• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: The schoolfellows
 Chapter II: Found out
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The cherry tent, or, The schoolfellows
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053740/00001
 Material Information
Title: The cherry tent, or, The schoolfellows
Alternate Title: The schoolfellows
Physical Description: 60 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel, George, 1815-1902 ( Printer )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Manufacturer: Dalziel Bros., Camden Press
Publication Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Theft -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
School stories -- 1887
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by The Hon. Mrs. Greene.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053740
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001598529
oclc - 23288317
notis - AHM2674

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    Chapter I: The schoolfellows
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Chapter II: Found out
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text















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The Baldwin Lbrar
RLnBF .k1
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-. LE'"
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4 ji








THE CHERRY TENT;

OR,

THE SCHOOLFELLOWS.



BY
THE HON. MRS. GREENE,
Authorof' Cushions and Corners, Filling f the Chinks,' etc.




WITH ILLUSTRATIONS.













LONDON AND NEW YORK:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
1887.






















CONTENTS.




THE SCHOOLFELLOWS.

FOUND OUT.












THE CHERRY TENT.



CHAPTER I.
THE SCHOOLFELLOWS.


have you
heard the
news that
the Doctor is
"off on a trip
to-day ?" asked Louis Frith of a boy
somewhat younger than himself, who
was reclining lazily on a bank which








The Cherry Tent.

overlooked the cricket-field; "and what's
more," added Louis, sitting himself down
on the grass beside his companion, "he's
not to be home till supper."
Well, and what good is that to you
or me ? if you had brought the news that
he was going to give us the cricket tent
which we want so badly, it would have
been worth listening to. I tell you what
it is, unless we get something of the sort,
we shall have to give up cricket alto-
gether. There's young Hill, who only
held the bat for a quarter of an hour, and
had scored thirty on our side, has been
obliged to chuck it up and go into the







The Schoolfellows.

house; he couldn't bear the heat. I
suppose the Doctor's gone to the flower
show?" added Maurice, sneeringly.













Louis and Maurice.


Not he; he said he had business
somewhere else that would keep him
away till quite late."
,- -














away till. quite late."








The Cherry Tent.

"Oh, I dare say-business is often a
very good name for pleasure; it's only
poor wretches like us, who have to toil
for hours over work that never will do
us a farthing's worth of good, that know
what business is. I was in hopes the
Doctor would have given us a holiday
to-day; I planned a walk with you and
Fellowes through Chorley Wood, but
the old fellow is as stingy of his holi-
days as if they were so much out of his
pocket. Phew! what a roasting day it
is to be sure!" said Maurice, lying back,
and placing his cricket-cap over his
eyes.





)


The Schoolfellows.






















Ckorley Wood.

"Suppose we do go for a walk to







The Cherry Tent.

Chorley Wood, holiday or no holiday ?"
suggested Louis, speaking below his
breath, for there were plenty of other
lads lolling about the bank.
Nonsense; it's out of bounds."
Well, and what of that ? we've often
been out of bounds before now."
"Yes, and a queer shave we had of it
last time. I 've often thought since, if
the Doctor had caught us, we should
nave got our uietus on the spot."
Fancy how fine it would be to stroll
under those glorious beeches; and we
might grub for chrysalises, too! Farrar
says there is not a wood in England like








The Schoolfellows.

it for caterpillars. Come, there's a good
fellow, do," urged Louis.
"No, it's too great a walk. We should













The Boys panted a Holidai.

scarcely have got there before we should
have to turn back for school, to say
nothing of all the fences and stiles one








The Cherry Tent.

has to get through. But, I say, look at
old Jackdaw coming along with his hat
on the back of his head, and his pockets,
as usual, crammed with books and papers.
I do believe he's bearing down upon us;
there's something up, I am sure."
He's not half such a bad chap," re-
plied Maurice, in a low tone, for the
master in question was advancing with
long strides, and was now close upon
them, smiling pleasantly too.
"Well, boys, I am the bearer, for once,
of pleasant tidings; there is to be no
school this afternoon; the Doctor has
had to go out on business, and I have







The Schoolfellows.

just received a telegram which calls me
necessarily to town for some hours, so
you can all go for a ramble, or have a
match at cricket, or, in fact, anything you
like, only don't go beyond bounds, and
you must all be up in hall at five o'clock
precisely. Mr. Barlow will preside at
supper if neither the Doctor nor I have
returned by that time."
"Hurrah I hurrah!" shouted a chorus
of voices, as Mr. Price stopped speaking,
and cricketing-caps flew up into the air
by dozens.
"Above all, I need scarcely say that
you 'll none of you think of going to the







The Cherry Tent.

flower show: the walk would be far too
long on this hot day, and the Doctor
desired me to tell you particularly that
none of you were to attempt it. There
are plenty of lovely walks all about with-
out trenching on forbidden ground. You
are on your word, gentlemen."
"All right, sir; the Doctor told us so
himself before he went," cried several of
the boys; and having given his message,
and executed the Doctor's orders, Mr.
Price turned on his heel and walked to-
wards the school.
Now what do you say to our walk ?"
asked Louis in the same undertone to







The Schoolfellows.

his companion i
"we have the b
whole afternoon, ; ,

and nothing and So o
nobody to in-
terfere with us;
let's take off our
cricketing things,
and start away at
once."
"All serene !"
replied Maurice,
stretching him-
self and yawning
lazily, "anything The School House.







The Cherry Tent.

for a quiet life; only remember, if we
are caught, you made me do it."
And the two boys, rising from the
bank, walked leisurelyarm-in-arm towards
the house.
It was indeed a scorchingly hot after-
noon, and had not the woods been out of
bounds, no walk could have been more
suitable for such a day; but the owner
of the wood objected to the boys tramp-
ing incessantly through it, and breaking
down his young fir-trees and saplings;
and besides, except on holidays, the wood
was too far off for an ordinary walk, so
that the Doctor was not so unreasonable






























































DECIDING ON A WALK. 2








The Schoolfellows.

in making it "out of bounds" as his
pupils thought
Maurice and Louis were not long in
changing their clothes, and having ob-
tained some sandwiches from the house-
keeper, and a basket and trowel from
the gardener to help them in their search
for chrysalises, they set out upon their
walk.
The road which they at first took was
open to all the school to walk on, but
by-and-bye, when the coast was clear and
no one in sight, the two boys turned off
by a stile into a private lane, and then
through a series of footpaths and gates







The Cherry Tent.

into the little village of Cherrywood,
which lay in a sunny nook just on the
borders of the wood.
The name of this place was in strict
keeping with its possessions, for the
cherry orchards abounded on all sides,
and the trees were already covered with
the ripe fruit. In spring, when the trees
were in blossom, people came from far
and near to see them, for the pink and
white flowers were quite a marvel for
profusion and beauty, and the paths
through the orchards were covered with
their tinted leaves; but the ripe cherries
had now taken the place of the blossoms,







The Schoolfellows,

and in nearly every garden a couple of
lads or a cunning terrier kept guard over
their tithe of fruit.
Louis and Maurice knew this only too
well, as a scar on the former's leg could
testify, and they were neither of them
inclined to risk the same treatment again,
nor the still more disagreeable conse-
quence of being brought up before the
Doctor; so they both hurried through
the lanes on which hung the branches of
the coveted fruit, and soon they were out
of reach of temptation.
But a fresh temptation was near at
hand, and one on which they had not







The Cherry Tent.

counted, nor, indeed, could they have
done so; for just as they climbed the
last stile which led into the only remain-
ing field between them and the wood,
they came in sight of a small canvas
tent or hut erected in the corner of the
enclosure, within which stood a deal
table covered with a white cloth, and on
this cloth dishes of ruddy cherries, and
black cherries, and white cherries, all
arranged in the most tempting manner,
and partly covered with cool green leaves,
a sight which made them both halt and
feel anxiously in their pockets, while a
card pinned on the entrance to the tent,







The Schoolfellows.






















with the words, "Ginger-beer and lemon-
ade sold here," added to their desire for
refreshment.







The Cherry Tent.

Have you any cash, Maurice ? I am
afraid I have none," said Louis, halting
outside the door, while he searched and
re-searched through all his various pockets.
"I thought I had a couple of coppers, but I
must have left them on my table at home."
I have not so much as a brass far-
thing," replied his companion, who was
searching with equal zeal for the neces-
sary coin; "stay! here I feel something
in my watch-pocket: it might be a six-
pence, but I 'm afraid it's only a half-
penny."
And a halfpenny it proved to be
when it was drawn forth from its hiding-







The Schoolfellows.

place, and both the boys' countenances
fell in proportion to the value of the
coin.
"Well, let's see what we can get for
a halfpenny; we might be able to chouse
them out of a few extra ones if we tried,"
whispered Louis, as he moved towards
the canvas door. "Do you make the
bargain, Maurice, for you have a much
better way of dodging people out of
things than I have."
"Oh, yes, I dare say!" replied Maurice;
" I 'm to do all the dirty work, and you're
to have the spoil;" but meanwhile he
followed Louis' example, and, drawing







The Cherry Tent.

back the canvas door, they both entered
the tent.
But whereas the owner of the cherries
or the guardian of the tent? On one side
of the opening there was a chair, and on
the table opposite it a pair of spectacles,
a ball of grey worsted, and a half-knitted
sock, while a large gingham umbrella
was also to be seen leaning against the
chair, and a plaid shawl hanging over
the back of it, but no person to guard
the golden ripe fruit.
The old dame is evidently off guard,
whoever she may be," observed Louis,
"unless, indeed, she is in hiding some-








The Schoolf ellozs.

where," he added in a lower voice, while
he.glanced carefully round the tent and
under the white linen tablecloth. No,
not a ghost of her! and now who is to
tell us how much fruit we can have for a
halfpenny, I 'd like to know? cherries are
cheap."
"No one, apparently," cried his com-
panion. "Suppose we give a shout to
let her know we are here, that will bring
her soon enough, I '11 warrant."
"Or suppose we help ourselves to
what we think fair," suggested Louis;
"there would be no harm in that, would
there ?"







The Cherry Tent.

No, I think not, supposing we don't
take too many.
"Pooh! why, in a place like this, which
is literally swarming with cherries, one
ought to get them for the asking. What
shall we put them in, though, if we do
help ourselves ?"
Into the basket, to be sure, the very
thing; and besides, I see a lot of paper
bags there on the far end of the table,
evidently meant for the purpose."
"Well, suppose you go and fill one of
them," cried Louis, eagerly; "and I '11
stand at the door and give notice if I see
any one coming."








The Schoolfellows.

"I 'd rather you did it yourself," replied
Maurice, firmly; "I can stand at the
door and keep watch quite as well as
you, and I '11 promise to sing out if I see
any danger."
"All square," cried Louis; and imme-
diately with quick though somewhat trem-
bling fingers, he proceeded to fill one of
the paper bags with white, black, and
red cherries, taking in turn some from
each dish, so as to make the quantity less
apparent, and also that they might have
the selfish benefit of the varied flavour
of the fruit.
"No one in sight?" he asked, as he








The Cherry Tent.

twisted the neck of the bag and trans-
ferred it to his pocket.
"No, not a soul: I say, what luck for
us! where's your halfpenny? Now,
quick, put it here, on the very front of
the table, so that the old soul will see at
once when she comes in that there is
honour among thieves."
"I don't think, for my part, that we
have the least right to call ourselves
thieves," said Louis, somewhat nettled
at his companion's joke : if the old silly
ain't here to sell her goods, she's got no
right to find fault with us for helping
ourselves; we pay our money, and that's








The Schoolfellows.

all she need look to. For my part, I
think we've overpaid her of the two."
Indeed, I dare say we have," replied
Maurice, half convinced by his friend's
righteous anger and argument; I should
not be surprised if she thought herself
awfully well paid into the bargain."
"Well, suppose, then, you fill a second
bag," suggested Louis, half in joke, half
in earnest: "you need have no misgiv-
ings afterwards that we overpaid her,
and we could each have a bagful to our-
selves."
Maurice hesitated a moment, whether
to carry out this suggestion or not, but







The Cherry Tent.

the temptation was a strong one, and his
conscience painfully open to false reasons
and convictions.
"I am quite certain, for that matter,
we are only taking what any boy in the
village might have for nothing," he said,
half pleadingly, as he proceeded to fill
the gaping mouth of the second bag,
"and a halfpenny will well pay her for
her loss, though I dare say the old cheat
might not think so. Now, here we are;
I've filled this one almost to bursting:
give one more look that the coast is
clear, and away we go."
"Quite clear," cried Louis, looking








The Schoolfellows.

round the field, "only make haste, do,"
he added, in a hurried whisper, "for I
hear some one stumping over the cobbles
in the lane. Come out, I say, Maurice,
and let's cut and run for it, before any
one can give chase."
Maurice hastily
flung the half-
penny on the
table, and emerg-
ed from the tent,
when, having
brought the -
second bag to
Louis, the two Come, Isay, Maurice."
3








The Cherry Tent.

boys took to their heels and fled down
the path, which led in a direct line from
the meadow to the field beyond.
They had not got more than half-way,
however, when they heard some one
shouting and calling after them, and,
looking hastily over their shoulders, they
saw an elderly woman standing at the
door of the tent, menacingly shaking a
stick which she held in her hand, and
calling out in a voice which was evi-
dently trembling with fury and impotent
rage.
"It is Bessie Barkley, I do believe,
the old vegetable woman who comes to








TYe Schoolfellows.

the school," cried Louis, panting for
breath as he tried to put on fresh speed;
" I know her blue poke bonnet, and her
yellow shawl, as well as I know myself.
It's a comfort that she's as lame as a
dog and as blind as a bat, or we should
run a good chance of being caught."
She will very likely go and tell upon
us at the house," replied his companion,
testily; and we shall be blamed whether
she's lame or blind."
"Not she; it wouldn't be worth the
drag of the long walk; and even if she
did, who's to tell that it was us ? Good
patience, what lungs the old woman has








The Cherry Tent.

got! she'll rouse the country before she
stops; the people on the high-road will
hear her, but let us once get into the
wood and we'll puzzle them all."
The high-road of which Louis spoke
lay exactly along one side of the meadow,
and afterwards entered the wood, through
which it ran for a distance of some miles.
It was a favourite resort in the summer-
time for the inhabitants of the neigh-
bouring town, as it afforded a cool de-
licious shade for many miles, and after
passing through the village of Cross Hill,
led to the pretty little watering-place of
Swallowvale, where the newest fashions








The Schoolfellows.

were daily to be seen, and where the
band played twice a day in the public
gardens.







The Cherry Tent.






CHAPTER II.
FOUND OUT.

HAT a lot of carriages there
are on the road to-day!"
cried Louis as he climbed on the top of
the wall which divided the meadow from
the wood; "the whole town seems on
the move."
It's the flower show, of course," re-
plied Maurice, climbing up beside his
friend and holding on by the branch of
an overhanging fir-tree; "they are all







Found Out.

spurring along to Swallowvale ; and what
a gorgeous day they have! Let's climb
along the wall to the roadside and have
a look at them."
"Look, look, there is the Somervilles'
carriage," cried Louis, as he scrambled
along the irregular top of the wall: I
see the two girls and their mother; let's
hurry on and have a bow from them;
they're the jolliest girls in the county:
so unaffected!"
"Suppose they tell that they saw us
out of bounds," said Maurice anxiously.
"Suppose they tell Queen Anne that
she's dead," replied Louis, contemptu-







The Cherry Tent.













P*1









"There goes the Somervilles carriage "

ously; "why on earth should they make

such busybodies of themselves ? besides'







Found Out.

how are they to know what the bounds
of the school are ? See there, they have
seen us, and are bowing like fun. They
are actually stopping the carriage, and
they want to say something to us: these
stones are the stiffest walking in the
world."
The carriage had come to a full stop
by the time the boys appeared at the top
of the wall which bordered the highway,
and the girls with pleasant smiling faces
were waiting to greet them.
"We are going to the flower show at
Swallowvale," said the younger of the
two, as Louis and Maurice jumped down







The Cherry Tent.

into the road, and raising their caps, came
over to the side of the carriage to speak
to them, "and mamma says if you are
going too, you can have seats in the
carriage."
Maurice and Louis looked at each
other for a moment with doubtful ques-
tioning glances, and then coloured pain-
fully.
Don't think for a moment of coming
unless you think you can," said Mrs.
Somerville good-humouredly; "perhaps
we oughtn't to have asked you."
"Oh, dear no, nothing of the kind,"
said Louis, reddening to a still deeper







Found Out.

hue as he understood Mrs. Somerville's
suggestion; "only the day is so hot and
the walk so very long, Maurice and I
thought the wood would be cooler."
"Yes, but now that you can ride, you
would like to come, wouldn't you ?" said
the same girl who had spoken before.
"We heard from Mr. Price that there
was a half-holiday at the school, and so
we know you need not be home till late."
It would be fun, wouldn't it?" said
Louis hesitatingly, as he looked into
Maurice's face.
Yes, a glorious treat; but are you sure
you have room for us ?"







The Cherry Tent.

"Plenty," cried the girls, "isn't there,
mamma ?"
"Certainly, if the boys themselves don't
mind a little crushing. Maria, move up
a little higher; so, now I think you can
both find room;" and Louis and Maurice
took their seats in the carriage beside
Maria, who satwith her back to the horses.
What a delicious sensation it was,
bowling along the smooth level road
without exertion of any kind, under the
most lovely canopy of green trees, espe-
cially after the long hot walk, and the
stiles, and the hasty flight through the
meadow! indeed, Maurice found the air







Found Out.

almost chilly after the intense heat of his
quick walk, but though he shivered a
little, he did not think much of it; and
he and Louis kept up a running fire of
fun and anecdote with the Somerville girls
and their mother, while they wound round
one curve after another of the pretty shady
road which led through the wood. The
girls, too, in their summer muslins and
blue silk mantles, and hats trimmed with
white feathers and field daisies, looked
so fresh and bright, that the boys felt
quite proud of their position as cavaliers,
and Louis held his head erect, and tried
to look the hero of the hour.







The Cherry Tent.

It was not until they were nearly out
on the sunny high road again that
Maurice's mind began to misgive him,
and a somewhat sudden gloom fell over
his face and manner. They were now
within a mile of the village of Cross Hill
and about four miles from Swallowvale,
and every step of the road they were
travelling was forbidden ground. If by
any chance the Doctor was to hear of
their doings, what a terrible piece of work
there would be! he might even expel
them for all Maurice knew; and then his
mother-what would she think of it?
This was always the way with Maurice;







Found Out.

he yielded with scarcely a struggle to
temptation, and hardly had he gained the
desired object, than his conscience or his
fears would damp all his promised plea-
sure; and now, even the thought of the
flower show, or the band, and all the sur-
rounding attractions of the carriage, could
not call the ghost of a smile to his lips.
"You look cold, Maurice," said Mrs.
Somerville, kindly; "I am afraid you
have got a chill from the sudden change
to the carriage after your walk."
"Oh, no, thank you, not the least," re-
plied Maurice, deprecatingly, "I assure
you I am quite warm now; I felt a little








The Cherry Tent.

chilly at first, but that was some time
ago."
"It will do you no harm, however, to
put on a little muffler; when we get near
the town you can take it off: do pray
allow me to give you some of the many
wraps we brought with us," urged Mrs.
Somerville. Maria, dear, stand up a
moment, pray, that I may see if the
Indian scarf is anywhere near you."
Maria stood up, but scarcely had she
done so when she gave a little scream,
then quite a loud cry of surprise and
vexation.
Oh dear! mamma, look at my beau-








Found Out.

tiful new mantle, it is quite ruined!" she
cried: "something has fallen upon it and
destroyed it completely; oh dear! it is
quite, quite spoiled, and now I cannot go
to the flower show." And Maria burst
into the most bitter tears of disappoint-
ment.
"Let me see; show me your mantle,
my dear child: there could not possibly
be anything in the carriage to spoil it."
And Mrs. Somerville leaned forward in
the vehicle and tried to raise the corner
of her daughter's blue silk cape; but her
voice also quickly changed to surprise
and annoyance, when she found not only
4








The Cherry Tent.

her daughter's mantle, but the cushions
of the carriage and the Indian shawl,
stained through and through with a dark
purple stain that for the moment looked
like ink.
"Oh, good gracious!" cried Louis, as
the full light of the misfortune burst upon
his mind, I am afraid it must be the
cherries."
"What cherries ?" asked Mrs. Somer-
ville; and, trying hard to conceal her
annoyance, she added, I did not see
any with you when you came into the
carriage."
"They were in our pockets," stam-








Found Out.

mered Louis; I forgot all about them.
I am awfully sorry; I never was so sorry
for anything in all my life!"
"Never mind!" sobbed poor little
Maria, trying hard to recover herself;
" it won't signify, really; it has not gone
on my dress, and I can borrow a shawl
or a jacket."
"Yes," chimed in Margaret, the elder
of the two girls; "we can stop in the
next village, at Mrs. Markham's, and
borrow a muslin scarf. I know she has
one she can either sell or lend."
Mrs. Somerville tried now to cheer
and comfort the boys, seeing their utter








The Cherry Tent.

misery and distress of mind, but no words
or suggestions of any kind could soothe
them; and it was with the greatest diffi-
culty they could be persuaded to remain,
as they knew from the quantity of fruit
stowed away into their pockets, that an
immense amount of injury might still be
done to the carriage.
It was not until they drove into the
little village, and stopped in front of a
sailmaker's shop with some haberdashery
rooms on the second floor, that Louis
and Maurice ventured to raise their eyes,
or look their companions in the face.
Poor Maria jumped out first, trying







Found Out.

all she could to hide the corner of her
mantle, which was literally soaked with
the inky juice of the cherries; but her
exit only served to make things worse,
revealing as it did a mass of crushed
fruit which had fallen from Louis' coat
pockets, and which had entirely destroyed
the carriage cushions as well as the beau-
tiful Indian shawl which had been placed
upon them.
"* Dear, dear, I am afraid it is a very
bad job!" murmured poor Mrs. Somer-
ville, whose good temper was scarcely
proof against such a trial; "but pray
don't trouble yourselves about it, it was








The Cherry Tent.

not your fault, you know, and so there
can be no blame attached to you what-
ever."
Oh, yes, but it was our fault!" gasped
Maurice, who by this time felt perfectly
sick with shame and misery: "we ought
never to have taken the cherries or got
into the carriage at all, for we were out
of bounds."
"Hush!" cried Louis, at Maurice's
elbow.
It was my fault asking you to come,
and pressing you to do it," urged Mrs.
Somerville, much troubled at the sight
of Maurice's distress. Now, don't think







Found Out.

anything more about it, boys. I will just
run inside, and see what can be done for
Maria's dress."
"What a gaby you are, Maurice, to
go and blab out everything," said Louis,
angrily: "if you go on that way the
Doctor will be sure to hear it all, and we.
have got into a jolly good scrape as it is."
"There can be very little doubt about
that, Louis," cried a voice in the boys'
ears, which made them start suddenly
round, and brought them face to face
with an only too familiar countenance.
Louis stared for a moment like one in
,a dream; but there could be no mistake,







The Cherry Tent.

it was the Doctor himself, who was
standing on the pavement beside the
carriage, with his eyes fixed in vexation
and sorrow on the guilty culprits.
"I am sorry to see you here too.
Maurice," he said, turning his gaze on
the younger boy, while he lowered his
voice, so that the passers-by in the street
might not hear him. I expected better
things from you. You heard me tell all
the boys this morning that they were
none of them to go to the flower show,
and yet I hear from Mrs. Somerville
that you are both on your way to Swal.
lowvale with her. Have you anything







Found Out.

to say in excuse for yourself, Maurice?
or must I give up all my confidence and
trust in your faith and honour ? I left
my charge for a few short hours," con-
tinued the Doctor, with increasing se-
verity of voice, "not for the purpose of
enjoying the flower show, which I con-
fess I should much have liked to do, nor
to take a refreshing stroll through the
wood, which is, perhaps, the greatest
rest open to me both for body and mind,
but to walk in the scorching sun to this
place to order the cricket tent which I
have heard you, Maurice, in particular,
are wishing for."







The Cherry Tent.

"It was awfully kind of you, sir; I
never can be sorry enough for what has
happened."
The Doctor turned away, and re-en-
tered the shop, to give a few last direc
tions; then, calling a fly, both the boys
descended with shame from the grand
open carriage, whose costly linings and
trimmings they had been the means of
ruining, and took their places in the fly
with their master.
That evening the Doctor sent for both
the boys, and questioned them separately
and at great length as to the events of
the day and their various acts of dis-







Found Out.

obedience. He spoke very gravely but
not unkindly, and urged upon them to
tell him the whole truth of the affair.
Maurice, who was humbled and pain,
fully contrite for his part in the unhappy
transaction, told everything to his master,
concealing nothing from him, and taking
upon himself even more than his fair
share of blame. He gave a perfectly
faithful account of their doings in the
tent, and the quantity of fruit abstracted
from the poor woman's store, and ended
with an offer to restore fourfold the value
of what had been taken; but Louis, un-
happily, did not follow the same truthful







The Cherry Tent.

course as his friend, and not knowing
that Maurice had confessed all, he sought
to account for his possession of the
cherries in a manner which, if true,
would have been perfectly justifiable.
The Doctor heard him to the end,
and when he had finished, without at-
tempting to contradict his story, he drew
from his desk a parcel tied up in paper,
which he desired Louis to unfasten.
Louis complied, in complete ignorance
of its contents; but no sooner did he
take off the paper cover than a guilty
blush spread itself over his whole face,
and tingled down to his very finger-tips,






























































THE PUBLIC REPRIMAND.








Found Out.

for what was it but the basket and trowel
which he had borrowed in the morning
from the gardener, and which he now re-
membered having left in the cherry tent!
He knew instantly that Bessie must
have been up to the hall and revealed
all their doings, and he left the Doctor's
presence stammering with confusion.
The next day both the boys received
"a public reprimand from the Doctor, and
"a punishment suited to their grave act of
disobedience, but Louis was not seen
from that day forth in the school, nor
was his name ever mentioned again by
the master.









The Cherry Tent.

Maurice lived on under the Doctor's

careful and loving eye for several years,

and in after days, when he was a grown-
up man, and filling a position of trust

and honour, he used often to recall the

day of the flower show in Swallowvale,

and to say he owed to Bessie Barkley
and her cherry tent the greatest and
most enduring lesson of his life.



THE END.





DALZIEL BS0S., CAM PRESS, LONDON, N W
DQ23529387226





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