• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Guide to FCD Recreation in the...
 To the Recreation Minded
 The FCD and Recreation
 Into the Sawgrass
 Access to the Wilderness
 Hunting and Fishing Informatio...






Title: Recreation in the Everglades
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053725/00001
 Material Information
Title: Recreation in the Everglades
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
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Bibliographic ID: UF00053725
Volume ID: VID00001
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 00020449

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Guide to FCD Recreation in the Everglades
        Page 6
    To the Recreation Minded
        Page 7
    The FCD and Recreation
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Into the Sawgrass
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Access to the Wilderness
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Hunting and Fishing Information
        Page 38
Full Text
























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EVERGLADES TRANSPORTATION Wilderness
used by the FCD for water storage is not prohibited
to airboating, which is a popular mode of transporta-


tion. Various models of swamp vehicles also are
used to penetrate the sawgrass country.


I-=F'








Central and


So


uthern Florida


Flood Control District


FCD Governing Board
Robert W. Padrick, Fort Pierce
Chairman


Robert L. Searle, Coral Gables
Vice Chairman
C. A. Thomas, Lake Harbor


Robert P. Blakeley, Plantation

T. R. Tomlinson, Melbourne


Executive Director G. E. Dail, Jr.



Recreation Director John H. Stretch


901 Evernia Street, West Palm Beach, Florida


* (Q) Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District "


Florida State Board of Conservation
Governor Claude Kirk
Chairman













Recreation


In The


Everglades


Published by The Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control District, 901 Evernia Street,
West Palm Beach, Florida



CONTENTS

GUIDE TO FCD RECREATION SITES.......... 6
TO THE RECREATION MINDED .............. 7
(A Letter from the FCD Chairman)
THE FCD AND RECREATION ................ 8
INTO THE SAWGRASS ...................... 11
ACCESS TO THE EVERGLADES ...............26

PLATES

Plate 1 Everglades Map ..................... 12
Plate 2 FCD District Map................... 17
Plate 3 Conservation Areas ................18
Plate 4 Conservation Area 1................. 19
Plate 5 Conservation Area 2............... 20
Plate 6 Conservation Area 3.................21
Plate 7 Sawgrass Recreation Park ...........22
Late 8 20 Mile Bend Recreation Area.........23
Plate 9 Loxahatchee Recreation Area .........24
Plate 10 Everglades Holiday Park............. 25





GUIDE TO
IN THE


F.C.D RECREATION
EVERGLAD ES


(SASO. AL2 (Y.AR-OUNOF) : RRYTOV 2 Ql
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3 U.LS. 2 7, S. OF TRRYTOWyN I

5 1d. 44, M/L. O TAFlMI TRABF L M
SUS.. 447, ANl MAMTY-/ CAbNAL D
8 5.R/ 7, WiD/,/FE REFUGE a U






23 S.R. 84 Ao Eo W R/VAR CANAA N I a
/3 (1/ S7, S. OF ANDYTO-VA

14 TAM/ CANAML N RAL w.R. or27 M 1 1
9 U. s. 27, .v OF 7ARNDYTOWN
20 STR. 2A7, 2MTRA. N. OF OFIA MIMRAIL
21 SR. 27, AD R IAMI CANND L/

22 PILLAM WAY 7WIL, PELLWAY O2 Y -W2 D Iw
23 S.R. 84 AT NEW RIYeR CANAL I
23 US. 27, S. O A4RRDYTOVNA
26 U.S. 27, S. OF ANDYTOWV! TllYN
2 I7 (M/AON LE OPN TO PS.R.27 D) U
28 04S 27, 5 OdNDYTOWNI/4M/5 I a a N

29H TAIL COLLECTING, POTOAM/ RAPHIL SKEC T, TAP, PI TE T ALL SITS.
30 TAMFORAMI AIL, I A HUNT17NG LES WCAOF MIE
31 TAMME FA. 7 L AND FRL-31 A CO
32 TAM/MI TRAIL, SPILLWAYS /2C-/2 I l
33 US.27 NEAR? TRRYTOWN U

34 US. 27 BETWEEI ANDYTOW4, TAfrToWN I

H KING (ON LEVEES OPEN TO PEDESTRIANS), NATURE STLIDY,
SHELL COLLECTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, ETC., ARE AVAILABLE AT ALL SITES.

(I/NFORMAT/0N ON FIr5/HHG AND HUNTING REGULATIONS CAN BE OBSA/NeD
FROM THE FLA. GAME AND FRESH WT/?e F/S/I COMM/S1153/ON. )




: ..


to the recreation minded


Water, wildlife and a favorable climate, closely
related features of peninsular Florida, have provided a
natural setting for outdoor recreational opportunities.

Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
(FCD) Governing Board members, charged with water
management in an 18-county area more than three times
the size of Connecticut, have had no desire to barricade
vast wilderness or waterways from the public.

In cooperation with state, local and federal agen-
cies, and private enterprise, the FCD has been moving
recreation forward.

Water control practices to protect man and conserve
water for himi have gone hand-in-hand with recreational
development, and, by design, the FCD now has an "open
outdoor policy:"

Aside from limitations imposed by economics, ne-
cessary flood control structures, safety factors and pub-
lic utility easements, the only restrictions on public
lands within the FCD are the boating, fishing and hunt-
ing regulations of state and federal agencies. Even
privately-owned lands within the FCD have been opened
to outdoorsmen by generous owners.

More than 50 recreational sites now are open to the
public on lands within FCD jurisdiction. Plans call for
an additional 100 sites throughout the 15,500-square-
mile district.

Many of the existing recreational sites are in Ever-
glades Conservation Areas, preserved in a wilderAess
state but used as a huge water storage facility by tihe
FCD as part of its mammoth project.

Created early in the FCD's history, the water con-
servation areas are the only South Florida Everglades
open to hunters, airboaters and swamp vehicle operators.
Fishing is permitted year-around. Boating is limited only
by terrain. Hundreds of miles of levees are open to foot
traffic; some to vehicles.

Realizing the potential that existed for outdoor rec-


reaction, the FCD early in 1952, just three years after its
formation, entered into a cooperative agreement with the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. The
pact provided for wildlife supervision of Everglades Con-
servation Areas 2 and 3, now known as Everglades
Wildlife Management Area.

Under the arrangement, the Commission agreed to
manage the 1,124-square mile area for the preservation,
protection and propagation of fish and wildlife.

But the FCD holds jurisdiction over the land and, in
opening the wilderness to the public, follows a policy
which allows use of the water and land under controlled
conditions so that wildlife and natural beauty are enjoy-
ed, but not despoiled.

In addition to the game and fish agency, the FCI)
has cooperated with federal agencies, such as the IJ. S.
Fish and Wildlife Service which operates Conservation
Area 1 as the Loxahatchee National Wildlife liefuge; the
Florida Outdoor Recreational Development Council (State
Cabinet), the State Outdoor Iecreational Planning Com-
mittee, the State Iload Iepartment, the State Board of
Parks and Historical Memorials, the State Board of Con-
servation, and the Florida Ievelopment Commission.

Popnilatlioi of the Flood Control District ilntrcnilwd
froni 801,000 in 1950 to an estimated 2,500,000 in 1967 -
more tlihn 10 per cent of the population of the entire
State. In addition, tile central and southern part of Florida
attracts millions of tourists annually. Outdoor recreation
is sought by many Floridians and visitors.

Whether resident or visitor, you are welcome to use
FCD recreational territory. We are pleased to have been
able to help make the wilderness and waterways avail-
able to you.

Cordially,




Robert W. Padrick, Chairman





















The FCD and Recreation






Water is Florida's focal
point for recreation.
Fresh water management is
the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control District's busi-
ness.
Recreation and the FCD
Project, now about 50 per cent
completed, are becoming more
..J, and more interrelated.
Under a state plan for de-
velopment of non-urban outdoor
recreation, the FCD has accom-
Splished much toward providing
4 access to previously inaccess-
ible wilderness preserved in a
state as close to nature's design
as possible.
The most unique are the
Everglades Conservation Areas
in Southeast Florida. Conserva-
tion-wise, these Everglades are
Sa phenomenon. Covering upwards
of a million acres, used as a
vital water storage area, the
FCD wilderness is within a half-
hour drive of such metropolitan
centers as Miami, Fort Lauder-
dale and the Palm Beaches.
Other geographical divisions

gone


fishin---







of the FCD include the Okee-
chobee Waterway, with 730-
square-mile Lake Okeechobee
as the hub in a cross-state canal
system; the Kissimmee Basin,
an extraordinary area of scenic
river, chain of lakes and creeks;
the Upper St. Johns River Basin,
with still more lakes and
marshes, and the Lower Florida
East Coast, a glitter-to-pineland
strip extending from the Cape
Canaveral missile complex to
the start of the Keys.
Recreational sites, with a
boost from the FCD in many
cases, either are in public use
or in planning stages, all revol-
ving around inland water focal
points.

Recreational planning has
been an integral part of water
management since the project
started in 1950. Citizen commit-
tees, appointed by the FCC
Governing Board, have served as
advisory groups to the board for
several years and work closely
with the district's recreational
planning department to provide
more sites for public use.
Since outdoor recreation
primarily is a family affair in
Florida, the FCD has been en-
couraging development of sites
which include at least picnic
areas and, preferably, camping
facilities even in remote wil-
derness areas.
With abundant opportunities
available, Floridians take part
in more outdoor activities per
capital than the average Ameri-
can, and millions of tourists
visit the state mainly to take
advantage of its outdoor living.
To do its share, the FCD
has opened vast sections of land
and water to the public and is
helping, through a recreational
planning and development de-
partment, to create more and
more recreation sites.


ANTICIPATING THE BIG FISH It's an eager moment when you pre-
pare for the "cast-off" at the ramp.


TRANQUILITY If you want "to get away from it all" the FCD Con-
servation Areas offermany opportunities. This spot gives one thinking
time or simply the chance to enjoy nature and the sounds of nature.
You can see this vista at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Headquarters,
west of the Delray Beach Boynton Beach area.


(Continued on Page 10)














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SAWGRASS FISHING Many areas, with water levels bream, pickerel and golden shiner with an occasional
regulated under flood control design, offer good to tarpon, snook or snapper.
excellent fishing. Catches include large bass, perch,


Tragedy Spawned The Project


The FCD was created to
protect life and property. Its
duties include flood prevention,
water storage during wet sea-
sons to provide a supply for
subsequent dry periods annually,
prevention of salt water intru-
sion, recharging fresh water well
fields, irrigation, preservation
of wildlife and recreational
development.
Levees, locks, spillways
and other structures along old
and new waterways, and in con-
servation areas, plus engineer-
ing know-how, help to do the job.
Devastating floods of 1926
and 1928, when hurricanes blew


water out of shallow Lake Okee-
chobee, killed more than 2,500
persons. The federal government
took action and built a dike
along the south shore.
Periods of flood and drought
followed in Central and South
Florida. A vast, damaging flood
in 1947 spurred officials at the
state and federal levels to take
further action. The Multi-Purpose
FCD was born.
Congress assigned the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to plan,
design, and construct a compre-
hensive project to solve water
problems of 18 counties. The
Florida Legislature in 1949 cre-


ated the FCD to represent state
and local interests and to oper-
ate and maintain most of the
water control works after
construction by the federal
engineers.
The whole project has been
termed the greatest earth moving
job since the digging of the
Panama Canal.
With Lake Okeechobee as
the hub, and various rivers,
canals and levees as the spokes,
the FCD water control progress
wheel continues to move for-
ward.

Recreation is moving with it.


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INTO THE SAWGRASS


Once remote and mysterious,
ever unique, the sprawling
"grassy waters" known as The
Everglades has beckoned to
civilized man since savage Indi-
ans roamed the marshy wilder-
ness centuries ago.
Man came. and saw. and
explored.
He died in the swamps be-
tween Lake Okeechobee and
Florida Bay.
First the Spaniards, then
the English, and finally Ameri-
cans floundered in the vast
wilderness. The Seminoles, after
losing the Battle of Lake Okee-
chobee in 1837 during the war
with federal troops, entrenched
themselves in the sawgrass coun-
try to the south. Federalists had
little stomach for guerilla
warfare tactics used by the
Indians in the Everglades and
even less for the marsh. The
Seminoles had things their own
way for years, but the white man
proved persistent.
Following Florida statehood
in 1845, plans were laid for
water control projects and land
reclamation. Initial efforts were
made in the late 1800's. Perhaps
over-zealous during a period
when agriculture reigned as the
economic base, man over-drained.
Conservation received little, if
any, consideration in the early
days.
Times changed, Man's out-
look changed.
Ultimately, man preserved
most of the Everglades wilder-
ness and yet served a rapidly


SEMINOLE INDIAN His forefathers staunchly resisted the white man
in the early 1800's. The Seminoles controlled the Everglades for many
years after they lost the Battle of Lake Okeechobee and some of them
still live along Tamiami Trail in Dade County. Most are on reservations
in South Florida.








THE EVERO LADE DS


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GLADE5 CO. Oteech7 .
i PALM
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GRAPHIC SCALE IN MILES FOi.AD A 'E,
COLLIER CO. '.



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L.; .... ..OT T N EVERGLADES in Ever" lades Naotional Park.
: ts in Ever.lades National Park.






.' .^ Eve '.R.... s in F.G. Conservation .reas 1.2 & 3.
S. E intended for purposesAD








LAND T other than conservation.
.. ..... EVERGLADES intended for purpose

other than conservation.






--I"lwVII


growing South Florida by employ-
ing engineering knowledge under
difficult conditions. in area
covering 1,345 square miles,
larger than Ihode Island, was
set aside to conserve water and
protect east coast municipalities
from floods.

FLOOD AND) DIOUGIII

before the advent of theI
FCD, the land flat as a table
top and exposed to a tropical
rain pattern of heavy summer
downpours experienced flood,
long periods of standing water,
and then drought. The overdrain-
age in the early part of this century
upset the balance of nature.
Floods and droughts became
more severe.
As South Florida bulged
with ever-increasing population,
the flood-drought cycle caused
heavy losses. Conservation be-
came a must.
The FCI, created in 1949,
was charged with water manage-
ment. Its duties were basic -
remove water rapidly from the
land during floods and store it
for use during dry seasons. Im-
plementation of the plan was not
simple. Normally, water is stored
by damming a stream. South
Florida's flat topography rules
this out. The FCD had to create
water storage areas by diking.
Lake Okeechobee, north of
the conservation areas, was the
only natural major water storage
area in South Florida. Starting
from that point, the FCD formed
the three huge "pools" to the
south.
Built by the U.S. Army Corps
ofEngineers, the levees, pumping
stations, spillways and canals
serving the three huge storage
areas now are operated and main-
tained by the FCD. These con-
servation areas represent 49 per
cent of the original Everglades.
Besides flood prevention
and water control, the FC
attempts to regulate the conser-
vation area water to preserve
wildlife that would have been


rBoat Rides T


BIG BASS Catches sucn us n...... ...uuIm oass
Recreation Area are not reserved for men only.


forced from the marsh by a pro-
gram designed only to drain the
land.
Nature has not made the
task of water conservation and
wildlife preservation an easy
one. The water for the area
comes from rainfall, not an an-
nual certainty as historic
droughts attest. And even after
rain falls in the Everglades, or
flows by gravity or is pumped
from the north, nature again re-
takes billions of gallons through
evaporation and transpiration.
Yet, under average condi-
tions, the FCD manages to store
water from normally heavy rains
during summer months for use
through winter dry seasons until
rain again falls.

MOST WATER UNDERGROUND

Water seeps into the rock
and fills subterranean strata.
While surface depths vary from
only a few inches to approximate-


at Loxahatchee


ly two feet, the desired regulation
stages are measured in terms of
feet "above mean sea level."
This means most of the measured
water is beneath the ground
surface.
Fluctuation of water levels
in the three conservation areas
is a direct result of water entering
or leaving by various means -
some controlled, but others which
cannot be controlled. Rainfall
principally, and pumping and
gravity flow to a limited degree,
supply the water. Losses, other
than regulated releases, occur
because of extremely high evapo-
transpiration, withdrawals for
irrigation and seepage.
Desired elevations of water,
not always possible, include
maximums after hurricane seasons
and minimums designed to allow
space for water storage during
an upcoming summer rainy season
Minimum regulations also are
influenced by levels adequate
for fish, wildlife and preservation


74.


0 I'







GRASSY FLATS


GATORS ARE LONERS The alligator, a link with the dinosaur age
and one of Florida's tourist attractions, is considered a "loner" of
generally mild disposition despite Hollywood's protrayal. His so-
called ferocity has been exaggerated, according to wildlife officers.
Even so, attempting to pet one or advance too near is not recommended.
If molested, the alligator is quite capable of inflicting serious harm
or death. Powerful jaws shut with 1,000 pound pressure and one sweep
of its muscular tail can break a leg or a neck. The Everglades
alligator, which rarely exceeds 12 feet, is considered a necessary
predator and an aid to fish management. It eats slow-moving rough
fish in Florida waters, thereby helping game fish and the sport fisher-
man.


of vegetation necessary to the
entire ecology of the area.
Water stages above mean
sea level desired in Conservation


Area 1 are 14 to 17 feet; in Con-
servation Area 2 from 12 to 14.5
feet; and in Conservation Area 3
from 9.5 to 10.5 feet.


Flatness is the key word
description for topography of the
Everglades.
From Lake Okeechobee
southward to the tip of the Florida
peninsula, the slope is less than
two inches permile, and elevation
ranges from 15 feet above mean
sea level to six or seven feet
west of Miami. The flatness and
heavy evaporation and transpira-
tion losses are major factors in
the flood control and water con-
servation problem.
Vegetation produced in the
highly humid, subtropical setting,
is dominated by the sharp-edged
sawgrass. It also includes hya-
cinth, water lettuce, water lilies,
maiden cane, rushes, cattail,
sedges and pickerel weed.
Scattered throughout the
Everglades are the hammocks, or
tree islands masses of vegeta-
tion which appear to float on the
river of grass. The hammocks,
also called strands or heads,
support the wax myrtle, holly,
willow and other woody species,
and smaller shrubs.
Previously dominated by red-
bay, proven by many burned out
bay tree stumps and logs found
on the islands, the hammocks
follow two main geometric pat-
terns circular and elongated.
Under the vegetation and
water lay limestone, muck, marl
and shell.

INDIAN SIGNS

Researchers believe that
each tree island within the Ever-
glades Conservation Areas at
one time or another was a camping
spot for Indians. Relics have
been found on the hammocks, and
experts feel that many Indian
artifacts remain on islands not
yet searched.
Calusa Indians named the
general area "Pa-hay-o-kee,"
meaning "grassy water," and
with only slight distortion, the
name remains in use today the
City of Pahokee on the eastern






shore of Lake Okeechobee, north
of the Everglades.
Other Indians in Southeast
Florida were the Mayaimis around
Lake Okeechobee and the Te-
kestas on the east coast.
The Seminoles arrived in
the area later, sometime in the
early 1800's, when only a few
Calusas remained.
Just as today, fish were
plentiful in the 'Glades area,
and the Indian diet included all
species, along with oysters, deer
and opossum, fruits, palmetto
berries and cabbage palm hearts.
Indian mounds, still observed
in the Everglades, were built to
bury the dead and to dispose
of garbage!
Every Indian was a tailor in
the early days of Everglades
society when moss and palmetto
clothing reigned as the fashion.
Where the Indian trod little
more than a century ago, out-
doorsmen now hunt and fish,
moving into the sawgrass marsh-
land by small boat, airboat,
swamp buggy, and halftrack.

WILDLIFE ABOUNDS

The Everglades Conservation
Areas teem with fish and wild-
life.
Marsh and canals support a
variety of fish, including bass,
speckled perch, bream bluegillss,
shellcrackers, warmouth), catfish,
pickerel, shad, the bowfin (mud-
fish), gar, golden shiner, look-
down, leather jacket, and
occasional eels, tarpon, snook
and snapper.
Waterfowl include ducks and
coots.
Animal life ranges from
raccoons, and otters to an inf.e-
quent black bear and panther.
There are deer, wild hog, bobcat,
rabbits, and wild turkey. Turtles
swim slowly in canals and water
trails.
One also can spot the famous
Florida alligator, a link with the
dinosaur age.
Displays of wild birds, sel-
dom equalled anywhere in a
tropical setting, are enjoyed by


birdwatchers, sightseers in gen-
eral, and the sportsman who
pauses to watch them as they
wade in the marsh or wing their
way across the grasslands.
Over the years, Loxahatchee
National Wildlife Refuge person-
nel in Conservation Area 1 ob-
served 168 species of birds,
including the rare wood ibis or
stork and Everglades kite. They
spotted various types of ducks,
the roseate spoonbill, many
species of egret and heron, hawks,
the bald eagle, turkey, and scores
of songbirds.
In theway of the wilderness,
death attracts the unattractive,
and many vultures are seen glid-
ing in blue sky over the rustling
sawgrass in search of the dead.
Frogs are an important wild-
life feature. It has been estimated
that approximately 200 individ-
uals derive the maior portion of


their income from frogging. The
average annual value of the
industry through sale of frog
legs is placed at more than a
million dollars. The frog also is
considered vital to the Ever-
glades' ecology. As one of the
more abundant vertebrates in
South Florida, the frog is an
important food for birds, fish,
mammals and reptiles
SPINNING ROD TO CANEPOLE
In the marsh area, anglers
employ several methods to make
catches. Casting, spinning and
fly fishing rods, as well as the
old standby cane pole, are used
with worms and live minnows or
artificial baits of all types.
Due to the extreme flatness,
low elevation, and fluctuating
water levels as a result of varying
degrees of rainfall, Everglades'
fishing may range from excellent
', noor and can change greatly


PLAYFUL RACCOONS "Masked" animals who like to pilfer food
from campers, raccoons are a common sight in the South Florida wilds.






























BASS AND MORE BASS This string of 17 largemouth bass, caught
in one day out of Sawgrass Recreation Park in Conservation Area 2, is
far above average, but good catches occur almost daily. A Fort Lau-
derdale outdoor columnist described this feat as "one of the finest
strings of big bass ever to come out of South Florida." Weight ranged
from nine pounds and eight ounces to three and three-quarters pounds.
The anglers are Bud McGee, owner of Sawgrass Recreation Park, and
guide Joe Piontek, right.


within short distances.
Perhaps the best advice is
to ask other fishermen, "Where
are they biting?"
Heavy rainfall at times
floods many acres of the marsh-
land. When this occurs,fish move
with the water, seeking new
places to spawn and feed. On
the other hand, during dry periods
when water levels recede,many
fish are crowded out of the
marsh into canals. Sometimes
jammed conditions in the canals
create a food shortage and oxygen
levels fall, thus killing a number
of fish.
But generally, water condi-
tions under the Flood Control
Project do not fluctuate to any
harmful degree. As previously
noted, water storage is the prime
purpose of the Everglades Con-
servation Areas, but regulatory
levels are designed to take
wildlife preservation into account
as a top consideration. Extreme
degrees of fluctuation are not
desired by the FCD and, when
possible, are prevented.


Some water fluctuation is
desirable, according to a biologist
with the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission. He said a
study showed that fluctuating
water levels seem to be the key
to good fishing in the Everglades.
Canal fishing, often under-
taken with cane poles off banks,
is available in many sections of
the FCD conservation areas.
Main waterways are:
(1) Hillsboro Canal,
which divides Con-
servation Areas 1
and 2 and flows to
the Intracoastal
Waterway between
Boca Raton and
Pompano Beach at
the Palm Beach-
Broward County
line.
(2) North New River
Canal, separating
Conservation Areas
2 and 3, with its
tidewater outlet at
Fort Lauderdale-
Hollywood in Bro-
ward County.
(3) Miami Canal, which
cuts diagonally


through Conserva-
tion Area 3 to the
east coast at Miami.
(4) Tamiami Canal, a
top bank fishing
area, bordering Con-
servation Area 3 at
its southernmost
point just north of
Everglades National
Park.

In addition, perimeter canals
around each of the conservation
areas provide many more fishing
miles. And to the north of the
water storage sawgrass lands lie
the West Palm Beach Canal and
northern sect ions of the Hillsboro,
North New River and Miami
Canals all in original Ever-
glades which now are farmland
that produces a variety of winter
vegetables and sugar cane.

DEER ARE MAIN TARGETS

The Everglades Wildlife
Management Area, policed by the
Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, covers Con-
servation Areas 2 and 3 under
FCD jurisdiction, and hunting
seasons generally open in mid-
November and extend to the first
of the following year.
Frogging also is permitted
during specified time periods,
generally September through
March.
The white-tailed deer, most
sought of Florida's big game
animals, is prevalent in the
'Glades. But they are elusive,
and an airboat or swamp buggy is
a necessity to the hunter.
Airboas also are used for
wild hog hunts in the marshes.
Occassional bags of wild
turkey or black bear occur in the
Everglades. They are rare, but
exist in the remote sections.
Panthers, alligators and
crocodiles are protectedd in the
State of Florida.
Among the unprotected
animals in the Sunshine State
are skunks, opossums, beavers,
bobcats, raccoons, foxes and
armadillos. With a hunting li-
cense, sportsmen may hunt rabbits
year-round, and there is a spring
turkey gobbler season.






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CANAL BOATING Hundreds of miles of canals million dollar recreation site along Hillsboro Canal
are open to small boats within Everglades Conser- at the Palm Beach-3roward County line.
ovation Areas. This is a typical scene near a quarter-







ACCESS TO THE WILDERNESS


Not many years ago only the
hardiest outdoorsmen ventured
into the sawgrass country once
dominated by the Indian.
These trailblazers cut their
own crude access points, perhaps
at many of the same spots used
by the Seminoles to enter the
Everglades.
Then came the machine age.
Canals and, later, roads were
built into the wilderness to ac-


comodate first barges and boats,
then cars and trucks. With the
invention of the airplane, man
got his first bird's eye look at
the vast marsh in south Florida.
With the development of
powerful engines, the white man
devised airboats and swamp ve-
hicles to penetrate the "grassy
waters." He took to the marsh in
search of game or simply from a


sense of adventure. He erected
primitive camps.
Then came the Flood Contrjl
Project to protect life and pro-
perty in Central and South Florida
and to make it possible for movie
people to live there. Part of the
plan to minimize effects of flood
and drought hinged on use of the
primitive Everglades as water
storage areas. Conservation
measures undertaken in the 1950's







by the FCD included diking the
'Glades in the interiors of Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade coun-
ties between West Palm Beach
and Miami.
Wildlife agencies worked
with the FCD and the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers to maintain
ecology as close to nature's plan
as possible to preserve wildlife.
The FCD, then as now, cooperated
with federal, state and local
agencies, and with private enter-
prise, to provide outdoor recrea-
tion facilities.
Access points were developed
at strategic locations in all three
conservation areas which cover
more than 860,000 acres. More
than 30 recreation sites now are
available to the public, and addi-
tional sites are being planned.
There are no entrance fees.
Even outdoor lovers without
a boat, airboat or swamp buggy
may enjoy the Everglades. Sev-
eral of the larger recreation areas
provide boat and motor rentals,
guided tours, camping facilities,
sightseeing boat trips, and air-
boat rides for those wishing to
skim over the marsh at speeds of
60 miles an hour or more.
Public land use also is
shared with sportsmen by bird-
watchers, shell collectors, sight-
seers and anyone who "just
wants to get away from it all."

HIKING IS POPULAR

Hiking is becoming more
popular and the FCD Project has
built-in "nature trails" the
levees.
While most of the levees and
dikes are prohibited to vehicular
traffic because of damage which
would be inflicted, the hiker is
welcome.
Approximately 700 miles of
levees have been built within
the FCD most of them in the
conservation areas and at
least several hundred more miles
of walking territory will be avail-
able upon completion of the
project. These FCD "trails"
offer hikers a chance to observe
wildlife, sometimes from very


close range, and the varied
aquatic vegetation.
There also is something for
the history-minded. Indian
mounds, pieces of pottery, and
other artifacts of a race that
inhabited The Everglades hun-
dreds of years ago, have been
found along with rare shell fossils
which had lain untouched and
unseen for millions of years.
Existing boat ramps and air-
boat and swamp vehicle access
points were improved, and others
built to open the wilderness on all
sides. Construction of levees also
meant construction of "borrow"
canals, so named because exca-
vation of dirt for the dikes created
parallel waterways due to high
underground water tables. These
canals provide more than 300
miles of fishing and boating
around the three conservation
areas.
Recreation sites, modest and
full service concession types, are
listed in the following pages.

THE RECREATION AREAS

Conserving water in the
Everglades' reservoirs by diking


served as an impetus for recrea-
tional development.
While area outdoorsmen
hunted and fished in the sprawl-
ing marsh before the water control
project was initiated, it wasn't
until the 1950's that what might
be termed "refined" recreation
came into its own.
As levees were completed
around the water wilderness of
interior South Florida, recrea-
tional development was organized
within the FCD in effort to keep
pace with increasing interest by
the public in outdoor pursuits.
Primitive tents, sleeping
bags or just blanket rolls were
being replaced with family-sized
tents, camping trailers and regu-
lar mobile trailers. More lodges
were springing up on hammocks
in the Everglades.
More and more money was
available in an improved post-
war economy. There was more
leisure time as the 40-hour work
week, and even shorter, became
commonplace. More persons could
afford boats, trailers, fishing
and hunting gear. More South
Floridian sportsmen built air-
boats and swamp vehicles.


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Covered picnic shelters are part
of overall planning for recreation sites. This area at Twenty Mile Bend,
FCD Site 6, is on the northern border of Conservation Area 1 about
halfway between West Palm Beach and Belle Glade on U.S. 441 (SR 80).
Picnicking is available in the shadow of the water control project's
largest pumping station (background). The station is open to visitors
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.











































LOXAHATCHEE RECREATION AREA FCD Rec- miles of the
reaction Site 9 is located between Conservation Areas west of Boca
1 and 2, providing access to more than 400 square


Everglades.
Raton.


It is only a short drive


After the Flood Controi
District was created in 1949, its
key function as a water manage-


Three recreation sites, inclu-
ding one with full service conces-
sion facilities, provide'access to
the 221-square mile water storage
area west of State Road 7 in Palm
Beach County.
They are on the east and
north rims of the conservation
area.
TWENTY MILE BEND
(Site 6)
Twenty Mile Bend Recreation


ment agency served to benefit a
public leaning toward more enjoy-
ment in the outdoors.


Area is located on the south side
of the West Palm Beach Canal
approximately 20 miles west of
West Palm Beach along State Road
80 at FCD Pumping Station S-5A.
The area is well-marked with
directional signs.
Facilities include a double
boat launching ramp, sheltered
picnic tables and parking space.
The ramp provides boating
access to approximately 55 miles


of canal encircling the conserva-
tion area.
Future plans call for a full
service concession offering sale
of fishing and hunting equipment,
food and beverages, guide service,
boat and motor rentals and sani-
tary facilities.
Other recreation features in
the Twenty Mile Bend area include
State Road Department picnic
grounds on the north side of West
Palm Beach Canal at a wayside
park and a boat launching ramp
into L-8 Canal on the north side
of the highway just east of the
pumping station. The ramp gives
access to 22 miles of the canal
outside the conservation area to
the north.


Conservation Area One







WILDLIFE REFUGE
(Site 8)

Loxahatchee National Wild-
life Refuge headquarters, located
on the east side of the water
storage area a mile west of State
Road 7 and northwest of Delray
Beach, provides a boat launching
area and parking space.
In addition, a nature walk
near the headquarters building
gives visitors an opportunity to
observe some of the Everglades'
wildlife.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, which manages a large
portion of the conservation area as
a sanctuary for wildlife, maintains
bird feeding and observation areas,
and a native stand of cypress with
wild orchids.
The federal agency plans to
improve the site by installing a
boat dock and ramp, picnic shel-
ters, rest rooms and facilities to
display wildlife.


service and sells food, beverages,
fishing and hunting licenses and
equipment, bait, fuel and oil. Air-
boat and sightseeing boat rides
also are available at a fee.
A six-mile long paved road
leads to the site from State Road
7 near the Palm Beach-Broward
County line.
Ramps provide fishing and
boating access into approximately
55 miles of canal around Conser-
vation Area 1, and a six-mile
canal which parallels a levee to
the northwest of the recreation
site.
Airboats are launched into
the marshland of Conservation
Area 2 about 1,000 feet south of
the concession building.


OTHER ACCESS ROUTES

Palm Beach County main-
tains a boat ramp near the county's
international airport on the north
side of Southern Boulevard (SR 80)
to provide access into the West
Palm Beach Canal via a short
spur canal. Small boats then can
move west to Twenty Mile Bend.
From the west, boaters may
use a ramp (Site 5) into Hillsboro
Canal at a bend six miles east of
Belle Glade on U.S. 441. Traveling
southwest on the canal, the boats-
man may travel about 15 miles to
a pumping station (S,6).


(Continued on Page 30)


LOXAHATCHIEE
RECREATION AREA



(Site 9)


Planned and engineered by
the FCD, the Loxahatchee Rlecre-
ation Area is a full service facility
which offers many conveniences
to the outdoorsman, including five
services free of charge as required
by the Flood Control Governing
Board.
Located at the junction of
Conservation Area 1 and 2 alont
the Hillsboro Canal about 13
miles west of Boca liaton, the
site provides free parking, drinking
water, picnic grounds, boat launch-
ing and rest rooms. The conces-
sionaire who invested capital tc
develop the site under long tern
lease with the L.S. Fish anu
wildlife Service, Florida Game
and Fresh \%ater Fish Commission,
and the FCI), sells and rents
boats and motors, offers guide


EVERGLADES DWELLER A strange-looking, exotic bird of the
marsh is the roseate spoonbill, one of many species observed in the
Flood Control District's water storage areas. Feathers ranging from
pink to deep rose are striking features of older spoonbills.











Outdoorsmen may use any
one of four recreational access
sites into this 210-square mile
"water wonderland" under FCD
jurisdiction.
One of the sites, north of
Andytown on U.S. 27, offers full
service facilities with various
conveniences.
There also are two "limited
use"'sites one for swamp ve-
hicles; another for bank fishing.
Along with Conservation Area
3, the vast acreage is part of
Everglades Wildlife Management
Area. As such, the sprawling
tree-dotted marshland, with its
accompanying network of canals,
is open to the public at all times.


The only restrictions are prohib-
ition of guns, dogs and trapping
devices during closed seasons.

SAWGRASS CAMP
(Site 2)
A full service concession
site, the recreation area two miles
north of Andytown east of U.S. 27
provides small boat access into
three canals and airboat and
swamp vehicle access into the
conservation area marshland.
Boats launched at two ramps
can travel ten miles on L-35B
canal, the waterway along the
dike between Conservation Areas
2A and 2B; the North New River
Canal between two spillways a


Conservation Area Two


SAWGRASS RECREATION PARK Picnic islands miles of Conservation Area 2 in Broward and Palm
(in foreground) lend a different setting to FCD Rec- Beach Counties.
reaction Site 2. The facility gives access to 210 square


distance of approximately five
miles and L-38 canal, the
northwest boundary of Conserva-
tion Area 2, another eight miles.
The concessionaire, who was
the successful bidder on a long-
term lease with the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission,
provides free parking, drinking
water, rest rooms, picnic area,
and boat launching. In addition,
sales include boats and motors,
fishing and hunting equipment,
souvenirs, food and beverages.
Boat rentals, guided tours, airboat
rides and other services, inclu-
ding camping space, are available.
A ramp is located on the
north side of the spillway about,
midway between Andytown and
Terrytown east of U.S. 27. It gives
access into the same canals






served uty Sawgrass Camp. otherr
boat ramp and swamp vehicle
launching site are planned.


(Site 3)

Located on the east side of
L.S. 27 about three miles south-
east of 'erryton, the site
includes an unimproved launching
ramp and picnic tables. The ramp
provides access into North New
liver Canal between a spillway
and pumping station, a distance
of approximately eight miles.

\\ \YSII)l. k\ll,
(Site 23)

adjacentt to State load 84 at
North New River Canal and a levee
(L-35 \)at the southeast boundary
of Conservation Area 2-1, the
facility includes picnic tables
and a foot bridge to permit bank
fishing on either side of the
waterway.
.\NI)YTOWmN IRECRELATION
A\IIF\ EAST
(Site 1-East)
Boat ramps are on the east
side of U.S. 27 at the junction of
a levee (L-35) serving as the
southern boundary of Conservation
Area 2. One ramp, on the north
side, gives access into North New
hiver Canal between the junction
and a spillway (S-11A). The other
ramp, south of the junction, pro-
vides access to the North New
River Canal parallel to State
Road 84.


More FCD recreation sites
are open to the public in this area
than in any other part of the Ever-
glades.
Covering 914 square miles -
more than a half-million acres -
\rea 3 is more than three times
as large as either of the other two
water storage "pools." And it
spans more acreage than 730-
square-mile Lake Okeechobee to
the north.


-e
oft N l

S- t -



BARBECUE MATERIAL South Florida outdoorsmen consider the
shell-backed armadillo a prime charcoal-grilled main course. Armadillos,
not on the protected list, are common in the region. Their meat tastes
like pork.


northern boundary of the conser-
vation area. The levee runs west
from U.S. 27 along the Palm
Beach-Broward County line.
XNINYTUwN RECREATION
Sll I *M .ST
(Site 1-\ est)

Two ramps are located on the
west side of U.S. 27 at a levee
(L-37). A ramp south of the junc-
tion gives access into the L-37
Canal which borders the east side
of Conservation Area 3. The other
ramp, north of the junction, pro-


One full service concession
is located strategically at the
junction of three canals. In addi-
tion, there are more than a dozen
smaller camps and ramps.

L-5 CROSSOVER RAMP
(Site 19)
Swamp vehicle access year
around is available via a rock
ramp at the dam on a levee west
of Terrytown, U.S. 27, at the


Conservation Area Three







vides access into three canals
and parts of three others. They
are L-38, the east boundary of
Conservation Area 3; L-68A,
L-67A, and sections of the South
New River, Miami, and Tamiami
Canals. When Alligator Alley
(Florida's Everglades Parkway)
is completed, the ramp also will
provide access into its canals.
Recreational access points will
permit boating and fishing in
canals created on each side of the
Parkway, a toll road.

WAYSIDE PARK
(Site 25)

Picnic facilities are available
at this roadside rest area less
than two miles south of Andytown
on the west side of U.S. 27.


EVERGLADES HOLIDAY PARK
(Site 13)

The only full service lodge
with access into the 914-square
miles of Conservation Area 3, the
40-acre site west of Hollywood is
popular with canal fishermen,
boaters and airboat operators.
Facilities include a conces-
sion building, where sportsmen
may purchase hunting and fishing
equipment and licenses, food and
beverages, books on fishing and
hunting, souvenirs, boats and
motors.
Boats also may be rented,
and visitors with a yen for "some-
thing different" can buy tickets
for airboat rides and rides on a
sightseeing boat which travels
canals in the vast wilderness
area.
Under FCD requirements, the
concessionaire must furnish free
drinking water, parking space,
rest rooms, boat launching ramps
and picnic grounds.
The firm leasing the site from
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission also rents space for
tent and trailer camping.
The full service recreation
site built atop levee 67A is easily
accessible from U.S. 27, about
five miles south of Andytown. A


LINCOLN VAIL VISITS Actor Ron Hayes, right, and his wife, Betty,
stopped in The Everglades to talk with Mel Littlefield, FCD pilot of
the District's amphibious plane. Hayes plays the role of Lincoln Vail
in the TV series, "Everglades."


short westbound road along the
south side of the South New River
Canal handles traffic into the
Park, located near FCD Pumping
Station S-9. Hollywood Boulevard
(State Road 820) is the main route
from the Fort Lauderdale-Holly-
wood area. U.S. 27 provides a
quick trip to the recreation site
from Miami to the southeast, and
Belle Glade, South Bay and
Clewiston from the north.
Everglades Holiday Park is
located at the border between


Conservation Areas 3A and 38 at
four levees and the South New
River Canal. Ramps provide
access into six canals, including
L-67A and parts of South New
River Canal, L-68A, L-38, Miami
and Tamiami. Airboats can reach
the wide expanse of marshland in
Conservation Area 3A.

FISHING CAMP
(Site 21)

Facilities include a boat







ramp, a commercial camp with
food, bait, tackle and other sup-
plies for sale, boat and motor
rentals and guide service. Located
on the east side of S.R. 27 (Krome
Avenue) near U.S. 27, the site
provides access to the \iami
Canal.

WAYSIDE PtHK
(Site 26)

\ rest area with picnic facil-
ities is located on the west side
of U.S. 27 approximately l'/ miles
south of the South New liver
Canal.

MAC'S FISH CAMP
(Site 27)
The recreation area is located


on the ;ist side of the Miami
Canal approximately 21 miles
northwest of S.H. 27 (Krome
Avenue). Services include boat
and motor rentals, guide service,
food, uait, tackle, fishing license
sales and a boat launching ramp.
lihe ramp provides access into
the \liami Canal southeast of
Levee 67A.

THOMPSON PAIHK
(Site 28)

Artificial lakes, a playground,
picnic area, camp grounds and
boat ramps are among the facilities
available at Milton L. Thompson
Park, operated by Dade County.
The recreational area is east of
State Hoad 27 (Krome Avenue)


less than 10 miles north of Tam-
iami Trail along the eastern
border of the conservation area.
KROME AVENUE
(Site 20)

A ramp gives boating access
into L-30 Canal at the southeast
boundary of Conservation Area 3
between the site and tne Dade-
Broward levee. It is located on
the west side of State load 27
about two miles north of ramiaini
Trail (U.S. 41). There are picnic
tables at the site.

I'it ML GL )EKS HIFLE'L !1 \Il.
(Site 29)

\n outstanding range, oper-
ated by )ade County through its


FVFr.,GLAOi'S LiCLIvAY PARK lhis popular those alongside Alligator Alley, a toll road across;
public recreation concession northeast of tiarmi the :verllaJes.
provides access to many r;-iles of canals, including






Park and Recreation Department,
offers rifle, pistol, skeet and trap
shooting. In addition, there is a
fishing lake. The facility is just
north of the Tamiami Trail at
Krome Avenue (SR 27). Riflery
programs include those for young
shooters novice through expert.
FISH MANAGEMENT AREA
(Site 30)
Known as the Tamiami Trail


Fish Management Area, the site
is on the north side of the Tam-
iami Canal between two levees
(L-30 and L-67A). It is a bank
fishing area and includes picnic
shelters. Fish improvement prac-
tices are conducted in this section
of the canal.
L-31 RA.M
(Site '11
An unimpir;v\ a i1t idau.hing


site, it is located on the east side
of the levee at Tamiami Trail and
provides access into the borrow
canal adjacent to the leveo.

L-67A RAMPS
(Site 14)

here are two ramps, one on
the east side of the levee to pro-
vide airboat access into marshland
and the other on the west to give


MOMENT OF TRUTH Bill Brown, resident manager
of the Loxahatchee Recreation Area, is caught by
the camera as he lifts a 9 Ib. 2 oz. bass from the


Everglades waters near his Recreation Center. At
right you can easily see that Bill is rightfully proud
of this beauty.







































INDIAN SETTLEMENT Miccosukees along Tamiami Trail (U.S. 41)
offer recreational facilities, including airboat rides into FCD Conser-
vation Area 3 to the north. Everglades National Park (far right) lies
south of the village, which contains a restaurant and tourist attractions.


boaters access to the levee's
borrow canal, Tamiami Canal and
several other waterways in the
conservation area. Airboats also
have access to wilderness from
the west side ramp.


S-12D AND S-12C RAMPS
(Site 32)

Wilderness access points are
on the north side of Tamiami Trail
(built over Levee 29 in this sec-
tion of spillway structures). Two
ramps provide access to boats
and airboats to the conservation
area canals and marshland just
north of Everglades National Park.
The area, known as "Fishermen's


Ramp," is a nine-mile long section
about 20 miles west of Miami.
Dade County and Seminole Indians
are developing recreational facil-
ities. An Indian restaurant, oper-
ated for the public, is nearby.
More than 20 miles of Tamiami
Canal is available for bank fishing.
Motorists will find ample parking
spaces on Tamiami Trail berms.

L-38 WEST L-5 JUNCTION
(Site 33)

A swamp vehicle launching
facility is located on the west
side of U.S. 27 across from Pump-
ing Station S-7 to give access
into the wilderness of Conserva-
tion Area 3A near Terrytown.


p


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READY FOR SWAMP SKIMMING Broad-beam air- sawgrass country. Owners tow them for miles to
boats are the favorite mode of transportation in the reach a favorite access point into the wilderness.


There also is a parking area
for a proposed boat ramp for access
into the L-38 West borrow canal.

L-38 WEST RAMP
(Site 34)

parking area has been con-
structed at the site of a future
boat ramp a quarter mile "rth of
S-11C spillway on the west side
of U.S. 27 between Andytown and
Terrytown. Access now for
fishing.


EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK

A tourist attraction south of
the FCD's Everglades Conserva-
tion Xrea 3, the park covers 2,190
square miles, including 192 square
miles of sawgrass country true
Everglades. Most of the park -
1,998 square miles consists of
tidal marsh, marl, rock and salt-
water.
Recreation includes camping,
boating, nature study (several
trails are open) and fishing, allow-
ed in most areas. Hunting is
prohibited. Airboats and swamp
vehicles are not permitted in the


park. Motorists may view part of
the park by taking Route 27 west
of the Homestead-Florida City
area. There also is an observation
tower south of Tamiami Trail
about 30 miles west of Miami.
Flamingo, at the end of
Route 27, has a motel and res-
taurant, service station, marina,
picnic and campgrounds, naturalist
programs, exhibits and sightseeing
boats.


Exotic birds and
including the Florida
are park inhabitants.


wildlife,
alligator,


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Hunting and Fishing



Information




This booklet was prepared as a guide to public
recreational sites within the Everglades Conserva-
tion Areas of the Central and Southern Florida Flood
Control District.
It is not designed to inform sportsmen of hunting
and fishing regulations, bag or creel limits. Such
facts may be obtained from wildlife agencies. Copies
of regulations, along with information on species to
be found in these areas of the state, are available
within the district at the following offices:
Everglades Region
Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission
Fourth District
551 North Military Trail
West Palm Beach



U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service
South Florida National Wildlife Refuge
Route 1, Box 278
Delray Beach




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