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mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
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mods:title Miccosukee clans crier
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Newspapers
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Mikasuki Indians
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Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Miccosukee Everglades news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053712/00005
 Material Information
Title: Miccosukee Everglades news
Physical Description: 4 v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: May 1, 1985
Publication Date: 1982-1985
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Indians of North America -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mikasuki Indians -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002033559
oclc - 36179317
notis - AKM1263
lccn - sn 97027662
System ID: UF00053712:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Miccosukee clans crier

Full Text


















































































Officers elected,


local people honored at NTCA convention


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Micouke* Tribe of Indians, PO Box 440021, Miami, FL 33144 Vol. 7,No.5


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With balloons, buttons and smile, Melody Osceola unknowingly becomes a
walking advertisement for the tribal Carnival of Health held in late April.


I


The conference included a .speech by John
Fritz, acting assistant secretary for Indian
affairs, and workshops on such national Indian
issues as substance abuse, education,
employment, gaming on reservations,
government contracting, health and water
rights.
During the annual awards banquet six people
were recognized for their efforts to better the
Indian community either locally or nationally.e
O. B. Osceola, a Seminole who builds chickees


Richared LaFromboise, Chairman of the
Turtle Mountain Chippewa, was elected
president of the National Tribal Chairmen's
Association (NTCA) at the organization's
annual conference in April.
The week-long conference at Omni
International Hotel in Miami was hosted by the
Miccosukee and Seminole Tribes.
George Tall Chief, Chief of the Osage, was
-voted vice president and Robert Young Deer,
Chief of the Eastern Cherokee, was voted
.. -.secetary; Roger Jim, Yakima-Tribal Chairman,
:* i elected treasurer. '''"


makers Pauline Tiger, Miccosukee, and Buffalo
Jim, Seminole, each received a special award for
community service, and Mike Kobiolka,
attorney, and David Hilton were given honorable
mentions for their service to the Seiinoles.
The NTCA recognized two tribal leaders who:
have exemplified the goals of the organization
during the past year. Buffalo Tiger, Chairman of
the Miccosukee Tribe, and Merle Garcia,
Governor of the Pueblo of Acoma, received thi
honors.


for living, received the Legg Mason Award for Entertainment include mic by Tiger-Tiger.-
Indian Buig ssm dfhe YearM andana ator ow by Bbby aTigeri


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May 1985 "--


Miccosukee

women were

war heroes,

says novel

War heroes. They dug holes,
buried their children alive with
palm fronds, hushed them with one
look.
They were Miccosukee women,
determined to save the lives of the
few hungry babies and youngsters
left. They hid the children from the
bullets, kept them silent lest they
be discovered by the white soldiers
who came to take the Indians away
to the no-good land West. The once-
settled people were forced to live on
the run, in strange lands, with no
crops to harvest, no safe place to
stay and start over.
The men were away, fighting off
the white army that was driving
the Indian families further south
into the mosquito-infested swamp
of the Everglades. And while
uncles and fathers and brothers
became warriors, and victims of
war, the women saved the lives of
the young and the feeble, who
otherwise would have perished in
the harsh wilderness.
That's the way it was, according
to author Betty Sue Cummings,
who spent four years researching
the history of the Miccosukee
Indians to write Say These Names
(Remember Them), a recently
published novel. The absorbing
book accurately recounts the
events of the era of the Seminole
Wars through fictional character
See-ho-kee, an approach that
allows a reader to expierence the
period rather than analyze it from
a historical view.
continued on page 3


Health Fair

contest winner

loses 32 Ibs.

*Pull.out photo section, page 4
Tribal Nurse-practitioner Marion
Treon won a free month's
membership to a health spa for
losing 32 pounds, more than any
other individual who entered the
Carnival of Health contest.
Her co-workers lost two pounds to
add to Treon's accomplishment, and
the health department won first,
place in the group category of its
own contest.
Other fairgoers got the wellness
message by playing prevention-
oriented games, practicing bicycle
safety in a relay race, eating at the
community buffet or competing in
other contests.
Louise Bert, for instance, got into
the health kick by can-canning
way. to winning the title of Ms.
'Health Fair '85. Mr. Health Fair,
William "Bo" Jim, won easily by
flexing his boutiful biceps.
Fifteen-year-old Kenny Cypress,
who breakdanced without breaking
any bones, won the talent contest.
In the greased pig contest Sandy
Osceola was the first to grab a piglet
apparently too terrified to flee,and
which was later raffled to Phillip
Sanders and family.
"Ringmaster" Crystal Hipkins
was chiefly responsible for
coordinating the annual event, but
most departments operated their
own booths.
The seven-hour carnival ended
with a bang about 8 p.m. with a
fireworks display.





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It wasn't a national holiday, but
for some May 13 was American
Indian Day. The Miccosukee Tribe
was one to celebrate then-the date
President Reagan chose to note in
1933-although most tribes do it the
last Friday in September.
Here's what some Miccosukee
said about the importance of
"American Indian Day to them.

"I think everybody should know
about American Indians. Nobody is
going to stop to think about them if
there's not a special day."
-Debbie Smith
"They have one for everyone else.
There's all kinds of national
holidays. To me it's important
because we are important, too."
-Ruth O. Lord

"I don't really know why it is called
American Indian Day. Everyone
has it a different day. If everyone--
the Seminole, the Miccosukee, the
"ioux, the Cheyenne, all the tribes-
held it one day, I could see it as an
important day. They ought to have
one day, have a big ceremonial day
at all the tribes."
-Andy Baster
'"Tey've all got something the
presidents and everyone else. They
never had anything for Indians.
' Now at least they have a day and
people can think about the Tndians."
-Anita Osceola
'There should be an Indian Day.
Just to get it once a year, it's got to be
important. They have Columbus
Day, that's supposed to be


important. Once a year it's
important to have an Indian Day,
even though every day is Indian
Day to us."
-woman who asked not to be
named
"I think it's important, but it
should be in the fall, when the
Indians chose their day, instead of
the day the government set for the
Indians. It's just another way for the
Indians to give in to the white way.
It's important for white people to
recognize Indians, but it should be
fall time, when the Indians chose a
day of celebration near harvest."
Matthew Rockwell
(Mohawk)
"It's important because Indians
are being recognized through a
holiday. There's Easter, Valentine's
Day, Thanksgiving, why shouldn't
Indians have a day?"
-Angela Billie
"It should be for the Indians to
enjoy, and to remember what
happened in the past."
-Rickie Tiger
"I think I already have important
days, which are the Corn Dance
days. I see that as Indian Days,
because it's real nice. Everyone
gathers, everyone's having fun,
enjoying themselves, playing ball
and dancing. I'd rather have a day
off for Corn Dance than for Indian
Day."
-Laura Billie
'To me, everyday is American
Indian Day. The holiday is just for
being lazy."
-Thomas Cypress


"1


Elizabeth Osceola gets her diploma at Head Start graduation last spring,
presented by Billy Cypress, assistant tribal chairman.




Miccosukee graduation

set for May 17 in gym


Miccosukee School graduation
and awards presentation will take
place in the gymnasium Friday,
May 17, at about 10:30 a.m.,
according to Principal Marie
Osceola.
The community is invited to
watch students be promoted or
graduated and receive awards for
citizenship, good attendance,


creative excellence and other
accomplishments, A new award
planned this year is the Tribal
Chairman's Award for Rxcellence in
Academics. Also, the school board
intends to recognize an oltsteanding
teacher and an outstanding parent.
The ceremony will be followed at
noon by a luncheon for student,
their parents and teachers.


a


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A consultant hired by the tribe has
finished a 100-page Miccosukee
Wildlife Management Handbook
that was intended as a guide for law
enforcement on the Alligator Alley
Reservation, but, according to one
source, it's complete enough to be
"an excellent reference" on nearly
any environmental aspect of the
area.
Carol Kruse, tribal planning
director, said it was "meant to
be used as a handbook for tribal
officials, especially police officers,
and other agencies involved in the'
area, such as the Bureau of Indian


Affairs [BIA], U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, the state game commis-
sion."
"It does point out, however, that if
properly planned, the Miccosukees
can successfully develop their
property in the heart of the
Everglades and not have an adverse
impact on the enviaounimt," she
said.
The book's contents include in-
depth information on the ecological
description of the area, -multiple
need of humans using the land, land
management, issues and current
wildlife management practice .


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news articles. Contributors can bring their work tothe
newspaper office, in the neighborhood building, or
leave it in the paper's mailbox in the administrative:
building.
Advertising is accepted. Ca or write to the editor
at the address at the left for rates and more
information.
Subscriptions are $10 for one year, $18 for two.
Send check or money order with complete address to
address at left. .... ,


Miccosukee Everglades News is published on or
about the 15th of each month by the Miccosukee
Tribe of Indians of Florida.
Letters to the editor regarding community issues
are invited. AN letters must be signed to be
considered for publication. Published letters, which
may be edited, express the opinion of the author and
not necessarily that of the tribal administration or
community.
S.TI ,gppr, . -#The,> -.' t -t'6 ::1. .- 409 n d ^'


Miccosukee
Everglades. News
PO Box 440021, Tamiami Station
Miami, Florida 33.144
305/223-8380


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.Wendy Cobourne, Editor


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What is the importance


of American Indian Day?


Wildlife management book

is 'excellent reference'


Horse
play
Playing horse
from front to
back are Lea
Oseol-, Jamie
Osceola and
Summer Rock-
wel; their
riders are
Megan Smith,
Myra Frank .
and Mahalath
Gordon.





May 19M3 iccok" -EIrgiode News


Novel uses fictional character to relate actualities of war


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"-- The Burea of Indian Aftirm (BIA) has
withdrawn its proposed policy that some said
was intended to "discourage bilingual programs
after the third grade."
Jan. 3 the bureau imued the new sidelines,
which stabd that the "objective" of the bilingual
program is to "assist those children of limited
English p~rlcency to improve their English
langmae skills/"
The new guidelines require a 'Yormal needs
assessment, a comprehensive individual
education plan" and other documentation to
justify the participation of any student beyond
the third grade in a bilingual program.
Cmrrantly, eligibility for bilingual funds are
based on documentation that the child's primary
Iftrumge is other than English and, for children


beyond the third grade, docinmntation of
additional costs to continue in a bilingual
program.
Attorney S. Bobo Dean stated in a memo to
his clients the Rock Point and Borrego Pass
school boards, "We understand that the new
requirements call for :instruments of evaluation
which do not exist and are clearly designed to
impose such burdensome requirements that
application for. .funding for bilingual
programs will be discouraged."
(Dean is also one of the Miccosukee Tribe's
legal consultants.)

Dean said the BIA's new policy "of a fast-track
to English" violated the Indian Education
Policies of the Secretary of the Interior (ISEP),
which state the assistant secretary for Indian


affair shall "provide for a comprehensive
multicultural and multilingual education
program. ..including the production and use of
instructional materials, culturally appropriate
methodologies and teaching and learning
strategies that will reinforce, preserve and
maintain Indian and Alaska Native languages,
cultures and histories, Tribes and Alaska Native
Native entities may utilize at their discretion."

BIA officials defended the proposal, said Dean,
by referring to a September 1984 audit by the
Interior Inspector General, which found that
some schools use bilingual ISEP funds to teach
English while other schools use the money to
teach Indian language and culture. The
Inspector General had recommended the bureau
"clarify the regulations."


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endsheets of Say These Names
(Remember Them), which shows
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wartime travels of See-ho-kee's
family from chapter to chapter, .


fM page I
The result is a book that
conservationist Marjory Stoneman
Douglas siad "should be a
espplemental reading requirement
in all Florida history classes."
Although the central character is
imaginary, about 45 of the
approximately 55 characters were
real people and of whom Ctnrmmings
said, "I described accs lately. I'm a
searcher for the facts." The book's
title refers to the actual names of
Creek and Miccosukee villages and
towns abandoned during the wars.
See-ho-kee is a sort of composite
personality of mid-19th century
Miccosukee women. A childless war-
widow at 14-"She had lost her
hnsband-before they had learned to
speak easily to one another"-See-
ho-kee does the heroic things the
women did then to save their people.
Courageous women like See-ho-
kee are the kind Clrnmmings likes to
write about.
"I was a counselor for many
years," she sa' i, "and I kept seeing
girls with a tremendous amount of
potential but without the push or
confidence, or whatever, they
needed to accomplish anything. I


realized that they simply didn't
have any role models.
"That's why I write about brave
women. Everywhere I look I see
courageous women."


r-


Cummings started the book "with
total ignorance," she said. "I've
lived in Florida since 1957, so it's
amazing how I could have lived here
so long and be that ignorant." The
public library in Titusville got her
"every book that I wanted," and she
read and took notes on "everything I
could find."


a


I


Virtually all her information
came from historical accounts of the
period, but -Cummings got "live
input" from Miccosukee community
women.
"Betty Osceola Cypress and
Louise Bert were both extremely
helpful,"- she said. "They told me
they could give me no more
information than what I'd read, but
they could tell me when I was wrong
about something."
The author has written several
previously published books,
including Hue Against the Grain,
which was nominated for a National
Book Award.


;r



*


ending in the Everglades. .- .r ..
***> 'A


I


Willie's kind neighbors-a group becoming
known as the Tree of Life Fellowship-got
together just to help the needy, and Willie was
their first concern.
Most of her chickees have leaky roofs, including
her sleeping and cooking chickees. So the group
coordinated its resources-mostly time and labor,
plus some materials-and began 'reroofing -one.
chickee in April.
Fellowship member Andy Buster said they'll
keep working every weekend until Willie's
sleeping and cooking chickees are repaired.,
He said eventually the group would like to build a
small house for her.


said Buster, "There are no large donations of
money so far, We're hoping we can get materials
donated to build her some kind of small house."
Buster credited temporary residents Preston
and Gwen Roland with getting the fellowship
started. The couple and their son Brint, who
attended the Miccosukee School this year, left
theirpost atiTamiami Checkpoint of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission in early
May to work at a square-dance operation at the
Appalachian Mountains.
"Through them it's possible for these other
people to contribute funds so we can.do some
things to help people," said Buster. "We re sad to


withdraws plans to cut bilingual ecuation


BIA


Community chips

in to repair,

woman's chickees

Thanik to the time and labor of some concerned
community members, Martha Willie is getting
some temporary shelter from the upcoming rainy
season.




4 Mkcouk Everldes News


May 1985


shows Elizabeth Osceola
s Osceola tends the fire
cleans chicken for the


Counselor Don Epps s
the spot to hit; Annie
while Pauline Tiger
community dinner.


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.:::::::::::i::::::::]:r::


Carnival








Top row, from left: William "Bo" Jim admires
the trophy trinket he won as Mr. Health Fair
'85; Kenny Cypress takes a whirl at a headspin
during his talent-show breakdancing; a
professional breaker from the Street Masters
shows that a headspin is much easier with a
helmet; "Ringmaster" Crystal Hipkins checks
out one of High Pockets' pockets. Middle row,
from left: Louise J. Doctor takes a toss at filling
the cavity; Brina Cypress, front, and Margaux
Doctor sample strawberries while Charles Billie
waits his turn; Caryn Billie, right, spins a ring to
win some artificial sweetener; Elizabeth
Osceola watches as High Pockets makes a
clown out of Melody Osceola. Bottom row,
from left: Fireworks illuminate "Carnival of
Health 1985;" Bobby Billie, right, studies the,
aim of Tribal Police Chief Tony Zecca while
Max Billie, left, loads his suction-cup dart gun;


of















































































































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May 198 Miccoke Evergdes News


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Parents risk their children's lives daily without realizing it





The folloUingis reprinted from the February
1985 issue of Native Nevadan.
By Bonnie J. Vogler
What are the effects of caffeine?
Caffeine is a stimulant drug, increasing the
resiration (breathing) rate, heart rate, blood
premore and the secretion of the stress
hormone. Its "wake up" effect is maximal
within an hour after the dose. In moderate
amounts (50 to 200 milligrams a day), cnffbne
seemn to be a relatively harmless drug. Some
excepions and considerations are discussed
below.
Pregnancy
Drugs the mother ingests are passed on to the
fetus and caffeine is no exception. The effect of
caffeine on the unborn child is not clear. All
drugs during pregnancy should be avoided
and cAffeine should not be an exception.
Exesive caffeine ingestion (more than eight
cups a day) has been known to cause problems
in delivery.
LaCtation
Chemicals readily enter the breast milk and
c~affne is no exception. A woman who is
nursing her baby should abstain from eating
drinking foods or beverages with caffeine.
Childhood
A cup of hot chocolate or a 12-ounce cola
beverage may contain as much as 50
milligrams of caffeine; chocolate bars also
contribute caffeine. Children who are troubled
by irregular heartbeats or have difficulty in
sleeping may need to control their caffeine
consumption.
Stomach irritant
~'affeine-containing foods and beverages
top the list of true stomach irritants. People
with ulcers should refrain from consuming
caffeine-containing foods and beverages. It
has been shown that even decaffeinated coffee
stimulatedn the secretion of stomach acid. This


ii _


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6" .....do$ NOW


indicates that there must be other compounds
in coffee besides caffeine that aggravate
ulcers.
Tolerance
Caffeine tolerance decreases with age. As
people grow older it is prudent to reduce the
caffeine intake gradually. The morning cup of
coffee may be all right but the afternoon or
evening cup may seriously interfere with the
ability to sleep at night.
Addictive?
Caffeine is not addictive, but it is habit-
forming, and the body adapts to its use to some
extent. A dose greater than what the body has
adapted causes jitteriness, nervousness and
in nal discomforu Sudden abstinence from
the drug after long or even moderate use
causes a characteristic withdrawal reaction;
the most commonly observed symptom is a
headache. If a person has adapted to a much
higher dose level than 50 to 200 milligrams of
caffeine, then dropping back to this level may
cause the same withdrawal reaction.
Overdose
A large dose of caffeine produces reactions
in the body that are indistinguishable from an
anxiety attack. People who drink between
eight and 15 cups of coffee a day have been
known to seek help from doctors for
complaints such as dizziness, agitation,
restlessness, recurring headaches and sleep
difficulties.
Heart Attacks
A large dose of caffeine can also cause extra
heartbeats and is believed to have caused
heart attacks in people whose hearts were
already damaged by degenerative disease.
However, neither caffeine nor its vehicle,
coffee, can be considered a risk factor for the
development of atherosclerosis (hardening of
the arteries). Neither the Framingham study
(done on middle-aged men) nor a study of 7,705
Japanese showed any correlation between
coffee drinking and heart attack risk.


People vary greatly in their responees to
caffeine. However, if you think your
consumption of caffeine may be causing
insomnia, try cutting down (especially in the
afternoon) and see if you sleep better.
Thanks to television advertising people are
becoming aware that ca ffeine is not only found
in coffee, tea and cocoa, but it is also added to
soft drinks. The chart below gives the caffeine
content of popular soft drinks.
Caffeine per 12-ounce can
(in milgrams)


Coca-cola ......
Diet Pepsi .....
Diet Rite .......
Dr. Pepper .....
Mountain Dew.
Mr. Pibb.......
Pepsi-Cola .....
Pepsi Light ....
RC Cola .......


.....45
......36

......40

..00o40
......38
......36
......36
......44
......44
......44
.......60
......40
A4


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59*
30*
30*
tin,
.32
.60
.66
.30
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....................



....................
...........o..oeo....
..........oooo......
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 00 0 0 00 0 00 0
0 0 0 00 0 0 00 0 0 0& 0
0 0 0 0 0 00 00 *0 0 0
0 0 & 0 0 0 0 a 0 0


Shasta Cherry Cola ..
Shasta Cola .........
Shasta Diet Cola.....
Sugar-free Mr. Pibb ..
Sunkist Orange ......
Tlbk


..............
..............
.ooeooooo.....o

..............
ooooeooooooe.
a 0 0 0 0 1


J LC U 0 0 . . o0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Caffeine in beverages, over-the-
counter drugs
Brewed coffee (1 cup) ................ 100-2
Instant coffee (1 cup)..................
Brewed black tea (1 cup) ................
Instant tea (1 cup) ......................
Decaffeinated coffee .................. .
Aspirin compound (aspirin, Phenacet
caffeine) ....... ... .. .................
Cope, Midol, Excedrin, Anacin ..........
Pre-mens ...........................
Many cold medicines ....................
Cocoa (1 cup) .......................... (
No-Doz, Vivarin ....................100-


/


*The amounts of caffeine will vary depending
on how much is used and the brewing method.


I


plugging unused sockets with safety plugs leaves
the chances for electrocution high.


easy reach, such as bleach, ammonia, oven
cleaner, plastic bags, medicines.
*Calling medicine candy to get a child to take
it may make the child think all medicine is candy.
*Leaving a hair dryer, radio or other electrical
appliance plugged in near the bathtub or sink.
Even if the appliance is off, if it is plugged in and
falls into water, electrocution will result.
*Placing pots on the stove with handles turned
outward. If the handles are turned to the center of
the stove it is much less likely a child will tip a
pan, accidentally or out of curiosity.
*Keeping the water heater set too high, which
can cause accidental scalding. A safe
temperature is 120 degrees.
*Leaving electrical cords lying around and not


According to emergency room doctor James
Wasco, parents risk their children's lives daily
probably without even realizing it. From Wasco's
observations, the following are the most common
dangers parents allow:
*Giving a child the wrong dosage or medicine
at night instead of turning on the lights.
*Tying a baby's toys to the rails of a crib or
playpen, where children can get tangled and
strangle.
*Allowing children to ride in a car without a
safety seat or safety belt, which is the only way to
protect them in case of an accident.
*Propping a baby's bottle up for feeding, then
leaving the room. A baby could choke to death.
*Leaving dangerous household products in


Across
1. Nutrient that builds muscles.
17. The measuring stick that measures the
energy in your food is a ie.
22. A, B-vitamin needed to prevent
Spellagra.
, 31. You can balance your diet if you follow
Basic Four.
43. Carbohydrates come from foods that are
sugary and .
Down
1. A very good energy snack.
y 4. If you have trouble with your school work
you should ask your
6,Ybunrieed this to build strong blood.i
17. A balanced diet is more important for
you than for your dog or your
19. You need more energy to play baseball
than you do to down.
35. Vitamin C is one vitamin that you must
have every ,
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health notes


Caffeine is a drug, and it's not a harmless one


Crossword






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micc Wr*tee


Mov 1985


Exhibit reveals little-known truth


Contrary to Sands of Iwo Jima, John Wayne
was not reponible for capturing the Japanese
island during World War II. The Navajo Indians
were.
Until a group of about 400 Navajoe wre
recruited, the Japanese were deciphering the U.S.
Army's secret combat codes, according to the
March 1985 Native Nevadan. But non-lndian
Philip Johnston recalled his early childhood on
the Navajo Reservation, and proposed that the
Marines use the unwritten language as a code.
The Marines recruited the Indians after
hearing a demonstration of the language, with
its complex syntax and unusual tones, and the
"Code Talkers" were formed. The initial
mnhmbers of the Code Talkers had to substitute
Navajo words for English military terms that do
not exist in the native language. For instance,
they used ne-as-jah, or "owl," to mean
"observation;" ga-gih, or "crow," to mean


"patrol plane;" and a-y
"bomb," according to Veld
author. The code vocabula .
hundred Navajo words, an
never able to break the codk


Maj. Howard Conner, as
Fifth Marine Division, ath
capture to the use of the cod
the 46 hours of landing ar
positions on the island, si
Code Talkers operated nonstop and relayed more
than 800 error-free messages.
The Code Talkers were not the only Navajos to
serve in the war, as 3,600 men and about 12
women served in the armed forces.
The story of the Code Talkers is on display at
a military museum on Treasure Island in San
Francisco Bay. The exhibit includes tape
recordings, uniforms and medals.


nve win rs n. ,e Tourm o mrs
consider relocating groves further south.


Missing a reign

Miss Indian America, Anne Louise Willie,
was dethroned by the pageant's board of
directors four months before the end of her
reign. Board pramident Larretta Hall smaid
"repeated and serious disagreements"
including scheduling and accounting of funds
had not been resolved, according to an article
in Cherokee One Feather. Willie, a White
Mountain Apache and Paiute, refused to
resign, claiming she was a "scapegoat" for her
travel coordinator's incompetence, and that
she was denied due process. Alternate Deborah
Secakuku, Hopi, took over the crown.


Shaky shelter

The Bureau of Indian Affairs temporarily
closed the Aztec TnrmitorY~_on the, N
Reservation because the building was
considered unsafe. A leaky roof over the
sleeping quarters caused ceiling hangers to
rust out, resulting in dangerous weight shifts,
and the ceiling had absorbed significant
moisture. The dormitory housed 104 students
who attended public school in. Aztec. The
students were moved to a campus 35 miles
away and are being bused to school until their
dorms are repaired.


Run for the money

A 35-mile Jim Thorpe Relay Run is one of the
highlights of the three-day Festival of
Festivals in Franklin, N.C., which begins
Friday, June 21 and also includes a Fancy
Dance Competition. Each three person relay
team, which must pay a $10 entry fee by
Wednesday, June 12, will share the run from
Cherokee to Franklin. First prize is $400 and
team trophy, second prize is $200 and a team
trophy and third prize is a team trophy, all to
be presented by Carl Thorpe, son, of the late
Olympi athlete. Commemorative T-shirts will
be given to all registered runners. For more
information about the run and the festival,
contact the Eastern Band of Cherokee
Indians, PO Box 411, Cherokee, N.C., 28719,
phone 714/497-9101.

Without a sound

William "Eddie Evans, a member of the
BlackfeetTribe, isoneof215 athletes who will
represent the United States at the XV World
.Gams for the Deaf, July 10-20, in Los Angeles.
Evans won place on the USA Pole Vanlting
Team during tryouts last June. He was the
only Montana com,,petito- to make the team.
He won the silver medal in pole valting


during an invitational with Germanyin 1979,
and won the bronze medal last yearin, Alntin.
Evans lost his hearing in 1973 after falling
from a:hoted".


The following is the second of two parts. The
first part described the four poisonous snakes
common to South Florida: Coral Snake, Eastern
Diamondback Rattlesnake, Dusky Pigmy
Rattlesnake and Florida Cottonmouth. This part
discusses how to avoid being bitten and new first-
aid practices for treating snakebite. Arthur C.
Webster, 721, was a park ranger naturalist at
Everglades National Park before transferring
north.
By Arthur C. Webster, MI
There are many things a person can do to avoid
being bitten by a vennmnus snake. Your safest
bet is to leave snakes alone. The trick is to see the
snake before you get so close the snake has to
defe,,d itself. Watch where you walk. Keep hands,
face and other body parts out of places where you
are unable to look first. Avoid heavy underbrush.
Use a light when walking at night. Step on logs
and make sure no makes are hiding under them
before stepping over. If you wear sturdy boots
and leave your pants loose outside your boots you
will stand a good chance of surviving a strike
without injury.
If you or another person has been bitten by a'
venomous snake there are some first-aid
procedures that you can use that will help
prevent rapid spread of venom throughout the
body. The recommended procedure for snakebite
first aid has changed over the years. Therefore,
the procedure you may have been taught when
you were younger may no longer be a
recommended practice today. Likewise, most
snakebite kits have out-of-date instructions. The
local authority in snakebite first aid is the Tampa
Bay Regional Poison Control Center. The
following first aid procedures come from their
current pamphlet, "First Aid for Venomous
Snakebitee"
First, it is very important to keep the .victim
calm. The more excited a person becomes the
faster the blood pumps throughout the body.


purpose. Do not apply ice or coolness to the
wound.
Fifth, if the bite was from a pit viper ( Eastern
Diamondback Rattler, Pigmy Rattler or
Cottonmouth) and the area around the fang
marks begins to swell, the cut-and-suck method
may be used. This step should not- be used if
medical attention is close by. Make a cut no
longer than a quarter-inch across each fang
mark running lengthwise with the appendage.
The cut should just go through the upper layers of
skin. The purpose of the cut is to enlarge the fang
puncture wounds to make suction more effective.
A note of caution: if the cut is made across the
width of the appendage, blood vessels, nerves or-
tendons may be damaged. Do not use criss-cross
cuts as directed in old snakebite kits, they do
more harm than good. If you have any doubts
about your ability to make the cuts without
causing more damage, the cut-and-suck method
should not be used. The suction should be made
with the suction cup that comes with snakebite
kits.
Oral suction should be used only as a last
resort and then only if there are no open sores in
the mouth. Suction does not need to be used
longer than 30 minutes. The cut-and-suck method
works best when used within the first two
minutes, and it should not be used after 30
minutes. The cut-and-suck inethod is not effective
for Coral Snakebites.
Remember to reassure the victim and keep
him/her calm. If you are away from
transportation walk slowly until you can get to a
car for a ride to the hospital. It is not critical to
bring a dead snake to the hospital for
identification. Most hospitals in South Florida
have two types of antivenom on hand, one for pit
vipers and one for Coral Snakes. The symptoms
from envenomation by Coral Snakes and pit
vipers differ so the hospital staff should be able to
diagnose which type of snake you were bitten by.


Second, keep the part bitten in normal The first-aid procedure of elevating the wound
anatomical position. For example, do not elevate and putting it on ice is not recommended. If you.
a bitten foot above the level of the heart, have any questions- about first aid for poisonous
Third, if bite is on an arm or leg apply a snakebites call the poison center at 1-800-282-
lightly constricting band four to six inches from 3171.
the fang marks, between the fang marks and the Although poisonous snakes may be a threat to
torso. The band should be snug but not tight. You humans, they serve an important role in helping
should be able to feel pulse below the band. to maintain a natural balance of living things.
Release the band every 30 minutes for about one By using common sense and caution your
-minute. chances ofbeing bitten by a poisonous snakes are
I Fourth, wipe or wash off the skin over the fang very remote. With proper first aid and medical
MI.p an :. ., The attenioni your chan ce .of recovering from a
. :.,., .. AA(& ^ ^ .i-. s ti~eb i ah ih :-:,i--- -,::' ---": ............ .
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Best first-aid for snakebite is

avoiding one in the first place










These businesses think you are a valuable customer


HARDWARE
*WE EXPORT 226 6650
* SE HABLA ESPANOL
OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR *


77N, .,I


CHEVROLET


SIGN OF SERVICE
for VISA / Commercial Checking Accounts / Certificates of
Deposit / NOW Accounts / NOW-Plus Accounts / IRA Ac-
counts / Savings Accounts / "Money Market Plus" Accounts /
Safe Deposit Boxes/Drive-In Tellers / Bank by Mail / 24-Hour
Depository / Publix and HONOR Automatic Tellers. / Com-
mercial Loans / Real Estate Loans / Installment Loans / U.S.
Savings Bonds / Collections / Travelers Checks / Christmas
Plan Accounts / Cashier Checks, Bank Money Orders / Payrolls
/ Depository for Federal Social Security, Withholding Taxes.
950 SW 57th AVENUE / MIAMI, FLA. 33144 / 266-1000'
Branches: 6600 SW 8th Street and 11439 Bird Road / Miami
Member FDIC / An Equal Housing Lender / Affiliate of Flori-
da Commercial Banks, Inc., a registered bank holding company.


7220 H. Kendall Drive o 661-2521


ACROSS FROM

DADELAND


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. ..o. . ,
. .,.o.. o. ,


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Western Trail Auto
6698 SW 8th Street
Miami, Florida 33144

Service and parts departments: 261-1141

Discount on Parts

OPEN 7 DAYS:
Monday Friday: 8 8
Saturday: 8 6
Sunday: 9 -3

In business 30 years


NOTICE
for WIC State Plan
The Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida proposes to
request the Food and Nutrition Service, USDA, to release
federal funds to be used by the Miccosukee Tribe for the
delivery of health and administrative services through a
Miccosukee WIC Program.
By August 15, 1985, a State Plan, describing Miccosukee
WIC Program operations, shall be submitted to the FNS for
approval. Efforts to develop the plan are presently under-
way and are on file at the Panning Dept., Miccosukee
Tribe of Indians of Florida, PO Box 440021, Tamiami
Tamicmi Station, Miami, Florida 33144, 305/223-8380.
All agencies, groups, and persons are invited to exam-
ine the State Plan and to submit in writing any comments
and/or recamnendations for consideration by the Micco.
sukee Tribe. Such written comments should be received at
above address on or before August 8, 1985.


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NEW CARS

NEW PICKUPS

NEW BLAZER 4x4s


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May m1985


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HARDWARE STORES "
PITrCHER PUMPS
VARIETY OF PIPES
FISHING SUPPLIES
12786 S.W. 8 ST.


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