• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Address to baby friends
 My bright penny
 Flora and her pet ba lambs...
 Sissy to baby
 Dunkley new railway from Birmingham...
 The dog that pulled the bell
 The playful kittens (picture)
 The well in the desert
 Where are the kids?
 The well in the desert (contin...
 Dear Dicky's grave (picture)
 Mother's cake
 Dunkley's four-in-hand (pictur...
 Mother's cake (continued)
 Johnny makes a rocking horse...
 Mother's cake (continued)
 Bound for Australia (picture)
 The pet kitten
 The river (picture)
 The sick prince
 Charlie making baby's carriage...
 The sick prince (continued)
 Emma's prayer
 Advertising
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: The baby's friend : a manual for all the popsey-whopseys in the world.
Title: The baby's friend
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053766/00001
 Material Information
Title: The baby's friend a manual for all the popsey-whopseys in the world
Physical Description: 32, 2 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dunkley, W. H ( Publisher )
Free Press Co ( Printer )
Publisher: W.H. Dunkley
Place of Publication: London ;
Manchester ;
Birmingham
Manufacturer: Free Press Co.
Publication Date: 1885
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1885   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Manchester
England -- Birmingham
England -- West Bromwich
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations and text printed in red ink.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements for baby carriages precede and follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053766
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221592
notis - ALG1817
oclc - 64613051

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Address to baby friends
        Page 2
    My bright penny
        Chapter I: Essie and her bright penny
            Page 3
        Chapter II: Essie and the beautiful blue-eyed doll
            Page 4
            Page 5
        Chapter III: Essie is taught a lesson
            Page 6
    Flora and her pet ba lambs (picture)
        Page 7
    Sissy to baby
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Dunkley new railway from Birmingham to London (picture)
        Page 11
    The dog that pulled the bell
        Page 12
    The playful kittens (picture)
        Page 13
    The well in the desert
        Page 14
    Where are the kids?
        Page 15
    The well in the desert (continued)
        Page 16
    Dear Dicky's grave (picture)
        Page 17
    Mother's cake
        Page 18
    Dunkley's four-in-hand (picture)
        Page 19
    Mother's cake (continued)
        Page 20
    Johnny makes a rocking horse (picture)
        Page 21
    Mother's cake (continued)
        Page 22
    Bound for Australia (picture)
        Page 23
    The pet kitten
        Page 24
    The river (picture)
        Page 25
    The sick prince
        Page 26
    Charlie making baby's carriage (picture)
        Page 27
    The sick prince (continued)
        Page 28
    Emma's prayer
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertising
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Advertising
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
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Dunkley's Patent Reversible-Handle


PAPER MACHE PERAMBUCOT.





WITH
LONDON:
76, FIXED HANDLE,
HOUNDSDITCH. E 5 5s.

SENT ON RECEIPT
MANCHESTER: OF

13, SHUDEHILL. POST OFFICE
ORDER OR
"CHEQUE, PAYABLE
BIRMINGHA M: TO
41 & 42, W. H. DUNKLEY,
JAMAICA ROW. AT EITHER
ADDRESS.



A

The above Drawing is a true copy of our 6 6s. Carriage, handsomely
finished in Best Carriage Style, and painted with lily, &c., steel elliptic springs,
and Patent Reversible Handle, in cloth or leather, and plated fittings.
The Baldwin Library
University
Pori da





7-

EVERY BASSINETTE IS MADE EXTRA DEEP,
So as to enable the elder child to sit up in comfort.
THREE CUSHIONS ARE ALSO SUPPLIED WITH EACH CARRIAGE.





NEW WIRE BODY,

WITH FIXED

HANDLE,

4 4s.;

O WITH

REVERSIBLE

HANDLE,

R5 5s.



B
Sent on receipt of Post Office Order or Cheque, payable to

W. H. DUNK LEY,
(TO EITHER ADDRESS),
LONDON: 76, Houndsditch. MANCHESTER: 13, Shudehill.
BIRMINGHAM : 41 and 42, Jamaica Row.







DUNKLEY'S

PAPER MACHE PERAMBUCOT.

Dunkley's Leading Line, Fixed Handle, 4 4s.


Sent on Receipt
of Post Office
Order or Cheque,
to either Address
most convenient
to purchaser.

Upholstered in
good quality
Carriage Leather,
fitted with four
Rubber Wheels,
Steel Springs,
China Handle,
Hand-painted
Panels, exactly to
Drawing.

C

LOTNDOIN :-76, IHoundsditch.
MAINICHESTE IE :-13, Shudehill.
BIRITMIVIGHA.IM[ :-41 & 42, Jamaica Row.








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11 MY THIRD ADDRESS 3


I.:Y DEAR LITTLE BABY FRIENDS. i


Oh, I do feel so proud!

Only think now, I an nearly three years old! but what pleases me most
I )is the ever loving way iln which I hfavoe bien welconrmd by my ever so very !.
dear toddie ones. .

HIon ... sweet little cheeks have reted on my bright ones? How
miany cots have I hareid with cirly headed darlings ?

S And is it strange thai I feel so proud ?

[I am to be dressed outt at a beautiful big red bri,;:k building at West
Bromwich, in, 0 such a nice dress; my covers-I mean my frock, must go
"1 through the Press five-but let me spell this carefully-five hun-dred thou-
sand times.
i The stuff to make my cov-my dress-weighs over nine tons; and I am
to visit the homes of one hun-dred thou-sand dear tiny tootsies in all parts
S of the world at one time !
of t -a
S' ju:...s, just think of that I and kiss me, every one of you, for being ever
S so good!
S', And that dear "Pa's" and "Ma's," and your sweet tiny selves, may have t J
H even's best blessings in the year to come, and for all time, is the most
loving wish of-Yours ever,
1 DUNKLEY, THE BABY'S F1:IEND.
S BIRJINGITAM, Deceimber, 188/.

!^[ ------- -^------- ^

S PUBLISHED BY W. II. DUNKLEY, LONDON, MANCIIESTER, AXD BIRMKGOIAM.
i hy Tu 1885.

1- .- -- -.--- ^
''" / APridfed 'y TIBE FREB PIRESS CO., Feat ,OEmpitw.


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I *: DUN ... A ': AL. 3


i .-'MY PRI^HT P :Y.
A -. FORE FOLKS, IN '. LITTLE A .
By FM.. y -.
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I was tnie a little girl x- Hlvd in oI on.in

Ar lays si I w v s ahy.
cl-i1 n TheIm so *nnch tro-;wl-. And I i
e .y cl l- I knoh I slw rAn ont ii th0 s rct '
a 1 ; if I mlonrl. Ouo il I r.en r q1to 11 inc' *

away h ave m. a 'I 1ht NOw ; w.
IlT ill 01e I was sitting qu y under -
t ta in. he di nin oom (if mamm i a ad ki Iown
wI was there she -waui not u w e on out S.ni ,:
'.! I I expect she a' I was L np ) in the
Nursery with the i. -), when I hard the
front door open, arid some visitors were sihew a int;o
Sthe U-ing roo-. o wa- time- -of I '
S. id. cai 1 to srhaf tho Ae
door, and ran down the street. I lnew there was
i alw -- an old 1 roman at the corn-'r w hen. e
'. '-evn y wTit'lh the niursemid, and I hid c'
looked at h-r nic d f1o .,| l -hni.
Yes, there she r- in her o red shaVi. I ran

do you coi ', little girl, without a ha on.? r
the oid woman.
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4 DUNKLEY'S A:.- .UAL.

^ E S .SIE
; AND T.. L - ..T. UL BLUE-_F. .D DOLL.
;t ', ( .J .'_- j :: II.
" s" Round the corner," said T. "Please give me
some apples." The old woman g'avc me three beauties,
S and told me to run home again directly. I thought
S I would like to go just a litil. other r and look in
"the toy shop tht we : .ed; o on I went,
b Iut no toy shop could I : First I turned to the
"right, and then to the tho i At last I came to one
I much larger than any I had soon before, with such
beautiful dolls in the window, one in pa rticular had
-. such lovely blue eyes and auburn hair. It was only
a little dull, o I ran in the shop, and asked the kind
'- Ilooking man behind th.e counter it hle would ,gie me
the doll with lovely blue eyes I cotld s5o in the
Window.
S"liWhere is your -, my little maid? asked <'
the man. ." Plese, sir," said I, "I (lid have a bright
'new ponny, but I gave it to the old woman for these
apples. May I have the doll now for these s 1 please,
j because I ca1 n keep the doll and only eat the apples? "
man looked at me, thlen asked me where I
Same *. -d him I did not know. but we lived
in a big honse long off as had come down
Three or fonr street to fl a toy shop, but this was
S not the same on'. Then I beg'i.a to c;y, and the man
",said he did not ', >w what to do with me if I could
not tell him Isth street I lived in; and .., i I told
:.' him my n.amen, was IE-e Landon, he said he did not
know the nme at all. \
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1) N N D K Y, ANNli U" i

EiS:Ei IS TAUGHT A LESSON.
! I: CiAl i !( l HI .
SC- HMi i < M
SAt last he put me on a hassock in the window
i," ( among thei dolls, thinking some one mig-ht go by and
Snow me. I sat there tor ever so 1l,.. and the kind
Sman sent his little iLaghter, Alice, with some tea and
Spread and butter for me, but she told me I must stay
in the window until some one saw me.
'; At last. just as it was getting' dark, and I was
b. lgi inning to cry, my papa went by, and I saw him,
i and called out, "Papa, papa!" and then he turned
". round, and saw me and came in; then I cried for joy.
"'- Papa told the kind shopiman that he was on his
Sway to the police station about me. Th. n', he gave the
man some money, and bought the l:.1iiil l d (loll with 1
the lovely blue eyes, but when we got home e gave it
to my little sister Annie, and sent me to bed. Dear
",, mama came up and kissed me; she, too, was rather
i angry, said I had frightened them all so. However, I
think it taught me a lesson, for I do not remember
/ running away after that.
F. M. W.



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S8 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.





l (SISSY TO BABY.





i, 'IT1. why did you come, dear Baby,
"- -:.To sleep in my little cot!
^ You need not say I asked you,
I'm quite sure I did not.


H.

SI know you're a little angel,
But then you make so much noise;
^ And Father, to keep you quiet,
Will give you my little toys.


III. .
But then, when you get a doll, dear,
"You musn't knock off its head,
Or I shall have to nurse it,
And watch it when ill in bed.


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10 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.

IV.
"I don't tI'l half the kisses.
!i; -I did before you came;
But then it's no use talking .
," 'I! I love vou all the same. i


v V.
'I have to wait for my porridge
S j Till after you are fed;
You seem to be always eating, ,
Or else asleep in bed.


VI. i
I

"They will not let me nurse you, "
You precious little thing :
S'h:-y really seem to treat you
S 1 As if you were a king.


"*- i VII.
.- ,, Alh, well, my dear little hl ,.-i.- i
0You are welcome to all you get,
."i Fior whoever could keep from loving
Such a queer little dear little pet,
I lENRY TiHOMAS.

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12 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.

STHE DOG THAT PULLED
I THE BELL,


A ,, father once had a very nice dog. His name
JI- 3 was Nep." He was very fond of little boys and
i girls, and I do not think he ever bit any one.
Like many other dogs, he was very fond of the
i water, and if a piece of wood was thrown in he
would soon go and fetch it out. But he could do
Sa great many other things. In the sitting-room there
Swas a handle by the side of the mantelpiece which
S used to ring a bell. On this handle a brush was
hung. "Nep" used sometimes to ring the bell by
"Ki pulling the brush with his teeth. Well, one day
"1ii "Nep" was in the room and wanted to go out, but
he could not push the door open with his paws because
it was latched, so he went and pulled the brush,
.-i, and made the bell ring. He then went and stood
.ti\ against the door till the servant came in to answer
Sthe bell, and he then ran out, w:g.-inh_ his tail.
Wasn't he a clever dog?
HENRY THOMAS.
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S14 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.



i THE WELL IN THE DESERT, .

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iI, 11.1 )-EN, here's a little story:-
".. i;* itr away in years gone by,
S' l' IIn wilderness a mother
Laid her darling down to die.



II. A
I -i Not a single drop of water
Could she give the little child.
'3 sAnd the sun was hot and scorching
Out upon the sandy wild.


Ill.
Must he die--her little babv ?
""No," she thought, for I \\ill pray-
SI I will ask the Lord to help ne.
1- .*"i, .He can send me help to-day."''
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16 )DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL. ,i

IV. 1
So s;ie prayed to God in heaven,-
I ti i'I up her heart on high;
Tl. .1 she rose, and looking round her,
Saw a well of water nigh.

S'i
v.
,- Then she ran and filled a vessel, t
; ?"i Hastened to the baby's side. .
Bathed his little aching forehead,
While for very joy she cried.


"i v VI.
Then the child grew slowly better,
I And he lived at. length to be
Chieftain of a mighty nation
In the desert wild and free. ..


VII.
So. dear children, let us ever
-l i Seek relief from God above;
He will help Lus in ou trials, -
i And will bless is with his love.
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18 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.



MOTHER'S CAKE, 1


i i [I

I ,' I i, mother in the kitchen
I J \1_ 1M a great big cake to-day,
: I Plums and currants quite bewitching
Me and little sister May.


SII.

1 For we watched the flour and spices.
"I Eggs and butter in it go,
"Candied peel and other nicies
Speckled all the flabby dough.


S IlL *"i

SNow the cake is left for baking--
-?'< Shut in oven, as we see; i
We are all our toys forsaking, '
Till we get it back at tea. '>
"jY i

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20 :ODUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.


TIV.
IHow we munch the luscious slices,
-I-y and I, and brother D)ick;:
SNurse says cake so rich with spices
Always makes small children sick. -




Tiny comes and sits and begs,
Holding out his long red tongue,
Squatting there upon his legs.
Begging of his masters young.


i.
Puss pretends she don't want any,
Lies asleep upon the rug :
May says she's had lto much dinny.'
-. i Pours her milk in her own mug.


VII.
SWhen we all are gone to bed,
And the cake is put away,
Pussy takes it in her head
She hasn't had her tea to-day.

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JOHNNY MAKES A ROOKING HORSE.










22 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.

VII.
Now no noise is in the house,
And our cake is on the shelf;

!I^Y ^Thinks he would like some cake 1i ai- -lr i


IX.
SMousey nibbles at the crumbs, .
Thinks it most delicious cake,
When sly pussy ,ly comes
;To see what supper she can make.

:. X ,"

s on Mousey runs along the ledge, "u
Tumbles to the floor beneath
., i3 (For he got too near the edge) 4
Into pussy's claws and teeth.


5 (,XI. .^
-^ '"!! Puss is strong and mouse is weak ---
It can't have -:i .- .i any pain:
Just one scrunch and just one s-queak. 3f
Pussy pops her down red lane. \'
5' F. M. W. f
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,24 DUNKLEY'S ..,. L AL.


STH E P E T K IT T E N .


.". little pussy,'she lies on the mat,
:d I stroke her, and kiss her, and give her a pat;
S:-ire's my own dear kitty, a present from pa, :
And I aiiost love her as much as mama.
Her coat is so white, and her f;- is so soft,
Her tail like a feather she 1--.: up aloft;
h-: has pretty blue eyes, and a itrl. pink nose,
And she Ilri- -, jumps, and gambols wherever she goes.
In the morning at breakfast old nurse is so good,
She lets me find kitty and give her some food ;
S Her saucer of milk in a corner I place,
:i'K And when she has lapped it she washes her face. ,
Then Freddy and I are sent out to play,
S And Kitty comes too in the garden so gay;
We run and have fun, until nurse calls us in
S' To learn how to read with Miss Mullerin.
We go for a walk when the .ftr. ''ii 's come, ;
'*1 But Kitty can't go, so we leave her at home
Iii Then she lies on the hearthrug and has a good nap,
And when we come back she jumps into my lap.'
ISi When the lamp it is lighted, and the blind is pulled down,
Then we dress kitty up in a little night gown ; :
S And she 1 .i- in a cradle all night like a baby,
You never heard tell such a tale before maybe.,
ANILORAE.






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*,,







THE RIVER.









S26 DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL.


"i THE SICK PRINCE,


I.

LBERT, our England's eldest prince,
SOnce on a sick bed lay; I
: Death's icy hand seemed stealing fast
| His royal life away.


.oh From every home throughout the land
" ..',: *Prayer rose from morn till eve;
And hearts that ne'er looked up to God
: Prayed that their prince might live.
I III.
: =* Day after day the tidings came,-
I He still in danger lay;
And still the earnest cry went forth,
', Oh! England, let us pray." *
" : IV.
STwo little children knelt beside
Their clean though humble bed,
l. ,; Clasped were their little rosy hands,
' i^ Bowed was each curly head.







27




















I -r























CHARLIE MAKES A BABY CARRIAGE.










28 lUNKi < ANNUAL.

i iV.
Oh Father, bless our parents both,
"Il .Brothers and sisters dear;
'I. And that we may in heaven live
Teach us to love Thee here."
VI.

SThe voices ceased-one little child
Had risen from his knees,
"7!i ?When softly rose again one voice,
And oh! our Father, please ,"
I'*?!'; VII. ,.
". : We've heard our Prince is very ill,
!/ Oh! do not let him die, I
"But make him soon again quite well,
Please do Thou hear our cry." *
VIII.
Good news at last spread through the land,
"13? Our Prince, our Prince will live !
To God all adoration be, .,
"To Him your praises give." II
IX.
SAnd who shall say that He who hears 2+
His lowliest creature's cry,
| Unnoticed let the truthful prayer
"I Of that little child pass by.


A- 9 'AN A:5 9 9 e*4q 9 % M











DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL. 29


SEMMI .S PRAYER.

S 1' ,i ".' "i '

me an apple, T .. I say; I will have another, or you will bo ,
-, -. *rry," cried a little girl of eight years old, stamping her foot and
I king .. .- at her elder sister, a pale, delicate child, of about
', four years older, who was trying to hold a dish of fruit out of her
reach. No, Emma," replied Lucy, mamma said I was to give you two,
Youand y have had three already, I will not give you any more to-night."
". '." face flushed with passion as she saw I;u,:y put the disi away, !;
and turning quicldy round, seized a knife which was on the table, and v
it at her sister.
Lucy saw the action, and had just time to move aside whe.n the knifo
S c.m flying past her and stuck in the : .i close to the place where she had
been standing.
",.; Oh, Emma," she cried, as she sank whiie and trembling into a chair,
", how could you do such a dreadful thing ; if I had not moved it might have
S' killed me, and then you wTould have been a murderess."
".- "What is a murderess? asked the child, fixing her eyes intently on ,,
* .' her sister's face.
""d' A person who kills another, and is hanged by the neck until he is
dead, and whom God is very angry with,': returned Lucy.
Emma's face was very white, and running to Lucy, she fell on her ;,i
knees before her. Oh, do forgive me, dear, dear Lucy," she sobbed, and -
"don't tell mamma, or '. me tint dreadful name, and I will never, no
',"' nnever, do such a thing again." :,
; "I don't know; you see it nas such an awful thing, and you must ask I
God to forgive you because you got into such a temper, and that is a sin, ''
Sand grieves him so much you know. If you get God's forgiveness first, then
'. ,l l f i-_ n .. .-reat man can pardon, .
S'. r I. ; still a few moments in .
S h .:. .. _the chair with both l
f- r ?
... ,









j' L^ T:^ IJ :1J ;i.J .i. j ; .j J i:? F .j ?;-'th

30 IDU :L.:.: ANNUAL.


hands, she prayed :-" Lord, teaeh me to be good and to serve Thee as I
1 ought. I ai a poor helpless child, and willing to be tnulght. U .: me
-i all my sins, and bli.t then out of Thy great book. And, 0 Lord, give me
S'i Thiv grace and Holy Spirit, and make me like i -, and make my heart as
i white as snow in the blood of the fountain, and cleanse me and take my
sins away. Make me love and servo Thee, and read Thy holy word, and
; sing Thy praises; and when I am tempted to do wrong let me remember
the four little words, i. .1 God ssest me.' 1 Thine is the kingdom, the
power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.
"0 Lord, bless papa and mamma, and all kind friends. Amen."
she rose. Do you think He has forgiven me now," she asked,
because ITe does not speak like you do, so how shall I know ? "
A feeling will come in your heart, and then it will be forgiven," said
Lucy.
But I don't feel any difference, and I don't believe it is in my heart,"
cried the child.
S" Then writo out your prayer, and perhaps it will come," replied her
sister.
But I don't know how, Lucy." .
"Yes, you do. If you could think of doing such a wicked thing, and
afterwards find words to ask forg-ivecnOss, why, of course you can remember
to write down what you have said to God, and perhaps Ile will be pleased,
"and forgive you at once."
'.F' illed with this hope, Emma sat down and did as she was told. When
the prayer was written, shle took it to her sister to read.
S" I think the feeling has come, Lucy; and now, won't you forgive me ? "
she asked humbly, and I will try to remember how wicked it is to be
angry, and every time I feel the wicked temper coming I will read over my
"- ?' little prayer, and perhaps it will make me remember."
The two children kissed each other and went to bed.
Emma is a big girl now, and as her prayer always helped her when she
felt herself getting angry, she hopes it will help some other little girl too.
L. A. FUosT.








SI,-. -------------,~ -- -~Yl~-~*L --- -- -



"" DUNKLEY'S ANNUAL. 31


Si CHILDREN'S CARRIAGES.

From the Autumn Number of The Christian Union," 1884.
S S:}VI'T lends a hand to make the Baby's surroundings beautiful and attractive, and
I a, t the present day the infant is regarded of sufficient importance for manufac-
I. turers to devote their energies almost exclusively to providing for his or her
I', wants. Even as it is, with all the improvements that have been made for his
comfort, Baby often has a strange way of shewing his gratitude, but for this
he will be forgiven. The child is unable to look back like those of mature
S years, and call to mind what the children of half a century ago had to put up with.
S Take for instance the infant of the present day ensconced in its softly padded couch,
supported on carefully adjusted springs, with rubber-tyred wheels, and hood to protect
the occupant of the perambulator from sun, wind, and rain, and compare the vehicle
,- K with the old-fashioned box on wheels which found Baby's Coach" of bye-gone days
-in whiih, to save the child from being bumped and shaken, it had to be half smothered
in pillows-compare this perambulator with the elegant ones that are now being manu-
S fractured by MESSRS. W. H. DUNKLEY AND COMPANY, of Birmingham, and we shall have
an idea of the vast comparison between past and present in more guises of the name
than one.
Perambulators, like many other articles, may also be looked upon n labour-saving
I aids, as well as vehicles for giving the child that fresh air which, as we have already
i) said, is s, necessary for its welfare, and in these days of dear labour, baby's coach is
S an almost indispensable adjunct to the homes of many families whose means do not
S permit of their i." ;.h,- a staff of nurses to take care of their little ones. Messrs.
)1iDcNKLEY in their various styles of perambulators that they are making certainly shew
S completely how the child's comfort and well-being are looked after at the present
S time, for the different coaches they turn out from their works are adapted to meet
S the requirements and suit the pockets of all classes of society. We have before us an
S illustrated catalogue of the perambulators they make, and from this we find the
S children's carriages are not only beautiful in design but scientific in their build.
Speaking, therefore, more generally upon the excellencies of the perambulators of this
S firm, their Perambucot is a neatly-made, single or double, four-wheeled "carriage "
withh light wheels and body, the latter supported on patent steel springs. The body is
upholstered with superior leather cloth, and it is furnished with apron, leather strap,
and foot-board. It is a perambucot that will stand a lot of rough usage from the hands
~ of the willing, but inexperienced elder j iveniles of the family, and it is offered at a
price that places it within the reach of the ordinary working man.
Messrs. DUNKLEY are also the manufacturers of a variety of bassinettes and peram-
1 bulators, in either of which babe can slumber as peacefully as in its cot, and, at the
same time, have the benefit of fresh air. In short, every perambulator made by this
well-known firm commends itself not only to thoughtful parents, but to all those who
S have the care and welfare of our little ones at heart-who knows ?-great men and great
.women in embryo. It is an old saying and a true one, that it is not the cheapest article
That is always the best, and that maxim is certainly true with reference to perambula-
k 'l tors. Many of the children's carriages now sold are so rubbishy that they either soon
"break down altogether or become a nuisance. Mr. DUNKLEY'S perambulators purchasers
S will obtain the best design and workmanship.








J.4-
S)J 1K 1 .LY. \:N UAL,
S .I ---,---...- -..--- ..... .._. .,- .- ---. .


"I' ,,
,i, Y u il are invitDUNd For l ac, ( KLEY' ;.

i ECLIPSE." ii':











,, This ew 'rie to And oort inlu
4-



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* ,-,,I-, er,y4,rA,





/ __./ -_ / ...... ,__-

S .-,u ill are invit,,i For le:an1 e, l -.,
'lhis n1 W ('arrire-, to Aen, A d\ coim(,t-rt ill:t,h:d, I, 1
W-im \ wivill hold little u Y in,,u mn, it t, lu-tikle,
.. itl, .r wue, twiu ,z" hti i.- I V111111 u i 0 lud0.'

', -- 7,i -1
M.-(I







DUNKLEY, London, Manchester, and Birmingham.


With Rubber Bicycle WITH BOW SPRINGS,
Wheels. 55s.
STEEL SPRINGS,
WITH BOW SPRINGS, 65s.
_45,. & 55s.. Brass-Jointed Wood
and ChinaHandle
-er l c t complete.
S R SENT ON RECEIPT OF POST
OFFICE ORDER. ENT ON RECEIPT OF POST
FFICE O OFFICE ORDER.
D E









OF POST OFFICE ORDER OF POST OFFICE ORDER
OR CHEQUE. OR CHEQUE.





F
Fitted with Dunkley's Patent Reversible Handle, Wire Body,
Brass-Jointed Hood, and Four Bicycle Wheels.


LONDON: 76, Houndsditch. MANOHESTER: 13, Shudehill.
BIRMINGHAM : 41 & 42, Jamaica Row.
L~IVON: 6, aunddifh. M NCHSTER 13 Shue11







DUNKLEY, London, Manchester, and Birmingham.

NOTICE. TRICYCLE HORSE.
DUNKLEY'S NEW
PATENT










Dunk-ley's Tricycle for Boy or pOR o Ci i
Girl, from 5 years to 15 Doll's Carrage, withFour Wheels and
NURSE42s., 55s., and 63s. Y OR GIRL, Hood complete, 12s. d.
TRICYCLE,
WITH PERAMBULATOR









The above is fitted with Rubber ,5 5s. Poll's Bassinette, with Canopy
Wheels, 26in., 28in., and 3Oin. complete, 21s.
ROOMBKINGINHORSE.D,
DuklTricycle Horse, Wood Wheels,
21s., 25s., and 30s.
WithTricycle Horse, bicycle heels,
S25s., 30s., and 35s.
Dunlrley's Tricycle for Boy or FOR
Girl, from 5 yearsto 15 BOY Doll's Carriage, with Four Wheels and









"42 SENT ON RECEIPTS OF PO OFFICE ORDER, PAYABLE TO d
The above is fittedith Rubber M e5 5s. Ioll's Bassinette, with canopy
Wheels, 26in., 28in., and 30in. complete, 21s.

"ROCKING. HORSE.


LONDON 76, oundsdith. MAN STER: huDunkly's Best London
Finish,

21s., 42s., and 63s.


With Chairs,'
84s.



SENT ON RECEIPT OF POST OFFICE ORDER, PAYABLE TO
W. 1-1. 1D1U 1K~LEY y
LONDON: 76, Houndsditch. MANCHESTER: 13,Shudehill, BIRMINGHAM: 41&42,JamaicaRow.








DUNKLEY'S NEW PATENT SPRINGS.



SENT
SON
RECEIPT
OF
POST
OFFICE
ORDER
TO
EITHER
ADDRESS.



G
4 4s. Od.
The accompanying Drawing fully describes the great advantage of my Patent Springs. The
body is well and tastefully made of wire, lined inside with best carriage leather. Best rubber
wheels, and well finished throughout.
Cloth Lined and Patent Reversible Handle, extra, 30s.

LONDON: 76, Houndsditch. Manchester: 13, Shudehill.
BIRMINGHAM: 41 & 42, Jamaica Row, and
1, 2, 3, 4, & 5, Dean Street.

,- .









PAPIER MACCGHE PERAMBUCOT,
HANDSOMELY UPHOLSTERED IN SILK, SATIN. VELVET, OR CARRIAGE CLOTH.
HAND-PAINTED IN THE MOST ARTISTIC MANNER.






Si
















Sent on receipt of Post Office Order or Cheque for 10 10s., to
W. H. DUNKLEY,
LONDON: 76, Houndsdilch. MANCHESTER: 13, Shudehill.
BIRMINGHAM: "'41 and 42, dJmaica Row.
PrinLted by THE FRE. PRESO C(O., MrFet ir :u iidth.
BIRMINOHAM~~~ : "4 "*2,dmfcnto.
-- I ']i I i





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