• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Thirtieth annual report
 Introduction
 The commission
 Table of Contents
 Summarizing in retrospect
 probation, parole, and the decade...
 Progress in new programming
 The broad scope of investigati...
 The parole and probation officer...
 The offender profile
 Tax savings and finances
 Central office, administration,...
 Figures and facts
 Back Cover














Group Title: Annual report
Title: Annual report - Probation and Parole Commission
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053722/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - Probation and Parole Commission
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Probation and Parole Commission
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053722
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001593164
oclc - 01569417
notis - AHL7215
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida Parole Commission.|Annual report of the Florida Parole Commission
Succeeded by: Annual report - Parole and Probation Commission

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Thirtieth annual report
        Page ii
    Introduction
        Page iii
    The commission
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    Summarizing in retrospect
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    probation, parole, and the decade of the 70's
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Progress in new programming
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The broad scope of investigations
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The parole and probation officer supervises
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The offender profile
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Tax savings and finances
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Central office, administration, and field operations
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Figures and facts
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text














INCREASED WORKLOADS
(Fiscal Year 1969-70)


23.2' INCREASE

39.1' INCREASE

32.4'G INCREASE

79. INCREASE

30.2' INCREASE

8. 1 INCREASE


IN SUPERVISORY
CASELOAD

IN NUMBER OF
PAROLES GRANTED

IN THOSE PLACED
ON PROBATION

IN PARDON BOARD
INVESTIGATIONS

IN TOTAL INVEST.
GATIONS

IN AVERAGE MONTHLY
WORKLOAD UNIT PER
OFFICER


11,985 14,764 2. 9

1,089 1,515 426

7,046 9,328 +? 28 ?


456 202


23,787 30,980 i 7. 193


95.2 102.9 + 7. 7






Probation,
Parole
and
The Decade
of
The 70's
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1970










30TH ANNUAL REPORT
of the
FLORIDA PAROLE AND
PROBATION COMMISSION
to
THE GOVERNOR AND THE CABINET


HONORABLE
CLAUDE R. KIRK,JR.
Governor and Chairman


HONORABLE TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State
Vice-Chairman










HONORABLE
EARL FAIRCLOTH
Attorney General


December 10, 1970

GENTLEMEN:

It is with pleasure that we provide you with the AnnualReport
of the Florida Parole and Probation Commission for fiscal year
ending June 30, 1970.
May we express our appreciation to you, the Legislature, and the
people ofFlorida for the fine assistance and support of this agency's
undertakings.


Sincerely,
J. HOPPS BARKER
CHAIRMAN
FRANCIS R. BRIDGES, JR.
CALE R. KELLER
RA YMOND B. MARSH
ROY W. RUSSELL


HONORABLE HONORABLE HONORABLE HONORABLE
BROWARD WILLIAMS FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN FREDO.DICKINSON,JR. DOYLE E. CONNER
State Treasurer Commissioner of Education State Comptroller Commissioner ofAgriculture



















INTRODUCTION


This report explores some of the functions, activities, and needs of parole and probation
programming in Florida.

It is dedicated to those who through their support and understanding can greatly
enhance the effectiveness of sound parole and probation practices.

The report is based on the findings through investigation, observation, and evaluation
of agency operations. Its purpose is to introduce, enlighten, and familiarize interested
persons with the responsibilities of this Commission in the important areas of crime
prevention and control and reformation of public offenders.




FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


























Chairman


RKANCIS K. BRIDGES, JK.
Commissioner


THE FLORIDA PAROLE
AND PROBATION COMMIS-
SION is proud of its unblemished
record of releasing, on parole,
only those inmates who have been
professionally screened and select-
ed with reasonable probability
that they will conduct themselves
as law-abiding citizens.
The LEGISLATURE and the
PEOPLE of Florida voiced their
confidence in the Commission and
its objectives by voting to retain
the Florida Parole and Probation
Commission as an autonomous
agency in the new constitution
adopted in 1968.
The commissioners will con-
tinually strive to maintain the
confidence as mandated by the
people of this state.


('9


CALE R. KELLER
Commissioner


KAYMUNU 15. MAKMb
Commissioner


Director


PulagaTS
AMA PAMIL
AN .0it
U.M..












CONTENTS

Thirtieth Annual Report ................. ................... ii

Introduction .......................................... iii

The Com mission ....................................... iv

Table of Contents .......................................v

SUMMARIZING IN RETROSPECT ..........................1

PAROLE, PROBATION AND THE DECADE OF THE 70'S ........ .5

PROGRESS IN NEW PROGRAMMING ...................... 11

THE BROAD SCOPE OF INVESTIGATIONS .................. 17
Presentence Investigation Production ........................ 24

THE PAROLE AND PROBATION OFFICER SUPERVISES ........ 25
Statewide Caseload ....................................33
Individuals Placed on Parole and Probation .................... 34

THE OFFENDER PROFILE ..............................35

TAX SAVINGS AND FINANCES ..........................45
Appropriations and Expenditures .......................... .47

CENTRAL OFFICE, ADMINISTRATION AND
FIELD OPERATIONS ....................................49

FIGURES AND FACTS:
Production ..........................................62
Finances ............................................44
Statistics ................ ..........................63








SUMMARIZING

IN

RETROSPECT






2 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

SUMMARIZING IN RETROSPECT

THIS REPORT IS ABOUT PAROLE AND PROBATION IN FLORIDA-the
14,764 offenders who are under supervision, the 204 professional staff members who
investigate and supervise the offenders' activities, and about problems of effectively
unifying efforts of the parole and probation officer, the offender, and the community.
The report is a composite of the thinking and recommendations of both field staff
and central office management personnel. Many of the recommendations are advocated
by national professional surveys and publications. It is dedicated toward summarizing
activities during the last decade, specifically concerning progress and activities of the
Commission in fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, and focusing particular attention
toward the decade of the 1970's.
SUCCESSFUL parole and probation supervision has a direct impact upon the
offender, crime prevention, the economy of this state and governmental operating costs.
It has allowed law violators, placed in the program to contribute over forty million
dollars in wages to the economy of this state last year.
Millions of dollars were saved in costs of crime detection, apprehension, prosecution,
and imprisonment for new offenses as a result of the program. Taxes paid by those
under supervision into the general revenue fund last year more than offset the appropri-
ations allocated for their supervision.
Supervision is an effective crime prevention tool and provides reasonable assurance
that a new offense is not committed while a client is under supervision. It has a lasting
effect as a guard against recidivism after completion of the parole or probation
term if success is, in reality, accomplished. This includes success in changing of
attitudes by engendering ideals of a law-abiding citizen, respect for other persons and
their property rights, stabilizing family and social relationships, and developing market-
able job skills so the offenders can successfully compete in the labor market.
DURING THE DECADE OF THE 60's a success rate of 78.7% with parolees and
89.4% with probationers has been maintained by comparing the number of individuals
completing supervision with the number whose paroles or probations have been revoked
because of technical violations or commission of new offenses. However, these respected
and envious figures have been sustained through expert guidance by a dedicated field
staff, a process of tenaciously calculating hardcore cases, concentrating on emergencies,
and careful selection by the Commission and the courts regarding those released on
parole and probation. Some of this could be termed "crisis supervision."
But... how much supervisory attention has been focused on causation and correc-
tion of the problems leading to criminal acts? How much attention has been provided to
the routine parole and probation case, the youth who was caught breaking and entering
a building, but who has the intestinal fortitude to abide by rules and regulations without
a crisis drawing attention to him during the term of supervision? What happens after
release? Has the offender developed a job skill, has he reached his educational potential,
has he been provided with the supervision expected by the sentencing judge or the
people of this state? Has, in fact, a professional job been accomplished with this
individual?






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 3

A CONSCIENTIOUS parole and probation officer asks himself these and many other
questions when a parolee or probationer leaves the office with termination or discharge
papers in his hand. Other frustrating situations experienced by members of field staff
involve questions such as, where should efforts be applied when the officer is only able
to provide meaningful benefits to a small percentage of caseload because of heavy work
assignments? Should concentration of efforts be directed toward the youthful offender,
the repeater, the hardcore offender, or should time be evenly distributed among the
cases? Should concentration be on surveillance, work with minor offenders, or should
the hardcore element be allowed to "hang themselves by committing new offenses and
at whose expense"? Perplexing? Yes, but these questions and many more are faced in
the daily decision making process of the parole and probation officer along with a
multitude of other problems.
SUPERVISION, under the present conditions, is inadequate! Precious little time is
available for experimentation and flexibility to develop needed new programs, innova-
tions, research and maintenance of existing efforts.
How many more offenders could have been safely released from prison, under parole
supervision, during last year with reasonable assurance that they would not again get
into trouble, without seriously jeopardizing the safety of society, if adequate super-
visory staff had been available? How many borderline youthful offenders could have
been placed on probation by the court thereby saving them from the stigma of
imprisonment, if the judges had more assurance of adequate supervision?
Many progressive prison reforms have been introduced in recent years by the Division
of Corrections which is recognized nationally for its efforts and accomplishments, but
imprisonment even at its best is a treatment of last resort for criminal offenders. Prison
officials agree with this analogy. Over 95% of all individuals sent to prison will someday.
be released. Substantially greater amounts of money are needed by prison officials and
the parole and probation system in order to develop rehabilitative programs on the
"inside" and provide for smooth transitional supervision on the "outside" upon release.
DURING THE LAST DECADE, overwhelming increases in investigative demands
and supervisory responsibilities have more than absorbed the increase in field strength
allocated to parole and probation. Presentence investigation requests by the courts have
increased from 2,825 in 1960 to 10,382 in fiscal year ending June 30, 1970 which
almost quadruples the demand. The number under supervision has more than doubled,
from 6,104 in 1960, to 14,764 at the end of last fiscal year. Other responsibilities of the
Commission have increased proportionately.
DURING THE NEXT DECADE and the next fiscal year significant advances are
possible in supervisory effectiveness, with its innate qualities of crime reduction, if the
following objectives are vigorously pursued:
First, authorize staff complement based on 50 workload units as recognized by
National Standards, which will allow for proper supervision, specialized caseloads,
and needed flexibility for experimentation and innovative programming.
Second, compensate present staff commensurate with educational achievements,
background, and experience in order to retain seasoned personnel who are neces-






4 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

sary for the viability of professional probation and parole services. (Personnel
turnover rate was 30% during 1969-70.)
Third, improve investigative and supervisory techniques by providing psychiatric
and aptitude testing, regularly scheduled prison interviews and inmate family
counseling.
Fourth, provide for broader implementation of existing programs in order to
realize full potential.
Fifth, develop support services including group therapy, community halfway
houses, storefront parole and probation offices, and supervision for all inmates
when released from prison.
Sixth, make provision for professional staff improvement through service
purchases for in-service training, educational stipends, and sabbatical leave for
educational purposes.
Specifically, what do these objectives mean? They would provide improvement in the
supervisory program and further professionalize the system of parole and probation in
Florida. Detailed specifications concerning recommendations are outlined in the fol-
lowing section.











PROBATION, PAROLE

AND

THE DECADE OF THE 70'S







0 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

PROBATION, PAROLE AND THE.DECADE OF THE 70'S
THE KEY TO SUCCESS IN FLORIDA

The Legislature and the people of Florida have constituted a rather unique system of
selecting members of the Parole and Probation Commission. Members are determined by
written examination and investigation of qualified applicants. The Governor and
Cabinet make the appointment from the first three eligibles who qualify by examination
and the appointee is certified by the Senate.
This system of selection insures that only experienced qualified professionals are
charged with the responsibility of making parole release determinations and administer-
ing parole and probation programming.
The recommendations contained in this section are predicated upon over 145 years'
accumulative professional experience by the five-member Parole and Probation
Commission.

Authorized Staff Strength
The Parole and Probation field staff is laboring under workload units almost twice
that which is recognized as National Professional Standards.
These conditions have a demoralizing effect on the field staff, reduce quality of
investigations, hamper crime prevention efforts and have a shallowing effect upon
supervisory results. The National Council on Crime and Delinquency, The Challenge of
Crime in a Free Society (A Report By The President's Commission On Law Enforce-
ment and Administration of Justice), and the Manual of Correctional Standards have
concluded that a parole and probation officer cannot adequately supervise more than 50
offenders and staffing needs should be based on this ratio.
The "Saginaw Project," which was a three year study and comparison conducted by
the Michigan Crime and Delinquency Council, further substantiated that caseloads with
maximum size of 50 individuals per officer allow for a substantial increase in the use of
probation without. significantly increasing risks to the community. This provides for
sizeable savings in public funds, improves quality of investigations, focuses on diagnosis
and treatment of offenders' problems, and allows for treatment in the community with
less need for imprisonment.
Parole and probation officers must have the necessary time to rally community
forces, including: vocational workers, the offender's friends, family members, employers
and others to reinforce supervisory counseling and guidance. The aim is to change not
only the context of the offender's life, but his personal orientation to the world around
him.
The Commission recommends:
Staffing should be predicated upon professional recognized workload units with
maximum of 50 units per officer. This is equal to supervising 50 offenders in a given
month without investigative responsibilities or the equivalent of ten presentence
investigations, which are rated 5 units per investigation, or any combination thereof.1
1 Manual of Correctional Standards -The American Correctional Association, p. 109







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 7

The Commission believes these standards would elevate quality and professionaliza-
tion of services, more fully cultivate the crime prevention attributes of successful
supervision, allow for increased utilization of probation, thereby reducing the number
of offenders committed to the state prison, and improve esprit de corps of field staff.

Compensation For Present Staff
The parole and probation staff is continuing to experience a turnover rate in excess
of 30% per year, which is inconsistent with a quality administration and costly to the
taxpayers of this state. Educators and other professionals in the field of parole and
probation recognize that a minimum of two year's on-the-job training and preparation is
necessary, in addition to the minimum requirements of a college degree, to qualify as a
parole and probation officer capable of making proper judgment and decisions regarding
delinquent human behavior and correction of same.
The highest loss of staff experienced last year was in personnel with one and two
years' tenure with the Commission. They were just beginning to justify their training
costs through a normal production schedule when resignations were submitted. It costs
approximately $20,000, including salary, to train an individual in this profession after
joining the Commission.
The parole and probation system is serving as a "proving grounds" for other agencies
and private industry which "siphon off" many of the trainees who are reaching their
peaks of productivity and benefit to this agency and the state.
High turnover, low experience level of personnel, and inadequate retention are not
only costly in terms of the spiraling dollar costs in recruitment and training, but in
terms of crime prevention and the effectiveness of parole and probation.


Another factor which is crucial in
the selection and retention of qualified
personnel is an effective staff recruit-
ment program.
The beginning salary of a Parole
and Probation Officer in Florida is
$6,972, and the average Officer I sal-
ary is $7,150.
The graph, at right (*), illustrates
salary scale based on a national sample
by Louis Harris and Associates in
1967. As shown, 56% of the parole
and probation officers in the United
States earn above $8,000 per year, and
23% earn in excess of $10,000 per
year.
The starting salary for Federal
Parole and Probation Officers in the
State of Florida with one year experi-
ence is $9,891.


PRESENT ANNUAL SALARIES IN
SELECTED PERSONNEL CATEGORIES
(Based On National Sample)
Under $6,000 i $10,000-12,000
-i $ 5,000- 8,000 $12,000-14,000
I --$ 0,oo000-10,000 | Over $14,000











PROBATION/PAROLE OFFICER
SOURCE National personnel survey conducted for the
Joint Commission by Louis Harris and Associ-
ates, 1968
*Joint Commission on Correctional Manpower
and Training, Inc. -A Time To Act.







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


Beginning positions in private industry with comparable responsibilities to those of a
parole and probation supervisor command much higher salaries.
In addition, Federal Parole and Probation Officers have experienced periodic salary
increases which far surpass those which have normally been available for state parole
and probation personnel although similar qualifications were required.
The Commission recommends:
A beginning salary of $8,500, with corresponding increases for present staff, which
is:
Commensurate with minimum educational requirements of a college degree and
one year of casework or counseling in lieu of a major in criminology, sociology, or
psychology.
Adequate compensation for present staff in accordance with their tenure and
responsibility in order to provide necessary means for retention.
These recommendations will result in a reduction of costs involved in the continuing
cycle of recruitment, training, and resignation of experienced personnel, and aid in
improving overall program effectiveness.
Investigation and Supervision Techniques
The complexities of human misbehavior point to the need for more scientific and
systematic testing techniques which will help determine proper diagnosis and prognosis.
Psychiatric examinations are needed in certain cases to provide the court with greater
insight concerning the defendant's behavior and to assist in supervisory planning.
Aptitude and other testing devices will benefit prison staff, as well as parole and proba-
tion officials, in setting forth comprehensive treatment programming.
Regularly scheduled inmate interviews and family counseling sessions in the com-
munity will help expedite the paroling process, alleviate apprehensions and anxieties,
and aid in establishment of a suitable release plan for the prisoner's reentry into society.
Provisions for researching are long overdue in the field of parole and probation. Program
evaluation is needed to gauge effectiveness of supervision techniques, measure new
program utility, identify needs, and serve as a planning resource.
The Commission recommends:
The funding of a Services Purchase Program, whereby examinations and testing could
be administered where needed, and where a therapeutic inmate interview program in
conjunction with family counseling in the community could be conducted.
The Commission also recommends a multi-faceted research program including agency
evaluation projects, collaborative research ventures with institutions of higher education
and cooperation with national and regional researchers.

Broader Implementation of Existing Programs
The effectiveness of parole and probation supervision has been continually stymied
by lack of funding and manpower to adequately implement existing programs and
develop innovations.







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

As an example, Mandatory Conditional Release provides an opportunity for super-
vision and guidance, which is needed by high risk offenders who do not qualify for
parole, but who are scheduled for release by expiration of sentence. However, to effect
desired results of establishing these individuals in the communities as law-abiding
citizens, concentrated close supervision and surveillance is imperative. The desired
results cannot be reached unless small caseloads are maintained with these high risk
offenders.
The Mandatory Conditional Release program is now limited to inmates who have 180
days gain time or more. Hundreds of other inmates, who do not qualify under these
conditions, are released from prison without any benefit of supervision, guidance,
employment or other assistance.
Specialist programs, including case classification according to supervision risks,
alcoholic and narcotic treatment, group and family counseling, youth and mis-
demeanant treatment, and others have been initiated; but full rehabilitative impact is
not being experienced because of limited manpower to properly implement.
Florida's Citizen Volunteer program has attracted nationwide attention and appears
to have considerable potential in developing community involvement and concern for
law violators. However, shortage of available field staff time to devote to the program
has seriously hampered expansion of program benefits. The Commission's Vocational-
Educational program represents a small percent of the parolees and probationers who
are under supervision. Consistent contact, guidance, counseling, encouragement and
motivating techniques are necessary to maintain many of these offenders in vocational
training programs which, when successful, greatly enhance their chances of living law-
abiding lives. Offenders, like other citizens who are vocationally trained, are able to
successfully compete in the job market and provide necessities for self and family which
contribute to their stability in the community.
A suitable and acceptable avocation is one of the major components necessary for
successful adjustment. Productive employment provides needed incentive for many
offenders to stay out of future trouble.
The Commission recommends:
A concerted effort should be made in broader implementation of existing programs
with special emphasis on vocational education. Specialists, experienced in parole and
probation case work, can add impetus in vocational upgrading and job readiness of those
under supervision. Research provisions should be made to measure job readiness at
outset of supervision compared to job readiness at termination of supervision.
Adequate staffing for broader implementation of specialist programs for drug
addicts, alcoholics and youthful offenders should be provided with arrangements for
group counseling and family assistance.
Support Services
Pilot programs in group counseling have demonstrated the effectiveness in helping
the participants become more aware of their deficiencies, thereby increasing responsi-
bilities and realistic attitudes toward their personal relationships in the community. The
successfulness of Alcoholics Anonymous, Al-Non, and similar groups, have manifested
the therapeutic value of inter-group reaction in helping to solve deviate behavioral







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


problems. Group counseling appears to have considerable promise in reinforcing the
offender supervisory program.
Alcoholic and offender halfway houses have successfully made their debuts across
the country. They provide temporary residence and treatment facilities combined with
the inter group benefits. They serve in a vital supportive role to the parole and proba-
tion program.
Storefront parole and probation offices, located in the familiar setting of the
offender, usually consisting of the ghetto or lower social economic areas, seem to
increase supervisory effectiveness. The offender is more apt to favorably respond in
familiar surroundings; the office is within easy access without posing transportation
problems; and staggered office hours can be arranged for convenient counseling.
The Commission recommends:
Stimulation and assistance in the establishment of a system of community offender
halfway houses, administered by the local community, should be continued. Halfway
houses provide temporary residence and a structured treatment program which will help
bridge the gap between the institution and complete freedom.
A series of satellite or storefront probation offices should be located within the
confines of the normal habitat of the offenders. Benefits afforded by local convenience
to both the offender and the parole and probation officer will add to supervisory
intensity and greater success.
Professional Staff Improvement
In this dynamic fast changing profession, it is imperative that professional staff keep
abreast of new methods of treatment and innovations in successfully dealing with
criminal behavior. Needs include specialized training in areas such as narcotics treat-
ment, group counseling, abnormal behavior, alcoholic treatment, and other areas of
specialization. The ability to secure part-time faculty, as the need arises, would consider-
ably improve staff development and provide orientation for effectively dealing with
varying offender behavioral problems.
Motivation and staff development could be considerably improved through educa-
tional stipends and provisions for sabbatical leave for educational purposes.
The recent report by the President's Joint Commission on Correctional Manpower
and Training shows:
54% of 94 state-level parole and probation agencies queried by the Presidential
Task Force indicated they offered time off for staff members to attend college.
and universities;
33% of the agencies provided tuition subsidy for college or university course
work; and
22% provided some educational leaves on full salary.
The Commission recommends:
Allowances should be made for securing part-time faculty and guest lecturers in
order to give greater depth and training in specialization.
Funding for educational stipends should be made available with provisions for
sabbatical leave for educational purposes of professional staff.











PROGRESS

IN

NEW PROGRAMMING







J1- FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

PROGRESS IN NEW PROGRAMMING

New and innovative programming is of paramount importance in the dynamics of
successful parole and probation and crime prevention. This section summarizes the
progress of new programs provided for in the statutes which are administered by the
Commission.

Mandatory Conditional Release
The Mandatory Conditional Release program is designed to "reach" high risk
offenders who because of their attitude, poor prison adjustment, extensive prior arrest
record, circumstances of offense, or other reasons did not qualify for parole.
Section 947.14, Florida Statutes, provides that persons released by expiration of
sentence, with 180 days "good time" or more to their credit, shall be released under
supervision of the Parole and Probation Commission for the remaining portion of their
sentence.
The purposes of supervision, which are similar to parole but should be more concen-
trated, include assisting the release in locating employment and residential settings
compatible with successful reentry into a free society; furnishing guidance and counsel-
ing; and providing surveillance during critical early stages of readjustment.
During fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, 274 individuals were released under terms
of Mandatory Conditional Release which brings the total number of those released to
400 since program inception. Of those released during the fiscal year, warrants have
been issued for 42 alleged violators. Revocation hearings have been held for 12
individuals and 10 of these were revoked and returned to prison.
The Mandatory Conditional Release program has experienced success in locating
employment and residence, but objectives of concentrated supervision and close sur-
veillance have not been reached due to staff limitations. Although some of the releases
resent any form of surveillance concerning their activities, the program seems to have
considerable merit in crime prevention and in adding to the stability of these
individuals.

Release on Recognizance
Section 903.03, Florida Statutes, authorize the Commission, upon the court's
request, to make investigations of persons charged with bailable offenses. The investiga-
tive report assists the court in determining if an accused is indigent and whether he
should be released on his own recognizance pending appearance for trial.
The investigation may include the defendant's family relationship, employment,
financial resources, character and mental condition, length of residence in community,
prior arrest history and other findings which assist the court in release determination.
Release on Recognizance, sometimes referred to as the Indigent Bail Bond Program,
helps provide equal bail opportunities for both rich and poor alike. If approved for
release by the judge having trial jurisdiction, the accused is released from jail without
bail and on promise that he or she will appear in court on the designated trial date.







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 13

During fiscal year ending' June 30, 1970, 4,382 individuals were investigated with
488 persons being released on their own recognizance while awaiting trial. The program
is operational in 27 district offices and reports reflect savings in jail costs of $168,456 as
a result of the program.
Other benefits include employment retention, family continuity, removal of
defendant from undue influences of hard core criminals which are sometimes prevalent
in the county jails, reducing possibility of the individual becoming embittered toward
the judicial system because of "serving a sentence," while awaiting trial, for an offense
of which he may be later exonerated.

Community Services
In spite of heavy workload demands with increasing responsibilities of investigation
and supervision, the Commission field staff has devoted considerable effort toward
development of a successful community service program. Program objectives include
further involvement of local community members in the offender rehabilitation process.
Section 947.081, Florida Statutes, provides for a Department of Community Services
within the Parole and Probation Commission to recruit and train selected citizen volun-
teers who assist parole and probation officers with special reference to vocational educa-
tional programming for parolees, probationers, and mandatory conditional releases;
maintaining stronger liaison with community resources; and stimulating community
programs for assistance in reintegrating the offender into the community.
The volunteer phase of the community service program involves citizen volunteers
working on a one-to-one basis with a parolee or probationer and in a "team effort" with
the parole and probation officer.
The professional maintains complete authority, is responsible for case supervision,
and utilizes investigative information and expertise to formulate a therapeutic super-
vision plan which may include vocational educational goals and other self-improvement
objectives for the individuals under supervision.
The volunteer's role is non-authoritarian. He or she merely develops a meaningful
friendship; serves as an inspirational personality or motivating catalyst; and helps to
reinforce educational, vocational, and self-improvement goals outlined in the super-
visory plan. The volunteer's activities are confined within the framework of the overall
supervision program as outlined by the professional. The added influences of the volun-
teers in supportive non-authoritarian roles appear to be adding a valuable new dimension
and depth in the supervisory process.
Since program inception November 1, 1968, 2,753 citizens have volunteered their
services to assist. Of these 1,760 of the applicants have been approved to work on a
one-to-one relationship with either a parolee or probationer. At the close of fiscal year
June 30, 1970 there were 911 volunteers actively working in this capacity. The remain-
ing 849 volunteers are ready for active assignments.
Volunteers are also working as Court Aides and Release on Recognizance Aides in
Jacksonville, Miami, West Palm Beach, Sarasota, and other areas. Specialist volunteers
are working as group counselors in Lakeland, West Palm Beach and Tampa. A volunteer







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


employment specialist in St. Petersburg has contributed many hours of service in help-
ing to locate and upgrade employment for offenders. Volunteers in other areas are
available to work with parolees and probationers concerning matters of marriage, family
planning, budgeting, religion, alcoholism, and other services vital to the offender's
adjustment. Volunteers are serving on advisory committees and in a multitude of areas.
At the close of fiscal year, 584 specialists and other volunteers were available to provide
these services.
Field recap figures reflect a total of 69,883 hours of services contributed by citizen
volunteers during fiscal year ending June 30, 1970. This represents a value in services of
$209,649 based on conservative estimated value of $3 per hour.
Continuous efforts have been made during the fiscal year in developing closer liaison
and broader utilization of community resources to assist in reintegrating offenders into
the community. Community Resource Directories are in the processing stages and will
be available to help expedite further utilization of local services.
The Hillsborough County Offender Diagnostic Center, referred to in last year's
Annual Report, is now an operational unit. The joint community project, funded by
Hillsborough County and the Federal Government, is a cooperative effort of the Inter-
agency Law Enforcement Council, Hillsborough County Officials, Parole and Probation
Commission, Division of Corrections, other state and county governmental units, private
persons, and industry. The first county work release was processed from the facility on
October 20, 1969, and the monthly average of work releases quickly rose to 30
individuals who now are participating in the program.
The Hillsborough County School System has set up a portable classroom and ten
inmates have completed the GED High School Equivalency at the center. Group
counseling is conducted by a parole and probation officer and two citizen volunteers.
Intelligence and aptitude testing help to identify individual needs and align course
assignments. State work releases are also housed at the center and federal offenders will
be participating in various sections of the program in the near future.
Two community operated offender halfway houses are in the planning and develop-
ment stages in Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. Tentative opening date for the latter is
set for October 15, 1970. Funding, administration, and operation is conducted by the
local communities with the Parole and Probation Commission providing technical assis-
tance, counseling services, and community motivation.
The community service volunteer program appears to be adding a new dimension in
parole and probation supervision by expanding and formalizing the already existing use
of volunteers to assist offenders under supervision. It is designed to harness these vast
dynamic resources of volunteer manpower and channel them into a supportive role of
the supervision program. The potential seems unlimited in scope and effect in bolstering
supervision, but broader implementation is needed to effect full potential.

County Work Release
Section 948.07, Florida Statutes, authorizes establishment of a work release program
for county prisoners subject to the supervision of the Parole and Probation Commission






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 10

after investigation. Any county may have a work release program upon motion by the
Board of County Commissioners and the concurrence of the sheriff of said county.
A pilot work release program was begun by the Commission in Marion County in
1967. Legislation was passed in 1969 authorizing county work release on a statewide
basis. The program allows certain county jail inmates to be released, at the discretion of
the judge, during the normal work day so they can work at a civilian occupation or
attend school. Prior to release, the Commission's field staff prepares a background
investigation of the individual including proposed employment, which assists the judge
in determining those to be released.
Upon release, the individual is supervised by a parole and probation officer much as
if he were on parole or probation. However, the release is required to return to the
county jail at the end of each work day until completion of sentence. He serves "his
time" during non-working hours.
Benefits of the program include: savings in jail costs and support of dependents,
employment availability when sentence is completed, accumulation of personal savings
from wages which is distributed upon final discharge, and retention of community
contact.
At the close of fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, 58 county work releases were
under supervision of the Commission. The earnings of those under this program during
the year totaled $209,430.99 of which $119,659.94 was paid to the county for "room
and board"; $41,315.51 went to support the dependents who otherwise may have been
on welfare; $36,008.81 was placed in savings accounts for disbursement at the time of
discharge; and $12,446.73 went for social security and income taxes.

Interstate Compact
Parolees and probationers, like other members of society, occasionally find it to the
betterment and advantage of their welfare to move from one state to another in order to
take advantage of employment opportunities because of changes in family situations,
health reasons, and other circumstances.
Some vacationers, while visiting in Florida, become involved in law violations and
when placed on parole or probation it seems feasible to develop a supervisory program
in their home state. The converse is desirable when Floridians are involved in law
violations while in other states.
The need for interstate investigations and supervisory services concerning parolees
and probationers led to the establishment of the Interstate Compact which is an agree-
ment among the 50 states, the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, to provide these services.
Section 949.07, Florida Statutes, provides that Intestate Parole and Probation
Compact is applicable to all adult parolees and probationers and transfers to other states
must be through the State Compact Administrator. It also provides for investigative and
supervisory services with periodic progress reports.
Services may be applicable to a student who is in Florida for the spring holidays,
Christmas, or summer vacation and who is involved in drug law violations, vandalism,
minor thefts, or other offenses. He may be a vacationer who has written some worthless






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


checks in order to fund his return trip home; a school dropout who takes a joy ride in a
stolen automobile to Florida; an alcoholic arrested for DWI; a migrant worker involved
in an assault case; or the criminal who plies his trade of robbery, theft, and con
manipulation. It would seem unrealistic to require such individuals, if placed under
supervision, to remain in Florida during term of supervision when they have permanent
residences in other states. This would place an additional burden on this state and
hamper the individual's chances of successful adjustment.
Allowing individuals under supervision to freely roam from state to state without
benefit of supervisory controls would likewise be impractical and not within the intent of
the court or paroling officials. The compact provides a businesslike approach in retaining
continuity of supervision and allowing for free exchanges of investigative information
among all 50 states, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. The increased incidence of crime
and mobility of our society has brought about greater demands for compact services during
the last decade.
At the close of 1961 there were 1,197 Florida parolees and probationers who were
being supervised in other states and 524 who were being supervised in Florida for other
states.
On June 30, 1970, there were 1,762 Florida parolees and probationers who were being
supervised in other states and Florida was supervising 901 parolees and probationers for
other states. This represents an increase of over 54% in the supervisory workload of the
Interstate Compact. In addition, Florida conducted 2,179 investigations for other states
during fiscal year ending June 30,1970.
Florida has been a member of the Interstate Compact since 1941 and'has heartily
endorsed the orderly process and concepts of reciprocal probation and parole services
between states. New Interstate Compact programming and planning includes: recent
development of uniform assistance request forms, adoption of uniform rules and regula-
tions applicable to parolees and probationers being supervised by other states, and studies
on how to expediently dispatch the ever increasing flow of information and assistance
requests between states.
Pardon Board
Section 947.07, Florida Statutes, authorizes the Parole and Probation Commission to
conduct investigations of persons who apply for executive clemency, and make recom-
mendations concerning the applicants to the Pardon Board which consists of the
Governor and Cabinet. A pardon restores civil rights, helps the offender regain self-
respect, assists in employment upgrading, removes some of the stigma, and helps in
overall community adjustment. The Pardon Board meets four times yearly during the
last month of each quarter.
During fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, 456 individuals were investigated by the
Commission's field staff for the Pardon Board.
The Commission may initiate pardoning action by making a thorough investigation and
study of an individual case and by making a recommendation to the Board concerning
clemency on its own motion, and at the request of the Director of the Division of
Corrections under certain conditions.











THE BROAD SCOPE

OF

INVESTIGATIONS






18 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

THE BROAD SCOPE OF INVESTIGATIONS
The Parole and Probation Commission investigative responsibilities are integrated and
varied in design, wide in scope and breadth, and serve a multitude of purposes and
functions.
Information contained in investigations such asRelease on Recognizance, Presentence,
Preparole, and others may determine imprisonment or freedom for an individual. The
Pardon Board investigation may be the deciding factor regarding complete pardon for a
crime and restoration of civil rights for the offender. Investigations affect employability,
transfer to other states, inmate visitation privileges, and other factors.
Investigative reports assist the courts, the Pardon Board, other states, parole commis-
sioners, prison officials, and others. They consume approximately 70% of the parole and
probation officer's time, but are essential to the viability of an effective rehabilitative
system.
Upon perpetration and detection of a crime the appro-
C private law enforcement agency begins seeking out a suspect.
v Sometimes, the culprit is caught in the act, but more often
Sthe tedious process of sifting evidence, fingerprinting, ques-
tioning, surveillance, and searching for motives and wit-
nesses precede arrest of the suspect.
Upon arrest, the constitution guarantees certain individual
rights and the arrested must be advised that anything he says
may be used against him and of the right to counsel. The
defendant also has the right to reasonable bail for most
offenses. Other safeguards help insure against false arrests or
misuse of police powers.

for both the rich and poor. With this in mind, a system of
equal bail opportunities has been established in Florida called
Release on Recognizance.

Release on Recognizance (for... the courts)
Arrest for an offense, either misdemeanor or felony, does
8 not necessarily mean guilt or conviction! Therefore, bail is set
ARREST on most offenses which allows for release of suspects upon
posting bond. The bond helps to guarantee defendant's
appearance in court on the trial date. However, many arrested
indigents or poor persons are financially unable to make
arrangements for release on bail and are forced to languish in
jail pending trial. Sometimes they are found innocent. Re-
sentment results because they "have served time" for a crime
for which they were not convicted. In order to provide more
equal bail opportunities for deserving indigents, the Florida
Legislature, in 1967, authorized the Parole and Probation
Commission to conduct Release on Recognizance investiga-
TRIAL






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 1

tions. The courts may request the investigations which place
background information at the judge's disposal for his use in
considering release, without cash bail, for certain individuals
unable to post bail.
The Release on Recognizance investigation helps gauge
the stability of the defendant in the community and the
likelihood of his appearance for trial, if released by the judge
without bail. The report considers employment, family rela-
tionship, arrest record, length of time in community, and JAIL
other factors to assist the court in making an appropriate
decision. The judge or jury determines innocence or guilt
with appropriate sentence or dismissal.
DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30. 190 4,3821RELEASE ON RECOGNI-
ZANCE INVESTIGATIONS WERE CONDUCTED FOR
THE COURTS OF THIS STATE.
In Orange County, Release on Recognizance interviews
are routinely conducted on individuals committed to the
county jail. Other counties utilize the procedure only when mJ ( rl
the court determines there is a probability that an individual
PRESENTENCE
will qualify for the program.
Presentence Investigation (for ... the court)
The presentence investigation is the "trademark" of
probation services and is utilized by the judges as an effective
sentencing determinate in the majority of felon cases which
appear before the courts. In addition, presentence investiga-
tions are now provided for many of the misdemeanor
offenses such as worthless checks, illegal possession of
alcoholic beverage by minor, petty larceny, and other
offenses carrying sentences of one year or less in county jails.
The presentence investigation is one of the most potent
weapons in crime prevention and control. It gives the judge PROBATION OFFICE
insight, on an individual basis, into mitigating circumstances INVESTIGATES
surrounding the offense, if any, the defendant's attitude,
amount of damage whether physical or material, prior arrest
record and pattern of behavior, family relationships and
circumstances, community reputation, marital status, in-
terest and activities, employment status and capabilities,
educational attainment, and other factors concerning prior
adjustment.
The. report also reflects physical, emotional, and mental
disorders when information is available. It sets forth a plan of _-
supervision which, when followed through, is designed to
COURT RECORDS


q
q


















Home / Family


POLICE RECORDS


EMPLOYMENT


FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

establish the law violator as a law-abiding individual capable
of conducting himself or herself as a productive con-
tributing member of the community.
The presentence report, which is requested by the sentenc-
ing judge upon conviction of the defendant, supplies the
court with sufficient and precise information upon which to
base a rational sentencing decision designed for individual
justice.
In the event probation is the decision of the court, infor-
mation obtained in the presentence report is utilized for
effective supervisory programming. The information may
also assist the Commission in determining future parole
action, helps in development of suitable parole plan, and
serves as a supervisory aid to the parole officer.
Information contained in the presentence investigation
contributed by the community is classified as CONFIDEN-
TIAL and should only be available to the court, prison
officials, Division of Youth Services and parole and probation
officials.
The confidential nature of the report has been upheld in
case law H. Frank Morgan vs. State of Florida, (142 So 2d
308) and Section 947.14, Subsection (6), Florida Statutes.
This helps protect the anonymity of persons who otherwise
might be reluctant to provide privileged information.

DURING LAST FISCAL YEAR, 10,382 PRE-
SENTENCE INVESTIGATIONS WERE COMPLETED
BY THE COMMISSION'S FIELD STAFF TO AID THE
JUDGES IN PROPER SENTENCING DETER-
MINATION.

1 Increased requests by the courts for presentence investi-
gations and other investigative services have placed an ex-
tremely heavy demand upon the production capabilities of
the field staff during the last decade. (see production chart
page 24).
In addition, there has been considerable action on the part
of the Florida Municipal Judges Association, a sociologist,
municipal judges, and others in pointing out the need for
presentence investigations, provided by the Commission, in
the municipal courts. A recent American Bar Association
Report recommends presentence investigations for each case
in courts trying criminal cases, and the Presidential Crime
Report also recommends presentence investigations on mis-
demeanants.


PROBATION..







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


At the present time Florida Statutes do not authorize
the preparation of presentence investigations by the Parole
and Probation Commission for municipal or metropolitan
courts. Although this is a needed and asked for service
involving "revolving door alcoholics," youthful offenders
charged with offenses including shoplifting, minor in
possession of alcohol, vagrancy, petty larcency, disorderly
conduct and other offenses which are forerunners to more
serious crimes, probation services are practically non-
existent in municipal and metropolitan courts of this state.
Sentences are meted out in the city courts without benefit
of background information or sentencing alternates such as
supervised probation with employment assistance, educa-
tional helps and other aids with which to reach the
causation and correction of deviate behavior.

Post Sentence (for ... the Commission)
In the event a defendant is sentenced by the court to the
state prison without benefit of a presentence investigation a
post sentence investigation is prepared by the field staff
which is similar to the presentence report. It is prepared after
sentencing and is used by prison officials for information
purposes and paroling officials in program planning and su-
pervision.
1.348 POST SENTENCE INVESTIGATIONS COM-
PLETED LAST YEAR.

Post Sentence Employment (for ... the Commission)
Occasionally, defendants are sentenced by the court with-
out a presentence investigation and the term of sentence is
too short to allow time enough for completion of a regular
post sentence investigation. Therefore, when an individual
qualifies for parole release, a combination investigation, cov-
ering information generally contained in the presentence
investigation and combined with information which is nor-
mally prepared in the preparole investigation, is conducted.
The purpose is to assist paroling authorities, provide infor-
mation for parole plan, and assist in the supervisory program.

226 POST SENTENCE EMPLOYMENT INVESTI-
GATIONS PREPARED LAST YEAR
Preparole (for ... parole release)
Preparole investigations are prepared prior to an inmate's
release on parole to insure and verify availability of employ-


PAROLE REVIEW


Employment/Residence


PAROLE






ZZ FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


EDUCATION


TERMINATION
S* *


Family- Visitation


ment and residence, measure community attitude concerning
return of the individual, assist in supervisory programming,
and provide the Commission with up-to-date information for
final release consideration.

1,119 PREPAROLE INVESTIGATIONS CON-
DUCTED LAST YEAR.


Employment Procurement (for ... parole release)
Some inmates do not have friends, families or other indi-
viduals in the community to assist them in locating employ-
. ment. The Commission recognizes the close relationship be-
tween suitable employment and the individual's successful
adjustment on parole. Therefore, the field staff, through its
close relationship in the community with businessmen, pri-
vate and governmental agencies, and other prospective em-
ployers, locates employment for the parolee prior to his or
her release. Parole officers also help make satisfactory resi-
dential arrangements which will maximize chances of success
for the parolee.

393 EMPLOYMENT PROCUREMENT INVESTI-
GATIONS COMPLETED LAST YEAR.


Mandatory Conditional Release (for ... the
Commission)
Investigations, similar to the preparole, are conducted on
mandatory conditional releases prior to release from prison.
They assist in planning and supervisory management.

336 MANDATORY CONDITIONAL RELEASE
INVESTIGATIONS COMPLETED LAST YEAR.

County Post Sentence (for the Commission)
Post sentence investigations are prepared on county jail
inmates who are being considered for parole. The reports
assist in making parole determination and in development
of a suitable supervisory plan.


H80 COUNTY POSTSENTENCE INVESTI-
GATIONS WERE COMPLETED LAST YEAR.


COUNTY JAIL


0* *






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 0

Pardon Board (for ... the Pardon Board)
The Pardon Board, composed of the Governor and the
Cabinet, relies on the Commission to make an investigation
covering background adjustment of offenders who make
applications for pardon.
The Board may grant full pardons and restore civil rights,
including: the right to vote, right to hold public office, and
right to serve on a jury. It assists the offender in restoring
self-respect and is beneficial toward complete and normal "CHECKING OL
readjustment into the community. Sometimes it is a pre-
requisite to employment upgrading and promotion. The
Board may also grant conditional pardons, commute sen-
tences and remit fines and forfeitures with the assistance of
the Commission's reports.
The Pardon Board meets the last month of each quarter to
consider applications for pardon, and the Commission pro-
vides the Board with investigative findings and recommen-
dations upon request.

DURING THE LAST FISCAL YEAR 46 INVESTI-
GATIONS WERE CONDUCTED FOR THE PARDON EMPLOYMENT
BOARD.

Other States (for ... Probation and Parole Departments in other states)

Our mobile society involves considerable movement from state to state and offenders
are no exception to the rule. The Interstate Compact to which Florida is a signator,
provides for investigative assistance to other states. The investigations include back-
ground verifications, prior arrest record, circumstances of offenses, presentence and
parole investigations, Florida placement plans, and other pertinent data.

DURING FISCAL YEAR 1969-70 2,179 INVESTIGATIONS
WERE CONDUCTED FOR OTHER STATES.

Security (for ... Division of Corrections)

At the request of the Division of Corrections, security investigations are prepared by
the Commission's field staff to help prison officials determine suitability of certain
persons maintaining correspondence and visiting privileges with inmates. The investiga-
tion provides information regarding home setting of the proposed correspondent or
visitor, relationship to inmate, employment status, interest and sincerity, reputation,
prior arrest record, if any, and a summary of the investigating officer's impression of the
individual. The investigations furnish the Commission with important information about
the persons interested in prospective parolees.


IT"


p






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


DURING 9I9-70 FISCAL YEAR 1,799 SECURITY INVESTIGA-
TIONS WERE CONDUCTED FOR THE DIVISION OF CORRECTIONS.


Work Release (for... the court)

County work release investigations assist the judges in determining which county jail
inmates will be afforded the opportunity of work release. The program provides that
selected inmates be allowed to continue civilian employment, check into the jail each
night during the term of sentence, and check out the next morning for employment
purposes.
Prior to placement of an individual in the program, the Commission's field staff
prepares background information concerning stability in the community, reputation,
employment experience, prior arrest record, family relationship, and other factors con-
sistent with probability of the work release) successfully completing the program.

DURING FISCAL YEAR 19 70 394 WORK RELEASE
INVESTIGATIONS WERE PREPARED FOR THE COURTS.
Intrastate inquiries, special requests from the courts, and requests from Central
Office account for 7,886 other investigations, all of which are of vital importance in the
rehabilitative process.


A GRAND TOTAL OF 30. 980 INVESTIGATIONS WERE CONDUCTED
BY THE FIELD STAFF OF THE PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION
IN FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1970.



ANNUAL PRESENTENCE PRODUCTION
1961-1970 10,3:8 2
11 .10 1 s0 1 The chart shows an
9- ,/ increase of over 200% in
HT 1 8 presentence investigative
u I -- production during THE
/ 65- LAST DECADE. It paral-
D4 lels other workload in-
3 creases during the same
2 period.










THE

PAROLE AND PROBATION

OFFICER

SUPERVISES






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


THE PAROLE AND PROBATION OFFICER SUPERVISES

"GUIDE, COUNSELOR, AND FRIEND"

Meaningful and lasting parole and probation supervision involves the mechanics of
the investigating process with correct interpretation of findings; expertise in personality
inventory and assessment; proper supervisory planning and programming; and the em-
ployment of techniques which transform attitudes, values, urges, and desires toward
constructive pursuits in law-abiding activities.
Some persons, because of their innate ability, strong family ties, religious convic-
tions, good discipline, or other character strengths never seriously violate the law.
Others, who are perhaps less endowed with these strengths, are more rebellious, and
possess scars of social maladjustment, are engulfed in the cesspool of crime. They violate
the laws and mores of society because of their inability to cope with life's problems.
The purpose of parole and probation supervision is to develop abilities which will
enable offenders to solve their problems within the framework of accepted practices.
Effective supervision, counseling or guidance is an art. Each requires patience, under-
standing with the ability to empathize, and diligence to establish rapport without be-
coming unduly involved with those under supervision. The complexities of criminal
behavioral modification are too broad to cover in this section, but some of the many
roles of the parole and probation officer will be briefly defined. Basic supervisory
principles are applicable whether working with parolees, probationers, or mandatory
conditional releases.
Initial Interview

Perhaps the single most important phase of the super-
visory process is the initial interview. The interview general-
ly takes place in the formal atmosphere of the parole and
probation office. Considerable time should be allocated for
this important first meeting between the counselor and the
counselee. Supervisory success or failure is many times de-
termined during this critical interview. The parolee or pro-
COUNSELING bationer carefully "sizes up" the figure of authority which
is represented by the officer. Too often, the interviews are
conducted with production line methodology. Because of
the ever-increasing demands upon the parole and probation
officer's time, many interviews are rushed with little evi-
S_ dence of warmth, concern or sincerity to the individual
being supervised.
During the interview session, discussions include super-
visory programming, personal problems, rules and responsi-
bilities of the offender, and other matters succinct to suc-
I cessful supervisory adjustment.
In addition, periodic office visits are desirable during the
HOME


IE






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION z I


course of supervision, the regularity of which is determined
by individual circumstances.
The home and family relationship is vital to good super-
visory adjustment. Too much time lapses between the ini-
tial interview and contacts at the home setting because of
the heavy supervisory workloads which are carried by the
parole and probation officers.
Continuity of programming can be lost because of the
inability of the parole and probation officer to follow
through with home visits in order to enlist family support
and reinforcement toward the goals which are germane to
successful supervision.

Home and Family

Family counseling with parents, wife or husband, chil-
dren and siblings is often a critical factor in establishing a
working relationship with the offender and in developing
their assistance in the overall program. Solutions to prob-
lems of family members contribute to harmonious family
relationships which are tantamount to successful commu-
nity adjustment with the ensuing ingredients of love, disci-
pline, concern, and stability.
Like many other members of the community, parolees
and probationers experience financial hardships, setbacks,
and money management problems. Distraught over finan-
cial dilemmas and beset by accompanied anxieties, the of-
fender may unknowingly set the stage for law violations
such as worthless checks, larcency, robbery, auto theft, or
similar types of offenses. The role of the parole and proba-
tion officer includes counseling in proper budgeting to help
prevent financial catastrophe which may lead to regressive
acts. Financial problems of the offender may be com-
pounded because of low earning capabilities and inflation.

Employment and Training


Regular contacts with the employer help cultivate his
assistance with the offender. Contacts on the job increase
the offender's awareness of his responsibilities to both the
employer and the supervisory program. Discussions with
the employer help discover unusual or deviate behavior on
the job. Erratic and abnormal changes concerning work ad-
justment usually are indicative of problems off the job.


FAMILY


FINANCES?


-_


_.lI-
EMPLOYMENT


JOB TRAINING


,


1

v






ZI FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


EDUCATION


COMMUNITY


These contacts help alert the parole and probation officer
toward identifyingg other problems which may need atten-
tion.
Good parole and probation supervisory planning in-
cludes an inventory of the offender's employment capabil-
ities. This includes skills already acquired, interests, apti-
tude testing and consultation, physical and mental attri-
-.."0. butes, and deficiencies.
Remedial measures are initiated through counseling by
the parole and probation officer regarding the needs and
benefits of maintaining stable employment, upgrading vo-
cational abilities, and improving productivity.
Upon determining training needs of an offender, the pa-
role and probation officer helps the offender overcome
some of the frustrations and anxieties associated with train-
ing enrollment. After enrollment, consistent motivational
contacts are needed to maintain and encourage interest in
training. Course instructors should be regularly contacted
to help disseminate any peculiar problems or difficulties.
S Motivating the individual is very often a tedious and time-
consuming task which requires patience, persuasion, and
diligence on the part of the supervisor.


M4INTAIUALT
ASSOCIATION


!.


RESOURCES


AN ENROLLMENT SURVEY CONDUCTED
MARCH 31. 1970 SHOWED 327 PAROLEES
AND PROBATIONERS WHO WERE ENROLLED IN
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS.


The 1970 survey compares favorably with the one con-
ducted on March 31, 1969, which showed 895 parolees and
probationers enrolled in training programs. However, con-
siderable improvement is needed in this area since the vast
majority of those under supervision are unskilled.


Community Resources and Assistance


The parole and probation officer is sensitive to other
services needed by the offender and members of his-family.
They may include assistance from Alcoholics Anonymous
and Al-Non which have proven significantly beneficial to
individuals beset with alcoholic problems.


VOLUNTEERS






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION Z

Halfway houses provide a temporary residence with home-like atmosphere and
advantages of interpersonal relationships and discussions of common problems. A parole
and probation officer intersperses counseling in areas of alcohol and narcotics addiction,
marriage, family, and other personal behavior. He utilizes the services of other agencies
to reinforce his counseling with individuals who have chronic and deep seated problems.

Specialized services may include assistance with mental disorders, spiritual problems,
serious emotional difficulties, and physical needs. Agencies such as health departments,
clinics, and other governmental and private agencies are utilized.

Another vast reservoir of community resources is now being tapped by the parole
and probation officer in the utilization of citizen volunteers. Interested citizen volun-
teers invest a portion of their time to serve as friends to youthful offenders. Sometimes
the role is a father or mother figure; it may be a big brother type relationship or just
being neighborly because of common interests. It may involve lay counseling, tutoring
or assistance in vocational training. Regardless of the role either as a good listener,
friend, or associate, the objectives include utilization of the positive influences afforded
by the volunteer. The one-to-one association, which matches ONE willing volunteer
with ONE parolee or probationer, has proven to have considerable merit in helping the
offender properly adjust in the community. Supervising and motivating the citizen
volunteer requires more of the parole and probation officer's time in order to bring a
match to desired successful conclusion, but benefits in the interpersonal relationships
and the resultant engendering of proper character strengths, values, and attitudes more
than justify the additional time invested.

Case Classification and Specialization
Specialization in supervisory programming adds impetus and creditability to the
supervisory treatment process. Specialized caseloads for youthful offenders, alcoholics,
narcotic addicts, and others have been initiated. However, caseloads far exceeding the
professional recommendations of not more than 25 individuals for each parole and
probation officer specializing in these problem categories, are presently being experi-
enced. This seriously hampers the crime prevention attributes and development of treat-
ment techniques for these groups of offenders.
In order to maximize efficient utilization of the parole and probation officer's time
allowed to supervision, a system of case classification is being used which classifies
parolees, probationers, and mandatory conditional releases according to projected
risks. Classifications are based on the anticipated closeness of supervision required to
prevent the individuals from again violating the law or terms of supervision.
As of June 30, 1970, 49% of the individuals under supervision were classified for
maximum supervision; 31% for medium; and 20% for minimum supervision.


Increased Role of Supervision

Parole and probation supervision is recognized as the most efficient, practical, and






dU FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

effective method of dealing with criminal offenders. It is consistent with the trend
toward community treatment, responsibility, and assistance for those who violate the
law.
Supervision in the community appears to have logic and garners more hope for
proper treatment for the majority of offenders. Removing law violators from the com-
munity in which they could not get along, placing them in a foreign, regimented, and
sometimes hostile environment which is atypical to the community in which they are
expected to learn to live, hardly seems to be the solution. Imprisonment for a few years
or months does not seem to afford parallel conditions of a free society which are
conducive to proper adjustment.
Judges, parole officials and other correctional experts recognize the benefits afforded
by supervision in a normal community setting. It is generally concluded that this is the
brightest hope for effecting necessary changes in the attitudes and actions of most law
violators. Of course, professional criminals, repeaters, and those involved in heinous
crimes must be institutionalized for the protection of society.
The graph on page 33 illustrates a dramatic increase of over 23% in the number of
individuals under supervision at the close of fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, compared
to the number under supervision one year ago.
The graphs on page 34 show an increase of 2,282 in the number of individuals placed
on probation last year compared to the previous year.
The number of parole releases increased by almost 40% last year.
Additionally, felon convictions in the criminal courts of this state during the last five
years show a definite trend toward greater use of probation. The following table shows
the percentage of persons convicted of felon offenses, during the last five years, who
were imprisoned and the percentage who were placed on probation by the courts.

PERCENTAGE OF FELON CONVICTIONS

Year Imprisonment Probation
Treatment

1965-66 62.5% 37.5%
1966-67 53.7% 46.3%
1967-68 53.2% 46.8%
1968-69 50.8% 49.2%
1969-70 43.8% 56.2%

Unfortunately, investigative demands consume three and one-half days of an average
parole and probation officer's work week which only allows him to spend one and
one-half days to supervise his entire caseload. The average monthly supervisory caseload
is 68.7 individuals per officer and this constitutes 19 more workload units per month
than he can adequately produce according to National Professional Standards. (One
work load unit is equivalent to supervising one parolee or one probationer for one






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 31

month. Based on 40 hour work week the national recognized professional standard is 50
work units or not more than 50 offenders to supervise in a given month and without
investigations.)

Parole Selection and Processing
Chapter 947.18, Florida Statutes, defines conditions of parole:

947.18 Conditions of parole. No person shall be placed on parole merely as a
reward for good conduct or efficient performance of duties assigned in prison. No
person shall be placed on parole until and unless the commission shall find that there
is reasonable probability that, if he is placed on parole, he will live and conduct
himself as a respectable and law abiding person, and that his release will be com-
patible with his own welfare and the welfare of society. No person shall be placed on
parole unless and until the commission is satisfied that he will be suitably employed
in self-sustaining employment, or that he will not become a public charge. The
commission shall determine the terms upon which such persons shall be granted
parole.
History. 14, ch. 20519, 1941.

Many complexdiverse problems, questions, and circumstances are considered by the
Parole and Probation Commission during its deliberations regarding a prisoner's release
on parole. Some include the realization that prolonged periods of confinement may
cause inmates to become "institutionalized"; that there is an optimum time in each
sentence when an-individual reaches a point of maximum benefit from imprisonment;
and that further incarceration has a deteriorating effect. Yet, society has the right to
protection and reasonable assurance that offenders released before expiration of sen-
tence and placed on parole do not again victimize some unsuspecting citizen.
Some of the frustrating questions which confront the Commission regarding parole
releases are: At what point in a five year sentence should an individual be released?
Has the inmate's attitude and behavior really changed? Does the arrest record reflect a
behavioral pattern inconsistent with the ability to live a law-abiding life even while
under supervision? Is his seemingly remorseful attitude genuine?

Other considerations include suitability of proposed parole plan and whether there
are enough professional staff available in the field to provide adequate supervision for
those being considered for release.

Revocation and Success
Success is defined as "a degree or measure of succeeding: a favorable termination."
The success or failure rate of parole and probation supervision is based on the term
of supervision from the time an individual is placed under supervision until termin-
ation of the supervision. For example if 100 individuals are placed on probation and
70 complete their respective supervisory terms while the other 30 individuals are
revoked by the court for new offenses or technical violations, this is rated as 70%
success. A rather extensive research would be required to follow up and determine
those individuals who have "failed" after close of supervisory term. However, the
small percentage of individuals committed to the state prison who have experienced
previous paroles (less than 15% during 1967-68) would seem to indicate that a low
percentage of former parolees or probationers commit new offenses.






32 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION
Since inception of a parole and probation system in Florida, the Commission has
maintained envious success rates with probationers and parolees of which it is justifi-
ably proud.
SINCE 1941, THERE HAVE BEEN 22.526 INDIVIDUALS RE-
LEASED FROM PRISON ON PAROLE BY THE COMMISSION. THE
PAROLES OF 4 INDIVIDUALS HAVE BEEN REVOKED. THIS CON-
STITUTES A SUCCESS RATE OF 78.7% DURING LAST FISCAL
YEAR, OF THE 26] REVOKED, ONLY 38% OF THESE HAD NEW
PRISON SENTENCES.
DURING THE SAME PERIOD OF TIME 57,095 PERSONS HAVE
BEEN PLACED ON PROBATION BY THE COURTS, 088 OF THE PRO-
BATIONS HAVE BEEN REVOKED. A SUCCESS RATE OF 89.4% HAS
BEEN SUSTAINED.
Of course, the real connotation of parole and probation success is much deeper,
broader, and more complex than comparing individuals who complete the supervision
term with those who fail.
Success involves more than abiding by the rules of supervision, refraining from
arrests, and satisfactory completion of the supervision period. It includes the ingrain-
ing of character values consistent with the norms of society, acceptable social conduct,
improvement of personal attributes and sense of values which provide respect for
personal and property rights of others, and many other changes.
Success in supervision involves the establishment of marketable job skills, stable
work habits, and appreciation for an organized society free from discomforts, physical
harm, loss of life and property, and other sordid effects caused by criminal acts.
In conclusion, success in supervision may be defined as a long term or life time
adjustment of a former offender in society which is consistent with a pattern of
accepted normal behavior and with no future violation of the criminal laws.






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION O3


INDIVIDUALS UNDER SUPERVISION


Total Under
Supervision


Probationers


Parolees


62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 1970


Probationers Other
3,843
4,201
4,780
5,350
5,932
6,306
6,275
8,409
9,391
11,612 215


Total Under
Supervision
6,667
7,066
7,832
8,457
8,840
9,111
9,106
11,142
11,985
14,764


1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970


Parolees
2,824
2,865
3,052
3,107
2,908
2,805
2,831
2,733
2,594
2,937






J4 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


INDIVIDUALS PLACED 9,328
ON PROBATION
1961 70

S- / Placed on Probation
Probation Revoked
T 7 60-61 2,085 283
O6 -- 61-62 2,322 368
U 62-63 2,732 413
S 5 63-64 2,956 426
A 4 64-65 3,430 419
N 65-66 4,117 436
D 3 66-67 6,275 381
2 S ** 67-68 6,564 569
68-69 7,046 707
1 ---------69-70 9,328 668

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

274 individuals were released on Mandatory Conditional Release during fiscal year
ending June 30, 1970.


INDIVIDUALS RELEASED
ON PAROLE
1961-70 1,515


14
H 12 Released on Parole
U N / Parole Revoked
N 10 60-61 1,193 325
D I 61-62 1,163 365
R 62-63 1,280 297
E 6 I 63-64 1,304 296
D 64-65 1,180 323
S 4 65-66 1,179 259
2 66-67 1,185 289
0 67-68 1,285 286
68-69 1,089 264
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 69-70 1,515 260
69-70 1,515 260











THE

OFFENDER

PROFILE







ti FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

THE OFFENDER PROFILE

TABLE I


OFFENSE


Abortion
Aggravated Assault
Assault WIT Kill
Animals, Cruelty to
Arson
Assault, Other
Auto Theft
Beverage Law Violation
Bribery
Illegal Use or Poss.
of Explosives
Shooting into Bldg.
Burglary
Concealed Weapons
Destruction of Property
Election Law Violation
Embezzlement, Fraud
Escapes
Extortion
Offense Against Family
Forgery, W. C.
Gambling
Homocide
Impersonation
Kidnapping
Larceny
Narcotic Law Violation
Perjury
Prostitution, Comm. Vice
Rape, Forcible
Rape, Statutory
Rape, Assault to Commit
Rec. Stolen Property
Resisting Officer
Robbery
Sex Offenses
Unauthorized Use of
Property
Unclassified Offenses
Moving Traffic Vio.
Moving Traffic Vio. DWI
Leaving Scene of Ace.
Habitual Offense
Rioting


MCR
No. %


28 12.22
1 .44


2 .87
13 5.67
2 .87




95 41.48
3 1.31
1 .44


2 .87

2 .87
31 13.53

6 2.62


21 9.17
3 1.32



1 .44
2 .87
3 1.32
2 .87
9 3.94
1 .44

1 .44


Parole
No. %

1 .06
66 4.59
15 1.05

5 .35
12 .84
43 2.99
3 .21


1 .06

432 29.98
3 .21


3 .21
15 1.04

9 .63
135 9.37
3 .21
189 13.12

3 .21
109 7.57
65 4.52
2 .13
1 .06
18 1.24
6 .42
10 .69
15 1.04
3 .21
242 16.79
19 1.32

2 .13
9 .63

1 .06
1 .06


229 100.00 1441 100.00


Probation
No. %

5 .05
279 2.75
21 .21
4 .04
24 .24
991 9.78
108 1.07
293 2.89


4 .04
34 .34
1174 11.59
139 1.37
54 .53
5 .05
24 .24
27 .27
1 .009
272 2.68
835 8.24
99 .98
231 2.28
3 .03
3 .03
1143 11.28
1082 10.68
1 .01
24 .23
2 .02
9 .09
17 .17
349 3.44
143 1.41
131 1.29
147 1.45

223 2.20
362 3.57
1124 11.10
699 6.90
39 .38
3 .02
3 .02
10131 100.00






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 37

This section provides statistical information concerning the characteristics of pa-
rolees, probationers, and mandatory conditional releases. The data was compiled at
the time individuals were placed under supervision. It points out significant factors
and comparisons regarding types of offenses, ages, educational levels and other areas.
Tables I through V list characteristics and data concerning all age categories and
involve 9,328 individuals who were placed on probation by the courts, 1,515 indi-
viduals released on parole by the Commission, and 274 mandatory conditional re-
leasees released by expiration of sentence. (The profile data contained in the tables is
based upon available data. It reflects variances in the total number of cases catalogued
since information was incomplete in some cases and in some categories at the time this
report was prepared.)
The offense most prevalent in probation cases was Burglary which accounted for
11.59% of the total number of offenses. It was followed closely by Larceny with
11.28%. The offense with the highest percentage for parole releases was Burglary
with 29.98% and the next most prevalent offense was Robbery. Of those placed on
mandatory conditional release, 41.48% were for offenses of Burglary and 13.53% for
Forgery and Worthless Checks.
The offense categories most prevalent for youthful offenders was Burglary and
Narcotics Law Violations. Occupational, educational, and other offense characteristics
of youthful offenders appear in Tables VI through VIII.
As shown in Table II, youthful offenders below age 25 account for 52.7% of the
probation cases, 54.19% of parole cases, and 38.89% of those released on mandatory
conditional release



TABLE II

Age at time placed under supervision.

MCR Parole Probation

AGE No. % No. % No. %

13 19 32 13.67 343 23.75 2817 30.05
20 24 59 25.22 439 30.44 2123 22.65
25 29 33 14.10 234 16.23 1098 11.68
30 34 39 16.66 167 11.56 710 7.57
35 39 17 7.26 84 5.81 609 6.49
40 44 30 12.82 72 4.98 548 5.84
45 49 8 3.44 46 3.18 453 4.87
50 54 8 3.44 30 2.07 279 2.97
55 59 5 2.13 17 1.17 231 2.46
60 64 1 .42 4 .27 182 1.98
65 -69 2 .85 6 .41 108 1.15
70 over 2 .13 215 2.29
234 100.00 1444 100.00 9373 100.00







38 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

Table III reflects that at the time of the offense, 79.10% of those placed on parole
were vocationally unskilled. Upon release from prison and placement on parole, 75.2%
were listed as vocationally unskilled. These figures reflect that 4.8% of the individuals
released gained a job skill while in prison. Similar gains are shown in the mandatory
conditional release cases.
In addition, 13.95% or 171 of those individuals released on parole, obtained a high
school General Equivalency Diploma while in prison and 18 mandatory conditional
releases earned a high school General Equivalency Diploma.

TABLE III

EDUCATION AND OCCUPATION
At time placed under
supervision MCR Parole Probation
No. % No. % No. %
EDUCATION

None 2 .85 21 1.46 70 .76
1 3 13 5.56 58 4.03 216 2.34
4 6 41 17.52 154 10.71 592 6.43
7 9 84 35.90 576 40.06 2406 26.12
10 11 61 26.07 363 25.24 2641 28.67
Hi Sch Grad 22 9.40 166 11.54 2118 22.99
Part College 4 1.71 54 3.76 921 10.00
College Grad 1 .43 13 .90 169 1.83
Business Sch 5 .35 20 .22
Unknown 6 2.56 28 1.95 59 .64
234 100.00 1438 100.00 9212 100.00

At time of offense

OCCUPATION

Professional 2 .85 15 1.05 332 3.68
Skilled 34 14.53 284 19.85 2227 24.71
Unskilled 198 84.62 1132 79.10 6454 71.61
234 100.00 1431 100.00 9013 100.00
At time placed under
parole supervision
Professional 1 .45 10 .71
Skilled 43 19.37 340 24.27
Unskilled 178 80.18 1051 75.02
222 100.00 1401 100.00
EARNED GED
while in prison
Yes 18 9.18 171 13.95
No 178 90.82 1055 86.05
196 100.00 1226 100.00


1







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


Court data, listed in Table IV shows that adjudication of guilt was withheld in
58.51% of the probation cases. The defendant is not deemed to be convicted of the
offense when adjudication of guilt is withheld either in misdemeanor or felony of-
fenses and providing he or she satisfactorily completes probation term. In regard to
felony offenses, the defendant does not lose his civil rights when adjudication of guilt
is withheld. These factors are of considerable importance when seeking certain em-
ployment positions. Withholding adjudication of guilt also helps remove some of the
stigma which is associated with conviction and assists in restoring the individual's
self-respect. Figures reveal that the courts withheld adjudication of guilt in 66.87% of
the felon offenses, but in only 50.78% of the misdemeanor offenses.
The court data table also shows that 82.19% of the mandatory conditional releases
pled guilty to the original offense while 71.58% of the parolees pled guilty and 72.46%
of the probationers admitted their guilt. In addition, 80.10% of the mandatory condi-
tional releases were defended by court appointed attorneys, including public defen-
ders. Defense counsel was appointed by the court in 64.17% of the parole cases and
29.47% of the probation cases.

TABLE IV


COURT DATA

Probation cases only
Offense Total
Felon Misd. Probation
ADJUDICATION No. % No. % No. %

Adjudication of Guilt 1457 33.13 2347 49.22 3804 41.49
Adj. of Guilt withheld 2942 66.87 2422 50.78 5364 58.51
4399 100.00 4769 100.00 9168 100.00
MCR Parole Probation
GUILTY BY No. % No. % No. %

Verdict 32 14.61 359 27.00 817 9.05
Plea of Guilty 180 82.19 952 71.58 6545 72.46
Nolo Contendere 7 3.20 19 1.42 1671 18.49
219 100.00 1330 100.00 9033 100.00
DEFENDED BY

Self 4 1.94 44 3.51 1977 25.38
Court Appointed 165 80.10 804 64.17 2295 29.47
Private Attorney 37 17.96 405 32.32 3516 45.15
206 100.00 1253 100.00 7788 100.00

Table V, next page, shows a history of heavy alcohol usage by 26.76% of the
mandatory conditional releases, 21.61% of the parolees, and 12.06% of the proba-
tioners admitted heavy use of alcohol. The table also reflects the number of offenders
with histories of mental disorders and physical handicaps.







4U FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

TABLE V

HISTORY


ALCOHOL

None
Light
Heavy


MCR


No. %

33 15.49
123 57.75
57 26.76
213 100.00


DRUGS


None
Light
Heavy


206
8
7
221


93.21
3.62
3.17
100.00


Parole


No. %


306
717
282
1305



1279
62
37
1378


23.45
54.94
21.61
100.00



92.82
4.50
2.68
100.00


HISTORY

MENTAL DISORDER
Yes
No



PHYSICAL HANDICAP


MCR
No. %

13 5.70
215 94.30
228 100.00


16 7.14
208 92.86
224 100.00


Parole
No. %

49 3.48
1361 96.52
1410 100.00


75 5.43
1307 94.57
1382 100.00


Probation
No. %

325 6.27
4862 93.73
5187 100.00


343 3.77
8744 96.23
9087 100.00


YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS

Tables VI through VIII include available profile characteristics of 5,803 youthful
offenders, ages 17 through 24, who were placed under parole, probation and manda-
tory conditional release supervision during fiscal year ending June 30, 1970.

The offense category involving the highest percentage of youthful probationers
was Burglary with 19.37%. This was also the highest offense category for probationers
of all ages. However, the second highest category for youthful probationers was Nar-
cotic Law Violations which accounted for 17.71% of the offenses committed by
youth. This appears to parallel the upsurge in drug usage by youth across the state.
The third offense category for youth was Larceny which is consistent with the highest
percentage of offenses committed by probationers of all ages.


Probation


No. %


1846
5328
984
8158



7779
877
290
8946


22.63
65.31
12.06
100.00



86.96
9.80
3.24
100.00







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 41

TABLE VI


Parole


Probation


OFFENSE:


Abortion
Aggravated Assault
Assault, WIT Kill
Animal, Cruelty to
Arson
Assaults, Other
Auto Theft
Beverage Law Violation
Bribery
Illegal Poss. or Use of
Explosive
Shooting into a Bldg.
Burglary
Concealed Weapons
Destruction of Property
Election Law Violation
Embezzlement & Fraud
Escapes
Extortion
Offenses Against Family
Forgery, W. C.
Gambling
Homocide
Impersonation
Kidnapping
Larceny
Narcotic Law Violation
Perjury
Prostitution, Vice
Rape, Forcible
Rape, Statutory
Rape, Assault to Commit
Receiving Stolen Property
Resisting Officer
Robbery
Sex Offense
Unauthorized Use of
Property
Unclassified Offense
Moving Traffic Violation
Moving Traffic Violation
DWI
Leaving Scene of Acc.
Habitual Offense
Rioting


No. %



9 10.22



1 1.14
9 10.22





44 50.00

1 1.14


1 1.14


6 6.81

1 1.14


6 6.81





1 1.14
1 1.14
2 2.27
5 5.68


1 1.14








88 100.00


No. %



19 2.42
1 .12

4 .51
6 .76
31 3.97
1 .12




314 40.16
1 .12



10 1.28


65 8.32

39 4.99

2 .26
58 7.42
44 5.63


7 .91
1 .13
3 .39
9 1.15
1 .12
154 19.69
4 .51

1 .13
6 .76


1 .13



782 100.00


No. %


1.78
.08
.06
.30
3.48
1.80
3.44


.08
.30
19.37
.81
.81
.08
.18
.36

1.94
5.81
.10
.34
.04
.06
15.27
17.71

.06
.04
.12
.28
4.53
1.45
1.98
.85


135 2.73
169 3.42
422 8.56


74
9
2
3
4933


S1.50
.18
.04
.06
100.00


YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS MCR







4Z FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

TABLE VII

AGE DATA YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS

Age at time Youthful Offender placed under supervision.


YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS


MCR


Parole


No. % No. %


1 1.09


7.69
7.69
18.68
12.08
5.49
15.38
13.22
18.68
100.00


2.04
10.23
14.83
16.75
15.63
11.38
11.63
9.59
7.92
100.00


No. %

1 .02
7 .14
11 .22
42 .85
894 18.09
1023 20.74
839 16.98
579 11.72
469 9.49
464 9.39
345 6.98
266 5.38
4940 100.00


The Age Data on youthful offenders shows that 78 individuals were under age
seventeen at the time of being placed on parole, probation or mandatory conditional
release. The juvenile offenders were certified or bound over from the juvenile courts to
the courts with adult jurisdiction because of lengthy or serious delinquency patterns.
Ages 17 and 18 accounted for 38.83% of the youth placed on probation, with ages
19 and 20 accounting for the largest number of mandatory conditional release and
parole cases.


TABLE VIII
EDUCATION AND OCCUPATION- YOUTHFUL


OFFENDERS


YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS

EDUCATION
None
1-3
4-6
7-9.
10-11
Hi Sch Grad
Part College
College Grad
Business Sch
Unknown


OCCUPATION
Professional
Skilled
Unskilled


MCR
No. %


11.00
47.25
36.26
4.39



1.10
100.00


4.40
95.60
100.00


Parole
No. %

2 .26
7 .90
47 6.03
358 45.90
238 30.51
78 10.00
33 4.23
3 .38
3 .38
11 1.41
780 100.00



2 .26
103 13.24
673 86.50
778 100.00


Probation
No. %


7
14
127
1248
1800
1064
564
23
4
35
4886


.14
.29
2.60
25.54
36.84
21.78
11.54
.47
.08
.72
100.00


85 1.77
701 14.63
4006 83.60
4792 100.00


AGE

13
14
15
16
17
18


Probation







FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 43

Table VIII reflects that 65.41% of the youth who were placed on probation lacked
a high school education and 83.6% of those paroled had not comp leted high school.
Of those released under mandatory conditional release supervision, 94.51% had not
graduated from high school.
Occupationally, 83.6% of the youthful probationers lacked occupational skills
while 86.5% of the parolees and 95.6% of the mandatory conditional releases did not
have occupational skills-or professions at the time they were placed under supervision.

"TYPICAL OFFENDER PROFILE"

The highest percentage in each statistical topic (age bracket, high school education,
etc.) was used to make up the "Typical Offender Profile" of a parolee, probationer,
and mandatory conditional release at time he or she was placed under supervision.

30.05% of Probationers, (Age 19 and under)
30.44% of Parolees, (Ages 20-24)
25.22% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, (Ages 20-24)

89.36% of Probationers, no prior felon conviction.
66.62% of Parolees, no prior felon conviction
40.67% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, no prior
felon conviction.

* 65.68% of Probationers, no prior misdemeanant conviction.
44.86% of Parolees, no prior misdemeanant conviction. W
25.75% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, no prior '
misdemeanant conviction. .

* 46.80% of Probationers, single.
50.20% of Parolees, single. HT
41.88% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, single.

* 64.32% of Probationers, not high school graduates.
81.50% of Parolees, not high school graduates.
85.90% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, not high
school graduates.

* 71.61% of Probationers, vocationally unskilled.
79.10% of Parolees, vocationally unskilled.
84.62% of Mandatory Conditional Releasees, vocationally
unskilled.
OFFENSE:
41.48% were released under Mandatory Conditional Release for the offense of
Burglary and 13.53% for Forgery and Worthless Checks.
11.59% were placed on Probation for the offense of Burglary; 11.28% for Larceny.
29.98% were released on Parole for the offense of Burglary; 16.79%for Robbery.






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


FIGURES AND FACTS -IN FINANCES
(FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1970)

IT COSTS 50 PER DAY TO SUPERVISE AN INDIVIDUAL ON PAROLEE
OR PROBATION.

IT COSTS $4.75 PER DAY PER INMATE FOR CONFINEMENT.
IT COSTS 182. 50 PER YEAR TO SUPERVISE A PAROLEE OR PROBA-
TIONER.

S181 IN TAXES WERE PAID ON AN AVERAGE BY EACH PROBA-
TIONER AND PAROLEE LAST YEAR WHICH WENT DIRECTLY INTO THE
GENERAL REVENUE FUND FROM WHERE APPROPRIATIONS ARE
ALLOCATED FOR PROBATION AND PAROLE SERVICES.

20,541, 525 WERE SAVED IN CONFINEMENT COSTS LAST YEAR
AS A RESULT OF PROBATION AND PAROLE SUPERVISION.

S41.238 .78 WERE CONTRIBUTED TO THE STATE'S ECONOMY BY
PROBATIONERS AND PAROLEES LAST YEAR (EARNINGS SPENT IN
LOCAL COMMUNITIES).

720,087 WERE CONTRIBUTED BY PROBATIONERS AND
PAROLEES TO SUPPORT THEIR DEPENDENTS.

S9 3, 650 WERE PAID BY PROBATIONERS AND PAROLEES TO
REIMBURSE VICTIMS FOR DAMAGES CAUSED.













TAX SAVINGS


AND


FINANCES


I






46 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

TAX SAVINGS AND FINANCES

The operating philosophy of the Parole and Probation Commission continues to
keep operating costs at an absolute minimum. As evidenced by the facts and figures in
this section, parole and probation supervision saves the taxpayers many millions of
dollars annually, contributes to the economy of the state, and the taxes paid by those
under supervision more than offset the costs of the supervision program.
Recent newspaper comments confirm the economic advantages of parole and pro-
bation.








I Ta.. 4y, My 20,196








Savings in costs of imprisonment alone amount to almost ten times the costs of
supervision. A report by the American Bar Association Project on Standards for Crim-

greatly reduces the financial costs to the public treasury of an effective correctional
system." "Probation costs something on the order of one-tenth of the cost of im-
prisonment."
DOLLAR VALUE BENEFITS of parole and probation services include the fol-
Savi lowing:
H)AA ,, i 'p 1'{,.













It costs 50 PER DAY TO SUPERVISE an individual on parole or probation.

It costs $4. 75 PER DAY FOR CONFINEMENT of an offender. As a result,

$20.54I,525 were SAVED IN CONFINEMENT COSTS LAST YEAR
through the utilization of parole and probation services.
^\jbl\ -Ipp ri 'h dll r h IWI .^
th- gh, Pm l~s la r an .na. ily i 1 Wef_ I ,2








Paroleevings in costs o imprisonment alone amount to almost year which was the costs of
supervision. A report by the American Bar Association Project on Standards for Crim-






inal Justice entity where they reside and ADDED To Probation" made these quotes: ProbatinOMY.
greatly reduces the financial costs to the public treasury of an effective correctional
system." "Probation costs something on the order of one-tenth of the cost of im-
prisonment."





DFAMILY SUPPORT paid by parolee and probation services include the fol-
lowing: Many of these family members could have been on welfare
It costs 50 PER DAY TO SUPERVISE an individual on parole or probation.

It costs M .75 PER DAY FOR CONFINEMENT of an offender. As a result,
S20.541,525 were SAVED IN CONFINEMENT COSTS LAST YEAR
through the utilization of parole and probation services.
Parolees and probationers earned 41, 2 ,8 ,907 last year which was spent in
the community where they reside and ADDED TO THE STATE'S ECONOMY.
FAMILY SUPPORT paid by parolees and probationers last year TOTALED
$720,087 Many of these family members could have been on welfare








FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 47


which would have added to the costs of state and federal operations if the family
wage earner had been in prison instead of under parole or probation supervision.

RESTITUTION, which requires repayment to the victim in the community for
merchandise stolen, worthless checks, other property losses and medical expenses
caused by injury to citizens victimized by criminal offenses, AMOUNTED TO

893.650 for the fiscal year.
TAXES PAID BY wage earning PAROLEES AND PROBATIONERS TOTALED

$10,409,745.
A SIGNIFICANT FACTOR is that on an average each parolee and probationer
contributed $200 to the state in the form of taxes. Of this, $181 went directly to the
General Revenue Fund from which parole and probation operating appropriations are
allocated. A comparison of the costs of supervision for an individual parolee or proba-
tioner, which amounted to $182.50 per year, reflects that an average parolee or
probationer contributed an amount in taxes, which went directly to the State Revenue
Fund, almost equal to the costs of his supervision.

OTHER SAVINGS resulting from parole and probation supervision include mon-
etary savings in costs of future crime detection, apprehension,prosecution,conviction,
and incarceration of offenders whose lives have been redirected to that of law-abiding
citizens.

THE MOST IMPORTANT BENEFIT of successful parole and probation super-
vision involves changing of attitudes, values, and goals through SALVAGING OF
HUMAN LIVES from a road of degradation, failure and defeat to a place of honor,
self-respect, and success.


FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION
Current Funds Statement of Approprtations, Revenue Expenditures and
Fund Balances for Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1970
GENERAL COUNTY
REVENUE ADMINISTRATIVE
TOTAL APPROPRIATION TRUST FUND
Fund Balance, July 1, 1969 5,370 -0- 5,370
Appropriation and Revenue:
Appropriations:
Salaries 3,198,225 3.198,225
Other Personal Services 9,400 9,400
Expenses 524,500 524.500
Operating Capital Outlay 142,034 142,034
Total Appropriations 3,874,159 3,874,159
Revenue 14.998 14.998
Total Appropriations and Revenue 3,889,157 3,874,159 14,998
Total Appropriations, Revenue and
Balances 3.894,527 3.874.159 20.368
Less, Reserve 6.319 6.319
Total Available 3.888,208 3.874,159 14,049
Expenditures:
Salary and Retirement Cost 3,177,338 3,164,731 12,607
Other Personal Services 9.313 9,313
Expenses:
Contractual Services 387,757 386,727 1,030
Materials and Supplies 36,953 36,945 8
Current Charges & Obligations 99,227 99,169 58
Operating Capital Outlay 140,216 140,216
Total Expenditures 3,850,804 3.837,101 13,703
Unexpended Balances, June 30, 1970 37,404 37,058 346
Add, Reserve 6,319 6,319
Add, Prepaid Expenses July 1, 1969 457 457
Less, Reverted to General Revenue 37.515 37,515
Fund Balance. June 30, 1970 6,665 .0- 6,665







48 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION











CENTRAL OFFICE,

ADMINISTRATION,

AND FIELD OPERATIONS







50 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


The CENTRAL OFFICE is located in Room 235,
Doyle E. Carlton Building, Tallahassee






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 01

CENTRAL OFFICE, ADMINISTRATION, AND FIELD OPERATIONS
Philosophical concepts, policies, and procedures of the Parole and Probation Com-
mission are set by the five-member Commission which has over 145 years' accumu-
lative experience in the professional field of parole and probation.
COMMISSION
DIRECTOR
FISCAL AND STATISTICAL ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
PERSONNEL AND TRAINING INTERSTATE COMPACT
COMMUNITY SERVICES RECORDS
PAROLE AND PROBATION
FIELD STAFF

CENTRAL OFFICE PERSONNEL
PAUL MURCHEK
Director
JOHN R. WALKER WILLIAM C. KYLE, JR.
Administrative Assistant III Assistant Director
JOHN W. MADDEN CHARLES H. LAWSON
Personnel Officer I Interstate Compact Administrator
LEONARD E. FLYNN WAYNE W. GILLETTE
Director of Community Services Administrative Assistant I

The Director of Parole and Probation administers the policies set by the
Commission and is responsible for planning, organizing, and directing the statewide
program of parole and probation for adult offenders. This includes selection of person-
nel, reviewing and approving all procedures for implementing agency programs and
evaluating program achievements. He interviews, evaluates and selects supervisory
personnel, evaluates performance, recommends promotions and terminations, and
directs day-to-day operation of the agency.
The Assistant Director of Parole and Probation assists the Director in overall pro-
gram administration, acting in his absence. He assists in the evaluation of field staff
activities, coordinates Pardon Board matters, analyzes supervisory problems, coordi-
nates parole violation and revocation procedures and assists in carrying out Com-
mission policy.
The Personnel Officer I administers a diversified personnel program with his range
of activities involving classification and pay, personnel placement and training, evalu-
ation, and other personnel functions necessary in overall operation of the agency. He
serves in a liaison capacity between Parole and Probation Commission and the Division
of State Personnel and Retirement in negotiating personnel transactions, planning and
conducting classification and pay studies.







OJL FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

The Administrative Assistant III is responsible for financial and budgeting controls,
compilation of statistical data, and administration of fiscal policies as set forth by the
Director. Records are maintained on insurance, payroll, purchasing, inventory controls
and accounting. Planned program budgeting in conjunction with work units and ac-
counting for appropriation revenue and expenses of the agency are maintained by this
section.
The Director of Community Services is responsible for developing, organizing and
directing statewide program of assistance for field staff through utilization of selected
citizen volunteers. Special emphasis is placed on vocational-educational programs for
parolees, probationers, and mandatory conditional releases. Statewide liaison is main-
tained with community resource agencies whose services assist offenders under super-
vision. Stimulation is provided for local community programs to assist in reintegrating
offenders into a free society. Public information and education programs are devel-
oped through local regional offices.
The Interstate Compact Administrator is Chief State Correspondent on Interstate
Parole and Probation matters. He reviews investigative findings and supervisory pro-
gramming regarding Interstate Compact cases and supervisory transfer requests. The
Compact Administrator represents the state at local and national conferences relating
to interstate parole and probation problems and reviews applicability of warrants for
revocation purposes.
The Administrative Assistant I assigns and reviews the processing and maintenance
of the vast record system in the central office. Case files on parolees, probationers, and
mandatory conditional releases are carefully catalogued with program progress re-
ports, investigating data, correspondence and other information which assists in the
overall operation of the records section. Liaison is maintained with records depart-
ment of the Division of Corrections via scheduled meetings as needed.

Staff Training and Development
A variety of in-service training has been conducted during last fiscal year through
workshops, conferences, and seminars for field staff with onsight inspection of mental
hospitals and penal institutions.
Advanced training has been provided in administration, office management, group
therapy programs and methods, and specialized treatment for alcoholics and drug
addicts.
The Division of Personnel and Retirement has provided training in conference
leadership, performance evaluation and supervisory leadership which is designed for
mid-level positions in administration and office management.
Many of the field staff have attended clinics offered by the Alcoholic Rehabili-
tation Center and the Florida Institute on Alcohol and Other Drugs which help pre-
pare them for treatment concepts such as "encounter groups" and "behavioral modifi-
cation systems."
Area conferences, held in different sections of the state, have proven their effect-
iveness in improving two-way communication between the field staff and central
office personnel. These conferences have been instrumental in the development of new
policies and trends in parole and probation programming.






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


Specialized training in management and counseling techniques has been provided
for 59% of the professional staff during last fiscal year. Policy and procedural training,
through the area conferences, has included all professional staff members.
The recruitment of properly qualified professional staff members continues to be
of primary importance in parole and probation. During fiscal year ending June 30,
1970. recruitment activities included the following:
365 APPLICATIONS WERE RECEIVED FOR EMPLOYMENT;
214 APPLICANTS EXAMINED AND PROCESSED;
141 PASSED THE EXAMINATION;
90 APPLICANTS WERE HIRED DURING FISCAL YEAR;
27 INDIVIDUALS WERE PLACED ON THE ELIGIBILITY LIST.
The examination for professional positions was given 115 times during the year and
at various locations throughout the state which provided easy access for applicants.
The Personnel Department processed reclassification of 72 positions, 56 of which were
the advancement of Officer I's and Officer II's. The remaining 16 were for clerical and
higher level supervisory positions.
There were 28 promotions involving professional personnel and 20 promotions of
clerical personnel.
During fiscal year 1969-70 the Commission experienced a 30% personnel turnover
rate. The professional class in the highest turnover rate was Officer I which also
experienced a turnover rate of 30%. Of those who resigned in the Officer I category,
76% had less than 2 years' experience and slightly over 50% had less than one year of
experience at the time of resignation. The high turnover rate continues to deplete the
ranks of field personnel especially in the area of short tenure.

Field Staff
In order to assist in the performance and overall administration, the state has been
divided into eight geographic areas for parole and probation purposes.
An Area Supervisor directs parole and probation activities involving the operation
of three or more district offices which include several counties. He supervises and
evaluates personnel, production, and controls within a given geographic area. Appli-
cant interviews, examinations, and personnel investigations are conducted. Recom-
mendations are made concerning selection of professional personnel and policy or
administrative changes in the agency operation.
A Regional Coordinator of community services is attached to each area office. He
administers citizen volunteer programs, maintains liaison with community resource
agencies, assists in vocational and educational programming of parolees, probationers,
and mandatory conditional releases, and stimulates community programs of assis-
tance. He coordinates public information and education and assists the area supervisor
in matters relating to parole and probation programming.
Geographic divisions of the state with listings of the personnel assigned to each area
are included on the following pages.











AREA I
PENSACOLA


Florida

PENSACOLA AREA I
Beroth G. Clayton
Area Supervisor
Phillip M. Cooper
Regional Coordinator
401 N. Baylen Street
Pensacola, Florida
PENSACOLA: District "1"
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
301 Ct. of Records Bldg.
Thomas E. David,
District Supervisor
Ortho K. Matheny, Jr.
Hunter J. Pfeiffer
Billy R. Hemby
Sheldon S. Thomas
Norman F. Brown
Judi J. Burleson
Homer G. Cruse
Ralph M. Moulder
TALLAHASSEE: District "11"
JEFFERSON, LEON, AND
WAKULLA COUNTIES
Leon County Courthouse
Room 211
Ernest S. Doster,
District Supervisor
John W. Allen
Ronald Lee Mercer
George M. Wood
Raymond A. Tucker, Jr.
Hardy C. Lashley
Timothy S. Robinson


MARIANNA: District "14"
WASHINGTON, CALHOUN, HOLMES
AND JACKSON COUNTIES
Jackson County Ct. Hse.
Room 248
Ronald H. Craven,
District Supervisor
Thomas H. Young
Woodrow W. Hatcher
CRESTVIEW: District "19"
OKALOOSA AND WALTON COUNTIES
Okaloosa County Courthouse
William N. Jones,
District Supervisor
Jerry L. Miller
Ernest L. Cotton
PANAMA CITY: District "25"
BAY AND GULF COUNTIES
Bay County Courthouse
Ruie E. Langford,
District Supervisor
Dewey M. Ivey
MILTON: District "30"
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
Santa Rosa County Ct. Hse.,
Room 206
Melvin J. Livings, Jr.
District Supervisor
QUINCY: District "40"
LIBERTY, GADSDEN, AND
FRANKLIN COUNTIES
Gadsden County Courthouse
John R. Skinner,
District Supervisor
Jimmy D. Folsom








AREA II
L JACKSONVILLE


AREA VIII
WEST
PALM
BEACH


Commission Field Staff

8 Area Supervisors

8 Regional Coordinators
Community Services

42 District Offices
6 Sub-Offices
257 Authorized Staff






bb FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


JACKSONVILLE -AREA II


Richard P. Hughes
Area Supervisor
Ray E. Howard
Regional Coordinator
Suite 102, 4077 Woodcock
Jacksonville, Florida

JACKSONVILLE: District "4"
CLAY, DUVAL AND
NASSAU COUNTIES
Suite M-106, Mezzanine
Duval County Courthouse
Otha R. Smith, Jr.,
District Supervisor
William W. Morris
Gordon A. Darby
James W. Alexander
Joseph O. Minton
J. Walter Wells
Charles R. Higginbotham
James L. Trotter
Kenneth T. White
Goetz W. Roese
Donald A. Thompson
Harry M. Ivey, Jr.
Stephen E. Mathis
Cecil H. Snellgrove, Jr.
Gary D. Shields
Karim A. Cadora
George R. Couch, Jr.
Linda J. Hatcher
Mary B. Weber
Merle D. Davis
John F. Teagle

LIVE OAK: District "2"
SUWANNEE AND LAFAYETTE
COUNTIES
Suwannee County Courthouse
Perry A. Holmes,
District Supervisor


MADISON: District "37"

Madison and Hamilton Counties
Madison County Courthouse
Troy O. Rhoades,
District Supervisor
Nathan S. Curtis, II

GAINESVILLE: District "10"
ALACHUA, GILCHRIST, AND
LEVY COUNTIES
Alachua County Ct. Hse.,
Room 307
W. Harold Martin,
District Supervisor
Ben E. North
Robert D. Clark
J. Perman Roberts, II
Howard E. Chenault

PERRY: District "24"
DIXIE AND TAYLOR COUNTIES
Taylor County Courthouse
William N. Gross,
District Supervisor

STARKE: District "41"
BAKER, UNION, AND BRADFORD
COUNTIES
944 No. Temple Avenue
James F. Bloodworth,
District Supervisor
Angus T. McDowell
Anthony N. Proto, Jr.

LAKE CITY: District "9"
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Courthouse
Robert B. Wilkin,
District Supervisor
Nathan Mayo Morgan






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 57


TAMPA- AREA III


Doyle I. Simmons
Area Supervisor
Harry C. Hamner
Regional Coordinator
313, State Office Bldg.
800 Twiggs Street
Tampa, Florida

DADE CITY: District "31"
PASCO COUNTY
Courthouse
William T. Browning,
District Supervisor
Robert L. Tennant

BUSHNELL: District "34"
SUMTER COUNTY
Jail Annex, Justice St.
Frederick V. Dietz, Jr.,
District Supervisor

TAMPA: District "8"
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Third Floor
Courthouse Annex
Jack M. DeBee,
District Supervisor
Paul A. Rigsby
Robert D. Adams
Rene Martinez
Vitale M. Castellano
John L. Tracy
Theodore C. Roos
Erio Alvarez, Jr.


S. Harold George
Area Supervisor
Robert E. Bolkcom
Regional Coordinator
Professional Center
Bartow, Florida


Daniel L. Hersey
Miss Sara Ann Holland
Robert L. Allen, III
Jesse G. Roger
Charles T. Hurd
Donald A. Parrish
James V. See, Jr.
Willie R. Coleman
Lionel Garcia
Joseph T. Isherwood
Mary Jo Simon

PLANT CITY: District "8-1"
SUB OFFICE HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
County Building
Robert W. Young,
Supervisor
Samuel W. Cooper

OCALA: District "17"
MARION COUNTY
Courthouse
Howell L. Winfree, II,
District Supervisor
Ray C. Chancey, Jr.
Arlene K. Dinkins
Howard J. Kent

INVERNESS: District "42"
HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTIES
Ct. Hse., Rm. 215
Michael C. Dippolito,
District Supervisor


BARTOW -AREA IV
SEBRING: District"32"
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Courthouse
Clifford M. Ables, III,
District Supervisor
Bill J. Fine






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


TAVARES: District "22"
LAKE COUNTY
Courthouse
Spence H. McCall,
District Supervisor
David M. Franklin

BARTOW: District "6"
POLK AND HARDEE COUNTIES
Hall of Justice Bldg.
William J. Ruster,
District Supervisor
Terry L. Davis
Joseph M. Cruce

LAKELAND: District "6-1"
SUB OFFICE
326 E. Main
Donald F. Allen,
Supervisor
Roy L. Nelson
Everett O. Springer
William W. Dicks
Ronald D. Wilson


VERO BEACH: District "12"
INDIAN RIVER AND OKEECHOBEE
COUNTIES
Indian River Courthouse
J. Vernon Wright,
District Supervisor
David H. Letts


WINTER HAVEN: District "6-2"
SUB OFFICE
Hill Building
Eugene H. Ginn, Jr.,
Supervisor
Frank D. Boyd


FT. PIERCE: District "38"
MARTIN AND ST. LUCIE COUNTIES
St. Lucie Ct. Hse., Rm. 117
Everard S. Bedell,
District Supervisor
William H. Walker
Michael W. Fin
Thomas H. Willis


MIAMI AREA V


Franklin P. McKain
Area Supervisor
William D. Tenney
Regional Coordinator
1515 N.W. 7th Street,
Suite 204
Miami, Florida

MIAMI: District "7"
DADE COUNTY
Rm. 367, St. Office Bldg.
Phillip N. Ware,
District Supervisor
John Miller


Sherwood O. Edwards
Rhea W. Wolfe
Clifford L. Summers
William R. Abbey
Lester R. Brandt
George D. Campbell
Dayne E. Clemmer
Sylvia R. Rihlberg
James D. Tote
Joseph E. LaVoie, Jr.
Anthony H. Holliday, Jr.
Pablo Garcia
Ronald J. Reese
Eddie Lee Zellner


L






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION Oz


Deanna B. Cournoyer
Eston W. Hunter
Homer James, Jr.
G. Rogatz
Michael L. Kite
William B. Fry
Jane B. Hickey
Robert M. Kellar
Jacqueline A. Lewis
Robert E. Phelan
Roger R. Williams
Robert J. Disher
Donald K. Fulp
Rufus T. Rundlett, Jr.
Terry L. Olsen
Gerard P. Verzaal


KEY WEST: District "26"
MONROE COUNTY
Courthouse
Robert W. Sawyer,
District Supervisor



NAPLES: District "36"
COLLIER COUNTY
Rm. A-209 Collier County
Government Complex
David A. Smith,
District Supervisor
Harold A. Strube
Raymond A. Bocknor


ST. PETERSBURG AREA VI


Francis M. Otts
Area Supervisor
David E. Lang
Regional Coordinator
2400 First Avenue No.
St. Petersburg, Fla.

CLEARWATER: District "3"
PINELLAS COUNTY
Courthouse, Rm. 104
Howard H. Sullivan,
District Supervisor
Charles D. Lyon
Charles H. Maxwell
Fred E. Sales
Keith B. Drake
John L. Stanford
Charles E. Jones

ST. PETERSBURG: District "3-1"
SUB OFFICE
2400 1st Avenue No.


Samuel G. Elliott,
Supervisor
Joseph A. Beiro
George W. Cary
L. John Makin
Clement M. Miller
Patricia H. Parker
William A. Maranto
James C. Campbell
Richard D. Lonsinger
Thomas W. Vinson

BRADENTON: District "13"
MANATEE COUNTY
Courthouse
LeRoy J. Jacoby,
District Supervisor
Richard Buckle
Floyd E. Boone
S. Frank Perkins, IV
John D. McLeod


I






OU FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION


FT. MYERS: District "23"

LEE COUNTY
Courthouse
Douglas K. deWolfe,
District Supervisor
Larry D. Kling
Gerald Gray


SARASOTA: District "27"
SARASOTA COUNTY


Courthouse, Rm. 334
Edward L. Jenkins,
District Supervisor
Leonard H. Peeples
Richard H. Hansen
Jeffrey P. Cohen

ARCADIA: District "33"
DeSOTO AND CHARLOTTE COUNTIES
DeSoto County Courthouse
Innes Carl Wesson,
District Supervisor


ORLANDO -AREA VIII


Armond R. Cross
Area Supervisor

Cloud H. Miller III
Regional Coordinator
309 Bradshaw Building
14 East Washington St.
Orlando, Florida

DELAND: District "15"
VOLUSIA COUNTY
Courthouse Annex, Rm. 7
William J. Cain,
District Supervisor
Robert K. Quam
Russell G. Wallace

HOLLY HILL: District "15-1"
SUB OFFICE
2nd St. and Riverside Dr.
Melvin H. Wills, Jr.,
Supervisor

SANFORD: District "28"
SEMINOLE COUNTY
Courthouse


James G. Lee,
District Supervisor

Joseph A. Schreiber
James H. Anderson

ORLANDO District "5"
ORANGE COUNTY
Courthouse Annex
Fred W. Shepherd, Jr.,
District Supervisor
Lee C. McDonald
Lawrence E. Horras
Gene S. Adkins
C. E. Limpus, Jr.
Raymond E. Senn
James S. Love
James J. James
Williams F. Garvin
Richard A. Baekey

PALATKA: District "29"


PUTNAM COUNTY
Courthouse
Charles D. Gall,
District Supervisor






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION -l


KISSIMMEE: District "39"
OSCEOLA COUNTY
Osceola County Courthouse
Kenneth W. Simmons,
District Supervisor

TITUSVILLE: District "20"
BREVARD COUNTY
Courthouse
Charles L. Barfield,
District Supervisor
Joseph M. Hunt
Francis J. Rudzik
John A. Alley, Jr.


EAU GALL IE: District "20-1"

SUB OFFICE
874 Montreal
William V. West,
Supervisor
Fredrick H. Dyke

ST. AUGUSTINE: District "21"

FLAGLER AND ST. JOHNS COUNTIES
St. Johns County Courthouse
Walter G. Ellerton,
District Supervisor
David E. Roberts


WEST PALM BEACH -AREA VIII


Harry C. Panos, Jr.
Area Supervisor
Francis J. Smith
Regional Coordinator
Pan American Bldg., Suite 426
West Palm Beach, Fla.


WEST PALM BEACH: District "16"
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Courthouse, Rm. 404
Glenn W. Hollingsworth,
District Supervisor
Kendall L. Damon
Ralph J. Nittolo
Jimmie W. Nichols
Joyce D. Haley
Raymond K. McShane
Ernest J. Amedee, Jr.
Michael A. Hirsch
Gothriel J. Lafleur
Raymond A. Long, III
Robert B. Thomas
Dale B. Wise, Jr.
Suzanne E. Young


FT. LAUDERDALE: District "18"
BROWARD COUNTY
Courthouse, Rm. 180
H. Squier Hanni,
District Supervisor
Frank J. Velie, Jr.
Douglas W. MacGregor
Patricia Butts
Gordon B. Zellers
Michael D. McMann
Randall V. Holbrook
James J. Smith
LeLand S. Day
Judith A. Wolson
Charles A. Dickun
Paul E. Myers
Benjamin J. Rivers
Nicholas J. Carroll, Jr.

LABELLE: District "35"
GLADES AND HENDRY COUNTIES
Hendry County Courthouse
Robert E. Hayes
District Supervisor





62 FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION

FIGURES AND FACTS-IN PRODUCTION
(FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1970)

10,382 PRESENTENCE INVESTIGATIONS FOR THE COURTS.
(pg. 24)

456 PARDON BOARD INVESTIGATIONS FOR THE
PARDON BOARD. (pg. 23)

30,980 INVESTIGATIONS OF ALL KINDS. (pg. 24)

3.588 JOBS OBTAINED FOR PROBATIONERS, PAROLEES,
AND MANDATORY CONDITIONAL RELEASES.

328 INDIVIDUALS PLACED ON PROBATION BY THE
COURTS. (pg. 33)

|1515 INDIVIDUALS RELEASED ON PAROLE BY THE COM-
MISSION. (pg. 34)

14,764 PROBATIONERS, PAROLEES, AND MANDATORY CON-
DITIONAL RELEASES UNDER SUPERVISION. (pg. 33)

102.9 AVERAGE WORKLOAD UNITS PER PAROLE AND
PROBATION OFFICER. (NATIONAL RECOGNIZED PRO-
FESSIONAL STANDARDS- 50 UNITS PER OFFICER.)

68. 76 AVERAGE SUPERVISORY CASELOAD PER OFFICER.
(NATIONAL RECOGNIZED PROFESSIONAL STAN-
DARDS IS 50 WITH NO INVESTIGATIONS.)

70% OF PAROLE AND PROBATION OFFICER'S TIME CON-
SUMED BY INVESTIGATIONS.






FLORIDA PAROLE AND PROBATION COMMISSION 63

FIGURES AND FACTS IN STATISTICS
(FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1970)

64.32% OF PERSONS PLACED ON PROBATION HAD LESS
THAN A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.
81.50% OF PERSONS PLACED ON PAROLE HAD LESS THAN
A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.
85.90% OF MANDATORY CONDITIONAL RELEASES HAD
LESS THAN A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.
71.61% OF MANDATORY CONDITIONAL RELEASES VOCA-
TIONALLY UNSKILLED.
79.10% OF PROBATIONERS VOCATIONALLY UNSKILLED.
84.62% OF PAROLEES VOCATIONALLY UNSKILLED.

BURGLARY WAS THE OFFENSE COMMITTED BY THE HIGHEST
NUMBER OF PERSONS PLACED ON PROBATION.
BURGLARY WAS THE OFFENSE COMMITTED BY THE HIGHEST
NUMBER OF PERSONS PLACED ON PAROLE.
BURGLARY WAS THE OFFENSE COMMITTED BY THE HIGHEST
NUMBER OF PERSONS PLACED ON MANDATORY CONDI-
TIONAL RELEASE.

72.46% OF PROBATIONERS PLED GUILTY TO THE OF-
FENSE AS CHARGED.
71.58% OF PAROLEES PLED GUILTY TO THE OFFENSE AS.
CHARGED.
82. 19o OF MANDATORY CONDITIONAL RELEASES PLED
GUILTY TO THE OFFENSE AS CHARGED.

58.51% OF PROBATION CASES-ADJUDICATION OF GUILT
WITHHELD.

44% OF PAROLE VIOLATORS COMMITTING TECHNICAL
VIOLATIONS, COMMITTED THEM DURING FIRST
SIX MONTHS AFTER RELEASE.

50% OF PAROLE VIOLATORS COMMITTING NEW OF-
FENSES, COMMITTED THEM DURING FIRST SIX
MONTHS OF SUPERVISION.


































Florida Parole and Probation Commission
R m. 235, Doyle E. Carlton Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32304







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