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Annual report of the Comptroller of the State of Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Comptroller of the State of Florida
Alternate Title: Report of the comptroller of the State of Florida
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Comptroller's Office
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: S.l
Manufacturer: Tallahasseean Book and Job Print
Creation Date: 1894
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Finance, Public -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ending Dec. 31.
General Note: Description based on: 1897.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000350039
oclc - 07376082
notis - ABY7828
System ID: UF00053735:00013

Table of Contents
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Full Text






ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE

COMPTROLLER

OF THE


State of Florida


FOR THE PERIOD


Beginning Jan. 1, 1894, and Ending Dec. .1, 1894.








5336
F6556*
I 8 9 ~TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
JOHN G. COLLINS, STATE PRINTER.
c 1895.


_~ ~















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES










ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE


COMPTROLLER

OF THE



State of Florida

FOR THE PERIOD

Beginning Jan. 1, 1894, and Ending Dec. 31, 1894:.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
JOHN G. COLLINS, STATE PRINTER.
1895.





33
5r~3 ~R















REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER.




TREASURY DEPARTMENT, STATE OF FLORIDA,
COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE,
TALLAHASSEE, January 1, 1895.
HoN. HENRY LAWRENCE MITCHELL,
Governor of Florida:
SIR-I have the honor of presenting herewith my official
report of the transactions of the Treasury Department of
the State, for the fiscal year ending December 31st, 1894.
FLORIDA'S FINANCIAL CONDITION.
My first report from this office, under date of January 1st,
1891, presented an unsatisfactory condition of the State's
finances. For the first time in many years she was unable to
meet some of her outstanding warrants. In addition to the
$100,000 borrowed in 1889, under Legislative authority, the
State was due in" the shape of deficiencies and warrants
outstanding, issued to educational institutions, about
$85,000. She was thus confronted with what might be
termed a floating indebtedness of $185,000 with the Treasury
depleted of funds applicable to such purposes.
The necessities of the State were so urgent that the Leg-
islature of 1891. authorized the borrowing of an additional
$100,000 to meet past deficiencies and outstanding warrants.
It required that sum and the ordinary revenue of the year to
pay those deficiencies and outstanding warrants, and meet
current expenses, including the cost of the Legislature then
in session.
The succeeding year (1892) witnessed an improvement,
not ithstanding the reduction by the Legislature of 1891 of
one-quarter mill from the State tax proper; and when the
Legislature of 1893 met, there were no deficiencies and no
outstanding warrants that the Treasurer could not pay on
demand.
This improvement was so continuous and steady, being
greatly stimulated by the financial legislation of 1893, that it









4

was never necessary to exercise the authority given by that
Legislature to again borrow funds to meet the current appro-
priations and interest upon the State debt. Indeed, the Legis-
lature of 1893 was so beneficial from a financial standpoint
that the expenses not only ceased to overrun the State's in-
come, but left a healthy surplus in the treasury.
This improvement can be well illustrated by a comparison
of the amount of cash to the credit of the "General Revenue"
in the respective years covered by this short resume of our
recent financial condition.
There stood to the credit of the "General Revenue" as
shown by reports from this office :
On December 31, 1890.................$ 8,123 01
On December 31, 1891...... ........... 16,543 91
On December 31, 1892................... 24,283 11
On December 31, 1893 ................... 41,130 93
On Dec-mber 31, 1894 ........... ... ..153,924 67
To this last sum must be added $7,118.51, covered into the
Treasury on account of the repeal of Chapter 3856. Laws of
Florida, creating a Bureau of Immigration, making the total
amount to the credit of "general revenue" on December
31st, 1894, $161,043.18. This amount stood to the credit of
the "general revenue," notwithstanding the fact that all ex-
penses of criminal prosecutions presented up to December
'31st, 1894, were duly audited and paid by the State.
REDUCTION OF TAXATION.
Impressed with the belief that the best financial theory
ever advanced, is to spend as little as possible, and that the
best tax ever levied is the smallest, I hope the course of the
Legislature will be such as to afford positive relief to the
people.
Owing to the counties assuming.the co'ta and expenses of
their own criminal prosecutions,, one mill will of course be
taken from the State tax proper,. as about one mill was the
levy considered necessary to meet those expenses during the
present year.
As witnesses for the prosecution are no longer paid by
the State (Jurors and Witnesses before the Grand Jury being
alone payable from the State Treasury), an additional reduc-
tipn of, one-fourth of a mill can be safely made, making the
total reduction of one and a quarter mills, or about $125,000,
annually. This will leave.the State tax proper, three mills.
These reductions are of course recommended upon the sup-
position that the revenue from the present License Laws will
not be materially altered, and that the Legislative appropria-












tions will be strictly confined to the estimated needs of the
State.
A deaf ear should be turned to every effort to increase the
estimated appropriations. As to extraneous expenditures,
(except a moderate sum to advertise the State's resources at
Atlanta), no persuasion or pressure should induce favorable
-action.
The fact that the State still owes one hundred thousand
dollars ($100,000.00) in New Yoik, which should be met on
the 17th of July of the present year, is of itself a conclusive
reason why the Legislature should exercise the most rigid
-economy and limit its appropriations to the necessities of the
government.
Organized special interests will perseveringly press for
State aid, b'at it should be remembered that the great body of
taxpayers look to the Executive, and to their Representatives,
to give them relief. Two years of financial and industrial
depression. with the products of our agricultural classes
lower than ever known in our history, and the great loss by
the extreme temperature of the present winter, should all ad-
monish us that the great mass of the people are asking an
alleviation of public burthens.
All of our taxes, State and county, have been too high.
Reduction of taxation is one principle in which the practice
always surpasses the theory. It gives relief and contentment
to the people. It invites more reasonable returns of property
for purposes of taxation. It is the strongest incentive to im-
migration that lawmakers can offer. It is the best advertise-
ment the State can make.
CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS.
The last Legislature, by a vote of over "three-fifths of all
the members elected to each house," passed an amendment to
Sec. 9, Article 16 of the Constitution, and the people at the
election of the 2d of last October adopted ,the same. The
amendment, which now forms a portion of the Constitution,
is as follows:
Section 9. "In all criminal cases prosecuted in the name
of the State when the defendant is insolvent or discharged,
the legal costs and expenses, including the fees of officers,
shall be paid by the counties where the crime is committed,
under such regulations as shall be prescribed by law; and all
fines and forfeitures collected under the penal laws of the
State shall be paid into the county treasuries of the respect-
ive counties as a general county fund to be applied to such
legal costs and expenses."
By this amendment Florida returned to the system that











had always existed in the State from her admission into the
Union up to 1887, when the constitution framed by the Con.
vention of 1885 went into operation. A system that four-
fifths of our sister States adhere to as more equal in its
operations, and more conducive to the best interest of their
taxpayers. It is not an experiment, but a system endorsed
by long usage and confirmed by intelligent experience.
It is based upon the principle of local self-government, a
principle that is not only the foundation of individual liberty,
but in its operations proven to be the most satisfactory and
economical.
Experience everywhere demonstrates that departments at a
distant capital cannot give local accounts originating in the
counties that intelligent consideration which can be exer-
cised by local authorities, familiar with local affairs, and with
the general surroundings bearing upon each particular case.
As our Supreme Court has said: "A more economical
method is required, whereby the local authorities, composed
of persons likely to be familiar with local affairs, may with
watchful care, defend and protect their own interests against
the fraudulent practices sometime alleged, of imposing upon
the auditing officer of the State without the possibility often
of his determining upon the justness of claims presented in
due form, but which might, without inconvenience, be more
thoroughly investigated by persons acquainted with the cir-
cumstances and origin of each claim."
Upon the other hand, experience equally demonstrates that
where accounts have to be audited and paid at a distant
capital, local authorities do not as a general rule give them
that close investigation which they would if they were to be
paid from the local treasury under their control.
The duty of paying such accounts alone produces a proper
feeling of responsibility in auditing, necessary to a due
economy.
Such payments at a distant capital has another important
bearing. Representatives are more prone to give Legislative
sanction to the importunities of interested parties to increase
costs and expenses, when the payments are to be thus 'made.
This has been evidenced in our own State.
After the adoption of the constitution of 1885, placing
criminal costs upon the State, th -re was not a Legislature,
except the Legislature of 1893, that did not pass bills that
increased those costs.
Would such have b en the result if the increased expendi-
tures had to have come from the county treasuries?
Of course there will be. some temporary inconvenience in
making the change, as in all great changes of a similar char-












acter, but I have never doubted that when once made it will
be satisfactory to the taxpaying p ople of the respective
counties as well as officials.
AN OPPORTUNITY NOW TO RELIEVE THE PEOPLE.
Reasoning from the safe basis of experience, the conclu-
sions are most satisfactory. They go far beyond the mere
change of the channel through which these expenses are
liquidated, and bring positive and permanent relief to the tax
payers. And was it not necessary ?
Every Legislature, after the adoption of the present con-
stitution, added to these costs and expenses until 1892 the
payments under the two heads of Jurors and Witnesses and
Criminal Prosecutions amounted to about $220,000. When
we reflect that this was two and a half (2-) mills upon the
entire net assessed valuation of the State, for these two
sources of expenditure alone, we begin to appreciate the
magnitude of this rapidly growing burthen. No other State
in the Union was subjected to such a tax rate, for such pur-
poses. It was a reflection upon the law abiding character of
our people, an increasing drain from the earnings of the tax-
payer, and a constant menace to the credit of the State.
The Legislature of 1893 fortunately placed a check upon
this growing evil, and presented an amendment, which, if fol-
lowed with proper legislation, will eradicate the cause.
HOW CAN RELIEF BE SECURED?
Let us now note the evidence to demonstrate that the
counties will not have to levy the one and a quarter mills,
which will be taken froin the State tax. Leaving out of pres-
ent c Insideration the fact that the large majority of the
counties now pay into the treasury more for criminal costs
than they receive back, a few considerations will evidence the
fact tha, it will not be necessary for any county to make as.
large a levy as the State has made for those costs.
In the first place, the counties only pay when the defendant
is insolvent or discharged. If the defendant is solvent and
convicted he is required to pay all costs. There cn be no
question of the fact that the State has b en made to pay many
cost bills that could have been made out of the defendants, if
due diligence had been exercised.
County Commissioners having to audit and pay these costs
out of the county treasuries for which they are responsible,
and being familiar with all the co editions, will naturally re-
quire more exhaustive efforts to secure the same from the de-
fendants.
Officers will soon learn that they must look more to the











criminal for their costs and fees, and a vigilance, prompted
by self-interest, will naturally largely increase the number
that should b3 made to pay the costs incident to their own
crimes.
The Commissioners should be clothed with authority to
utilize the labor of those sentenced to the county jail in'any
manner they may deem best to produce a pecuniary return for
the expenses of prosecution. With due diligence, and author-
ity to utilize the labor of county convicts, there can be no
question that County Commissioners will be able to reduce
largely the amount of payments from the county treasury.
The law should also allow the net proceeds of all convicts
sent to the penitentiary, to be divided between the counties,
in proportion to the number of convicts from each county.
In addition to this, all fines and forfeitures are now re-
quired by the amendment to the constitution, to be paid
into the county treasuries "to be applied to such legal costs
and expenses." The fines and forfeitures have heretofore
gone to educational purposes, but the insignificant sums col-
lected under these heads in the respective counties, in com-
parison with what they should have been, caused many of the
foremost and most enthusiastic educators in the State to ad-
vocate that all the proceeds collected under the penal laws of
the Sta:e be applied to the expenses of said prosecutions.
It is the natural and logical method of applying them.
The "net proceeds" of fines paid into the school fund dur-
ing the last scholastic year amounted to only $9,906.50.
Every one who has investigated the question feels that
this sum scarcely represents one-fifth of the amount that can
be collected from all the fine- imposeil by the various Justi-
ces of the Peace and higher courts of the State. There will
be the strongest possible incentive for officials to see that
such fines are paid into the County Treasury to meet their
fees; and the County Commissioners will be more active, and
secure monthly reports of all fines imposed, and into whose
hands placed for collection. It should soon follow that the
few counties now having the largest criminal litigation will
be correspondingly reimbursed by the increased revenue from
the fines imposed in such litigation.
The same results will fl )w from the change requiring For-
feitures to be utilized for criminal costs. Officers who have
the approval of bail bonds will learn that it is to their
interests not to approve b nds unless the penalty can be made
on execution against the sureties.
As the matter formerly stood, no one seemed interested
enough to enforce collections, and it is claimed that there
are hundreds of bail bands in various counties that have becn











forfeited and no judgments ever rendered. There should also
be a more expeditious and better method than the one now in
force for estreating and collecting these forfeited b.il bonds.
In some of the States a sufficient sum is realized from the
fines and forfeitures alone to meet all the expenses of crimi-
nal prosecutions, and it is believed that under proper laws
and due vigilance on the part of officials it will soon approxi-
mate that amount in Florida.
The law should provide for a separate and distinct county
fund, to be known as the Fine and Forfeiture Find, into
which all proceeds applicable to criminal costs should be paid.
It should be under the control of the County Commissioners,
and it should be made their duty to see that every fine and
forfeiture that it was possible to collect, and all the other rev-
enues applicable thereto, be paid into such fund to meet crim-
inal costs. The payment of such costs should come exclus-
ively from this fund, and have no connection with the general
revenue fund of the county.
After careful investigation, with the experience of other
States as a guide, the conclusion is reached that if proper
laws a-.d regulations are enacted by the approaching Legisla-
ture it will not cost the taxpayers one-half of the amount re-
quired when the State made the payments, and at the same
time do full justice to all officers. Indeed, there is no valid
reason why Florida sh u'd not, at an early day, follow the
example of Georgia and Alabama in rendering prosecutions
self-sustaining, and entirely relieving taxpayers from the bur-
then.
REFUNDING TO THE COUNTIES.
Had it have been known when the last Legislature was in
session, that the amendment to section 9, article 16, of the
Constitution, woul l have been adopted by popular vote, the
Comptroller, who generally estimates the millage for the
State tax proper, would of course have placed the estimate
at fully one mill less. The amendment was adopted on the
second day of October, 1894, a month before the taxes for
that yver were due. The State consequently is collecting
that amount of taxes for criminal costs, after said costs were
placed upon the counties by constitutional mandate.
In view of the facts of the case, and the further potent
fact, that the State can legitimately spare the amounts now
being collected for criminal costs, both equity and justice
demand that said amounts be refunded to the respective
counties.
The proposition seems to my mind so clear, just, and self-
evident, that I cannot doubt but that a bill for the relief of











the several counties of the State, having that object in view,
will meet the hearty concurrence of the Legislature. The
counties will thus be in lunds to mett the demands for
criminal costs without any embarrassment, until opportunity
is afforded them to make the necessary provision for said
costs.
EQUALIZATION OF ASSESSMENTS.
No question comes to the front with greater regularity to
vex lawmakers and officials, than the equalization of assess-
ments for purposes of taxation. For the last twenty years
Comptroller's reports and Executive messages have'called
attention to the inequalities of the assessments in our State.
The prominence given to it, however, in recent discussions
through the press is a sufficient justification of a more ex-
tended and detailed notice.
In pursuance of my determination to investigate the laws
of most of the States in the Union, bearing upon this subject,
tho-e of Massachussetts and Virginia were the first examined.
They were two of the oldest States, and if experience was
valuable, supposed to have profited by i'. Their Educational
Institutions rank with the best, and their representative men
are always classed with the most cultured. They represented
also the leading characteristics of the two great 'sections of
our Union. Surely if perfection was approachable in finan-
cial legislation, those two honored commonwealths would at
least give affirmative evidence.
My investigation of the Massachusetts tax system,
was met with the declaration from high authority "'that the
system of taxation in use in the State of Massachusetts is a
thoroughly indefensible method, when judged on the ground
of either political economy or practical results, and there is
absolutely no justice in the present form of taxation which
arbitrarily taxes one class of property and exempts another."
Turning to Virginia, it was' found that Gov. McKinney, in
retiring from the governorship in December, 1893, after four
years of experience, found the assessments so unequal and so
unsatisfactory in that Commonwealth that he felt it his duty
to c ill the matter to the attention of the General Assembly in
a special message, in'which he rec mmended the creation of a
"special tax commission" to take the entire subject under
consideration. Experience and education had found no solu.
tion for the question in those two States.
Investigation demonstrated that the equa;zation of assess-
ments was a greatly discussed and much vexed question in
nearly all the States.
But the want of success of others should not deter us from











an earnest and intelligent effort to at least secure some im-
provement. The examination of the que-tion presents three
separate considerations; First, the equality of assessments in the
counties; second, the equality of assessments between the'
counties, and then, the consideration of the great inequality
between the assessment of real and personal property.
EQUALITY OF ASSESSMENTS IN THE COUNTIES.
The equality of assessments in the county is the leading
factor in the attempted solution. It is the keynote to the
situation. Without it success is impossible. How is that to
be secured?
Our constitution provides for the appointment of assistant
assessors of taxes in the respective counties, and our revenue
law prescribes their duties.
In addition, the Legislature of 1891 required the County
Commissioners in each county to appoint "two intelligent
and fair-minded freeholders in each precinct" to act with the
Assessor, or A-sistant Assessor, in securing a proper valua-
tion upon all real property in that precinct. Their valuations
were then to be, revised and equalized by the County Com-
missioners. Apparently every agency was here provided to
secure the objects of the law.
The Assessor was to exercise his best judgment in arriving
at the "full cash value" of the property. His decision was to
be examined and revised by "two intelligent and fairminded
freeholders in each precinct." The result of their combined
judgment was then to be revised by five gentlemen, appoint-
ed by the Governor from among the most intelligent and
capable citizens of the county, as County Commissioners.
What more ciuld be done? And yet the system was not a
success, and in some counties it was claimed that the two
intelligent and fair-minded freeholders in each precinct '
placed such different values upon the same grade of prop-
erty in adjoining precincts that the inequality was more
glaring than ever. The failure to equalize was so manifest
that the succeeding Legislature omitted the two freeholders
and left valuations to the Assessor, to be revised and equal-
ized by the County Commissioners.
After an examination of the revenue laws of many States,
no better agency was found suggested to equalize values for
assessment purposes in the respective counties, than such a
board as the five County Commissioners are presumed to be.
They are appointed by t:.e Governor, and supposed to be
among the most trustworthy and intelligent business men of
the county, and it careful and proper selections are made,
where can you look for an agency in the county that should











be able to secure better results? Yet there are evidences
of great inequality in many of the counties. It is to be
hoped, therefore, that suggestions from all sources will be re-
ceived and well considered by the Legislature, in its efforts
to deal with a question that has perplexed mankind ever
since "there went out a decree in the days of Claudius
Caesar, that all the world should be taxed."
It must, however, be remembered that no human agency
-can secure equality of assessments to the satisfaction of all.
Men's judgments will differ, even when viewing questions
from the most disinterested standpoint.
EQUALIZATION BETWEEN THE COUNTIES.
The desire of localities to avoid the payment of an undue
proportion of the State tax, is frequently the cause of a ten-
dency to low assessments. But if those assessments in the
counties are just and properly equalized, it would be much
less difficult for a central or State Board to equalize such
values between the counties.
Examination shows some twenty-one States of the Union
having State Boards for such purposes. The boards are vari-
ously designated, but the duties are all practically the same.
In some of the States the officials'of the State have to per-
form the duties, others having slch boards fill them with
citizens disconnected from any of the duties ot State officials.
As a rule. their duties are simply to equalize assessments
between the counties, taking no c gnizance of any' inequali-
ties of valuations in the counties. Some few, however, go to
the latter extent. In 'stch cases members of the State board
give public notice when they will be in a particular county,
and the As-essor arid County Comm'ssioners, (or other
county boards of equalizal ion,) are summoned, and questioned
under oath as to the equality of asseismenis. Individuals are
also invited to appear and point out any known or supposed
injustice in the assessments.
In the twenty-one States having such boards, the financial
officers in twelve state that they are a success, in eight very
doubtful, and in one an entire failure. They all agree, how-
ever, that it depends largely upon the qualifications of the
men placed on said boards.
Of these twenty one States having equalizing boards four
are classed as Southern
The best results are thought by some to be accomplished
by having a State convention of assessors to meet th- State
board of equalization when the values of reld estate atr being
adjusted. Missouri and Indiana particularly seem to have
been imbu d with that conviction, and last spring Governor











Stone, of Missouri, at the unanimous request of the State
Board of Equalization of that State, invited the assessors to
meet in convention and co-operate with the board in its
work. Of course such a convention of assessors was not ex-
pectrd annually, for the valuations fixed upon for real estate
were supposed to stand for r number of years.
Florida established a State Board of Equalization, on Jan-
uary 30, 1871, to be composed of eight members. It was a
joint legislative c ,mmittee of three from the Senate and five
from the House, appointed by the presiding officers of those
two bodies. Its incapacity was stamped upon its surround-
ings at its birth, and its short existence ended in a dismal
failure.
INEQUALITY BETWEEN REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY.
While inequality of assessments upon visible property is a
question of the highest import, the question of subjecting
the invisible.property to bear its just proportion of the bnr-
thens of government, is equally important, and fully as dif-
ficult. It is a question that seems to have defeated the ef-
forts of the entire country.
The Governor of Virginia, in a message to the Legislature
of that Slate under date 4,f December 12, 1893, said: From
1870 to 1880, the census returns show-that the assessed valu-
ation of the personal property of the United States decreased
one million and a quarter, and from 1880 to 1890 the decrease
was even greater; the real estate increasing during the same
period more than five billions, while the fact is conceded that
the value ot r,.l estate and personal property increase, as a
rule, pari passee."
If such be the case one would suppose from the decrease in
the. value of personal property, that the country was rapidly
rushing.to bankruptcy.
The mere statement of the facts carries the conviction that
thevast wealth.of their country, embraced in credits, bonds,
mortgages, stocks aid other invisible property, is not rep-
resented on the tax books,' and does not bear its just propor-
tion of the burtlens of _,oyernmnt-t.
Florida unfortunately is no exception to the rule. In 188.
the assessed value of personal property in this State amounted
to $19,357,499. In 1894, seven years thereafter, it had de-
clited to 4$17,484,969.
Can anyone believe that the personal wealth of Florida,
including the invisible property alluded to above, decreased
$1,872,530 in the la-it sevciI y,.ar', and hiat, too, in view of
the fact that $869,435 in the shape of bank stock was added











to the personal assessment for the first time the. past year ?
If so, his credulity should at once secure for him a guardian.
It is estimated by those best informed upon the subject that
the personal property of a Commonwe ilth, including of course
credits, bonds, mortgages, stocks, etc., is about equal to the
value of its real estate. While this proportion may not be
observed inan agricultural State like Florida, yet it is doubt-
ful if there appears upon her assessment rolls more than one-
fourth of the value of her personal property; and three-fourths
of that class of property, better able than any other to bear
the burthens of taxation, escape entirely.
The numerous remedies that have been suggested for in-
equality of assessments but emphasize the difficulties sur-
rounding this greatly discussed question. Aside from the
State boards of equalization, numerous other suggestions
have been made. Some suggest that the State secure its
entire revenue from personal property, or a license and in,
come tax, leaving the real estate for county taxation, that
the State may avoid the difficult and delicate question of
equalizing its value in and between the counties.
Other suggestions are for the counties to be ,assessed ac-
cording to wealth or population, such sums as may in the ag-
gregate be necessary for the support of the State govern-
ment, thus leaving it to the counties to make their own
equalization. A few of these suggestions are merely re-
peated to show) the vexed nature of the question, as they are
open to very cogent criticism.
Certainty, equality and productiveness are the chief essen-
tials of a good tax law; they are the canons and best embodi-
ment of financial wisdom, as approved by the most eminent
economists. Many of thesenumerous financial suggestions
jeopardize these maxims, and the law making powers should
weigh well all proposed reforms, for it is not every change
that procures improvement.
The equalization of values is of the highest importance to
the end that all may contribute equally to the support of
government, and we all should desire that equality upon the
constitutional Basis. ofthe 'just valUation-of all property
both real and personal" Ta simply raise the value, however,
of real estate and visible personal property without a just
equalizatidh and leave still untouched the vast millions of in-
visible property, that can best contribute to the government
which gives it security and protection, will increase rather
than alleviate present complaints.
My efforts have been simply to present some salient facts
gathered from the laws, etc., of other States, not pretending
to give positive remedies for difficulties that have baffled











statesmanship for centuries. Copies of the laws creating
boards of equalization in the several States have been se-
cured, which will be at the service of the appropriate com-
mittees, with such suggestions as shall be deemed beneficial.
At the same time some needed changes of a minor nature in
our revenue laws will be presented.
BANK TAXATION.
Chapter 4117, Laws of Florida, provides for the assess-
ment and collection of taxes on bank stock. Under it, all
shares of stock in banks incorporated and existing under the
laws of the United States, or of this State, have to be as-
sessed for taxation.
Paragraph 12, section 9, of Chapter 4115, Laws of Florida,
requires all banks to pay a license tax, graded according to
the amount of capital stock. The United States courts have
held that States could not collect a license tax from a na-
tional bank, and confines her powers of taxation to the capi-
tal stock pf such banks. The State banks, however, under
our laws, are subject to boih the license tax and the tax on
capital stock. This is manifestly unjust, and it is respectfully
submitted that banks coming under the provisions of Chapter
4117, and taxed on their capital stock, should not be required
to pay a license tax also.
The year just closed is the first that bank stocks were
ever assessed, and the tax made payable by the banks. There
should not be the great inequality in the assessments of
this class of property as it appears on the assessment rolls of
the respective counties.
TAXATION.
In his "Constitutional Law of the United States," Dr. H.
von Hoist says: "The ideal of tax legislation in all modern
civilized States, must be to have each individual bear the
public burthens in the exact proportion that his ability to
pay taxes bears to the tax paying ability of the entire pop-
ulation. The realization of this ideal is impossible. It can
be approached only by combining different taxes in such a
way as to make their defects balance each other."
The most satisfactory legislation looks to securing rev-
enue from those sources best able to bear it, and in some of
the States, notably Delaware and Pennsylvania, it has pro-
gressed so far as to eliminate all taxes for State purposes
from real estate. While Florida cannot advance very rapidly
in that direction, she should at least take every step forward
that her conditions will permit.
The legislation of the last session, taxing the stock of











national banks, increasing the revenue from insurance com-
panies, securing 'ome interest from the idle moneys in the
State Treasury, taxing sleeping cars a small per cent. of their
incomes derived from business in the State, was all in the
direction of securing revenue from more fruitful sources, to
the end that the burthen might be better equaliz d, and ulti-
mately greatly lowered, upon all classes of property. This
report only shows the income from some of those sources for
the last five months of 1893. The increase due for 1894,
being payable in January of this year, will appear in the next
annual report from this office. Let us hope that future Legis-
latures will rep rt progress in similar directions.
TAX ON LITIGANTS.
The last Legislature provided for the payment of one
dollar before docketing any suit in civil actions in any courts
of the State, other than Justices of the Peace.
Those who have investigated the question contend that a
very small percentage of the people ever have any need of'
civil suits in our higher courts, but are annually compelled
to p:ay taxes for the payment of jurors and court expenses for
the benefit of the few, miny of whom from disposition and
habit become chronic litigants.
Several States, acting upon this theory, placed a small tax;
sometimes a percentage on the amount for which judgment is -
given, sometimes a jury tax in such civil suits, and a con-
siderable revenue is derived from those sources.
In this connection it is proper to suggest that ad the
clerk of the Circuit court collects the $1.00 now charged for
docketingg civil cases in his court, he should be allowed a per-
centage for the amount collected.: If the theory is carried
further, and a percentage on the amount'of the judgment *is.
required,,or a juiy tax allowed to be collected by the clerk,'
there is every reason why he should receive a compensating
percentage.
.COLLATERAL INHERITANCE TAX.
Many of the States collect a revenue from a tax on collat-
eral inheritance, Not to lay a burthen upon the 'immediate
succession, as descent of property from husband to wife, wife
to husband, parent to child, or child to parent; but only on
such property as through the protection of the statute comes
into the possession of persons or corporations who have no
such direct claims upon those from whom it is derived. When
property passes to a new owner who has not such direct claim
to it, there can be no reasonable objection to its paying a tax
to the State whose laws allow and protect it. It is a tax that.











is rapidly growing in favor with lawmakers, and while the
amount derived in this State might possibly be small for
years to come, yet it would be in the direction of advanced
financial thought, and tending to the reduction of the tax
rate.
SPECIAL LEGISLATION.
In some of the States a tax or fee is charged for special or
private legislation. And why not? Our Legislature costs
the taxpayers between eleven and twelve hundred dollars per
day, and why should the time be spent in considering acts
for special or private purposes, when the public needs require
constant consideration?
If one will take the time to note the number of pages in
the published volumes of our laws, devoted to such special
legislation, the magnitude of the work will be apparent. We
have general laws for such purposes, and if they do not suf-
ficiently cover the field, then broaden them, and prevent the
Legislative journals from being encumbered with the con-
sideration of private and special bills, to the delay and det-
riment of the public demands.
The tax or fee should be paid before the measures could be
introduced, and be large enough to at least partially com-
pensate the State for the time lost, and cost of printing and
binding. Such a law would relieve the Legislature, and give
abundant time for.the consideration of public business, and
with proper general laws, work no hardship to citizens or
other individuals.
What is the use of general incorporation laws, if public
legislation is to be delayed by continuous special applications
for charters ? ,
What necessity for a general banking law, if the law
making power is to be constantly appealed to for special and
private acts ? To repeat, if the general laws are not sufficient
make them so, and let the time of the Legislature be given to
public business. If that time is claimed for pri-ate interests,
then let such interests contribute to the expense.
PENSIONS.
The report from this office to the last Legislature gave
the expenditure for pensions for the previous year at
$36,593.77. Upon this basis there was appropriated $40,-
000.00 per annum for pensions. This amount would have
been abundantly sufficient had it not been for the change in
the pension law.
Chapter 4180, Laws of Florida, greatly broadened the scope












of previous legislation, and necessarily increased the expend-
itures. The amount due to day (January 1, 1895). for the
last quarter of 1894, shows conclusively that it will require
$55,000.00 annually to meet the expense of those already on
the pension roll. There are now claims before your Excel-
lency aggregating $10,000.00 per annum more, with applica-
tions constantly coming in. It was thought by some that
this last legislation would only add about $5,000.00 to this
class of expenditures. Experience, however, is d. monstrat-
ing that it will probably require $30,000.00 annually to me t
Sthe increase made by the last Legislature, making a total ex-
penditure of $70,000.00 per annum for the cost of pensions.
As the amount appropriated fr the first -ix months of the
present year will be exhausted by payments to be made for
the last quarter of 1894, a full annual appropriation will have
to be made for 1895, as well as for 1896.
DEPOSITING PUBLIC MONEYS.
Chapter 4157, Laws of Florida, authorizes the Governor,
VTreasurer and Comptroller to deposit the public moneys in
those banks in the State offering the best inducements as to
interest and security. The revenue derived from that source
for the last fiscal year amounted to $2,371.94, more than
enough to pay the Treasurer's salary.
The law is in conformity with the practice of many other
States, and, while bringing in a revenue,'will have a most
beneficial effect in eliminating the position of State Treasurer
from being a prize to be contested for by moneyed institu-
tions. There was a growing feeling with conservative citi-
zens, that there existed a strong tendency in that direction
in our own State, and we were drifting to a condition when
capacity would be a secondary consideration to securing the
deposits lor particular interests.
When public funds are to be deposited in banks giving
the best inducements as to interest and security, it greatly
lessens, if it does not destroy, this'prompting motive, as
well as furnishing some pecuniary aisislance to the State.
To require all the various funds of the State to be kept in
the State Treasury, would necessitate an additional expense
as well as a discount for collecting warrants in all distant
portions of the State, To obviate that expense as well as
the discounts upon educational, as well as other warrants
drawn upon the Trea- ury, the public funds have been kept in
various banks in different sections of the State. It is thus a
convenience to the people, but there is no valid reason why
the banks should not furnish security for, and pay interest
upon, any surplus they may hold. The law should be more











definite in defining what character of securities the banks
*shall be required to give, before the Treasurer would be au-
thorized to deposit the funds, and also defining the method
the Treasurer should pursue in selling such securities in. case
of default.
CONVENTION BONDS.
The Constitutional Convention of 1868 issued $30,000.00
of eight per cent. bonds to defray its expenses, and a special
tax was levied to liquidate them. All of said bonds were
paid except fifteen, of $100 each, making a total of $1,500.00.
Reports from this office again and again referred to the
non presentation of these bond, and in 1885 they were
dropped from the lists of the State's liabilities, the natural
presumption being that they had been destroyed or lost.
A few months ago one of these bonds of $100 was presented
at this office for settlement, but, there being no appropriation
for such a purpose, payment had to be deferred for Legisla-
-tive action. It is respectfully suggested that the Legisla.
ture authorize the Comptroller to draw his warrant on the
Treasurer for the payment of the principal and interest to
date of maturity of any of these remaining fifteen convention
bonds that may be presented.
LICENSE FOR SELLING LIQUORS.
The State assumes to regulate the sale of spirituous, vinous
or malt liquors by granting licenses to sell the same under
certain restrictions. Those licenses, being expensive, lead to
numerous devices to avoid their payment. The trouble is
aggravated by the inefficiency of the law to ferret out these
devices and the inadequacy of the penalty should a conviction
follow.
Whan the St .te issues a liquor license, the .holder should
be entitled to the same protection 'as those who receive
other licenses, and the penalty should be of such magnitude
as to deter persons from a violation of the law,
Constant complaints are made by persons holding such li-
censes, that the law is being violated, and collectors are
powerless, under certain conditions,-to procure such evidence
as is necessary to secure dbnvictions. In other cases the
guilty parties temporarily abandon the business upon the
meeting of the Circuit Court, and move to other localities
to continue in disregarding the law. Should, however, a con-
viction be secured, a small fine is paid, and the business fre-
quently continued.
The evil should be vigorously dealt with. The scope and
power of officials should be sufficiently broadened to enable











them to act promptly and efficiently, and the penalty should
always carry with it imprisonment, as well as a fine amount-
ing to at least as much as the State and county tax. It is
not creditable to our laws to have such numerous complaints .
of their constant violation.
PRINTING DELINQUENT TAX LISTS.
Owing to a change in the method of advertising the de-
linquent tax lists by Chapter 4111, Laws of Florida, there
was no advertisement of such lists in 1891. The Legislature
of 1893 going back to the former system of ttx sales, ren-
dered it necessary to advertise the delinquent tax lists of
1892 .and 1893, in 1894. This accounts for the unusually
large amount of warrants issued under that head during the
past year, the advertisement of two years falling in one.
INSURANCE LAWS.
The development and progress of the business of insurance
necessitates a thorough investigation of the laws bearing
upon so important a question. Doubts have arisen as to the
qualifications of "various companies and associations apply-
ing for admission to enter the State. Other associations
and companies are transacting business in the State without
proper authority.
-It is believed that many utterly worthless insurance and
investment schemes are operated to defraud the people.
The State Treasurer, as Chairman of the Board of Insur-
ance Commissioners, will present these matters to your Ex-
cellency more in detail, and suggest needed changes in the
insurance laws, to the end that no unauthorized company,
however sound, can under any circumstances do business in
the State, and the people at the same time be protected from
insurance and investment schemes organized to swindle.
Immense sums of money are drawn annually from our
State for the purposes of insurance, and it is unfortunate that
we have not home companies to transact the business, and
thus retain within our limits those accumulations, to be uti-
lized for the development of our varied resources.
STATE ATTORNEYS.
I see no reason for changing the suggestion made two
years ago that State attorneys should be paid a salary com-
mensurate with their duties. The more reflection given the
subject, the more cogent the reasons appear.
The conviction fees should remain as now established by












law, but they should be collected and paid over to the County
Treasurer to assist the counties in meeting the costs in crim-
inal prosecutions.
APPROPRIATIONS AND DEIICIENOIES.
The estimates for appropriations are carefully calculated,
and it is hoped they will not be lowered unless the laws re-
quiring the expenditures are changed. If the laws require
expenditures, the reduction of appropriations does not lessen
the State's obligations, but only creates deficiencies, and there
is no economy in having deficiencies, as they have to be met.
The increase of inmates in the Asylum, and the expense in-
cident to a sewerage system, have produced a shortage in the
appropriation for that institution.
The employment of stenographers was much greater the
past than the previous years, and it will be necessary to ap-
propriate $1,100 to cover such employment. No appropria-
tion is asked for that purpose beyond the present deficiency,
as it is considered that the State is no longer liable for those
expenses.
It is not deemed necessary, however, to consume the
time of the Legislature in passing a deficiency bill for the
sums that these two appropriations are left in arrears, but
have to the extent necessary added the required amounts to
general appropriation estimates for the last six months of
the present year.
EL/ lTioNS.
As it relates to the expenses of government, it is not deemed
inappropriate to express the hope that the Legislature
will inquire into the necessity of longer continuing the ex-
penses incident to the methods of having dual elections bi-
ennially. Leaving out all other considerations, it is an addi-
tional expense to the people, that in the judgment of many,
is no longer necessary. Such a change would of course re-
quire an amendment to the constitution.
A STATE EXAMINER.
Under Section 2191, Revised Statutes, the Comptroller is
authorized to appoint a suitable person to make, an exami-
nation of the affairs of banking companies. The compensa-
tion for such examiner is to be at the rate of five' dollars for
each day -employed in such examination and mileage, to be
paid by the bank examined, and which may be recovered by
suit against the corporation.
The number of persons qualified to properly examine a
bank is limited, and persons possessing such qualifications,











generally have lucrative employment. They will not sur-
render even temporarily their permanent business, and ad-
vance their own expenses for such compensation, to be se-
cured from the bank examined, at the end of a possible law
suit.
Under Section 414, Revised Statutes, the Governor is au-
thorized to designate an agent for any county to examine
the accounts, books, etc., of persons authorized to receive
public moneys. In interviews. with your Excellency upon
the question, the difficulty of securing temporarily the ser-
vices of competent agents, has been made manifest. Both
laws are greatly weakened if not destroyed in their efficiency
by the same cause.
Thj most efficient way to meet the trouble is to have a
public examiner for the entire State, whose time will be de-
yoted exclusively to the work. Such examiner should be ap-
pointed for four years, with a salary payable by th State,
that will command a qualified person. His duties should
embrace the examination of banks, as well as the ace units of
all officers, State and county. All banks examined should be
required, under penalty that would enforce prompt compli-
ance, to pay a sum into the Treasury of the State sufficient, to
cover th expenses and per diem of the examiner while e,-
gaged insuch investigation.
The frequent examination of the accounts of all officers
who handle public moneys, would alone secure results that
would more than compensate the, State for the'expense. It
would properly attest the superior worth of the larg- num-
ber of efficient officers in our State, and stimulate others to
follow their example.

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH.
Warrants amounting to $31,568.29, hav been issued dur-
ing the year on account of expenses of the State Board of
Health. The amounts collected at quarantine stations for the
last year and held by the Board, will undoubtedly be commu-
nicated to your Excellency in the official report of the State
Health Officer.
At the request of the Board, your Excellency, under date
of May 21st, 1894, directed this office to "fix the assessment
for expenses of the State Board of Health at one-half mill."
The gross levy under such assessment amounted to
'$52,130,31, which is now being collected with the other
State taxes.











TABULATED STATEMENTS.
Tabulated statements are herewith submitted, showing:
Receipts at the Treasury for the year ending December 31,
1894.
Balance in Treasury January 1, 1895, and its distribution
among the several funds.
Receipts on account of general revenue for the year end-
ing December 31, 1894.
Disbursements on account of general revenue for the year
ending December 31, 1894.
Bonded debt of State on December 31, 1894.
Warrants issued for the fiscal year ending December 31,
1894.
Estimated appropriations necessary for the last six months
of the fiscal year 1895, for 1896, and first six months of the
fiscal year 1897.
Statement of expenses of criminal prosecutions by counties
for the fiscal year 1894.
Statement of expenses of jurors and witnesses by counties
for the year 1894.
Assessment of railroad property in each county for the
year 1894, made by the Comptroller, with "assistance and
advice of the Attorney-General and Treasurer."
Assessment of the telegraph property of the State made
by the Comptroller, with "assistance-and advice of the At-
torney-General."
Statement showing length and value of track and rolling
stock of each railroad in the State as assessed for 1894.
Statement showing length and value of all telegraph lines
assessed for 1894.
List of disabled soldiers and widows of soldiers receiving
pensions from the State.
List of lunatics in the hands of private parties receiving
compensation from the State December 31, 1894.
List of banks organized under Chapter 3864, Laws of Flor-
ida, and.their condition at close of business on December 29,
1894.
Value of property, with gross amount of State taxes
assessed for the year 1894, including licenses and auction tax.
Abstract of assessment rolls, showing the property
assessed for the year 1894 in the several counties of the State.
Very respectfully,
W. D. BLOXHAM,
Comptroller.








A
















Receipts and Disbursements.


The aggregate balance in Treas-
ury, January 1, 1894, was.. $136,773 02
Total receipts at the Treasury
from all sources and on all
accounts for the year ending
December 31, 1894......... 883,220 27.
Total expenditures for year end-
ing December 31, 1894......

Balance in Treasury January
1,1895........... ......


This balance is distributed
among the different funds as
follows:
generall Revenue, applicable to
current expenses, including
interest on bonded debt.....
Common School fund, principal
One-mill School tax..........
State Board of Health........
Seminary fund, principal......
Department of Agriculture ...
Agricultural College fund ....
Common School fund, interest.
Blind, Deaf and Dumb........
Sinking Fund Bonds of 1873..
Sinking Fund Bonds of 1871..


161,043
30,666
42,814
1,943
1,429
5,093
4
13,626
44
547
39


- $1,019,993 29

762.740 76


$257,252 53


18
01
36
30
53
29
98
35
10
68
75-


257,252 53












General Revenue Account.


The receipts and disbursements on General Revenue Ac-
,oount for the year ending December 31st, 1894, were:
RECEIPTS.
Balance as per report, January 1, 1894........ $ 41,130 93
License Tax, December 31, 1894............. 172,901 54
Taxes 1894............ ............ ..... 5,659 33
Taxes 1893.... ...... ..................... 437,656 44
Taxes 1892......................... ....... 15,532 84
Costs Criminal Prosecutions.... ............. 1,789 93
Charter Tax............ .............. .... 7,611 00
Phosphates............ .................. 12,289 05
Commission Tax........................... 1,877 00
License Tax, Civil Actions................... 3,962 70
One per cent Insurance Premium Tax........... 8,235 35
Revised Statutes......... ................. 060 00
Acts of Legislature.......................... 112 00
Juror and Witness Money refunded .... ..... 74 15
Auction Tax......................;.... 351 04
Interest on -Deposits........................ 2,371 94
Asylnm Pay Patients ..................... 225 00
Sleeping Car Tax.......... ............ 292 23.
Hire of Convicts................. ......... 14,000 00
Immigration Tax transferred................. 7,118 51
Printing refunded ........................... 5 00

$733,855 98
DISBURSEMENTS.


Dec. 31, 1894.
Salaries, Executive Department ..............
Salaries, Judicial Department ...............
Contingent expenses of State ................
Stationery, Executive and Legislative Dep'm'nts
Expenses, collection of revenue ..............
Pensions................................
Maintenance of Lunatics ......... ........
Printing .......... ...................
Post-mortem Examinations ..................
Janitor, -upreme Court .....................
Jurors and W itnesses......................
Contingent expenses, Supreme Court.........
Criminal prosecutions .......................


$21,262
34,000
915
819
56,034
50,499
47,381
9,446
699
300
89,315
1,633
99,428











W atchman at capitol........................ 499 99
Janitor at capitol............................ 300 00
Rewards, apprehending criminals............ 1,805 23
Contingent expenses of Capitol............... 3,001 26
Expenses, Normal schools .................. 8,855 85
Blind, Deaf and Dumb Institute.............. 8,672 25
Expenses, Florida State Troops ............ 2,864 91
Encampment, Florida State Troops........... 5,000 00
Salary, Chaplain State convicts ............... 275 00
Stenographers in Circuit courts...............' 1,169 63
Expenses, Circuit court judges acting as Su-
preme judges ............................. 24 70
Phosphates ............................ ... 2,419 38
Secretary, Supreme court judges............. 1,500 00
Salary, Adjutant General.................... 1,000 00
Appropriation, West Florida Seminary......... 2,000 00
Appropriation, East Florida Seminary ........ 2,000 00
Stenographer for Governor .................. 570 00
Printing Delinquent Tax lists ................ 37,642 40
Township plats, and lists of State and United
States land entries ....................... 360 00
Contingent expenses, Superintendent of Public
'Instruction ............................... 500 00
Librarian, Suprem6 court .................... 300 00
Purchase of books for Supreme Court library... 547 58
.Confederate Soldiers' Home .................. 370 57
Revenue refunded .......................... 25
Interest on loan ........... ................ 8,750 00
Costs adjudged against the State in civil cases 138 86
State Board of Health...................... 6,062 62
Printing Supreme Court reports.............. 2,039 75
Insurance on State buildings................ 12 50
Interest on bonded debt.................... 62,394 00
Balance ................................... 161,043 18

$733,855 98
















Bonded Debt of State.


BONDS OF 1871.
Seven per cent. bonds, 1871, interest payable
annually, January 1st.
Amount issued............................ $390,000 00
Deduct amount in Sinking Fund.......... ..... 82,300 00
$267,700 00
Deduct amount in School, Seminary and Agri-
cultural College Funds.................... $175,600 00
$92,100 00
BONDS OF 1873.
Six per cent. bonds, 1873, interest payable semi-
annually, January and July:
Amount issued........................... $925,000 00
Deduct amount in Sinking Fund.... ........ 160,200 00
$764,800 00
Deduct amount in School, Seminary and Agri-
cultural Funds ...... ...... ............. 499,200 00
$265,600 00

Total seven and six per cent. bonds in hands of
.individuals..... ..................... $357,700 00















Warrants Issued.




From January 1, 1894, to December 31, 1894, inclusive, under
the following heads of expenditures.
Salaries, Executive Department ...............$ 21,262 50
Salaries, Judicial Department ................ 34,000 00
Maintenance of Lunatics................. ... 47,002 33
Jurors and Witnesses ....................... 87,847 87
Expenses Collection of Revenue .............. 55,419 69
Printing .................................... 9,450 18
Criminal Prosecutions........... t........... 96,382 63
Salary of Librarian of Supreme Court.......... 300 00
Confederate Soldiers' Home ................... 370 57
Stenographer for Governor ................... 570 00
Revenue Refunded............................. 25
Contingent Expenses of Supreme Court ........ 1,635' 53
Purchase of Books for Supreme Court Library.. 503 83
Appropriation for Janitor at Capitol........... 300 00
Appropriation for Watchman at Capitol........ 499 99
Stationery for Executive and Legislative Depart-
ments ..................................... 819 83
Post Mortem Examinations .................... 729 30
Appropriation for Janitor of Supreme Court .... 300 00
Stenographers in Circuit Courts ............... 1,169 63
Expenses of Florida State Troops.............. 2,814 73
Rewards for and Arrest of Fugitives from Jus-
tice .. .................. ........... 1,605 23
Contingent Expenses of State ................. 861 28
For Township Plats and Lists of United States
and State Land Entries..................... 360 00
Institute for the Blind, Deaf and Dumb......... 8,672 25
Contingent Expenses of Superintendent of Public
Instruction................................ 500 00
Pensions ..................................... 50,911 35
Expenses of Colored Normal Schools .......... 4,849 47
Expenses of White Normal Schools............ 3,782 82
Expenses of East Florida Seminary............ 2,000 00
Expenses of West Florida Seminary .......... 2,000 00
Salary of Adjutant General ................... 1,000 00











Contingent Expenses of Capitol ............... 3,006 02
Seminary Fund, Interest...................... 5,807 00
Department of Agriculture ................... 8,953 54
Expenses of State Board of Health............. 31,568 29
Interest on Loan.. ............ ............ 8,750 00
Printing Delinquent Tax Lists ................ 37,642 40
Common Schools (one mill tax, 1893 and 1894).. 103,254 95
Salary of Secretary to Supreme Court Judges f.. 1,500 00
Salary of Chaplain for State Convicts .......... 275 00
Phosphates .................. ............. 2,419 38
Common Schools, Interest (1894)............. 35,305 97
Printing Supreme Court Reports .............. 2,103 50
Costs Adjudged Against the State in Civil Cases, 138 86
Insurance on State Buildings ................. 12 50
Encampment of Florida State Troops .......... 5,000 00
Expenses of Circuit Judges Sitting on Supreme
Bench ................................... 24 70

$683,683 37












Estimated Appropriations

Necessary for the current expenses of the State Government
from July 1 to December 31, 1895, and also for the expen-
ses of the Legislature, which convenes April 2, 1895.
For Salaries Executive Department 6,750 00
Salaries Judicial Department 16,786 50
Maintenance of Lunatics 40,000 00
Jurors, and Witnesses before Grand Jury 30,000 00
Expenses Collection of Revenue 27,500 00
Chief Clerk in Comptroller's Office 750 00
Private Stcretary to Governor 600 00
Clerk Supreme Court as Librarian, under
Sec. 1321, Revised Statutes 150 00
Clerk Supreme Court per diem, Sec. 1321,
Revised Statutes 469 50
Clerk Superintendent Public Instruction
payable from interest on Common School
Fund. 450 00
Clerk of Attorney General's Office 450 00
Stenographer in Governor's Office 360 00
Clerk in Treasurer's Office 600 00
Contingent Expenses Supreme Court 750 00
Purcha-e of Books for Supreme Court Li-
brary 250 00
Janitor at Capitol 150 00
Watchman at Capitol 250 00
General Printing and Advertising 5,000 00
Bookkeeper in Comptroller's Office .600 00
Printing Supreme Court Reports 1,000 00
Stationery for Executive and Legislative De-
partments 500 00
Post Mortem Examinations .500 00
Janitor of Supreme Court 150 00
Costs Adjudged against the State in Civil
Cases 50 00
Expenses Circuit Judges Sitting on Supreme
Bench 150 00
Stenographers in Circuit Courts audited
claims 1,100 00
Expenses of State Troops, including encamp-
ment and all other expenses authorized by
law 7,000 00
Contingent Expenses at Capitol 1,500 00
Rewards for and Expenses of Arrest of Fugi.
tives from Justice 1,000 00












Contingent Expenses of State
Lists of State and United States Land Entries
for use of Assessors .
Blind, Deaf and Dumb Instituue
Traveling and Incidental Expenses of Super-
intendent of Public Instruction
Pensions
Assistant Auditing Clerk, Comptroller's
Office
Expenses Normal School .
Clerk of Secretary of State
Salary of Clerk for Supreme Court Judges.
Salary of Adjutant-General
Expenses Bureau of Agriculture, Clerical
Aid.
Legislative Expenses .
Add Interest on Bonds of 1871 and 1873,
Payable by State Treasurer on Coupons.


750 00

250 00
5,000 00

250 00
55,000 00


500
3,500
600
750
500


500 00
70,000 00

40,000 00

$322,416 00











Estimated Appropriations
Necessary for the Current Expenses of the State Government
for the Year 1896.
For Salaries, Executive Department $13,500 00.
Salaries, Judicial Department 33,573 00
Maintenance of Lunatics 60,000 00
Jurors, and Witnesses before Grand Jury 60,000 00
Expenses of Collection of Revenue 55,000 00
Chief Clerk in Comptroller's Office 1,500 00
Private Secretary to Governor. 1,200 00
Stenograp'er in Governor's Office 720 00
Clerk in Treasurer'- Office 1,200 00
Contingent Expenses of Supreme Court 1,500 00
Purchase of Books for Supreme Court Li-
brary 500 00
Janitor at Capitol 300 00
Watchman at Capitol 500 00
General printing and advertising 10,000 00
Bookkeeper in Comptroller's Office .1,200 00
Printing Supreme Court Reports 2,000 00
Stationery for Executive and Legislative
Departments 1,000 00,
Post Mortem Examinations .1,000 00
Janitor of Supreme Court 300 00
Costs adjudged against the State in Civil
Cases .. 100 00
-Expense Circuit Judges Sitting on Supreme
Bench 300 00
Expenses of State Troops, including en-
campment and all other expenses author-
ized by law 10,000 00
Contingent Expenses at Capitol 3,000 00'
Rewards for and Expenses of Arrest of Fu-
gitives from Justice 2,000 00
Ciotingent Expenses of State .1,500 00
List of State and United States Land
Entries for use of Assessors 500 00
Blind, Deaf and Dumb Institute 10,000 00
Traveling and Incidental Expenses of Su-
perintendent of Public Instruction 500 00
Insurance on State Buildings 2,000 00
Pensions 70,000 00
Assistant Auditing Clerk, Comptroller's
Office 1,000 00
Clerk Supreme Court as Librarian, under
Sec. 1321, Revised Statutes 300 00











Clerk Supreme Court per diem, under Sec. *
1321, Revised Statutes 939 00
Clerk Attorney General's Offie 900 00
Clerk State Superintendent Public Instruc-
tion, payable from interest Common
School Fund 900 00
Expenses Normal School 7,000 00
Clerk of Secretary of State 1,200 00
Salary of Clerk for Supreme Court Judges 1,500 00
Salary of Adjutant General 1,000 00
Expense, Bureau of Agriculture, Clerical
Aid 1,000 00

Add Interest on Bonds of 1871 and 1873, pay-
able by State Treasury on Coupons 80,000 00

$440,632 00










Estimated Appropriations
Necessary for the Expenses of the State Government for Six
Months from January 1 to June 30, 1897.
For Salaries, Executive Department 6,750 00
Salaries, Judicial Department 16,786 50
Maintenance of Lunatics 30,000 00
Jurors, and Witnesses before Grand Jury 30,000 00
Expenses Collection of Revenue 27,500 00
Chief Clerk in Comptroller's Office 750 00
Private Secretary to Governor 600 00
Sten, grapher in Governor's Office 360 00
Clerk in Treasurer's Office 600 00
Contingent Expenses of Supreme Court 750 00
Purchase of Books for Supreme Court Li-
brary 250 00
Janitor at Capitol 150 00
Watchman at Capitol 250 00
SGeneral Printing and Advertising 5,000 00
LuuKKeeper in uomptroller:s Office 00 00
Printing Supreme Court Reports 1,000 00
Stationery for Executive and Legislative
Departments 500 00
Post Mortem Examinations 500 00
Janitor of Supreme Court 150 00
Costs Adjudged against the State in Civil
Cases 50 00
Expenses Circuit Judges Sitting on Su-
preme Bench 150 00
Expenses of State Troops, including all ex-
penses author zed by law, excepting En-
campment 3,000 00
Contingent Expenses at Capitol. 1,500 00
Rewards for, and Expenses of Arrest of Fu-
gitives from Justice 1,000 00
Clerk Supreme Court as Librarian under Sec.
1321, Revised Statutes 150 00
Clerk Supreme Court per diem, Sec. 1321,
Revised Statutes 469 50
Clerk Superintendent Public Instruction,
payable from interest on Common School
Fund 450 00
Clerk Attorney General 450 00
Contingent Expenses of State 750 00
Lists of State and United States Land
Entries for use of Assessors 250 00










Blind, Deaf and Dumb Institute
Traveling and Incidental Expenses of Su-
perintendent of Public Instruction
Pensions
Assistant Auditing Clerk Comptroller's
Office
Expenses Normal Schools
Clerk of Secretary of State
Salary of Clerk of Supreme Court Judges
Salary of Adjutant-General .
Expenses Bureau of Agriculture, Clerical
Aid
Add Interest on Bonds of 1871 and 1873,
Payable by State Treasurer on Coupons.


5,000

250
35,000


500 00
3,500 00
600 00
750 00
500 00

500 00

40,000 00

$217,316 00


No estimate for the State Board of Health has been made,
as the special levy of $52,130.31, under Section 784, Revised
Statutes, referred to in this report, takes the place of any
general appropriation.












36,

ExPENSE of Criminal Prosecutions, by Counties, for. 1894.



1 I I

COOUTrB. S S 6
0 s o d u o S




Alachna. ....... 3,962 55 361 46 39 78 194 83$ .......... $ ......... $4,558 62'
Baker .......... 29915 ........ 41 88 13 92 ........ .... ... 34 95
Bradford. ....... 1,736 70 23 56 194 09 43 2S ............... 1,997 58
Brevard......... 2,193 85 101 60 ........ 86 71 ........ ........ 2,382 16
Calhoun......... 338 05 1 96 13 05 12 87 ................ 65 93
Citru.......... 2,861 25 169 79........ 11 28................. .. 2,646 32
Clay.............. 885 95 15 70 46 92 21 40 ........ ........ 969 97
Columbia...... 3,03076 622 95 ........ 409 41 ................ 4,063 12
Dade ............ 582 60 45 56 33 64 17 04 .... ... .... 678 84
DeSoto..... .... 820 45 48,97 20 54 88 96 14 61 ........ 973 53
Duval............ 6,843 51 986 72 105 96 14 24 1,042 64 1,840.00 10,833 07
Escambia........ 4,259 05 906 42 260 10 21 77 844 99 765 00 6,557 33
Franklin ...... 317 70 89 27 75 31 9 35 .................... 491 63
Gadsden ........ 891 40 12298 41 34 59 66 ...... ............. 1,115 38
Hamilton........ 1,l11 83 38 85 125 24 115 28 ........ ........ 1,591 20
Hernando........ 881 25 .......... 17 21 16 66 ....... ........ 415 12
Hlllsborough.... 3,851 20 873 42 853 23 13 23 488 82 1,10000 6,629 40
Holmes ......... 8210 ......... 31 15 27 5 ................. 140 78
Jackson............ 3,321 72 242 66 16 43 217 99 .......... ........ 3,798 80
Jefferson........ 589 80 497 27 66 45 30 98 ................ 1,184 50
Lafayette.......... 485 30 5 16 ......... 86 61 ........ ... .... 577 07
Lake............ 1,747 09 13 36 6607 3479 16888 240 00 2,393 19
Lee .......... 322 96 ................. 48 53 ........ ........ 371 49
Leon ........... 2,317 51 458 78 26 94 117 58 ............. ... 3,159 81
Levy ............ 293 75 40 80 4 31 4 39 ....... ........ 343 25
Liberty.......... 41 8.......... 8 04 7 94 .............. 57 78
Madison......... 720 65 26 67 79 77 44 49 ....... ....... 871 58
Manatee ......... 133 45 ............. .............. 10 80 ........... 144 25
Marion.. ..... 8,092 35 522 84 89 20 26 14 221 48 680 00 4,632 01
Monroe.......... 1,674 55 969 06 32004 49 53 ......... ........ 3,01318
Nassau ..... ... 701 22 195 50 108 55 25 15 ................ 1,30 4
Orange......... 1,680 5 29381 16 72 7103 26156 35000 2,673 65
Osceola ........ 404 35 35 82 28 84 37 85 .................. 506 86
Pa ...1 10 ...... 39110......... 27 20 18 34 ........ ........... 436 64
Polk............ 2,473 63 33 75 23 68 209 05 ........ ......... 2,739 41
Putnam.......... 2,193 30 538 33 150 22 9 1 18225 615 00 3,688 23
St. Johns ....... 1,568 55 50954 5 60 43 0 ................ 2,126 75
Santa Rosa...... 1,677 50 220 110 77 118 40 ....... ....... 1,908 87
Sumter ........ 959 95 11000 17 30 27 81 ........ ....... 1,11506
Suwannee....... 2,87671 92 29 42 97 225 44 ....... ........ 2,37 41
Taylor .......... 106 15 .................. 11 61 ....... ...... 117 6
Volusia.......... 2,329 80 144 43 8184 11 89 118 77 175 00 2,855 73
Wakulla ........ 357 95 7 96 49 06 19 79 ..... ......... 43476
Walton.......... 734 10 4 94 26 57 51 12 .................. 846 73
Washington ..... 85 05 16 70......... 62 2 ............ ..... 664 07
Totals ......... $6.429 07 59.324 08 3,004 91 $2,871 83 $2,799 3) $5,765 00 $91,194 19
STATE ATTORBNYS.
1st Judicial Circuit.......... $690 00
2d ........ 550 00
8d ........ 67500
4th ........ 60000
5th ........ 4000
6th ........ 531 30
7th ....... 405 00
--. ............................... ............ 4,191 80
Costs adjudged against the State............................................. 341 47
Clerk of the Supreme Court................................................ ...... 655 6T
Total expenditures on account of criminal prosecutions for 1894 ..........$96,382 6&












Expenses of Jurors and Witnesses,


By Circuits and Counties for 1894.


First Judicial District:
Santa Rosa
Walton .
Escambia
Holmes.
Washington .
Jackson
,Second Judicial District:
Gadsden
Liberty
*Calhoun
Franklin
Leon.
Wakulla
Jefferson
Third Judicial District:
Madison
Taylor
lLafayette
Hamilton
Suwannee
Columbia
Fourth Judicial District:
Nassau .
Duval .
Baker
Bradford
Clay .
St. Johns
Fifth Judicial District:
Putnam
Alachua
Levy
Marion .
Sumter .
Citrus .
Hernando


Expenses by Expenses by
Counties. Circuits.

$2,008 60
2,302 60
.4,204 95
828 15
1,955 00
.4,595 74- $15,895 04

2,910 15
383 25
711 10
922 65
S 2,589 60
802 00
875 85- 9,194 60


.1,552 60
577 60
.2,866 65
2,909 40
3,180 60
,311 05- 14,397 90

344 35
S 4,998 90
462 10
S 1,180 00
915 60
.1,186 15- 9,087 10

S 2,285 51
3,252 27
824 00
.4,569 70
1737 45
S 1,648 95
554 75- 13,872 63












Sixth Judicial District:
Hillsborough
Manatee
Polk
Monroe.
DeSoto .
Pasco
Lee
Seventh Judicial District:
Volusia.
Brevard
Orange .
Dade
Osceola.
Lake


. 6,096 20
551 05
S2,743 15
1,187 25
2,130 05
966 55
S 835 20- 13,509 45


1,953 70
S1,279 55
S2,442 20
1,118 85
944 60
S4,152 25- 11,891 15

$87,847 87
















RAILROADS.




STATEMENT showing the Assessment.of Railroad and Tele-
graph Property for the year 1894 in each county, as as-
sessed by the Comptroller, with the "assistance and ad-
vice of the Attorney-General and Treasurer."

FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULA AR RAILROAD CO.
Alachua county.


Mles.Hdths..
35.00-Main track at ............ $4,500
29.00-Main track at.......... ... 6,000
3.22-Side track at ............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Baker county.
26.25-Main track at ............. 6,000
.94-Side track at.... .......... 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Bradford county.
19.74-Main track at............. 6,000
.40-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Clay county.
5.75-Main track at............ 6,000
.50-Side track Ht ............... 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Columbia county.
19.00-Main track at............ 6,000
1.37-Side track at ............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Duval county.
38.00-Main track at............. 7,000
16.98-Main track at ............ 6,000
4.23-Side track at .............. 2,333
b.55-Side track at .............. 1,750
P ro rata value rolling stock


$157,500 00
174,000 00
4,830 00
50,129 31-$386,459 81


157,500 00
1,410 00
2),276 94- 179,186 94


118,440 00
600 00
15,019 40- 134,059 40


84,500 00
750 00
4,660 94- 39,910 94


114,000 00
2,055 00
15,190 93- 131,245 98


266,000 00
101,880 00
9,868 59
6,212 50
46,803 27- 430,764 86












Gadsden county.
85.56-Main track at............. $6,000
N.94-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hernando county.
6.25-Main track at............. 6,000
.03-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hlllsborough county.
35.59-Main track at............ 6,000
5.10-Main track at............ 2,000
1.96-Side track at ............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Jefferson county.
18.50-Main track at............. 6,000
4.38-Main track at............. 2,000
1.60-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Lake county.
14.50-Main track at............ 6,000
;9.00-Main track at ............. 4,500
1.68-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Leon county.
26.00-Main track at.............. 6,000
11.00-Main track at.............. 1,500
1.27-Side track at .............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Levy county.
60.20-Main track at............. 4,500
4.67-Side track at ... .......... 1,125
Pro rata value rolling stock
Madison county.
34.50-Main track at............. 6,000
1.71-Side track at............. ,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Marion county.
41.45-Main track at............. 6,000
3.66-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


$213,360 00
1,410 00
27,219 87-$241,989 87


37,500 00
45 00
4,683 31- 42,228 31


218,540 00
10,200 00
2,940 00
31,806 24- 258,486 24


111,000 00
8,760 00
2,400 00
18,255 96- 140,416 96


87,000 00
40,500 00
2,520 00'
18,777 98- 148,797 98


156,000 00
16,500 00
1,905 00
28,539 85- 202,944 85


270,900 00
5.253 75
48,376 80- 824,530 55


907,000 00
2,565 00
27,003 61- 236,568 61


248,700 00
5,490 00
33,640 78-. 287,830 78












Nassau county.
i5.50-Main track at............. $6,000
(2.25-Main track at............. 1,500
3.13-Side track at ............. 2,000
L 1.34-Side track at ............. 1,500
Pro rata talue rolling stock
Orange county.


24.00-Main track at.............
15.67-Main track at.............
1.73-Side track at.............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Pasco county.
21.00-Main track at.............
.81-Side track at ..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Sumter county.


4,500
4,000
1,125



6,000
1,500


86.00-Main track at............ 6,000
159-Side track at............ 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Suwannee county.
27.00-Main track at.... ......... 6,000
1.34-Side track at ............ 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stcck
Wakulla county.
9.25-Main track at.... ....... 1,500
.01-Side track at .............. 375
Pro rata value rolling stook


$333,000 00
3,375 00
6,260 00
2,010 00
46,400 56-$391,045 56


108,000 00
62,680 00
1,946 25
30,874 05- 203,500 30


126,000 00
1,215 00
16,264 81- 143,479 81


216,000 00
2,385 00
28,032 74- 246,417 74


162,000 00
2,010 00
21,134 55- 185,144 56


13,875 00
3 75
6,905 65- 20,784 40


PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD CO.
Escambia county.
9.98-Main track at............. 7,000 69,860 00
4.99-Side track at.......... .... 2,333.33 11,643 32
Pro rata value rolling stock 6,916 44- 88.419 76
Santa Rosa county.
39:87-Main track at ... .. ...... 7,000 279,090 00
1.34 Sidetrack at.............. 1,750 2,345 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 19.039 84- 800,474 84
Walton county.
35.26-Main track at ............. 7,000 246,820 00
1.17-Side track at..... ........ 1,750 2,047 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 16,831 39- 265,698 89












Holmes county.
20.52-Main track at............ $7,000
.61-Side track at.... ......... 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Washington county.
15.36-Main tack at............ 7,000
1.09-Side track at.............. 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Jackson county.
39.43-Main track at............... 7,000
1.35-Sidb track at.............. 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Gadsden county.
.72-Main track at.............. 7,000
.15-Side track at............ 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock


$143.640 00
1,067 50
9,762 48-$154,469 98


107,520 00
1,907 50
7,600 23- 117,027 73


276.010 00
2,362 50
18,841 18- 297,213 68


5,040 00
262 50
401 96- 5,704 46


PENSACOLA RAILROAD.
(Operated by the L. & N. R. R. Co.)
Escambia county.
48.29 -Main track at.............. 6,000 259,740 00
8.18-Side track at............. 2,000 16,360 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 100,396 00- 376,496 00

JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY WEST RAILWAY CO.
Duval county.
11.37-Main track at............ 7,000. 79,590 00
2.44-Side track at............. 2,333 33 5,693 32
Pro rata value rolling stock 22,863 70- 108,147 02
Clay county.
28.00-Main track at............. 7,000 196,000 00
3.23--ide track at ............. 1,750 5,652 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 51,704 08- 253,856 58
Putnam county.
40.17-Main track at .............. 7,000 281,190 00
8.38-Side track at............. 1,750 14,665 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 80,378 89- 376,233 89
Volusia county.
44.58 -Main track at............. 7,000 312,060 00
6 43--ide track at ............... 1,750 11,252 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 84,452 27- 407,764 7T












Orange county.
4.80-Main track at................ $7,000 $33,600 00
3,43-Side track nt ............. 1,750 6,002 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 18,625 50- $53,828 00

FLORIDA. SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO.
(Main Line).
Putnam county.


28.66-Main track at.............. 5,000
5.92-Side track at ............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock
Alachua county.
31.68-Main track at............. 5,000
4.36-Side track at............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock
Marion county.
52.70-Main track at............. 5,000
7.50-Side track at ........ ..... 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock
Sumter county.
17.85-Main track at............. 5,000
.60-Side track at............. 1,25)
Pro rata value rolling stock

Hernando county.
10 52-Main track at............. 5,000
1.26-Side track at............ 1,250
Pio rata value rolling stock
Lake county.


28.28-Main track at............
3.58-Side track at.............
Pro rata value rolling stock


143,300 00
7,400 00
88,091 80- 188,781 80


158,150 00
5,450 00
84,480 19- 198,080 19l


268,500 00
9,375 00
57,591 68- 330,466 68


89,250 00
75C 00
17,650 38-- 107,650 38


52,600 00
1,575 00
11,269 45- 65,444 45


5,000 116,400 00
1,250 4,475 00
25,695 89 146,570 89


FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO.
(Charlotte Harb ir Division).


Polk county.
17.60-Main track at............ 5,000
2.18-Side track at ............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock


88,000 00
2,725 00
11,646 86- 102,371 86


DeSoto county.
57.65-Mnin trick at............. 5,000 288,250 00
8,92-Side track at............ 1,250 4,900 00
Pro ra a value rolling stock 86,258 64- 329,408 64










44

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY CO.


Alachua county.
25.21-Main track at ............ $7,000
5.75-Side track at ............. 1,750
S Pro rata value rolling stcck
Columbia county.


18.70-Main track at............
12.47-Main track at............
2.46-Side track at ..............
1.67--Side track at.............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hamilton county.
14.18-Main track at.............
1.19-Side track at..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Suwannee county.
40.67-Main track at............
3.41-Side track at..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Gadsden county.
2.86-Main track at ............
2.07-Side track at...............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Nassau county.
23 84-Main track at.............
3.64-Side track at.............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Duval county.


5,000
7,000
1,250
1,750



7,000
1,750



7,000
1,750



7,000
1,750


$176,470 00
10,062 50
54,816 53-$240,849 03


93,500 00
87,290 00
3,075 00
2,922 50'
61,930 68- 248,718 18


99,260 00
2,082 50
26,965 28- 128,307 78


284,690 00
5,967 50
77,334 39- 367,991 89


20,020 00
3,622 50
8,649 24- 32,291 71


7,000 166,880 00
1,750 6,370 00
48,211 19- 221,461 19


13.65-Main track at.............. 7,000 95,550 00
8.05-Side track at ............. 2,833 33 18,783 30
Pro rata value rolling stock 38,070 70- 152,404 00
Jefferson county.
11.05-Main track at............ 6,000 66,300 00
.67-Side track at ............. 1,500 1,005 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 20,561 69- 87,866 69

SILVER SPRINGS, OCALA AND GULF RAILROAD CO.
Marion county.
31.79-Main track at............. 6,000 190,740 00
1.48-Side track at.... ........... 1,500 2,220 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 12.329 86- 206,289 86












Citrus county.
44.80-Main track at............. $6,000 ,$268,800 00
1.47- -ide track at ............ 1,500 2,205 00
Pro rata value ro'ling stock 17,147 66-$288,152.68&

WINSTON AND BONE VALLEY RAILROAD.
(Operated by the South Florida Railroad Co).
Polk county.
15.63-Main track at............ 4,000 62,520 00
3.38-Side track at............. 1,000 3,380 00- 65,900 00

SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD CO.
Orange county.


33.96-Main track at..:........... 7,000
17.40-Main track at............. 6,000
8.77-Side track at.............. 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Osceola county.
15.00-Main track at ............ 7,000
15.40-Main track at............ 6,000
8.15-Side track at............. 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Polk county.
58.28-Main track at.... ........ 7,000
23.55-Main track at............. 6,000
5.63-Side track at.............. 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hillsborough county.
87.50-Main track at............ 7,000
1.04-Main track at............. 6,000
8.32-Side track at.............. 2,333
4.48-Side track at ............. 1,750
1.03-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro ata value lolling stock
.Jasco county.
24.00-Main track at............... 6,000
1.10-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hernando county.
14.29-Main track at .....:....... 6,000
3.43-Side track at.... ......... 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


287,720 00
104,400 00
15,847 50
45,199 72- 402,667 22;


105,000 00
92,400 00
5,512 50
25,219 58- 228,182 08


372,610 00
141,800 00
9,852 50
61,L47 60- 585,710 10


262,500 00
6,240 00
7,745 56
7,840 00
1,545 00
35,608 03- 321,478 59


144,000 00
1,650 00
18,867 67- 164,517 67


85,740 00
5,145 00
13,820 12- 104,205 12.












Summer county.
.63--Main track at.............. 6,000
*94-Side track at ................. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Citrus county
13.99-Main track at.............. 6,000
1.30-Side track at.... .......... 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Marion county.
-8.04-Main track at.............. 6,000
.68-Side track at ............ 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Levy county.
4.45-Main track at.............. 6,000
Pro rata value rolling stock
Alachua county.
~3.13-Main track at.............. 6,000
1.17-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


3,780 00
1,410 00
1,180 17- 6,370 17


83,940 00
1,950 00
11,493 49- 97,383 49


48,240 00
1,020 00
6,554 82- 55,814 82


26,700 00
3,345 06- 30,045 06


138,780 QO
1,755 00
18,266 31- 158,801 31


SANFORD AND LAKE EUSTIS RAILWAY.
(Operated by Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway Co)
Lake county.
20.58-Main track at................ 6,000 123,480 00
.86 -Side track at .............. 1,500 1,290 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 13,059 73- 137,829 73


Orange county.
8.02-Main track at.............. 6,000
.87-Side track at .............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


48,120 00
1,305 00
5,415 07- 54,840 07


ATLANTIC COAST, ST. JOHNS AND INDIAN RIVER RY.
(Operated by Jacksonville, Tampa and Kty West Railway Co.)
Volusia county.


20.75-Main track at.............. 6,000
.56-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Brevard county.
15.00-Main track at .............. 6,000
1.57-Side track at.............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


24,500 00
840 00
16,058 43- 141,398 43


90,000 00
2,355 00
12,486 49- 104,841 49











DELAND AND ST. JOHNS RIVER RAILROAD.
(Operated by Jackson ille, Tampa and Key West Railway Co).
Volusia couLty.


4.00-Main tia:k at.............. 5,000
1.40-Side track at ............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock


20,000 00
1,850 00
5,550 00- 27,400 00


SANFORD AND ST. PETERSBURG RAILROAD CO.
(Formerly Orange Belt Railroad.)
Orange county.


37.40-Main track at ............ 3,000
1.10-Side track at.............. 750
Pro rata value, rolling stock
Lake county.
22.1 -Main track at.............. 3,000
.20-Side track at.............. 750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Sumter county.


14.10-Main track at........ ....
.20-Side track at..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Pasco county.
41.10-Main track at.. ..........
.10-Side track at..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hillsborough county.
37,80-Main track at.............
.40-Side tack at..............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Hernando county.


3,000
750


112,200 00
825 00
19,789 00- 132,814 00


66,300 00
150 00
11,462 20- 77,912 20


42,300 00
150 00
7,350 20- 49,800 20


3,000 123,300 00
750 75 00
21,176 80- 144,551 80


3,000
750


4.00-Ma'n track at............. 3,000
.10-Side track at.............. 750
Pro rata value rolling stock


113,400 00 *
309 00
19,634 80- 133,334 80


12,000 00
75 00
2,107 40- 14,182 40


GEORGIA SOUTHERN AND FLORIDA RAILROAD CO.
Hamilton county.


32.00-Main track at............. 6,000
1.57-Side track at.... ......... 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


192,000 00
2,355 00
47,633 82- 241,988 82












Columbia county.
22.70-Main track at............. 6,000
1.16-Side track at............ 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Bradford county.


88.00-Main track at.............
1.02-Side track at.............
Pro rata value rolling stock
Clay County.


5.60-Main track at............. 6,000
.40-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock
Putnam county.
22.70-Main track at............. 6,000
1.23-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock


186,200 00
1,740 00
33,855 91- 171,795 9t


6,000 198,000 00
1,500 1,530 00
48,272 34- 247,802 34


33,600 00
600 00
8,513 64-


42,713 64


136,200 00
1,845 00
33,955 23- 172,000 23


TAVARES, APOPKA AND GULF RAILROAD CO.
Lake county.
25.00-Main track at............ 3,000 75,000 00
.26-Side track at............. 750 195 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 19,805 00- 95,000 00-

SOUTHWESTERN RAILROAD CO.
(Formerly Green Cove Springs and Melrose Railroad and Western
Railroad of Florida)
Clay county.


33.50-Main track at.... ......... 1,500
1.00-Side track at.............. 375
Pro rata value rolling stock


50,250 00
375 00
2,500 00- 53,125 00<


PENSACOLA AND PERDIDO RAILROAD CO.
Escambia county.


7.80-Maintrack at............. 2,000.
1.70-Side track at............. 500
Pro rata value lolling stock


15,600 00
850 00
7,550 00- 24,000 001


PENSACOLA, ALABAMA AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD CO.
Escambia county.
8.50-Main track at ............ 2,000 17,000 00- 17,000 00










49

PENSACOLA AND ANDALUSIA RAILROAD CO.
Santa Rosa county.


17.00-Main track at............ 1,000
1.00-Side track at............. 250
Pro rata value rolling stock

PENSACOLA AND MOBILE RAILWAY
ING COMPANY.
Escambia county.
5.661-Main track at............ 5,000
1.87--Side track at............ 1,500

ST. JOHNS AND LAKE EUSTIS
45.27-Main track at............. 8,000
2.29-Side track at............. 750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Marion county.
2.00-Main track at............. 3,000
Pro rata value rolling stock


17,000 00
250 00
5,250 00- 22,500 00

AND MANUFACTUR-



28,333 00
2,812 50- 31,145 50

RAILROAD CO.
135,810 00
1,717 50
2,000 00- 189,527 50


6,000 00
1,352 62- 7,352 62


JACKSONVILLE, MAYPORT AND PABLO RAILWAY AND
NAVIGATION CO.
Duval county.
16.27-Main track at............. 2,500 40,675 00
.21--Side track at............. 625 131 25
Pro rata value rolling stock 8,283 75- 49,090 00

JUPITER AND LAKE WORTH RAILROAD CO.
Dade county.
7.63-Main track at............ 2,500 19,075 00
.10-Side !rack at.............. 625 62 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 3,637 50- 22,775 00

JACKSONVILLE STREET RAILWAY CO.
Duv.l county.
8.00-Main track at....;........ 3,000 24,000 00
.75-Side track at............. 1,000 750 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 19,250 00- 44,000 00

FORT MEADE STREET RAILWAY CO.
Polk county.
1.00-Main track at............ 1,500 1,500 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 5 00 00- 2,003 00
4










50

STAMPA STREET RAILWAY CO.
Hillsborough county.
2.75-Main track at.............. ,000 8,250 00
.75-Side track at............. 1,000 750 00
': Pro rata value rolling stock 12,150 00- 21,150 00

S ORLANDO STREET RAILWAY CO..
Orange county.
2.00-Main track at............. 2,000 4,000 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 1,000 00- 5,000 00

TALLAHASSEE STREET RAILWAY CO.
Leon county.
2.00-Main track at.............. 1,000 2,000 00
'Pro rata value rolling stock 500 00- 2,500 00

PALATKA AND HEIGHTS STREET RAILWAY CO.
Putnam county.
1.75-Main track at............. 2,000 3,500 00
Pro rata value rolling stuck 1,000 00- 4,500 00

ST. AUGUSTINE AND SOUTH BEACH RAILWAY CO.
St. Johns county.
S3.75--Maintrack at............. 2,500 9,375 00
Pro iata value rolling stock 2,000 00- 11,375 00

JACKSONVILLE AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD CO.
Duval county.
16.25-Main track at............... 2,000 82,500 00
.50-Side track at ............. 500 250 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 10,000 00- 42,750 00

ARCADIA, GULF COAST AND LAKEL- ND RAILROAD CO.
Manatee county.
12.00-Main track at ............ 2,000 24,000 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 2,000 00-- 26,000 00

FLORIDA MIDLAND RAILROAD CO.
Orange county.
I.i ~i--ai track at............. 3,000 114,000 00
.43-Side track at............. 750 322 50- 114,322 50












Osceola county.
6.00-Main ~rack at............. 3,000 18,000 00
.10-Side track at.... ......... 750 75 00- 18,075 00

JACKSONVILLE, ST. AUGUSTINE AND HALIFAX RIVER
RAILWAY CO.


St. Johns county.
18.50-Main track at............. 7,000
3.00-Side track at.... ........ 1,750
Pro rata value rolling stock
Duval county.


129,500 00
5,250 00
41,313 32- 176,063 32


17.80-Main track at ............. 7,000 124,600 00
2.00-Side track at............. 1,750 8,500 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 38,046 69- 166,146 69

ST. JOHNS AND HALIFAX RIVER RAILWAY CO.
Putnani county.
8.80-Main track at ........... 7,000 61,600 00
1.00-Side track, at... .......... 1,750 1,750 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 3,079 06- 66,429 06
Vclusi. county.
18.00-Main track at.. .......... 7,000 126,000 00
1.50-Side track at.............. 1,750 2,625 00
Pro rata value rolling stock i 6,126 70- 134,751 70
St. Johns county.
25.90-Main track at............ 7,000 181,300 00
.50-Side track at..'............ 1,750 875 00
Pro rata value rolling stock 8,294 24- 190,469 24

ST. JOHNS RAILWAY CO.
St. Johns county.
12.00-Main track at.............. 2,000 -24,000 00
.50-Side track at............. 500 250 00
SPro rata value rolling stock 4,000 00-- 28,250 00

ST. AUGUSTINE AND HALIFAX RIVER RAILWAY CO.
St. Johns county.
18.40-Main track at............. 5,000 92,000 00
.25-Side track at............. 1,250 312 50
Pro rata value rolling stock 11,851 14- 104,163 64












Putnam county.
6.90-Main track at............ 5,000
.25-Side track at............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock


34,500 00
312 50
4,543 47- 39,355 97


JACKSONVILLE, ST. AUGUSTINE" AND INDIAN RIVER
RAILWAY CO.


Volusia county.
48.40-Main track at............. 6,000
2.50-Side track at............ 1,500
Pro rata value rolling stock -
Brevard county.
55 70-Main track at ............ 6,000
4.60-Side track at............. 1,500
Pro rata value lolling stock


290,000 00
3,75J 00
84,330 00- 828,480 00


334,200 00
6,900 00
40,670 00- 381,770 00'


ATLANTIC AND WESTERN RAILWAY CO.
Volusia county.


28.10-Main track at.............. 6,000
.60-Side track at............. 1,250
Pro rata value rolling stock

CARRABELLE, TALLAHASSEE AND
COMPANY.
Franklin county.
13.84-Main track at............. 4,000
.13-Side track at............. 1,000
Pro rata value rolling stock
Wakulla county.
23 66-Main track at............ 4,000
Pro rata value rolling itock
Leon county.
11.32-Main track at............. 4,000
Pro rata value rolling stock


140,500 00
750 00
6,000 00- 147,250 00

GEORGIA RAILROAD



55,360 00
130 00
6,985 00- 62,475 00O


94,640 00
11,830 00- 106,470 00


45,280 00
5,660 00- 50,940 00


TAMPA AND THONOTOSASSA RAILROAD CO.
Hillsborough county.
11.00-Main track at............. 5,000 55,000 00- 55,000 00,









55

SOU IH FLORIDA TELEGRAPH CO.


Orange county.
17.00 1 at........... .. ............. 50
30.00 .2 at........................ 70
Osceola county.
18.00 2 at...... ..................... 70
Polk county.
60.00 2 at.......... ............. 70
Hillsborough county.
34.00 2 at.......................... 70
Pasco county.
22.00 2 at........................... 70
Hernando county.
17.00 2 at............................ 70
Citrus county.
40.00 2 at....... ..................... 70
Marion county.
40.00 2 a'........ .......... ..... .... 70


850 00
2,100 00


2,950 00


1,260 00. 1,260 00


4,200 00

2,380 00


4,200 00

2,880 00


1,540 00 1,540 00

1,19000 1,190 00


2,800 00


2,800 00


2,800 00 2,800 00


Alachua county.
30.00 2 at .............. ...........
Levy county.
20.00 2 at ... ...... ... ...........


70 [2,100 00

70 1,40000


WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO.


Columbia county.' ... .
10.00 3 at........................... 85 850 00
10.00, 4at.......................... 100 1,000 00
Duval county.
15.79 5 at.......................... 115 1,8155 85
Escambia county. .
7.00 1 at ..................... .... 50 350 00
6.00 2 at........................... 70 420 00
10.56 3 at...'...:............::.:..:: .85 897 60
45.00 4 at.....:..................'. 100 4,500 00
Gadsden county.
2.86 2 at..:... ....... ........... 70 200 20
1.00 3 at...................'.. ... 85 85 00
35.00 4at...................... 100 3,500 00
Hamilton county.
14.11 1 it............. .... ... .. 50 705 50'
32.30:: 3 at........ ................ ... 85 2,745 50
Holmes county. ,
21.25 3at...;....................... 85 1,806 25


2,100 00

1,400 00





1,850,00

1,815 85




6,167 60



8,785'20


3,451 :0

1,806 25


t '












Jackson county.
88.00 3 at............................ 85
Jefferson county.
22.00 4 at.......................... 100
Leon county.
26.00 4at............................ 100
1~adison county.
34.00 4 at..................... ...... 100
Nassau county.
10.00 2 at.......................... 70
22.84 5 at.......................... 115
Santa Rosa county.
39.50 3at.......................... 85
Suwannee county.
8.89 1 at............................ 50
26.00 4at ......................... 100
Washington county.
14.00 3at......... ............... ... 85
Walton county.
36.50 3 at.......................... 85


8,230 00

2,200 00

2,600 00

3,400 00

700 00
2,626 60


8,230 00

2,200 00

2,600 00

3,400 00


3,326 60


3,857 50 8,857 50


419 50
2,600 00

1,190 00


3,019 50

1,190 00


8,102 50 8,102 50


INTERNATIONAL OCEAN TELEGRAPH CO.


Alachua county.
19.00 1 at.......................... 50
21.44 2at............................ 70
82.92 3 at....................... 85
3.82 4 at.. ........................ 100
14.89 5at ........................... 115
Baker county.
24.00 6at.......................... 130
Bradford county.
34.00 1 at........................... 50
20.34 5 at ......................... 115
Brevard county.
80.00 1 at............................ 50
105.00 2 at........................... 70
Clay county.
5.00 1 at........................... 50
28.00 6 at............................ 130
5.80 5 at...... ...................... 115
Columbia county.
13.18 1 at............................ 50
10.00 6at.......................... 130
720 feet cable wire at 31 cents...
Dade county.
38.00 1 at............................. 50


950 00
1,500 80
2,798 20
332 00
1,654 85


7,235 85


8,120 00 3,120 00


1,700 00
2,339 10

1,500 00
7,350 00

250 00
3,640 00
667 00

659 00
1,300 00
223 20


4,039 10


8,850 00



4,557 00



2,182 20


1,900 00 1,900 00












DeSoto county.
'20.00 2 at........................... 70 1,400 00
57.65 3 at....................... 85 4,900 25 6,300 25
Duval county.
8.24 1 at......................... 50 162 00
21.76 3at....................... 85 1,849 60
18.73 4 at.................... ..... 100- 1,873 00
10.00 5 at......................... 115 1,150 00
16.92 6 at........................... 130 2,199 60
18.00 10 at.......................... 190 3,420 00
5,100 feet cable wire at 31 cents.. -1,581 00 12,235 20
Hernando county.
10.52 2 at ...... ......................... 70 736 40
6.41 3at....... .................... 85 544 85 1,281 25
Hillsborough county.
46.70 1 at........................... 50 2,335 00
6.00 2at.,.......................... 70 420 00
20.05 4 at........................... 100 2,005 00
20.00 5at........... .. ..... 115 2,800 00 7,060 00
Lake county.
92.95 1 at ............................. 50 4,647 50
5.00 2 at............................ 70 350 00
39.00 3 at............................ 85 8,315 00 8,312 50
Lee county.
30.00 2 at........................ ....... 70 2,100 00
16,000 feet cable wire at 31 cents 4,960 00 7,060 00
Levy county.
40.00 1 at........................... 50 2,000 00 2,000 00
Marion county.
2.00 1 at............................. 50 100 00
93.14 3at.......................... 85 7,916 90 8,016 90
Nassau county.
31.30 1 at........................... 50 1,565 00
14.56 3at.......................... 85 1,237 60
670 feet cable wire at 81 cents... 207 70 3,010 80
Orange county.
57.32 1 at......................... .... 50 2,866 00
28.00 2 at............................. 70 1,960 00
4.80 4 at........................... 100 480 00
660 feet cable wire at 81 cents... 204 60 ,5,510 00
Osceola county.
60.00 1 at............................. 50 3,000 00 3,000 00
Pasoo county.
41.60 1 at.............................. 50 2,080 00
21.33 4 at ......................... 100 2,133 00 4,213 00
Polk county.
15.00 2 at........................... 70 1,050 00
17.60 3 at.......... ............ 85 1,496 00 2,546 00












Putni'u county.
22.00 1 t........... ................. 50 1,100 00
41,56 2 at.... .............. ..... 70 2,909 20
40.17 5 at ......... ............. 115 4,619 55
1,450 feet cable wire at 81 cents 449 50 9,078 25
St Johns county.
26.27 2 at...... ..................... 70 1,872 50
18.40 3 at................................. 85 1,564 00
18.50 4at........................... 100 1,850 00 5,286 50
Sumter county.
14.10 l at.......................... 50 705 00
52.01 3at........................... 85 4,420 85 5,125 85
Volusia county.
27.80 1 at ................... ....... 50 1,365 00
48.75 2 at ............................ 70 3,4t2 50
48.58 4 at...................... 100 4,858 00
400 feet cable wire at 31 cen's,.. 124 00 9,759 50
SOUTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY'S TELEGRAPH.
Clay county.
'34.00 1 at............................... 50 1,700 00 1,700 00
CARRABELLE, TALLAHASSEE AND GEORGIA RAILROAD'S
TELEGRAPH LINE.
Franklin county.
14.00 1 at .............. .....,..... ,50 700 00 700 00
Wakulla county.
24.00 l at..............................50 1,200 00 1,200 000
Leon county.
12.00 1 at.......................... 50 600 00 600 00
POSTAL TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CO.
Escambia county. :
23.00 2 at............ ............. 70 1,610 00 1,610 00;
SUGAR TELEPHONEIAND' TELEGRAPH CO.
Osceola county.
17.00 1 at...... ........... ....... 30 510 00 510 00M





Statement Showing the Length and Value of Main Track, Branch, Switch and Side Tracks, and Rolling Stock of Each Railroad in
4l4 Q 4+ 4- Ac ^-^ .17 AOA


Florida Central and Peninsular R. R. (Including Fernandina and Amelia Beach |
R R., East Florida and Atlantic R. R., and Turkey Creek R. R.) ............



Pensacola and Atlantic R. R ... ......................................... .......

Pensacola Railroad .. .... ... ..... .. .... .. .. ..
Jacksonville, Tampa and 'tey West R'y .........................................

Florida Southern R. R. (Main Line) .................. .... .........................
Florida Southern R. R. (Charlotte Harbor Division)..............................

Savannah, Florida and Western R'y... ...................................


Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf R. R ... .......... ....................
Winston and Bone Valley R. R. (Operated by South Florida R. R.)................
South.Florida R. R.......... ..... ...... ... .............................


Sanford and Lake Eustis R. R. (Operated by J,, T. & K. W. R'y.).................
Atlantic Coast, St. Johns and Indian River R'y. (Operated by J., T. & K. W. R'y.)..
DeLand and St. Johns River R. R. (Operated by J., T. & K. W. R'y.) ....:.........
Sanford and St. Petersburg R. R. (Formerly Orange Belt R. R.)..................
Georgia Southern and Florida R. R..........................................
Tavares, Apopka and Gulf R.-R................................................
Southwestern R.R. (formerly Green Cove Springs &'Melrose R'y & West. R'y of FIda.
Pensacola and Perdido R. R............................................
Pensacola, Alabama and Tennessee R. R............. .....................
Pensacola and Andalusia R. R ................. .......... .......... ...........
Pensacola and Mobile Railway and Manufacturing Company .....................
St. Johns and Lake Eustis R. R ............ ......................................
Jacksonville, Mayport and Pablo Railway and Navigation Company ..............
Jupiter and Lake Worth I. R..................................................
Jacksonville Street R. R............. ............. .............. ..................
Fort Meade Street R. R ........ ......................................
Tampa Street R'y...................................... ..........................
Orlando Street R. R ................................ ........................
Tallahassee Street R'y........... ...............................................
Palatka and Heights Street R'y............................... ........
St. Augustine and South Beach R. R............................,...............
Jacksonville and Atlantic R. R............................... ...............
Arcadia, Gulf (oast and Lakeland R. R............. ........................
Florida Midland R. R ......................................... .................
Jacksjnville, St. Augustine and Halifax River R. R.............................
St. Johns and Halifax River R. R..................................... ..........
St Johns R 'y ........................................... ....... ...................
St. Augustine and Halifax River R. R...........................................
Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Indian River R. R................................
Atlantic and W western R. R .....................................................
Carrabelle, Tallahassee and Georgia R. R.........................................
Tampa and Thonotosassa R. R .................................................
Consumers' Street R. R ........................................................

Tampa Suburban R. R ........................................................


Atlantic, Suwannee River and Gulf R. R........................................
M ain-Street R. R................... .. .................................... .......


MAIN TR
ASSESSED
Per
Miles. I Mile.


3800
4(;8 57
128 2,
15.67
9.48
22.50
161.14

43.29
128.92

164.64
75.` 5
13-.88
11.05
18.7o

76.59
15.63
189.60
145.92

28.60
31.75
4.100
156.50
11 6i. 00
25.00
3..50
7.80
8.50
17.10
5.66
47.27
16.27
7.63
8.00
1.11
2.75
2.00
2.01
1.75
3.75
16.25
12.00
44.00
36.3(1
52.70
12.00
25.30
104.10
28.1(0
48.82
11.0,
1.50
3.00
1.(0
4.75
1.00
5.00
2.75

2,736.42


$7,000
6,000
4,500
4,000
2,0f0
1,500
7,000

6,000
7,000

3,00
5,000
7,000
6,(00
5,0011


4,000
7,0011
6,000

6,000
6,b00(
5,'(O'0
3,000
6,000
.,0100
1,5011
2,000
2,000
1,000(
5,000
3,000
2,500
2,500
3,000
1,5"00
3,000
2,00 1
1,000
2,000
2,500
2,000
2,000
3,000
7,00'
7,000
2,000)
5,000
6,000
5,(00
4,000
5,000
3,000
4,100
8,500
3,000
2,000
5,000
3,000


SWITUH & SIDE TRACKS
ASSESSED VALUE.
SPer
Mile. I Value.


ACK, BRANCH,
VALUE. A

Value. Miles.

$266,000 423
2,811,420 3.13
576,9110 3 55
62,6801 24.36
18,960i 6.40
"3,750 .01
1,127,980 4.99
S........... 5.71
259,740 8.18
902,440 2.44
.. ....... 221.47
828,200 28.22
376,250 4.10
930,160 ) 8.05
66,300 I 17.73
93,509 .67
....... .. J 2.16
459,54(1 2.95
62,521) 3.:38
K77,8301 3.32
875,520 22.03
.. .... .. 9.65
171,60(1 1.73
z14,500 2.13
2(,001 1.40
469,500 2.10
69(1,010 5.38
75,000 .26
50,250 1.00
15,101 1.70
17,01 .. ..
17,000 1.00
28,333 1.87
141,810 2.29
40,675 .21
19,o75 .10
24,00)1 .75
1,500 ......
8,250 .75
4,000 .......
2,000 ......
3,500 .......
9,375 ........
32,5110 .50
24,000 ......
132,000 .53
254,100 5.00
368,900 8.00
24,000 .50
126,500 .5"1
624,600 7.10
140,500 .611
195,280 .13
55,0(1( .......
4,501 ........
12,0(10 ......
3,5011 ......
14,250 ....
2,000 ......
25,0011 .......
8,250 ......

$14,800,538 224.56


$2,383
2,000
1,750
1,500
1,125
375
2,333ia3o
1,750
2,0100
2,3H30o
1,750
1,23.0
1,250
2, 3l38
I ,751

1,500
1,5110
2,383
1, 70
1,500
I ,520
1,..5)0
1.500
1,240
700
1,5110
750
375
503
.., ....
250
1,500
753
6L5

1,0O)








1,700
1,750
500
1,250
1,500
1,200
1,000


ROLLING STOCK.

Value.


) $530,997 55
.......... ...

I .. ... ...

t 79,393 525

100,396 0Oi
S253,024 44

179,718 89
47,9u0 50

836,039 70

.......477...
29,477 52


TOTAL

VALUE.


$4,375,792 8S
...... ... ..




1,229,0(9 34

371;,496 Of
1,198,780 26

1,081,9443 811
431,775 51

1,479,890 50


493,442 52
r:; ( ['t nrl


$9,868 59
6,260 00
6,212 50
36,540 00
7,200 00o
375 00
11,1543 32
9,992 50
16,360 00
5,65.3 32
37, :72 5.
29,025 00
7,625 (00
18,783 3
31,027 50
1',Ilo5 01o
3,075 00
4,423 01(l
3,380 00
7,745 51;
38,552 5,
14,475 01
2,595 0(1
3,195 00
1,85. ( 0(
1,575 00
8,070 00i
195 00(
375 00
850 00
...........
250 00
2,812 50
1,7t7 50
131 2
62 50
750 00
..........




250 00
... .......
397 50
8 750 00
5,250 00
250 0(0
625 O0I
10,650 O01
750 (I"
130 00




5...,696 ..

..... ......

$358,696 59


a C~LLC .33F-33 C UI L I7~


. .... ... ... C. .. .=
241,002 52 2,155 ,125 58 1 Jo "oo

18,47480 192,669 80 i o-
28,544 99 246,239 92 0
5.5.'.0 00 27,400 00
81,520 40 552,595 4"
172,230 94 876,300 94
19,8115 00 95,0010 00
2,500 0O 53,125 00
7,550 00 24,!000 o(
.... ...... .. 1.7,0(00 00
5,21>0 00 22,500 HO
........... ... 31,145 50
3,352 62 146,880 12
8,283 75 49,090 00
8,637 50 22,775 01
19,250 00 44,000 00
500 o11 2,1100 00
12,150 00 21,150 0O
1,000 (0 5,000 00
5(0 00 2,500 01
1,1100 0O 4,500 0
2,000 00 11,375 0
10,000 00 42,751 (I0
2,000 00 26,000 00
............... 132,397 51
79,360 01 342,210 11
17,500 00 391,650 00
4,000 0,' 28,250 (0
16,394 61 143,519 61
75,000 00 710,250 00
6,0(10 00 147,250 rn
24,475 00 19,885 O(
........... .. 55,000 iin;
4,CO0 00 0 8,500 001
.... ......... ......... I .
5,000 00 386,50 00
............... ..............
. .............. .... ........
2,000 00 27,000 00
3,000 00 11,250 00

$2,448,780 19 $17,608,014 78


oa

aD I
w ar
0 u~
C a0
SS ~
0 ha

a a

a
0 0d



a

o Le












Statement Showing the Length and Value of Telegraph Lines Assessed for the Year 1894.
ONE WIRE. Two WIuEs WInES. CABLE WIP.ES.

NAME.OF COMPANY.a S th



Jacksonville and St. Johns Bar Tele-
graph Company.................... 2200 25 $ 0 00 ...... .. ........ ....... ..... $.... $ ........ ... 550 00
Chectawhat hie Telegraph Company '17.00 25 425 00 ...... .... .......... ... ........4...5 00
South Florida Railroad's Telegrap 2300 50 1,150 00 .................... ................ ....... 1,150 0
Apalachicola and arianna Tele-
graph Company................... 110.00 25 2,750 00 ...... ................. .......... ...... ....... ......2,750 00
Atlantic and inlf Telegraph 'onp'y 27.00 0s 1,30 00...... ............ ............................... ......... 1,350 00
Silver Springs, Ocala and Gull Rail-
way's relegraph................... 69.85 50 3,492 50 ...... ............. ........ ......... ... .. ........... ,4 50
Savannah, Florida and Western Rail-
way'a Telegraph.. .... 6920 50 3,460 00 .......... ..........3,4 ...... ...... 00
South Florida Telegraph Company.. 170) 50 850 00 311.00 70 21,770 00 ............................................... 22,620 00
Southwestern Railway Company's .
Telegraph ....... 34.00 50 1,70000 .............. ....... ......................... 1,700 00
Sugar Telephone and Telegraph -
Company................... 1700 30 510 01 ...... ... ......... ........................0
Carrabelle. Tallah.ssee and Georgia 5 0
Railroad's Telegraph ............. 50.00 0 2,500 00 ................. ........ ............ 2,500 00
Western Union Telegraph Company 29.51 50 1,475 00 18.86 70 1,320 20 3 203.11 85 17,2645 .. 4430200
4 198.00 100 1980000
5 38 63 115 4,442 45
International Ocean Te'egraph Co.... 577 69 50 28,884 50 358.02 70 25,061 40 3 353.45 85 30,043 25 25,000 31 7,750 00 131,680 25
1 4 135.31 110 13,531 00 I
5 110.70 115 12,730 0 }6
S6 78.92 130 10,259 60
10 18.00 190 3,420 00 J

1.06324 $49,097 00 687.881 48,151 60 1,136.12 $111,491 35 25,000 $7,750 00 $216,489 75
Total assessed by Comptroller ............ ................... ..... $216,489 75
Telephone lines, etc., assessed by County Assessors.................... 4,000 00
$220,489 75
Difference in assessments (fractional parts of dollars)..................... 4 45
$220,494 20
Total as shown in assessment rolls ..........,....,,........... 220,494 26












62

LIST OF DISABLED SOLDIERS Receiving Pensions From the State Under Sec-
tions 568 to 571, inclusive, of the Revised Statutes of Florida.


Name of Pensioner. Name of captain ofth Regiment.
SCompany.


Alachua ..........















Baker ........






Bradford..........




*Clay ...........












Calhoun ..........







'Columbia .....


Capt A P Moody ....... 9th Florida
Sam Mayo.......... 9th Florida
SConner ........... 47th Georgia
SP B H Dudley...... 7th Florida
L A Hardee ........ 3d Florida
Lallistado........ 22d Georgia
Company "E"......... 1st So..Carolina


W M Stott........
Company "F".........
FM Weston........
Tilman Ingram......
Harvey ............
George Langford...
G W 'arkhill..........
H F York ............


10th Florida
9th Florida Vol
6th So. Carolina
7th Florida
lst Florida.
4th Florida
2d Florida
7th Florida


Nancy Terrell, widow of
James Terrell .............
Jane E Fletcher, widow of
General Fletcher ....
Joshua Spear ...............
Jacob Link..................
Samuel H Wienges.........
J P Hall ......................
Nathan Hall ..................
Mrs H M Pendarvis, widow
of E L Pendarvis ............
Joseph Gill...................
Elizabeth M Weston,widow
of IT W eston ...............
William T Richr.rdson....
Martha A Smith, widow of
Jackson W Smith ..........
John T Hazel................
George C Williams .....
John Groves.................
Ann E Dugger, widow of B
Dugger .....................
Hugh Brown .................
Emily Godwin, wi ow of
James Godwin .............
James M Hodge ..............
Samuel Crews, Sr.,........
John Addison .............
Caroline Barry, widow of
W F Barry..................
George W Teston...............
Judson It Vining.............
Green B Goodman.........
Louisa Coleman, widow of
Moses Coleman.............
Sarah C Carter, widow of
Elisha W Carter...........
Robert N Batten..............
Martha Green, widow of
Samuel Green.... ....
Louisa A Thomas, widow
of William Thomas..... ..
G W Broer........... .......
Nancy Thomas, widow of J
A Thomas .................
Mary E Stokes, widow of
Harry Stokes..... ......
Catherine Sweat, widow of
Edmund Sweat..........
William Ayers............
Martha J Sexton, widow of
JW Sexton.............
Newton Yon...... ..........
Susan Taylor, widow of
David Taylor..........
Elizabeth Hanna, widow of
Hamilton Hanna ........
Martha J Beck, widow of
W H Beck..............
James C Knight .........
David Jordan ..........
T A Hutchinson:. .........
Joseph R Plympton.....
Mrs S A Douglass, widow
of James Douglass......
Susan Davis, widow of
SGeorge Davis.... .......
E G Rogerson ...........


G Vanzant.........
Company "D"......
John Harvey.. ..
J C Richards .......


5th-Florida
let Florida Cay
1st Florida Cav
10th Florida


" William Clark... ... st Florida
"W H Mann......... d Georgia
F M Jackson .......29th Georgia
" A A Roberts........ 1st Florida Cav


D J McLeod........
J A Summerlin ...
G W Call...........


Co. F, Georgia
1st Florida Cav
Ed Florida


" Sam Mays.......... 2d Florida Bat


M ays ... .... ....
T S Means..........
May's Company.....


2d Florida Bat
1st Florida
3d Florida Bat


" E Carroil's Compa'y 10th Flotida


AS Moseley........
J H Ellis .........
E Carroll...........
William Gregory....


7th Florida
1st Florida Bat
5th Florida
Col. H'y Regt


Lane ................ 4th Florida
RA Walker........ 9th Florida


Gregory ..........
J Q Stewart .......
AJ T right .....
Jesse S Wood ......
A J T Wright......
G H Hunter .......
John M Pons.........
W It Moor.........


5th Florida
10th Florida
2d Florida
3d Florida
10th Florida
9th Florida
8th Florida
2d Florida


County.


" Garey ............. Fineg's Brigade
G Vanzant......... 5th Florida


------
















County.


Columbia ....















Citrus ..........


Duval..........
























DeSoto ........



Escambia......





Franklin........


Name of Cap'ain of the Regiment.
Company.


Capt T E Buckman .....
William Jay........
Gamett..... ......
Vinzant ............
SG Vinzant..........
John Bryant.... ...
N A Carswell........
GH Hunter ........


Ist Florida Battf
14th So. Carol'a
5th Florida

5th Florida
5th Florida

10th Florida
3d Georgia
9th Florida


Name of Pensioner.


John Gibson.. ...........
Samuel A Cothran.........
Jane H Langford, widow of
F M Langford .
Allyphaire Milllgan, widow
of J Milligan .........
Joel K Niblack .......
Charity Johnson. widow of
William Johnson........
Wildam J Wynn .........
Mrs Susan Rowan, widow
of JR Rowan
Esther Niblack, widow of
James S Niblapk .......
Martha A Lone, widow of
James Long ..........
W H Long.... .............
James L Turner ..........
Allen Sauls .... .......
Elisha A Zellner.... ...
James W Johns ..........
E K carter ..............
James R Moore .........
William C O'Neal ........
Alexander B Harvey ......
Elizabeth Silcox widow of
Wade Silcox...................
James Ellison ...................
PB Redford ........ ......
James C West .................
W it Bowden..... ..........
Colon Thomas......... ...
Albert ubbege................
Conner Roberts......
Susan Warren, widow of
James Warren...........
John Pope............
Susan Ann Houston, widow
of L C Houston..........
Caroline M Hartley, widow
of George A Hartley ...
E A Fernandez ...........
Nancy Youngblood, widow
of J Youngblood...........
Margarie Ann Carter, wid-
ow of Levi H Carter .....
Louisa R Johnson, widow
of F A Johnson ............
Mrs M Lloyd, widow of
W H Lloyd ...............
Sarah Ann Stuart, widow
of James M Stuart......
Elias Whidden .............
Mrs LA Turner, idow of
J W Turner ........ ..
John W Tanner ........
William J Brown...........
E B Sweat......................
Mary G Barclay, widow of
David Barclay. ....... ..
Thos Lisco.............
John B Brown ............
Benj J Hugon .............
John E Jordan.......
Joshua T Kep .........
LJ Walden ..............
Amos R Shat ...........
Ceiia Ann Ha prison, widow
of J R Harrison .........


" Felix Simmons.....
Vinzant ...........
A P Butler .............
FJ Clark ..........
SJohn A Averitt......
N S Cobb ................
SDa-her............
"Company "D".......
L A Hlardee ........
SA Doggert.........
"John M Pons.......
SJohn M Pon. .....
company "B"... .
L A Hardee ......
"A Doggett........
John W escott......
S J B Oliver.............
SCompany J" .........
SJohn Starke........
SAA Ochas.........


8th Florida
5th Florida
1st So. Carolina
2d Florida Car
58th Alabama
1st Florida
N6th Georgia
3d So. Carolina.
3d Florida
3d Florida

3th Florida
8th Florida
50th Ga Vols
3d Florida
8d Florida
Brevard Batt
3d Florida
8th Florida
2d Florida
11th Florida


" AA Ochas.......... 21st Florida

" Wescott ............ st Florida
" J JDaniel.......... 2d Florida

" Company "B"......... 7th Florida
" A Drysdale........ 3d Florida


" Pons ..............
" Company "B". ...
" W W Scott.........
" James Gettes ......


8th Florida
let Florida Car
1st Florida
thi Florida


" J Hopkins.......... 2d Florida
" D Hughes ......... 1st Florida Cav
" W D Bloxham...... 5th Florida
" Wm P Fowler ..... 24th Alabama


A D McCaskill .....
Lee ........... ...
J F Mcflelland.....
J M Johnson........
C Thigpen...........
C L McKinnon .....
II' M Divldesn ...
W E Crjpp. ......


61st Alabama
33d Alabama
2d Florida
1st Battalion

let Florida
oth Florida
1st Florida


E W Moise......... 7th Ga Cavalry


" G Vinzant.......... 5th Florida
















County.


Gadsden .... ...





















Hamilton .....




























Hillsborough..


Name of Pensioner.


Moses Lambert..............
James J Nelson ...........
Thos J Peavy................
J P Poythress.........
Mary A Connon, widow ol
J C Cannon .. ......
Martha McRae, widow of
SD J MeKae ...... .......
Mrs E P Shepard, widow
of W A shepard ........
Martha A Roland, widow
of S C Roland............
J W Edentleld..........
Fontaine t Shepard .....
John W Scott. ....... ...
B A Ke p.......... ......
Mrs P A Gregory, widow
of W T Gregory........
r aura W MCDonald ......
Z M Lott .................
Rosa na L Taylor, widow
of John M Taylor........
Beni C Collins ............
Bryant Walsh.... ......
James A Barr ...........
CJ Crbb ............
John Gill .............
John V "w-11 -
Lucretia Keen, widow of
D Keen...... .......
Alex Royal ..........
Wm Belote............
Andrew J Dempeey ......
W D Bellamy.............
M a Michell, widow of
Chas Mi chell.............. .
Benj F Jackson............
Meivina Raulerson, wi,'ow
of Elias Ralnu rson ......
B Moody.............
Jno Williams .......
Maria Sterling, widow of
E St rling.... .......
David Hurst.............
Lewis L Taylor ............
Jhn W Grautam........
Sarah Ann Waters, widow
of Washineton Waters
David Robarts.............
Martha Mobl y, widow of
Sm E Mobley ...
Sarah A E Miller, widow of
Timothy Miller............
John B MlcLeod............
Nancy Bass, widow o!
Benj. Bass.. ... ...........
Martha Ann Fennell, wid
ow of James Fennell....
Thomas B Miranda........
N B Ellis. ..............
John Weeks..........
John J Fergus n ..........
Nancy Davis, widow of
Eiisha Daiis.... ....
Enoch D Allen .........
W;a W Harris... ......
EO Waker ..............
Rebecca Barnett, widow of
Jas. Barnett.............
Nancy A Lewis, widow of
Asa Lewis.... ..........


Name of Captain of the Regiment.
Company.


CaptRA Waller...........
S B Love.... ... .
Mitchell.. ........
Wm Robinson......

SJC Evans.........
James Evans.'......

TM Mickle......

Blocker ..........
CA Gee ...........
RHM Davidson...
JnoW Webb........
J C Evans..:......

Gregory .........
Bassett.., ........
SBLove.. .......

A Waller.........
RA Waller.... ...
GW Scott.........
W T Gregory .....
S A Finlay .......
Wm Frink....
T R Rnrlrman

J F,Tucker.. .....
"Jno Frinit ......
H J Stewert........
"Ed West...... .....
J J Daniel..........

Company "E".....
J K Stewart........

G Vinznt.........
W Stephens.:....
Those Lott.... .....
Company "C".....
Ben K 1..1 ,. .
Chas t '1.I,.s
HF York ........

OF Peck..........

CF Cone .........
C F Jenkins.... .:.
Gettes... .........

H ull.................

John W Frink......
Juo A Martia :.....
SJno Frink...:.
L Mitchell........
Jno J Daniel .......

P Bird........ .
SGeo ge Duncan.....
AP Bailey.........
"A P Butler...


3th Florida
3th Florida
291h Georgia
25th Louisiana
3th Florida
3th Florida

Hope's Batt
2d Florida
Ith Florida
3th Florida
Ith Georgia
3th Florida

ith Florida
ith Florida
3th Florida

3th Florida
53h Florida
id Florida Car
5th Florida
-l1th Georgia
5th Florida
1st i lorida Bat

3th Florida
5th Florida
Md Florida
1st Florida Bat
Cons Florida

let Florida
Sth Florida

5't Florida
2d Flor.da Cav
26th Georgia
Fla Reserves
55th Georgia
1st F:oria Cav
Bulk Fla Keg

Ith Florida Bat
ltlh Florida

ist Florida Cav
IOth Florida
7th Florida

1st Florida Cav

5th Florida
Mar Light Ar
5th Florida
1th Florida
2d Florida

11th Florida
25th Georgia
5th Florida
1st So Carolina


R B Smith............ 7th Florida
J A Edwards..... 61st Georgia
















County. Name of-Pensioner. Name of Captain of the Regiment.
_Company


Hillsborough .. Mary Miley, wiow of
James Miley .......;...
E RClinkscales.............
Wm M H11. ............
Nathan Odom ...........
Elizabeth Stafford. widuw
I of Co'umbus Stafford ...
Wm 0 Simmons .........
Richard T Cddin ...........
Frances A Dikes, widow
ofJ H Dykes.. .........
Holmes........ Jas Hickmarl..... .......
Warren D Jackson ....
W JFree............. .
Elizabeth Lewis, widow of
H H Lw a ..... ..
Jonah Shv....... .......
DC Standley...........
Amorose oilman ........
Mary Gilman, widww of
Jabez Gilman..............
Hernando. ..Elizabeth McCrean, widow
of John McCrean... ...
Jackson ...... Mrs Mahlala Plair, widow
of T F Plair ........... .,
J W Basiord ............
SS Bassford............'.
S Jos M Lockhdrt. ..........
Jane Taylor, widow of
Wm Taylor ............
Joseph T Allen..........
Jno T D.ivideon...........
Mrs S E Liddon, widow of
B G Liddon.'.... ......
Jno C Tidwell...... ......
Wm Sketoe ..............
Saluda Coonrod, widow of
J H Coonrod...........
James AS lls ... .....
Barbara Shouppe, widow
of Caspar Shouppe........
Moses Dykes.. ...........
John l' Kemp.......... '..
Ge T Denham..........
S lizabeth Smmerlin, wid-
ow of Jos Summerlin....
: I Melvina Dykes, widow of
Henry Dykes.............
Hardy Cook......... .....
Dorcas T Coof, widow of
SBB Cook... ........
Mary A Jacobs, widow of
Wm A Jacobs..
Alice P White, widow of
SJohn S White .......
Ann Judson Wilton, wid.
ow J F Wilson.........
Sarah J Peacock, widow
of Abraham Peacock....
Mary Pittman, widow oi
H R Pittman
Nancy J Brannon, widov
of John Branion ......
Samuel Tharp........
Mary b Garrett, widow of
Henry K Garrett.......
Jefferson[ ..... oshua Duncan............
Rebecca Grubbs, widow of
John Grubb,.. .....'.
Sarah Bridgman. widow o
Geo Bridgman.. .......


Capt D Hughes .........
Jno Miotts ........
JJ Dickison .......
"A J Lea ................

Gettea...............
Izard ... ..... .....
JJ Wescott .......
CA Gee ..............
James McCrey ..'.
Blackford ..........
JW Jackson.......
Hutt. .......
T Smith..............
Hagans..............
Cooper..............

Wm Roberts...........


1st Florida
6th So Carolina
2d Florida
5th Florida
7th Florida
llth So Car
1lth So Car
4th Florida
--Alabama
th Alabama
59th Alabama
6th Alabama
6th Alabama
6th Alabama
33d Alabama

33d Alabama


" Bassett......::......... 6th Florida


J F McClellan......
MN Dickson. :......
M N Dickson.......
Walt Roh'nson.....


2d Florida
4th Florida
4th Florida
Ilth Florida


" J F McClellan...... 2d Florida
J F McClellan .....d Florida
7' 'r .r- l!r.. '3' Alabama
" Jas W'ed :;.......... 3d Georgia
SRobi son ......... 11th Florida
"Wm Petere.....;..... 5th Florida
A B Gacis........ 6th Florida
" M N Dixons ...... 4th Florida

" Ja es Jackson....... 45th Alabama
" J M White... ....... 6th Florida
" %E, 'T .%4 1 6th Florida .
" T L l. i- r 15th Alabama
" Lane ..4....t....... th Florida


" Those E Clark.... ...
"L M Attaway ......
, Gracey.. ..!........
" Company "F".....


8th Florida
6th Florida
8th Florida
llth Florida


" HO Bassett........... 6 h Florida

" H O Basstt. .... 6th Florida
" G W Bassett.'........ 13th Florida

" Chieholm......... 5th Florida Bat

" Cooper.......... 33d Alabama
T E Clarke .. ... 8th Florida
" Hays........... ..... 6th Florida
"D B Bird.......... 3d Florida
" Wiley Warwick .... lst Florida Res
" W C Bird.... ........ 1st Florida
















County. Name f Pensioner. Name of Captain of the Regiment.
C _____ompany.


Jeferson .......





















Liberty........



Lee ......... .


Leon ...........














Levy ..........


William Bailey .. 5th Florida
A P Amaker...... 1st Florida
WC Bird... .... IstFlorida


William Bailey ..
G W Parkhill....
AZ Bailey.......
W Bird........
William Bailey ..
William Bailey ..
William Bailey..
W C Bird........
P Sheffield.. .
William Footman
William Bailey.
P Bird...........
Appleby Lee......
PBBird.........
G W Reynolds.
Company "G"....
Partridge .......
Gamble ..........
W T Gregory ...


5th Florida
2d Florida
5th Florida
1st Florida
5th Florida
5th Floridr
5th Florida
1st Florida
50th Georgia
1st Cavalry
5th Florida
10th Florida
4th So Car Car
10th Florida.
29th Mississippi
3d Georgia Vols

-- Artillery
5th Florida


Susan Jones, widow of
M Johns......... ....
W G Denham ........ ...
W H Dodgen................
C E Coles, widow of J W
Coles........ ........
Patrick Conlff............
Martin Kinsey.............
Joel E Walker ................
Archibald Lacy ........
Hilary Bishop.........
WA Hamrick ...........
Samuel M Neeley..........
C E Merriman, widow of
G H Merrlman ..........
J Bradley McLeod........
Missouri Ayers, widow of
Ira Ayers.............
Chas B Wheeler.... ....
Jno D Taylor.. ............
John H Haran..........
Thos P Williams..........
A J Hamilton ..............
L H Spratt
Mrs F A Nalley, widow of,
Peter Nalle ............
Mary Thomas, widow of
J Thomas................
D Of Russell, widow of JD
Russell.... ............
Geo W Dwyer ............
Randle McCardle ........
Cath J Bariean, widow of
WR Barinean.. .........
Geo W Powell.............
E Condelary, widow of P
Condelary ...........
B F Page....................
Thos W Carr..............
Mary E Revell, widow of
S E Revell............
Hugh Black................
Adine Purvis, widow of
J N Purvis.............
Henry C Blllinnsley ........
Nancy M Ferrell, widow of
DW Ferrell..............
W B Ferrell...............
Geo T Brown.............
John J Clayton...........
[sham M Blake ... ....
Margaret Gereill, widow of
G Guereill .............
Wm Russell.............
Silas Weeks ...............
John H Sutton ...........
Hanford D Cook...........
Aaron Higginbotham ....
Maggie J Mooney, widow
of J A Mooney..........
Henry M Smith .......
Mary L Brown, widow of
W F Brown.............
Sarah E Sheffield, widow
of W F Sheffield.........
Nancy A Dudley, widow of
J VR Dudley...........
Calvin A Deas........
Susan W Tison, widow of
GMTison ...............
Moses Keen ...............


Richard Waller..
.CJ Jenkins .....
S Spencer........
CA Bryan......
A Johnson.......
Spencer. ...........
RH M Davidson.


8th Florida
10th Florida

5th Florida
5th Florida
4th Florida
5th Florida
6th Florida


Bryan .........5th Florida
Parkhill ......... 2d Florida


Lawson ............
Tuberville ...........
RN Gardner ...
Abram Bailey....
Company "B" ...
FL Villipigue...
Gray.................
James Hunt......
W P Pillan .........
Alex Moseley....
J C Chambers....


5th Florida Bat
Home Guards.
5th Florida
5th Florida
7th Florida Cav
Light' Artillery-
9th Florida
4th Florida
2d Florida
7th Florida
6th Florida


W W Scott ......... th Florida
Rose............... 3d Florida


Ab Flewellen....
PBH Dudley....
PB H Dudley....
J C Richards ....


39th Alabama.
7th Florida
7th Florida
9th Florida


S M Garey....... 9th Florida
PB H Dudley.... 7th Florida.


W D Bloxham .. 5th Florida
James C Evans... 6th Florida
T M Jackson .... 29th Georgia















County. Name of Pensioner. Name of Captain of the Regiment.
S1 Company.


LeTy...........








Lake.............




LaFayette .....














Manatee ......
Madison ......




























a


& H Bateman.............
EH Benefleld.............
L B Smith...................
Miles Alford ..............
John M Ricks..............
Levi H Senterfeit .........
Lewis Appell..............
Mary A Armstrong. widow
of Geo Armtrong.....
Georgia McGowan, widow
of DL McGowan ...
Rebecca Harrington, wid-
ow of W Harrington.....
Jacob E Varn..............
Sarah Jane Blackman, wid-
ow of Jno Blackman.....
Allen J Hopson..........
WCJohnson...........
John FLeggett ...........
James Corbin ............
M S Poore.............. ...
John H Polk ..............
Daniel J Stewart ..........
Elizabeth McCully, widow
of Pearce McCully ......
Levi Starling ..............
Mary F Stephenson, widow
of David Stephenson ....
Daniel J Davis..............
Maria Crews, widow of J
L Crews.......... ...
William G Brown ...........
Elijah J Perry, Sr ...........
Joshn H Ezell..............
ohn Wright .. .........
John J F~ reason ...........
George Dice ...........
Wiley Knowles... ........
Martha E Sutley, widow of
Absolom Sutley .........
Jane Gaston, widow of
Alex Gaston.........
Clem Lanier.. .........
Malachi Sloan...............
Mary Carter, widow of
John Carter.... ........
Rebecca Flowers, widow
ofJas Flowers......
H B Gibson ...........
Silas Coker................
RM White ..................
W H Buler.... ........
J B Terry.......... ...
F JB Fox...........
Martin V B Lnnier.........
Duncan McDaniel..........
Amanda P Newsome, wid-
ow of W J Newoome.....
Bethany C ykard, widow
of E Rykard...........
Nancy Sealey, widow of
F WSeley.. .......
Lucy Gale, widow of Hi-
ram Gale.......... ..
Thos J Wilson...............
Ivey A Thomas...........
Malachi H Warring........
WT Porter................
Martha Morrow, widow of
J A Morrow .........


Capt. WL Moore......
N A Hull ........
Runnells...........
Lewis ...........
Thomas Bevill ..
Cobb ............
Company "0"...
T M Micklin......

R H M Davidson
H F York........
SD Mclornell..
J T Leslie ......
Fleming ... ....
Polleyman .......
N A Hull..........
B H Shackleford..
GW Stiles.. ....
J C McGehee....
A J Wright........
Turner ...........
Young ..........
Cobb.............
CF Cone.. ......
Company "E"....
Pillows...........
H A Hubbard....
J J Daniel..........
Wm Bailey. ....
Geo Langford.....
R H Gamble....


J Bryant......... 1st Florida
W W Pillan. ..... 2d Florida
A J Lea ...... th Florida


J Westcott.......
AJ Lea..........
JD Graham. ....
WC Bird........
WP Pillan......
M CToggott. ...
RT Kolb........
CE Dyke........
Jno Holleyman..
Thos Langford..


10th Florida

5th Florida
2d 80 Carolina
1st Florida
2d Florida
4th So Car
---Ala Art
Arty Florida
5th Florida
3d -


W N Taylor...... 17th Georgia
W H Dial........ 4th Florida


Girardean........
Straights...........
J L White .......
Bob Hardee......
T Langford .......
DBird..............

Beggs...............


ad Florida
3d Florida
19th So Car
9th Georgia
3d Florida
3d Florida
11th Florida


2d Florida
C I, 1st Florida
1st Florida Cav
9th Florida
31st Georgia
45th Georgia
1st Florida Cay
7th Florida
1st Florida Bat
Oth Florida
7th Florida

Tth Florida
Florida Brig
2d Florida
5th Florida
let Florida Car
Oth Georgia
18th Ga Bat
4th Florida
3d Florida
Dillsworth Reg
50th G orgia
Ist Fla Cavalry
1st Florida Car
5th Florida
3d Florida
- Alabama
2d Florida
5th Florida
4 h Florida
Fla Light Art















County. Name of Pensioner. Name of Captain of the Regiment.
Company.


Madison .....












Marion ........




















Monroe .......
Nassau ..... ;










Orange ........







Pasco.........


Capt'in Dyke ............. Gamb's Art
Company "A"... 10th Florida
Peck.............. 11th Florida
R A Gardner..... 5th Florida


Mar: ha L Baker, widow of
J A Baker .............
Mahala Parker, widow of
Matthew Parker.........
Catherine Edwards, widow
of Wm B Edwards.......
G W Jeffcoat ................
Mary Ann McCormick, wid
ow of Ell Mcrormlck....
Joseph D Ragan...........
Louisa A Webb, widow of
Samuel S Webb,........
RT Davi ..............
James P McAdams..... ..
James Kelley ...........
Thomas N Bembry.......
Hardy Rainer.............
Patr ck N1add n......
Daniel J Fogg...............
John W Hall. ............
Frank S Holley............
J B Carter.............
M A Tanner, widow of T
R Tanner...........
J J Mrsah.... ............
John M Collins...........
Ehza M Smith, widow of
.J H F smith ......
John W Tompkins .......
Emily J Hooker, widow of
James W Hooker........
W W Best ..........
Martha S Brown, widow
of John R Brown ..
Hannah E Mills, widow of
Elbi rt Mills .............
Nancy S Wallace, widow
of Thbs J Wallace.......
Ellen Howard Mann, wid-
ow of James A Mann....
Solomon Smith...........
Jules Chabert.............
Corne'ins Wingate ..........
John A Woodburn.........
Malachi Thorn, son ........
Loui-a M Higginbotham
wid of J H ligginbotham
Virginia A Johnston, wid
ow of Edward Johnson...
Margie Ann Holt, widow
of lohn Hol .... .............
Julia Sanders. widow of
Benjamin Sanders ...........
Martha C Wingate, widow
of John Wingate ........
Michael H Hansell .........
Edward C Stevens ..
Mary Jones, widow of A B
Jones.........................
John H Carson ..................
Nancy Shortridge, widow
of George Shortridge ...
Nancy Harris, widow of W
H Harris ........ ...........
Charles A Roberson.........
Lovey A Atkins. widow of
GW Atkins ................
Jackson J Page............
Hardy S Dormany..........
John J Rogers ..........
[Richard Ellia :................


dth Fl rida
51st Georgia
4th Florida
10th Fla Reg
3d Florida
50th Georgia
5th Fl rid%
4th Florida
2d Florida
7th Florida
9th Florida
7th Florida
4th Florida
9th Florida
9th Florida
6th So Carolina
Hixon'sBatte'y
9th Florida

8th Florida
1st So Carolina
7th Florida


J H Counts........ 7th Florida
S M G Gary......... 9th Florida


A P Moody .......
S M G Gary........
RB Smith .....
Felix Simmons...
B W Powell ...
Company "E" ..
Fred Clark .......
Ram "Atlanta"...


Bird's Battali'n
9th Florida
7th Florida
8th Florida
1st Florida
7th Georgia
2d Florida
C 8 Navy


Company "H" ... 5th Florida


....................
Felix Simmons.
Oliver Cook......
T S Means .......
Company "K" ..
W D Woods ......


Marion Lt Art
Sth Florida
19th Florida
1st Florida
2d Florida Cav
Home Gdof Ala


T W Langford .. 3d Florida
Wm Campbell .. So Carolina
J C Stewart........ 1st Florida


WT Saxon.......
W H Dial..........
H Stewart.......
A Morrison......
BO Grends ....


3d Florida
4th Florida
2d Florida
Sim Ga Reg'm't
10th Florida


Company "D"...
Holt Co "K"......

0 Peeks........
Ellis.............
Giradeau .......
Sheffield..........
John Frink......
TJ awls ........
J D Hopkins ....
J H Counts ......
John W Pierson
R Bullock........
Fletcher ........
S M G Gary
Mootey ...........
L Straights .........
T J Perry........
J W Pearson ...
Stewart...............
B B Kirkland......
J H Counts....















County. Name of Pensioner.


Pisco ...........





Polk ...........

























Putnam........


St. Johns.......









Sumter..........






Suwannee ....


Emma A Mobley, widow
of Byrd Mobley...............
Martha Acree. widow of
Samuel Acree................
Littleton Hurst ............
J H Matthews ..........
FM Griffin ....................
Joseph B Rogers .............
Thoma% J McMullan..........
J B Arnold .......................
Henry R Hill ..................
George W Griffin..........
Martha E A Thomas, wid-
ow of Rolain Thomas ...
S G Jones, widow of W N
Jones.......:...............
D A Lewis, widow of H H
Lewis ................
J F Darley.................
Rizan V Bryant............
M B Swearingen .........
Lydia Welch, widow of
Bryant Welch ............
William Sturgess..........
A E Williams, widow of H
C Williams ..............
Rebecca J Crum, widow of
n on fim .. ....
Eliza A A Lewis, widow of
James J Lewis ...........
Mary Ihabella Parker, wid-
ow of John Parker.......
Spicey Whidden, widow of
Bennett Whidden.........
Julia F Garrard, widow of
J A Garrard ..............
Fauntleroy Brannan .......
Wm Johnson.............
Eliz-t A Jerkins, widow of
RWJerkins ...............
Turner J Griffin..........
Peter Pelicer ...........
Pastora Lopez, widow of
Alonzo Lopez ..............
Margaret Carrera, widow
of Gaspar Carrera.........
EM Lopez.....................
Josiah Roberts ............
Wm E Oste'n .............
Andrew J Roberts.........
Andrea Plummer. widow
of J A Plummer.........
Francis A Triay ........
James G Wall .................
Alice E Scott, widow of
James E Scott,..............
Marthi H Chapman, widow
of Giles P Chapman....
Laura & Williams, widow
of Irwin J Williams......
Elizabeth A Fussell, wid-
ow of Wm S Fussell......
Samuel M Deas ...........
John C Overstreet........
Thomas Kenady.... ..........
Robert Reid ....................
Anthony Sapp...............;...
Mrs Harriet Qniett, widow
of T P Qiett .........
Drucilla Coward, widow of
Jno F Coward...............


Name of Captain of the Regiment.
Company.

Cspt'in John McNeill..... 9th Florida
John Bryan........ 1st Reserves
T Langford....... 3d Florida
Williams......... 4th Florida
Leslie.............. 4th Florida
P it Bird ........... 10th Florida
PB Bird ........... 10th Elorida
William Sheffield 4th Florida
N S Blount ........ 7th Florida
John T Leslie.... 4th Florida
W T Saxon ........ 3d Florida
G B Langford..... 3d Florida
Fred Worth....... 8th Florida
J D Wescott .... 10th Florida
Arthur Roberts .. 1st Florida
S A Spencer .. 5th Florida
Asa Stewart....... 9th Florida
G R Langford..... 4th Florida
Company "A" .. 7th Florida
J W Whidden..... 4th Florida

John Bryan....... 1st Florida Res
William Footman est Florida Car
Fred Worth........ 8th Florida
J C Chambers..... 9th Alabama
Gettes ............. 7th Florida
Summerlin ....... 1st Florida
A G Moseley .... 7th Florida
B Smith.......... 20th N Car
Alex Moseley.... 2d Florida
John L Phillips.. 3d Florida

George Powers.. 10th Florida
J L Phillips .... 3d Florida
Jno M Pons... .. 8th Florida
Jno L Phillips... 3d Florida
Jno M Pons ..... 8th Florida
J A Pace'ti......... 8th Florida
E Maxwell ... ... 3d Florida
Jno McNeil....... 9th Florida
Fletcher ............. 4th Florida
Chamberlain .... 2d Florida Car
J R Mizell ....... 7th Florida
J R Mizell......... 7th Florida
J Tucker ........ 8th Florida
H J Stewart...... 2d Florida
C E L Allison.... Oth Florida
R M O'Neal...... 29th Tennessee
HO Bassett...... Oth Florida
W P Pillows 2d Florida
Hall.... ........... st Florida












'70


County.


Suwannee .....





















Santa Rosa....





Taylor .....













Volusia .......




Wakulla ......



Walton ........


Name of Captain ot the Regiment.
Company. ______


Name of Pensioner.


Elizabeth Turner, widow
of Riley D Turner .......
Edward B Co its .............
Clarlan Heir, widow of R
Heir .........................
John Lee......................
Those P Landing .. ....
Wilson Goodson...........
J J Fielding .................
Mrs Eliza C Ferguson,
widow T Ferguson.........
Mrs Mary Vann, widow of
E W Vann...............
W O Jackson............ ...
Mary H Lee, widow of Geo
H Lee...................
Joseph S Hogans .............
Sarah A Adams, widow oi
J L Adams.....................
Sarah bealey, widow of S
C Sealey ...... ....
Martha E Osteen, widow
of Bennett D Osteen ...
Matthew Johns............
Jame- M Foster..............
M C Burns ................
Hiram P Bush............
Jas Franklin.... .......
JarrettBray.. ...........
Nancy J Morrison, widow
of Miles Morrison ......
Sarah J Dixon, widow of
AB Dixon ... .......
M A English, widow of
B English ...............
Tiney Hogans.........
E Young, widow of Thos
Young. ...............
F N English, widow of M
J English ................
Z 0 McLeod .. ........
Martha R Turner, widow
of F T Turner .........
John T Albritton.......
Mary A Faircloth, widow
of C Faircloth ..........
Wm C Llpscomb ..........
Clarissa b Bellamy, widow
of Calvin B Bellamy.....
Geo W Odum .............
Penelope Prevatt, widow
of Chas M Prevatt......
W L Cromer...... .........
Day d L Wickham ........
Jno R Glenu .............
Jno N Dougherty.........
Robert R Pi ott .... ......
H II Braswell .............
Geo W Smith.............
Larkin Robinson. ........
CS Alligood...... ........
TP Brannon.. .........
J W Stephens...... ......
W J Powell..............
W B McLeod.................
Daniel P McDonald........
Catherine Hicks, widow of
Adam Hicks.............
Uriah Woodham..........
Penina Truet, widow of
Jno Truet.....................


8th F.orlda
4th Florida
1st Florida
2d Florida
10th Florida
bth Flrridt
3d Florida
5th Florida
llth Florida
8th Alabama


J H Tucker......... 8th Florida
C F Co.e.......... sFla Cav
Frink ............. 5th Florida
McElroy........ Scott's Ca Bat


Arthur Roberts...
J Stewart.......
J Stewart.....
R Partr dge....
Sewell .... .........
Jno Watkins ....
J D Leigh ........
Amos ........


1st Florida Car
10th Florida
10th Florida
1st Florida
29th Alabama
1st Florida
tst Florida
15th Battalion


Jesse Pritchett.. Home Guards


AJ Lea..........
Chas J Jenkins..
Beggs....... ......
Beggs................
JH Huner........
J W Westc tt ...
S A Parramore..


5th Florida
10th Florida
llth Florida
5th Florida
26th Georgia
llth Florida
Md Fla Cav


John Frink...... 5th Florida
Smith Parramorell 1st Fla Car


A J Lee..........
A J Lee........
W W Sloans....
MA Knight ....
G R Langford.....
John Mizell ..
J W Patterson..
D L Frierson....
S A Spencer......
Shine. .. ....
C A Bryan. ......
W D Bloxham...
Cooper...............
M Kinney........
J T Brady .......
A B McLeod.....
SA Cauthon.....
A McMillan......
WC Oates.......


Perry's Reg
5th Florida
7th Florida
9th Florida
3d Florida
7th Florida
12th Georgia
3d Florid
5th Florida
11th Florida
ith Florida
5th Florida
33d Alabama
33d Alabama
42d Georgia
let Florida
6th Florida
8th Florida
15th Alabama


A B McLeod ..... 6th Florida


Capt'in Summers............
Dials.... .... ...
N A Hull.. .........
WP Pillan.......
Wescott.............
J W Holleyman...
J S Wood.. .....
Jno Frink..........
Company "D"....
Modeau ...........

















County. Name of Pensioner.


Walton........ Wm L Brown...............
John Stafford..............
J W Smith...... ..........
JW Bell............. .
|WmM Miles ... ......
IBenjamin Langfo d.......
Mary A Gomillian, widow
of A J Gomillian.........
Tamer La..siter, widow of
W B Lassiter...........
Washington.... James L Vickers..........
Henry Anderson............
John W Taylor..............
NJ Potter, wid w of W
R F Potter ..............
C F Ausburn........... ...
Wm L Riley ...............
Wm Ward ................
Nancy Palmer, widow of
D WPalmer.............
Joseph F Wachob...........
Emily C Dortch..............


Name of Captain of the
Company.

C L McKinnon..
A C Munroe.....
AB McLeod......
Branan.............
H B Grace ......
A B McLeod.....
E A Cur y ....
McLeod ............
H B Grace.......
B Laspler..........
DD McLean ....
Adaway ..........
W Lane..........
W T McCall......
Dr. Jennings...


Regiment.


1st Florida
6th Ala Cav
1st Florida
33d Alabama
4th Florida
1st Florida
4th Bat Fla Vo I
1st Florida
6th Florida
4th Florida
11th Florida
6th Florida
4th Florida
53d Alabama
Clayton's R


Lane .............4th Florida
T E Clarke....... th Florida
Wm Lane........ 4th Florida













LIST OF LUNATICS in the Hands of Private Parties, January 1, 1895.

County. Lunatics. In Whose Care. Mo.
Amt.

Baker ...... Evelina Crawford.......: James H. Powers .... $ 8 00
Bradford ... Caroline Swindle ....... R. C. Heiberger...... 12 50
William Sullivan ....... Elizabeth Neal....... 8 00
Margaret L. Crawford .. William B. Crawford. 10 00
Clay ....... Irvin Higginbotham.... Charles Conway...... 0 00
Louisa Higginbotham .. Thomas Scott........ 8 00
Mary Brooker .......... Thomas Scott......... 8 00
J. W Dean.............. H. Ja'rrett .......... 10 00
Calhoun.... Josephine Coxwell'..... M. A. E. Streetman... 8 00
Duval ..... Sarah M. Conner........ W. B. Conner........ 8 00
Walter Broward ........ Adel Broward........ 10 00
Robert Armstrong ...... Sheriff of Duval co'nty 10 00
Franklin ... Dillie Davis ............ James Davis ........ 8 00
Gadsden ... Elizabeth Vickers ......Area Vicker......... 12 50
Jerry Campbell.......... J. P. Campbell....... 8 00
Mary Holloman ........ Lizzie II. Abney ..... 0 00
Mary Owens............ Charles Blount........ 12 50
Lilla Eckles............ William Eckles ...... 8 00
Fannie E. Chester ...... Annie Rudd ......'.. 8 00
Bettie Stafford......... H. F. Sharm......... 8 00
Reddin Edwards....... T. J. Edwards ....... 8 00
Holmes .... Elizabeth Slaughter .... Richmond Leavins... 8 33&
Lydia M. Ellis.......... Joseph Ellis..........6 '25
Dicey M. Carnley ...... Martha J. Carnley.... 6 25
William J. Holly........ Sarah A. Holly...... 8 331
Rebecca Murphy ....... William Murphy..... 12 50
Mary Byrd ............. Elizabeth Byrd....... 7 00
Jacob Standly..;....... l)avid Neel .......... 6 25
Laura Parish........... S. F. T. Parish....... 12 50
David Smith ........... Alexander Smith..... 5 00'
John T. Trant.......... Mary Ann Trant ..... 8 00+
James Tadlock ......... B. F. Tadlock ..... 8 00
Hillsboro... Mary Hunter .......... Joshua I. Hunter... 10 00,
Ellen Hunter .......... Joshua H. Hunter.... 10 00
Phoebe Ann Smith .....John T. Baggett ..... 10 00
Louis Dishong ......... E.D. ishong ....... 12 50
Jackson .... John Hardgrove........ John I. King......... 8 331
Lizzie Osborne ......... Robert Osborne 10 00
Jefferson ... William Kinsey ........ Christian Kinsey..... 8 00
Liberty .... Beckie Ann Larcus ..... Mrs. V. 0. Carson.... 6 00
Leon ...... Elizabeth Stephens .... Celia Clark ......... 8 331
Nancy McClenny ...... William F. Hartsfield 12 50
Thomas Johnson ...... Jane R. Johnson ..... 12 50
Ella R. Hartsfield....... A.N. Childers ....... 12 50
Frances Walden........ Georgie Ann Wallace. 12 40
Eliza Pigott ............ Robert R. Pigott..... 10 00
Levy ...... Amelia Hearn ......... Eliza Iearn........... 12 50
Ellen Bailey........... John I. Phillips...... 10 00,
Madison.... Laura M. McLeod ...... J. L. Agnew ........ 12 50
Palmer Wilson ........ Emily Wilson........ 8 33
Nassau .... Mary J. Jones ......... J. Hampton Jones.... 12 50















County.


Lunatics.


Jacob Saunders.........
Lucinda Shima........
Norella Oliver..........
Louisiana Espey........
Louisa Aymard.........
Matthew P. Harvell ....
John R. Halford........
William Josiah Miller ..
Jane Busbee.............
Ben Anderson ..........
Tempa Babb ...........
Catherine Frater .......
Charles Crosby .........
Mary Ann McRae......
John R. McRae.........
Mary Smith ............
Jesse Love Scaniers ....
John Branan ..........
Celia Caswell...........
George W. Cawthon ....
Amy Slay ......:.......
Florida Wallace ........
Martha Boyett.........
Sam Brooks ...........
Ursen M. Kemp ........
Claborn Smith.........
Ephraim Tucker ......
Ella I. Pitts............


In Whose Care.


J. Buchanan .........
J. C. Blount..........
L. A. Oliver..........
J. H. Espey ..........
Lewis L. Aymard ....
Margaret Harvell.....
John J. Halford ......
Elizabeth Miller......
W. J. D. Cawthon....
Jack Syples ..........
John L. Campbell ....
Archibald McDonald .
J. T. Crosby .........
Amanda Anderson...
Amanda Anderson....
John P. Morrison....
William Scaniers.....
Thomas Branan ......
J. W. Smith..........
WR.R. McCullough ..
Robinson Slay.......
Georgie Ann Wallace.
Martha E. Williams..
William H. Walker...
George W. Nazworth
Elizabeth Page......
Luther Tucker......
Isaac P. Pitts .......


Nassau ....
Polk .......
Sumter...'..
Suwannee..
Santa Rosa.
Taylor .....
Walton .....













Wakulla ...





Washington


Mo.
Amt.

$ 8 33f
10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
8 331
10 00
8 331
8 00
6 25
12 50
12 50
8 00
6 25
6 25
7 00
8 331
.5 00
8 331
5 00
10 00
12 40
10 00
5 00
5 00
8 00
8 00
8 00


__ _I_~I_










































I










Statement of Banks Organized Under the Banking Laws of the State of Florida.

RESOURCES. DECEMBER 24, 1894.


W a,

0 1 8 1 8 8 8 660
No. Name. Location.


_____________________ U U d 1 2
Idi I). tI | e |I


*< /- 1 > i. ,, rn^ n /^ 1 / Mn In At/ r* o n m. )m I C AYo no toe: ,;11 nMi m lo rio -Al Q-o .* a')1 0 -Q0101 non dl A lb Q11 l Q g firt rr\ 'QA AWc An n A4 6601fifi nn 3l5lft 9 69i f


Quincy State BanK..........
The Bank of Tavares.......
The Bank of Pasco County .
Volusia County Bank.......
Brevard County State Bank.
Indian River State Bank....
Leesburg & County State B'k
Union Bank of Key West...
State Bank of Fort Meade ..
Brooksville State Bank .....
Jefferson County State Bank
Dade County State Bank....
St. Petersburg State Bank..
Melbourne State Bank......
State Bank of Eau Gallie....
Bank of Tarpon Springs ....
State Bank Df Orlando......
Merchants Bank of Orlando.
Osceola County State Bank..

SAVINGS BANK.

The State Savings Bsnk ....


Qyuncy, Fla ......
Tavares, Fla.....
Dade City, Fla ...
DeLand. Fla .....
Cocoa, Fla .......
Titusville, Fla ...
Leesburg, Fla ....
Key West, Fla....
Fort Meade, Fla..
Brooksville, Fla..
Monticello, Fla...
Palm Beach, Fla.
St.Petersburg, Fla
Melbourne, Fla...
Eau Gallie, Fla...
Tarpon Sp'gs, Fla
Orlando, Fla .....
Orlando, Fla.....
Kissimmee, Fla ..


Aug. 20, 188U.
Aug. 30, 1889.
Sept. 5, 1889.
Dec. 2, 1889..
Dec. 12, 1889 .
Jan. 1, 1890 ..
March 19, 1890
April 19, 1890
June 26, 1890.
Aug. 15, 1890.
Dec. 13, 1890 .
Jan. 25, 1893..
April 17, 1893.
June 28, 1893..
Aug. 14, 1893.
Sept. 29, 1893.
Oct. 27, 1893.
Nov. 23, 1893.
May 28, 1894..


Tallahassee, Fla.. Oct. 25, 1889..


viy ii o
10,949 19
23,823 98
126,573 04
42,750 21
96,683 36
75,103 48
43,896 63
23,070 21
36,161 24
57.169 45
35,130 90
16,865 48
20,546 02
16,121 11
28,168 10
67,964 53
61,675 37
19,001 60



111,849 03


82, 014 81 ....... ......
79 89 2,548 00........
148 01 ...... .... ... ..


4,121 59
2,615 44
6,896 84
1,092 75
92 29
115 83
2,200 37
2,681 48
2,731 54
1,568 60
380 99
1,547 18
5.600 99
567 53
564 36
987 84
-p',.33
.3-5 -'?'


......... 1i I0 UL
733 03 2,884 19
6.200 00 14.123 67


39,502 00
14,994 48

7,446 79
445 00


5,000 00
1,073 06

3,000 00
430 01
1,700 00
56 20
Sr.5o.g0


......... 28,081 77


6,160 81
3,866 52
36,613 72

6,991 21


7,013,08

3,801 43

460 69
19,551 65
24,806 59
" i'c. i li


u, I .. ......


21,i564 6 00........
582 06 ........
6,444 86 ........
1,100 00 1,641 27
12.703 17 4 4.9
2,210 21 ........
2,285 42 ........
11,426 68 ........
3,537 94 3,000 00
3,687 07 ........
580 22........
1,480 55 .........
594 78 ........
867 45 24 9C
1,755 60 .........
14,542 60 ....
, .:' I. ,! 6,;70-U


TO ,u> I J TP ,t' U
.......... 1,677 78 7,634 42
5,290 00 1,900 00 .........
..........1 1,948 34 24,074 57
5,)81 62 1,416 87 ...........
4,302 81 2,252 75 1,426 74
..... .. 1,412 21 106 20
12,000 00 195 94 150 00
...... 1,400 00 ..........
1,50000 1,424 11 173 00
1,500 00 1,720 00.........
1,255 49 1,435 '8 2,850 00
. ....... 2.506 (5 1,900 00
... 959 24 .........
..... .. 662 00 150,00
. .... .. .. 1. 355 80 ..........
9,500 00 3,153 66 ..........
S.. ....... 1, 930 00 .. .....
656 05.........
[.;.4''.6 'oj-i6


I'JS -.1-;- -


204 10
890 24
3,547 05
1,234 61
3,641 81
261 69
3,337 32
990 37
2,354 05
1,189 01
1,221 25
1,339 02
1,586 65
1,133 02
1,362 35
6,101 32
4,489 17
1,470 32
3? 5 'rj0'f


40 251


I ov CUmu ...


1,(00 00


13,50
162 80


1,453 38 ........
18 00 ........9
54 20 11,911 -27
84 25 26,049 00
.. ...... .. ....... .
97 40.........
361 20 ..........
58 80 ..........
36 00 . . .
33 0 .........
188 41 ..........
547 35 ..........
834 42 .........
1,474 50 .........

zs.:'2g 3g(3^(


j(.. : .? ;


l.ol 2%7,.47 i6 '.? q'


5r. 6 .j2
5'1^^ -


2
3
4
5
6
9
10
S11
12
5 15
17
18
19
20
21
F r 22
23
24



1


1,140 56
4,165 10
948 80
563 25
257 75
4,302 40
15,075 20
920 35
195 15
4,801 42
969 80
21 35
1,521 14
S597 00
421 78
1,523 80
1,670 20
925 74
1 1 qV ,71


43 62
54 89
197 40
44 12
560 51
39 56
12 01

11 24
25

22 '22

77 44
32 04
1.1 .. ,


,

1,805 00
1,379 00
11,207 00
7,050 00
6,796 00
2,009 00
1,173 00

6,512 00
426 00
1,872 00
2,100 00
1,245 00
4,722 00
3,558 00
1,333 03

8,242 16

8,242 16


27,864 66
56,703 80,
186,226 01
64,192 14
176,697 84
155,687 72
120,938 80
45,193 53
48,020 75
80,849 24
65,727 62
33,350 42
32,354 65
24,001 49
42,756 84
115,318 71
103,655 83
38,973 38



148,213 21


i *', L "


i /


t, I....-. n -


I


I


I


I


................... .


I


'


375J g.oo











LIABILITIES, DECEMBER 24, 1894.


Name.


Quincy State Bank.................
The Bank of Tavares ..............
The Bank of Pasco County .......
Volusia County Bank..............
Brevard County State Bank.........
Indian River State Bank............
Leesburg and County State Bank ...
Union Bank of Key West...........
State Bank of Fort Meade ..........
Brooksville State Bank ............
Jefferson County State Bank........
Dade County State Bank ...........
St. Petersburg State Bank ..........
Melbourne State Bank..............
State Bank of Eau Gallie ...........
Bank-of Tarpon Springs............
State Bank of Orlando .............
Merchants Bank of Orlando.........
Osceola County State Bank .........

SAVINGS BANK.


Location.


Quincy, Fla..........
Tavares, Fla ........
Dade City, Fla ......
DeLand, Fla .........
Cocoa, Fla ..........
Titusville, Fla.......
Leesburg, Fla .......
Key West, Fla........
Fort Meade, Fla......
Brooksville, Fla......
Monticello, Fla.......
Palm Beach, Fla .....
St. Petersburg, Fla..
Melbourne, Fla.......
Eau Gallic, Fla.......
Tarpon Springs, Fla..
Orlando, Fla .........
Orlando, Fla ........
Kissimmee, Fla ......


The State Savings Bank ............ ITallahassee, Fla..


$60,000 00
15,000 00
15,000 00
50,000 00
25,000 00
25,000 00
25,000 00
50,000 00
15,000 00
15,000 00
40,000 00
15,000 00
15,000 00
15,000 00
16,000 00
16.500 00
25,000 00
25,000 00
15,000 00
0 7000oo 0o


20,000 00


0
0 ~
0
2)
COl '0
0 '
'0
0,


$7,736 00

850 00

2,100 00
5,000 00
2,200 00
3,000 00
600 00
3,000 00
2,500 00
300 00
1,449 08

1,221 89







4,000 00


$10,833 89$ .......

2,463 66 .......
8,604 11 .......
1,778 68 ........
4,707 78 .. .
1,472 59 ......
6,709 01 145 00
1,267 87 ........
1,486 90 .. ..
6,083 68 ....
2,913 49 ........
1,088 79 ........
1,268 33 .......
.. .... 35 00
3,749 50.......
6,235 37 ..... ..
6,857 25 .....
1,722 55



3,033 36 ........


$53,658 2,$ 439 00
10,110 15 2,644 15
32,807 84 3,122 30
108,099 06 3,927 28
28,643 71 1,642 25
114,490 45 650 00
119,652 38, 50 00
49,084 791 12,000 00
20,435 21 30 55
21,386 64 105 27
32,046 1i 45 40
47,514 1. .......
14,866 28 500 00
14,486 32 1,600 00
6,655 3( 80 00
18,723 40 471 03
67,669 74 148 60
70,173 56 1,500 00
21,885 85i 364 98
120,68648 ..........

120,686 48........


$34,290 68
110 36

417 55




5,107 00



200 00
..........


6,265 00
125 00

4g, s J
'72X7


0b
'0
0

o

o s


U .0


o o


$........



2,027 50





47 70








".0 7. .

9... ^


$. ......





5 40









536 37
........


.. .. ...... .
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... 6,849 61
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........
..... .........


Y
2)

.m
'a a
C S
02S



CS |
o h
Oo3
2)cO


$ 4di 8c







.....i ....


12c 35
.... ....


.........


..... $ .. ... .... .. .... .... ... $ ........


2,460 00
15,000 00
66666..........
20,000 00
..........'


..........
2,684 18






593 47


S..........


..........
178 01
3,000 00

7,307 35
...... ...
68 72
5,875 01


246 27


2,000,00
10,000,00


'iu,~s.?u


493 371 .......... ................


$167,359 69
27,864 66
56,703 80
186,226 01
64,192 14
176,697 84
155,687 72
120,938 80
45,193 53
48,020 75
80,849 24
65,727 62
33,350 42
32,354 65
24,001 49
42,756 84
115,318 71
103,655 83
38,973 38
/. S r.T 7 ? 7I 2-


......1 148,213


4n .sO)- '-3is .qj(.^


177 .07o. /2- ,/71.F


, :-.
[ *


-- ----- ---





-- - - I -


.


--


''''''''


'''''"''
'''''''''

:I


'''''''''

'''''''''

















STATEMENT from Assessment Rolls of 1894, showing the total valuation of Real and Personal Property, including
Railroad and Telegraph Lines, together with the Gross Amount of State and County Taxes Assessed and Licenses
collected in each County; also amount of Auction Tax.


__ _ __ _ -3 .9 ,^,V 0

0 0
s! E! P4- E 0.
? ^ sa a ssa
AO

s '*s 5, 0 05
6a
0o E0



a a a5 "
coUXTErS. 2 s



0 ^ t I 0 1
__ <_ a
00~5 0
-- 0, S~ 1
0" ~d 0
d 4 E~~i E m o


Alachua................... .....
Baker............. .............
Bradford.................. ........
Brevard.... .......................
Calhoun................. ........
Citrus........................
Clay....................................
Columbiaa.............................
Columbia...... .........
Dade................. ..........
DeSoto... ............ .
Dnval............................
Escambia.............................
Franklin......................
Oadsden.............. .........
Hamitton ........................
Hernando..... ............
Hilllsborcngh..........................
Holmes........... ......
Jackson............................
Jeferon.... ...................
LaFayette...........................


$2,810,780
386,823
871,774
1,854,760
463,622
1,114,222
893,991
1,006,363
1,157,057
1,564,780
6,699,700
3,072,350
564,272
574,540
628,220
847,590
5,040,250
308,371
1,031,567
986,920
785.840


$636 600
111,516
335,300
289,106
124,658
135,536
180,211
404,479
92,335
608,410
1,688.920
945,170
175,835
261,110
323,010
144,740
1,168,845
148.455
588,729
342,650
188,350


$984,139 84 $10,595 85 $4,442,115 69
179,186 00 3,120 00 680,645 00
408,861 00 4,039 00 1,619,974 00
486,611 00 8,850 00 2.639,327 00
........... 2,100 00 590,380 00
385,532 00 5,040 00 1,640,330 00
398,607 00 6,257 00 1,479,066 00
551,760 00 4,032 00 1,966,634 00
22,775 00 1,900 00 1,274,067 (00
329,410 00 6,300 00 2,508,850 00
1,004,550 00 14,600 00 9,407,770 00
537,061 26 6,167 60 4,560,748 86
62,475 00 1,050 00 803,632 00
279,984 00 3,785 00 1,119,419 00
370,295 00 3,450 00 1,324,975 00
231,830 28 2,471 25 1,226,631 53
843,199 63 9,440 00 7,061,734 63
154,470 00 2,231 00 613,527 00
997,213 68 3,530 1,919,039 68
228,281 00 2,795 00 1,560,646 00
............... 953,690 00


$25,542 58
3,916 42
9,314 84
15,188 74
3 397 36
9,431 89
8,510 67
11,231 98
7,327 99
14,438 04
54,134 49
26,248 27
4,622 64
6,436 08
7,618 56
7,057 15
40,621 86
3520 16
11,034 48
8,973 72
5,483 71


$7,148 51
623 69
1,948 01
4,390 71
76 97
377 03
940 62
3.631 96
4,296 92
3,499 33
27,269 35
18,454 20
1,639 99
2,308 45
1,625 34
813 34
17,440 91
594 01
2,640 78
2,104 66
164 74


388,868 50
6,468 98
17,338 74
29,869 48
6,495 80
16,403 30
18,766 62
21,901 46
13,005 37
26,751 20
102,076 70
44,675 73
11,428 11
8,762 18
10,020 72
14,168 95
70,834 49
7,025 27
18,934 05
20,669 43
12,259 28








Lake ........... ................
Lee....................... ............
Leon.......................
Levy........................... ....
Liberty..........................
Madiron...........................
Manatee.......................
Marion...........................
Monroe...........................
eNassan............................
Orange............ ...................
Osceola..............................
Pasco........ ............... ....
Putnam .............................
Polk....... ..........................
St. Johns.......................
Santa Rosa.........................

Ta y or...........................
Vo nsia .. ......................
Waknlla.........................
Walton... .....................
Washington..........................
FromlwpwUmIns. Companies...
From Building and Loan Asso....

Totals............. ..........


2,954,010 831,930
1,016,629 1506,459
1,467,676 410,200
986,766 264,645
270,744 47,645
911,160 434,760
1,050,753 70 233,623 75
4,296,730 9306450
2,172,998 612,575
1,142,904 340,081
3,581,320 722,050
941,376 270,819
946,780 179,770
2,453,170 434,510
2,814,430 716,100
1,899,480 271,530
514,560 474,990
1,207,915 247,956
776,'00 460,465
412,940 112,540
2,510,270 357,390
256.756 92,252
708,088 336,814
932,595 267,470


$68.886,890 70 $17,484,969 75


762,138 30

256,385 00
354,575 00
236,570 00
26,000 00
886,754 76
18,000 00
616,506 00
966,37300
246,207 03
452,549 28
842,300 45
755,980 00
518,321 20
322 976 00
410.238 49
553,136 44

1,187,043 00
127.254 00
265,698 89
117,027 73


117.668.275 26


8,312 50
7,060 00
3,200 00
38,400 00
3,400 00
................
12,069 40
4,000 00
6,337 00
8,461 00
4,770 00
6,903 00
9,078 25
6,760 C0
5,286 50
3,360 00
5,125 85
4,624 50

11,110 00
""ii'iiw"65
1 200 00
3,102 60
1,190 00


4,046,390 80
1,180,048 00
2,137,460 00
1,609.385 00
318,389 00
1,585,890 00
1,310,377 45
6,132,004 16
2,707,573 00
2,105,808 00
5,278,204 00
1,463,172 03
1,586.002 28
3,739,058 70
4,293,260 00
2,691,617 70
1,315,885 00
871,87235 34
1,794,925 94
525,480 00
4,066,818 00
477,462 00
1,313,703 39
1,318,282 73


23,284 94
6,788 48
12,298 19
9,257 23
1,830 74
9,126 '7
7,537 28
36.304 40
15,573 44
12,112 75
30,374 19
8,351 25
9,127 70
21,506 84
24,698 32
15,473 14
7,567 70
10,911 72
10,328 40
3,022 96
23,400 26
2,746 13
7,568 89
7,596 19


2,786 29
375 86
3,194 82
98 49
27 00
1,911 21
438 68
6,306 19
10,946 92
3,577 58
8,038 39
1,657 27
520 43
4,250 92
1,723 83
7,065 79
2,345 58
339 27
978 30
71 45
1,439 26
36 50
359 86
808 50
11,416 66
297 90


S220.494 201 $104,260,629 91 1599.828 54 $172.901 53


Received from Auction Tax, $351.04.


39,610 11
12,444 74
16,460 33
13,925 74
3,911 47
17,691 90
16,011 94
55,718 84
24,125 89
24,211 88
45,468 21
19,087 57
15,950 60
24,283 76
44,429 60
33,287 41
14,664 92
16,839 36
16,760 88
6,030 77
39,381 91
7,703 00
11,600 74
13,270 00


$1,053,601 71


.












A TsnACT Showing Assessment of Real and Personal Property for the Year 1894.
By the Several Counties.





COUNTIES..SC 0
2 0 0 -
.0 04 0 &

W Ej o 1 g 0
*0>< C 2I


o a 00 g so s .o


Alachua.......... ..... 702,829 29,048 $1,609,46 $778,655 $422,670 $2,810,780 2,801 16,876 2,125 6,839 $232,292 $404,308 $636,600
Bak'r................. 342,20* 5,848 302,168 8,880 77,815 386,823 417 7,473 1,488 3,248 68,834 44,68i 111,516
Bradford .............. W35,585 25,386 468,194 77,300 328,280 871,774 1,455 12,614 4,921 6,935 152,259 183,041 335,300
Brevard................ 716,4526 488 1,24,768 244,220 385,772 1,85,760 251 4,217 ... 216 33,181 255,925 289,106
Calhoun .... ........ 507,813 1,679 397,371 5,660 0,601 461,622 341 6,739 4,320 4,848 67,703 5,955 124,658
Citrus.............. 83,519 1. 392 ,8.... 3,41 ....... 1,114,222 37 3,969 491 1,836 40,973 94,563 135,536
Clav......... ........ 335,823 4,590 388,164 240,501 265,326 893.991 579 7,430 317 2,681 68,668 11 543 180,211
Columbia........... 4497,750 55,971 650,486 75,810 280,008 1,006,363 1,887 10,143 1,429 8,444 176,012 228,437 404,479
Ilade.... ............ 806,247 2,340 1,070,913 14,678 71,466 1,157.057 56 72 ... 4 3,518 88,817 92,335
DeSoto........ ........ 2,110,133 4390 1.183,00 31,80 ........ ... 1,56,730 1,322 57,852 2,781 9,71 307,785 300625 608,410
J)ual................ 470,584 5,451 1,319,360 3,84,070 1,556.270 6.699.700 808 5,682 608 1,203 92,468 1,596,452 1,688,920
Escr-bia............ 362,445 2.88 374,010 1,277,740 1,420,600 3,072,350 948 4,719 4,126 2,137 78,884 868,286 945,170
Frank in .............. 350,9'9 514 199.55 364,737 ... ... 564.272 86 2,213 835 414 25,835 150,000 17583
Gadeden....... .. 372,608 40,098 .310,94 139,610 123,985 574,540 1,392 6,228 1,635 6,289 116,768 144,342 2 110
Hamilton........... 312,827 48,380 404.90 57.870 165,400 628,220 1,407 8,295 1,146 7,736 135,850 187,160 323010
Hernand........ .... 284443 5.78 6 8,0 49,180 180,070 847,590 616 4,665 1,360 1,653 55,985 88755 144740
Hillsborough ....... 800940 1,400,450 1,411,530 2,228,270 5,040,250 2,146 22,228 3,539 6,441 245,108 923,737 1,16884
Holmes .............. 202.158 ,6 252,995 10,384 45,012 308.371 603 8,548 12,120 8,210 91,744 56,711 455
Jacuson......... .... 527,074 87,109 744,0 48,835 238,226 1,031,567 3,157 14,612 7,292 18,832 291,713 295016 586,729
Jefferson............. 37,9 104,675 62,40 70,110 254,410 986,920 1,944 5,217 1,021 7,080 166,400 188,250 342,650
LaFayette.... ........ 1,008 ...... 42,927 785340 719 13,175 87 ,760 115550 2,800 168350
Lake........ ........ .418 15,369 1, 433,65 882,145 638,200 2,954,010 1,093 4,211 153 1,24 74525 257,405 331,930
ee................... 1,479,431 1,103 80,29 186,440 20,820 1,016,629 212 12,578 ........ 9 4,078 92,383 156469








Leon.................
Levy .... ........
Liberty............
Madison ...........
Manatee.... .........
Marimn ..............
Monroe........ ......
Nassau..............
Orange........ ......
Osceola.... .........
Pasco................
Polk...............
Pntnam ... ..........
St. Johns.............
Santa Rosa ...........
Sumter .............
Suwannee, ..........
Taylor...........
Volusia ..........
Waknlla..............
Walton ..........
Washington ......

Totals ............


437,488 133,952
684,274 12 470
513,561 3,896
296,872 93,590
788,216 5.662
810.029 52,859
10,814 ....
265,531 2,274
770,200 25,274
707,740 3,831
460,6851 ,228
1,093,849 15,213
442,707 15,205
660,782 2,878
682,643 3,579
266,840 17,490
387,718 51,696
389,825 6,775
695,883 12,401
373,814 15,151
670,856 5,912
699,840 ........

25,295,223 976,705


827,04C
814,930
270,744
570,690
718.805
2,318,171
48,998
236,994
928,72U
668.546
747,980
1,735,85C
736,490
553,-'25


46.3,622
464,52
387,972
775,290
231,284
479,843
629,365

$32,815,121


196,550
103,520

49,880
51,900
477,530
2,124,000
449.788
410,515
272,830
33,190
371,340
429,935
1,344,265
31,270
28,162
87,405
1,915
474,770
1,370
65,335
185,190

$17,376,315


445,085
68,315

290,890
280,048
1,501,030
............
456,122
2,242,085

165,610
707,240
1,286,745

209,86o)
40t,161
225,770
23,053
1,260,210
24.152
164.910
118,040

$18,695,454


1,487,675
986,765
270,744
911,160
1,( 50,753
4,296,730
2,172,998
1,142,904
3,581,320
941,378
946 780
2,814 430
2,453.170
1,896,480
514,530
1,207,915
776,700
412,940
2,510.270
256,756
708,088
952,595

$68,886,890


1,628
1,236
224
2,026
798
3,332
271
63C
1,517
315
920
1,620
1,127
757
896
1.242
1,970
421
1,151
516
787
804

48,816


6,445
13,235
3,749
8,559
26,793
17,614
11
8.717
9,388
38,808
7,205
32,586
8,390
5,837
10,283
10,952
10,756
12,423
10,671
o,406
10,268
11,205

508,018


979
1,260
1,037
1,176
2,521
8,3.5

2,600
20
625
365
3,433
41
136
19,822
1,057
1,304
387
1,600
802
23,774
10,166

132,205


4.868 140,200
4,236 127,175
2,417 34,976
8.467 170,095
3,102 127,110
8,249 279,320
........ 13,77
3,72% 111,914
1,008 115,310
843 131,250
2.354 72,005
6,393 271,106
1,495 110,050
1,255 63,110
6,162 141.154
3,824 121,354
7993 175,757
5,873 83,004
2,4 0 119,03C
4,440 55,487
8,772 148,443
4,955 123,040

204,924 $5,426,808


270,000
137,470
12,669
264,665
106,513
667,130
490,800
228,147
606,740
139,589
107,7685
444,996
324,460
208,420
333,830
126 02
284,708
29,536
238,360
36,785
188,371
144,430

$12,058,164


410,200
204,645
47,645
434,700
233,623
936,450
512,576
340,061
722,050
270,819
179,770
718,100
434,510
271,530
474,990
247,956
460,465
112,540
357,390
92,252
336,814
287,470

$17,484,969









































































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IS









































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