAID "JACK UP THE BEAN STALKS?"

























THE HISTORY

OF


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.
With Twaety.rTo PltUres by Thomas I Dail.

ON frequent cause of deep He who commits an evil
distress, deed, '
Is found in children as heed- Is like a man who sows bad
lessness. sced;
Children who, brisk, and blithe, I He may be sure that, quick
and gay, or slow,
Will sport and gambol all the That seed will burst and sprout
day ; and grow.
Who pierce a mother's fond Thus when you read how all
heart through, in vain,
And know or care not what The thievish- giant strove for
they do; gain,
Such children soon the tune This maxim in your memory
will see, keep,
When they'll repent right nkat a man someth he *hall
bitterly reap.










--------::





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;) JAoK was nimble and Jack was quick,'

And Jack could jump over candlestick,

But Jack his labour would often snirk,

And Jack loved play, but he hated work,

And so Jack's mother, a widowed dame,

To want and poverty quickly came,

And one day sent her heedless lad.

To sell the very last cow she had.


He climbed up the bean-stalk hand 6vel
A rogpe of a butcher met him now, hand,
And for a few beans he bought the cow, / And came to a strange and unknown
Which beans Jack's mother, in grief land.
and woeo, //A fairy met him and told him a tale,
Threw into the garden, not thinking How Jack's father had dwelt in a lovely
they'd grow. vale,
Until a great giant fierce and bad,
Next morning Jack was surprised to see,
Had slain him and robbed him of al
A bean-stalk had grown up gallantly. he had.
he had.

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So that with her baby forced to Then hearing her husband coming
flee, back,
Jack's motherhad fallen topenury; In a nice snug cupboard she hid
Then Jack who was both brave oug Jack.
and bold, As soon as the giant his supper
Determined to get back his father's d oe
ol He counted his pounds o'er one
gold,
To the giant's castle he straight by one,
Then sat by the fire, and soundly
"went up, slept,
And the giant's wife let him in to" . While Jack from his place of con-
sup, cealment crept.















And reached with the bags of gold the door, A dog snarled at him as he went on,
Whence his mother had fled many years before. But Jack to old Towzer threw a bone.


























He got safe home, to his mother's relief, And also the giant's wondrous hen,
For she lay pining and sick with grief. That laid eggs of gold again and agaih.















But another time the giant was sharp, The giant ran himself out of breath,
For Jack went and stole his golden harp, And here you see how he met his death.


Jack ran to the bean-stalk hard and fast,
"And reached the foot of the plant at
last.
Then quickly he cut the bean-stalk down,
And it fell with the giant who clung
thereon,
That the monster with shattered head,
Lay in the garden still and dead.
And the Fairy said, "Jack you've your
own again,
For justice is done, and the robber
slain."





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