<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla dl
!-- Miccosukee Everglades news ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00053712_00004
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2006-10-05T11:29:17Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-03-04T14:35:42Z RECORDSTATUS METADATA_UPDATE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
PreQC Application, 3.4.8
INDIVIDUAL
SMATHERSLIB\ranrenn
METS:note Updated pubdate from serial hierarchy
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type ALEPH 002033559
OCLC 36179317
NOTIS AKM1263
LCCN sn 97027662
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued marc 1982-1985
point start 1982
end 1985
mods:dateCreated April 1, 1985
mods:frequency Monthly
marcfrequency monthly
regular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00053712_00004
mods:recordCreationDate 830103
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (ALEPH)002033559
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg FUG
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent 4 v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1985
mods:number 1985
Enum2
April
4
Enum3
1
1
Year
1985
1985
Month
April
4
Day
1
1
preceding
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Miccosukee clans crier
mods:subject SUBJ650_1 lcsh
mods:topic Indians of North America
mods:geographic Florida
Newspapers
SUBJ650_2
Mikasuki Indians
Newspapers
SUBJ651_1
Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Dade
mods:city Miami
Miccosukee Everglades news
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 53712_004_001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
LSTA
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00053712
sobekcm:VID 00004
sobekcm:Coordinates
sobekcm:Point latitude 25.787676 longitude -80.224145 label Place of Publication
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Miami Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1985 1985
2 4 April
3 1
METS:amdSec
METS:techMD TECHMD1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JPEG1 width 630 height 961
JPEG2
JPEG3
JPEG4 614 998
JPEG5 891
JPEG6 935
JPEG7 953
JPEG8 951
JP21 5264 8032 servicecopy UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_001.jp2
JP22 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_002.jp2
JP23 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_003.jp2
JP24 5008 8144 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_004.jp2
JP25 5840 8256 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_005.jp2
JP26 5456 8096 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_006.jp2
JP27 5344 8080 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_007.jp2
JP28 8240 UFDCUF\03\01\07\52\0000453712_004_008.jp2
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 imagejpeg CHECKSUM 6145c090c937e8457c7ea1c8417eab19 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 341564
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 53712_004_001.jpg
G2 1a175f4a3b96e34acb8d3a8a41c3ba88 383237
53712_004_002.jpg
G3 98114339334a71326c076b8f8393dba0 311576
53712_004_003.jpg
G4 cccbd47b839b52478709de93c46ff586 404084
53712_004_004.jpg
G5 16a4845ac482741b041c92a0727176bd 364338
53712_004_005.jpg
G6 bac64692ed8bd80b20a7118a63a454ab 353683
53712_004_006.jpg
G7 2b3c831ba8bce01e33109570bf36f675 347511
53712_004_007.jpg
G8 017d792b5587affb188f51851df7ca15 345643
53712_004_008.jpg
imagejp2 25dd2de147b48dfe35c79e55a4c73a27 5285154
53712_004_001.jp2
5bb40d9333655e4e7ad7d97ddb5d866c 5285155
53712_004_002.jp2
7d9209e7a01ef4253355b5a28efbcb6c 5285164
53712_004_003.jp2
89b55febbe2869762ee381c58738b3bb 5098200
53712_004_004.jp2
36d55701ac028d584d80263f4f2c94be 6026989
53712_004_005.jp2
1407ef34340580f4ab7c68340d8763c9 5521575
53712_004_006.jp2
a560e0be9282d0e02f00ab19a415f9f6 5397551
53712_004_007.jp2
9710d83950d706e5690a9b2b3f58a2ec 5619763
53712_004_008.jp2
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Chapter
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4
PAGE5 5
PAGE6 6
PAGE7 7
PAGE8 8
METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners webskins which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC UFDC_Interface_Loader
INT2
FDNL FDNL_Interface_Loader


Miccosukee Everglades news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053712/00004
 Material Information
Title: Miccosukee Everglades news
Physical Description: 4 v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: April 1, 1985
Publication Date: 1982-1985
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Indians of North America -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mikasuki Indians -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002033559
oclc - 36179317
notis - AKM1263
lccn - sn 97027662
System ID: UF00053712:00004
 Related Items
Preceded by: Miccosukee clans crier

Full Text

I II III IMWI '


II II


~~r ~~~~ L'l lw' W r~I r g 4l w lr rr -\,

F


I


state prosecutors to prove that the animal he has
publicly admitted to killing for Indian medicine
purposes is specifically that of a Florida panther.

The FGFWFC defines a-Florida panther as one
having a cowlick on its back, whitish flecks on
the back of its neck and a crook at the end of the
tail. *


laws apply to Indians while on tribal land and
influence the interpretation of the Constitutional
right of freedom of religion.
Since Billie's arrest in December 1983 the
Florida Legislature, at the request of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
(FGFWFC), amended the law to incl-"' all
panthers. Billie's defense lawyer" the


The trial for Seminole Tribal Chairman James
Billie, who is accused of the felony of killing a
Florida panther, is scheduled to begin Tuesday,
April 30, in Naples.
Bilie is charged with shooting a Florida
panther, an endangered species, on the tribe's
reservation in Big Cypress. The outcome of the
trial could set a precedent on whether state game


,,~c.ee
,e


ALA &A LA ,A kA L & A g & & A 6 A Ld& A L d & A--------- 0 0 0 & b L &-- O L---A 6 & L,


wrl,Iw Pill kvwA
WF W4 f W4 f N409 WWW W'W'W I If


Miccosuk Tribe of Indians, PO Box 440021, Miami, FL 33144


Vol. 7, No. 4


registration desks at the
evening of the banquet.


hotel the


By time of this publication, the
annual conference of the National
Tribal Chairmen's Association
(NTCA) at Omni International
Hotel may be half over, but there
may still be time to attend the.
awards banquet Wednesday
evening, April 17.
The,formal dinner follows a no-
host reception that begins at 6:15.
Seating for dinner takes place
promptly at 7. The banquet includes
music by Tiger-Tiger and an
alligator-wrestling show, in
addition to the presentation of five
awards to Indian achievers at the
local and national levels.
Banquet tickets are $35 each or
$50 for a couple.. Tickets can be
purchased at the conference


The Miccosukee and Seminole
Tribes are hosting the convention,
NTCA's fourteenth, which began
April 15 and ends Friday, April L9.
Among items on the week's
agenda are the election of new
officers; workshops on national
Indian issues such as health,
government contracting, education,
substance abuse, employment,
gaming on reservations, water
rights; a speech by Acting Assistant
Secretary for Indian Affairs John
Fritz; a discussion of the President's
Commission on Indian Reservation
economies; and a presentation of
Indian affairs and the 99th
Congress.


Senator says U.S. must help

Indians before aiding Africans


High Pockets the Clown will provide everything needed for a healthy
belly laugh at the Carnival of Health April 19.



Carnival of Health is outdoor event


When a floor discussion began in
the Senate March 19 on an African
Famine Assistance bill, Sen. Barry
Goldwater of Arizona voiced this
opinion, according to Indian News
Notes, a publication of the Bureau of
Indian Affairs.

"Here we are, once again, looking
all over the world for people to help.
We have approximately a million
Indians living in this country. I
have about one-third of all Indians
living in my state. Their average
income is about the average income
of what we are talking about in
Africa. The unemployment rate is so
high that it is almost too ridiculous
to mention.
"We have reservations in Arizona


where in 200 years we have never
been able to build a hospital. We
have reservations in Arizona with
no schools. This is not true in just my
state; it is true across the nation.
"The American Indian has never
been treated right by the federal
government. Treaties have never
been followed; promises have never
been kept. Why this Congress can
send billions of dollars around this
world to every little godforsaken
country and then not pay attention
to our Indians in this country is
beyond me. ..
"I hope I live to see the day the
American government realizes its
responsibility in the United States
and does not have to look all over the
world for places to toss its money."


fireworks will be set off for the
fair's grand finale. Another
highlight is a talent contest.
Amusements include High Pockets
the Clown and such games as Fact
Pond, and projects made by
Miccosukee students for the Dade
County Youth Fair will b1e
displayed.
Carnival planners said
volunteers are needed, especially
for the food line. To help out,
contact the clinic or the health
office in the neighborhood
building.


The winner of the weight-loss
contest and a free two-week
membership to Scandinavian
Holiday Health Spa will be
announced Friday evening, April
19, during the Carnival of Health.
Twenty-eight people entered the
contest. The department that loses
the most total weight will also be
recognized.
This year's version of the health
fair takes place outside the
gymnasium from 12:30 to 8:30 p.m.
A community buffet dinner will be
served between 4:30 and 6:30, and


Trial for Seminole Tribal Chairman Billie is April 30


April 1985


Florida tribes host NTCA


conference in Miami





I-------m-


..


mwouk.ar Levmidedsm ew


April 1985


Tommy Tiger parks an airboat in front of the Orange Head Camp during the tribe's survey of its land.
The camp was one of dozens built by non-Indians on Miccosukee land.


Owners of the non-Indian Orange Head
Camp, which is on Miccosukee land, were the
first to comply with a new tribal policy that
requires camp owners to buy permits.

Other camp owners have until Tuesday,
April 30, to apply for one of the permits, which,
if approved, cost $1,200 for one year beginning
May 1. Anyone on tribal land without a camp
permit after April 30 'may be treated as a
trespasser, according to the policy.


The tribe developed the policy because it
"doesn't want indiscriminate use of the
reservation," said Carol K use, planning
director.
Most of the 50 to 80 non-Indian camps on the
tribe's federal reservation in Broward were
built years before the 76,000-acre tract was
legally transferred into trust for the tribe in
June 1984. The tribe developed the policy of
permitting the camps as an option to forcing
their removal.


adolescents on up can come," said Don Epps,
human service counselor.
Some of the specific topics to be examined are
substance abuse as a disease, the stages of
alcoholism, stress, personal development and
alternate highs.
The classes take place every Monday at 3 p.m.
in the health office, neighborhood building. The
department encourages'anyone, including tribal
employees, to come, and Epps said feedback is
appreciated.


Ever searching for ways to meet the needs of
the community, the health department is
offering a new educational service to anyone
interested in the subject of chemical
dependency.
The department is holding weekly
"educational support classes" aimed at
informing the community about the physical,
psychological and sociological effects of alcohol
and other drugs.
"It's kind of a general class so anyone from


Being responsible and dependable could pay
off to local teenagers if they apply for the five
summer jobs the National Park Service is
offering.
None of the jobs require prior training, and
those that require training are taught on the
job. The jobs are part of the park service's Youth
Conservation Corps program, which runs from
Monday, June 24, through Friday, August 16.
Two young people will be hired to work in
Ochopee. One will assist in maintenance work,


and the other student will operate the
switchboard at the park's Ochopee headquarters.
Three teens will be hired to work at Oasis
Ranger Station. One will assist with
maintenance, one will work assisting visitors at
the Visitor Center and one will help rangers do
such field jobs as posting signs.
For more information and to apply, see
Florence Doty in the employment and training
office, neighborhood building.


news articles. Contributors can bring their work to the
newspaper office, in the neighborhood building, or
leave it in the paper's mailbox in the administrative
building.
-Advertising is accepted. Call or write to the editor
at the address at the left for rates and more
information.
Subscriptions are $10 for one year, $18 for two.
Send check or money order with complete address to
address at left.


Miccosukee Everglades News is published on or
about the 15th of each month by the Miccosukee
Tribe of Indians of Florida.
Letters to the editor regarding community issues
are invited. All letters must be signed to be
considered for publication. Published letters, which
may be edited, express the opinion of the author and
not necessarily that of the tribal administration or
community.
The paper also welcomes contributions of art and


-t *


Miccosukee
Everglades News
PO Box 440021, Tamiami Station
Miami, Florida 331.44
305/223-8380

Wendy Cobourne, Editor


JTPA program


offering more


job opportunities

By Florency Doty
Already, three quarters of the Jobs Training
and Pepcement Act (JTPA) program year have
gone by.We're now heavily involved in planning
for the new year, which begins July 1, 1985, and
for the summer programs, which begin June 1,
1985.
It has been a very intense and active year.Two
years ago the tribe had one-fourth of the funding
level it now has to provide employment and
training activities for Miccosukee community
members. Now, with the increase in funds for
the tribe's JTPA programs and with the generous
and imaginative support of the Florida
Governor's Council on Indian Affairs' (FGCIA)
JTPA program, we have been able to assist
community members with a wide range of
employment, training and educational
opportunities that would otherwise have been
unavailable.
In the last three quarters of the program year,
72 individuals have been enrolled on the tribe's
Title IV, Summer Youth Employment Program
and the FGCIA's programs. Three individuals
went on to receive their General Equivalency
Diplomas (GED) after completion of their
training on the JTPA program; three were
employed by private industry off the reservation;
18 obtained non-JTPA employment; 12 are
students; and 14 are currently enrolled in one of
the programs.
The employment and training program can
provide a number of opportunities for community
members. Any individual between the ages of 14
and 16 can enroll in the JTPA school/work-
experience program as long as s/he is regularly
attending school. There are various summer
programs for youth available such as the
FGCIA's Florida Indian Youth Program (FIYP),
the National Park's Youth- Conservation Corps
Program and our regular Summer Youth
Employment and Training program.
The tribe has recently been notified of its
allocation of funds for the new JTPA Title IV
program year, which begins July 1, 1,985, and is
available to those from age 17 on up.
Through participation in this program,
individuals may be placed in employment and/or
training positions virtuallyin any field they may
wish to explore or upgrade skills in, whether the
job is on the reservation or in town.
On the reservation, the GED, adult-education
and vocational education programs are made
available to JTPA participants as appropriate.
Also, a reciprocal referal system exists between
other programs whereby services needed by
participants can be provided.
Any employee or individual interested in
hearing more about the tribe's employment and


training program should contact Florence Doty
in the neighborhood building at the tribal
government complex, (305) 223-8380.
The positive impact these programs have on
participants and the community as a whole is
tremendous. A number of times, community
members have stopped by to say thanks for the
job for themselves or a family member. But,
really, the thanks should go to tribal
administration for making these opportunities
possible.:


Orange Head Camp builders are first

to buy tribal permit to keep camp


New class offers info about drugs, alcohol


Park service to hire five students for summer





Seminole Recreation Schedule


~T,~.~~III~~I\III~~I~I;I\~I~~~~~~.~I~5~`


subscriptions i
d Subscriptions to Miccosukee Everglades News are $10 for one year,
(12 issues) or $18 for two years (24 issues).

Name:
Address:
Mail this form with check or money order to: Miccosukee Everglades News, I
P.O. Box 440021, Miami, Florida, 33144.. C
IIPl a II / / I = = =I / / / 1 1


IC 1 ~ ~


In business 30 years
'-..,'-.-...--L',-=-,. ... *:..:,.b :.L,,i.1.-:..,-,-:-- 1.- ..... ---,,',jjjj...j


`Ic~'~l-~;~r~lr;~l~---------


3: i:


Miccosukee Everglades News


AoN 1985


The following is a list of Miccosukee students
who won awards for projects they entered in the
Dade County Youth Fair in March.
American Heritage
First place jewelry entries:
Joshua Osceola
Angie Cypress
Johnny Tigertail
Elizabeth Osceola
Margaux Doctor
Amanda Bert
Sean Billie
Willie D. Osceola
Ryan Billie
Gabriel Osceola
Ricky Osceola
Julie Chrisjohn
Philip Sanders
Ursula Billie
Geneva Jim
Helen Tigertail
First place for knife sheath:
Brint Roland
First place special prize for jewelry:
Jolene Osceola
Josefina Gomez
Home Improvement
Second place patchwork wall hangings:
Jolene Osceola
Caryn Billie
Margaux Doctor


Crafts
First place moccasins
Jeffrey Chrisjohn
Randy Schenandoah
Charles Billie
Dukes Billie
First place leather pouches
.Duane Billie
Charlotte Billie
First place loomed wall hanging:
Josefina Gomez
Child Development
Children's book:
Priscilla Buster (1st place)
Helen Tigertail (2nd place)
Howdy Osceola (2nd place)
Pamela Billie (2nd place)
Eric Gomez (1st place, child's doll)

Wood Carving
Randy Schenandoah (1st place)
Jewelry
Priscilla Buster (special award)
Heather Cypress (1st place)
Charlotte Billie (1st place)
Jolene Osceola (1st place)
Eeyao Osceola (1st place)
Barbara Billie (1st place)
Farren Osceola (1st place)
Elizabeth Osceola (3rd place)


Viorda Miller, left, modac the ball out of reach of
Regina Jumper at a tournament hosted by the
Micoesukee Tribe.







Dr. Rehbein

Memorial Tourney


Miccosukee Recreation is reviving the annual
Dr. Rehbein Memorial Basketball Tournament
Friday and Saturday, May 10 and 11.
Interested teams have until Saturday, April
20, to register for the competition. The double-
elimination tournament has room for six teams
each of men and women, and a most valuable
player will be selected from each divisions.
The tournament is in honor of the memory of
- Dr. J. W. Rehbein, who was director of the tribal
Community Action Agency (CAA) for several
years during the '60s. He was still working for
the tribe in 1972 when he died from a heart
attack.
To sign up for the tournament, call Cassandra
Osceola, recreation supervisor, at (305) 223-8380.


Anyone interested in participating in these
events can do so by contacting Cassandra
Osceola, recreation supervisor for Miccosukee,
at 223-8380, extension 372, or by calling
Seminole's recreation department at (305) 583-
7112.

5th Annual Howard Tiger Memorial
basketball Tournament
th Annual 1-Pitch Softball Tournament
oftball Tournament
eminole Softball Tournament
nd Annual Josiah Johns Memorial Roping
'-ball & Little Girls Softball Tournament
uinual Play Day


This schedule of the Seminole Tribe
recreation activities is published as a service to
those members of the Miccosukee community
who want to participate or attend. A schedule
of this tribe's activities is pending.


Hollywood

Big Cypress
Brighton
Hollywood
Brighton
Brighton
Big Cypress


April 19 & 20

May 3 & 4
May 17 & 18
May 24 & 25
June 1
June 8
June 29


Parts


Discount on


S1 1I03 S. Dixie Hwy. (Next to Pumpernik's) Miami, FL 33156
(305) 235-5525

0 .' Kip & Krista
> af ^O^ Fabrics + Patterns Notions Trims
Indian Jewelry Moccasins Crafts -
Boutique Cothing & Gifts
"Thank you for your business for over 35 years"
Lynn Paskewich, Owner


..a


i.


OPEN 7 DAYS:


Monday Friday:
- Saturday:
Sunday:


8-8
8 6
9 3


Miccosukee students win top awards

for projects in Dade County Youth Fair


set for May 10,


11


Western Trail Auto

6698 SW 8th Street
Miami, Florida 33144

Service and parts departments: 261-1141





































Congress to discuss Indian issues


Live-in treatment


Indians in Canada fight to


forests


Paper suggests other articles worth reading
ap^


I


~kZ~R---l'. ~r~ ~rrr


I I


A lt,-la,, ,n,,M N


The Miccosukee Tribe will observe
American Indian Day Monday, May 13, but it
will probably be doing it alone.
When President Reagan declared that date a
holiday in 1983-during the time he gave
personal attention to Indian affairs-it was
just for that year. May 13, celebrated as
American Indian Day in some states since
1916, was never made a permanent national
holiday.
Neither was the fourth Friday in September,
which this year falls on the 27th. That day has
been observed in some states since 1919, and
it's the one that staff of the Florida Governor's
Council on Indian Affairs will honor. Other
state employees, however, will observe neither
date.
The Seminole Tribe, the only other federally
recognized tribe in Florida, will celebrate in
September, as will most other tribes in the
country.
The campaign for such a holiday began in


1912, according to the Book of Days, when
Seneca Indian Arthur C. Parker asked
Congress to establish it Congress didn't so
Parker convinced the Boy Scouts of America to
do it They kept it up for three years. in the
meantime, Red Fox James, a Blackfeet, rode a
pony around the country gathering the
support of 24 states to declare an American
Indian Day. He delivered the endorsements to
the White House with no results.
Sept 28, 1915, the president of the American
Indian Society issued a proclamation urging
the nation to recognize its native citizens. New
York was the first state to oblige, its governor
declaring in 1916 that May 13 is the date to
observe.
Each state government continues to choose
whether and when to celebrate American
Indian Day. Some proclaim a date annually,
some have set a permanent date and others
ignore the holiday. Some states note Indian
Day, but do not treat it as a holiday.


The National Congress of American Indians
(NCAI) has compiled a list of Indian-related
legislation and issues likely to be discussed
during the upcoming 99th Congress. Included
on the list are the following:
*Reauthorization of the Indian Health Care
Improvement Act, which President Reagan
vetoed after the last congressional session.
The House version of the new bill provides for
establishing a position of Assistant Secretary
of Indian Health.
*Reintroduction of the Bureau of Indian
Affairs (BIA) Fiscal Accountability Act,
which would require the BIA to account its
spending to Congress.


*Reintroduction of the Juvenile Indian
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Act.
*Reauthorization of the Higher Education
Act with an allowance for Indian education
programs to receive "forward funding."
*Introduction of the Amerian Conservation
Corps Act, which would establish a youth
conservation-work program.
*Reintroduction of legislation that would
authorize tribes -to issue industrial
development bonds, a right already granted to
state and local governments and one
recommended in the report of the President's
Commission on Indian Reservation
Economies.


The Chickasaw Nation has opened an
alcohol/drug treatment center with a 30-day,
live-in program. The center can treat up to 10
Indian men at a time, but women are treated
on an out-patient basis. Patients come. from
the 11 counties of the Chickasaw Nation.


Cherokees save town

About 100 families, mostly Cherokee, saved
the school of Bell, Oklahoma, by building a 16-
mile water line when authorities threatened to
close the school. The village had no water lines
or running water, and was unable to get
funding to replace or repair dilapidated
housing. But with help from tribal authorities,
they got funds for a plan that relied on
their own labor. The community formed teams
including both sexes and all ages, and built a
16-mile water line, built 25 new houses and
repaired 20 other homes.


Unusual request
A Jicarilla Apache woman has formally
asked the Secretary of the Interior to giveher a
pro-rata share of her tribe's wealth. Bernice
Muskrat, according to Rocky Mountain News,
is a recent graduate of law school who claims a
1907 federal statute allows for such requests.
Muskrat helped form Americans for Native
Democracy, a group devoted to freeing Indians
from being wards of the federal government
and other organizations that control
reservations. Muskrat's request is being
reviewed in the Interior Solicitor's office. Her
2,400-member tribe owns more than 700,000
acres of land in New Mexico.


save


journal, one made to appease the protesters
and get the approval of a team-government
appointed to be impartial-that spent more
than two years on an alternate plan.
Since the announcement of the final plan,
some anonymous protesters have rut spiral
spikes in spruce and hemlock trees to be,
harvested for timber, then warned the
company that their saws would be ruined by
the spikes, which are difficult to remove from
the trees. Other protests included a rally that
drew 1,200 and a boat blockade to prevent
loggers from unloading their chainsaws and
axes.
After the blockade let the loggers through,
Chief Moses Martin of the Clayoquots ended a
non-violent confrontation by saying, "We
welcome you as a visitor only, not as a logger.'"
Following that incident MacMillan Bloedel
requested a hearing in the British Columbia
Supreme Court to get the protests stopped. The
protesters are also scheduled for a hearing to
get the logging stopped.


Clayoquot and Ahousat Indians in Canada
Share fighting to save 12,000 acres of forests on
Meares Island that are scheduled to be clearcut
by logging company MacMillan Bloedel,
according to an article in the environmental
journal Earth First!
Members of the Indian bands use the
forested island as a source for food-deer,
geese, salmon, clams, oysters-and for other
traditional needs such as herbs for medicine
and cedar for carving canoes and paddles.
The Indians have been joined by a group of
non-Indians, Friends of Clayoquot Sound,
who are conservationists or sympathetic to the
Indians' cause, or who use the island
recreationally for camping and canoeing.

MacMillan Bloedel's plan calls for
clearcutting 90 percent of the forests, about
12,000 acres, of the 21,000-acre island over the
next 20 years. The company publicly considers
the plan a compromise, according to the


from the Winter 1985 Akwesasne Notes.
*"The Situation of Indigenous Populations
in the United States: a Contemporary
Perspective"
*"The Future of Indians" (analysis/
opinion)
*"Indians: Target for Nuclear Waste Sites?"


From time to time, Miccosukee Everglades
N News will suggest articles from other
publications that may be of interest to our
readers but are not appropriate for publication
here due to limited space. All publications
mentioned are-available in the tribe's
p inmunity-library. The following
ggeted readings, coincidentally, are all


r


?


smoke

signals


13 is Indian Day for some


May


Osceola filling in
Curtis Osceola, former planning director for
the Miccosukee Tribe, has taken over as acting
executive director of United South And
Eastern Tribes (USET) in Nashville,
Tennessee. Osceola is filling in while the not-
for-profit tribal support organization selects a
permanent person for the position, which was
formerly held by Itex Evans. Osceola did not
.indicated whether he applied for the job.



No white husbands
Pamunkey tribal law forced Joyce Krigsvold
to move off the reservation with her white
husband and their children. The law prohibits
Pamunkey women who marry men of another
race from living on the reservation. A non-
Indian woman who marries a Pamunkey man,
however, is not only allowed to live on the
reservation but, if the man dies, she is entitled
to live on tribal land until her death as long as
she doesn't marry a non-Pamunkey.
Krigsvold's half-Indian children retained
their tribal rights and are allowed to live on the
reservation without their parents.


Winning novel

Love Medicine, the first novel by Louise
Erdrich, a Turtle Mountain Chippewa, won
the 10th annual National Book Critics Circle
Award for fiction. Erdrich was the first Native
American to win a major literary award since
N. Scott Momaday won the Pulitzer Prize for
House Made of Dawn, a 1969 novel.





SIGN OF SERVICE
for VISA / Commercial Checking Accounts / Certificates of
Deposit / NOW Accounts / NOW-Plus Accounts / IRA Ac-
counts / Savings Accounts / "Money-Market Plus" Accounts /
Safe Deposit Boxes / Drive-In Tellers / Bank by Mail / 24-Hour
Depository / Publix and HONOR Automatic Tellers /Com-
mercial Loans / Real Estate Loans / Installment Loans / U.S.
Savings Bonds / Collections / Travelers Checks / Christmas
Plan Accounts / Cashier Checks, Bank Money Orders / Payrolls
/ Depository for Federal Social Security, Withholding Taxes,
950 SW 57th AVENUE / MIAMI, FLA. 33144 / 266-1000
Branches: 6600 SW 8th Street and 11439 Bird Road / Miami
Member FDIC / An Equal Housing Lender / Affiliate of Flori-
da Commercial Banks, Inc., a registered bank holding company.


~5


5


Miccosukee Everglades News


Coral Snakes tend to be secretive and
therefore are rarely seen. They may be found
hiding under leaves or amongst logs. Coral
Snakes are most common along the edges of
woodlands such as hardwood hammocks and
wet areas. Their neurotoxic venom-
poisonous to the nervous system-is used to
subdue snakes, lizards and frogs.
Florida Cottonmouths, Dusky Pigmy
Rattlesnakes and Eastern Diamondback
Rattlesnakes are all pit vipers. Pit vipers have
a pit or opening between their nostrils and
eyes. Inside the pit is a heat receptor that
helps a snake locate and aim when striking
at warm-blooded prey.
Florida Cottonmouths are aquatic
snakes that average three feet in length. The
dark brown or black head is large arid
triangular. Outlining the mouth are creamy
white streaks. Brown or black bands on a
lighter background mark the snake's body.
The belly is tan. Nonpoisonous watersnakes
are often mistaken for Cottonouths. A
watersnake has a more slender head than a
Cottonmouth. Cottonmouths have elliptical
pupils, typical of pit vipers, whereas
watersnakes have round pupils. In addition,
Cottonmouths may vibrate their tails when
excited and watersnakes do not.
The name Cottonmouth describes the
snake's characteristic aggressive display. A
Cottonmouth avoids physical contact when it
feels threatened by throwing back its head
and opening its mouth wide to expose erect
fangs and the white interior of its mouth.
Cottonmouths are common in freshwater and
mangrove habitats. The eat fish,
salamanders, frogs, snakes, lizards, small
turtles, baby alligators, small mammals and
birds.
One of the most common pit vipers in the
Everglades is the Dusky Pigmy
Rattlesnake. Pigmies have a rough, scaled
gray back marked with dark circular spots
down the center and rows of lighter spots on
the sides. Reddish-brown spots along the
center of the back are usually present. Adults
average 20 inches in length. The rattle is very
small and sounds like the buzz of an insect.
Pigmy Rattlers have a short temper and are
eager to fight. Their aggressive disposition is
a clear warning to stay away.
Pigmies are found in pine flatwoods, around
marshes and in sawgrass-rush prairies of the
Everglades. They feed on mice, lizards,
snakes and frogs.
The largest pit viper in southern Florida is
the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake,
which usually grows to a length of six feet;
however, the largest Eastern Diamondback
on record is eight feet long. Diamondbacks are
identified by their dark brown or black
diamonds outlined by cream or yellowish
colored lines. The background color ranges
from olive to nearly black. Unlike the barely
audible rattle of a Pigmy, Diamondbacks are
loud and buzzing.
Eastern Diamondbacks inhabit palmetto
pine flatwoods and are occasionally
encountered in sawgrass-rush prairies. They
eat rats, squirrels, rabbits, birds. Evidently,


the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake's
favorite food is the cotton rat.
An Eastern Diamondback hunts by coiling
up anld waiting near a rat trail. If something
unedible walks by, like a human, the snake
will remain still, and usually undetected,
blending into the background with its
protective coloration. If you find yourself very
close to a rattlesnake that is coiled and ready
to defend itself do not make any sudden
movement. It has been found that a sudden
movement will elicit a strike from a
rattlesnake while a slow deliberate movement
over the same distance won't. A snake that is
stepped on will probably bite.


The following is the first of a two-part
article. This part describes the poisonous
snakes in southern Florida. The second part,
which discusses how to avoid snakebites and
first aid for snakebites, will appear in the next
issue, May 1985. Arthur C. Webster, III, is a
park ranger naturalist at Everglades
National Park.
By Arthur C. Webster, III
One afternoon, about 5 p.m., a young
woman left a friend's house in the Big Cypress
area to get her shoes from her car. It was a
walk that she will never forget.
Walking barefoot, her attention was
directed archer dog until she felt a sudden,
sharp pain in her foot. She immediately
looked down, saw a snake, and realized she
had just bon bitten.
The woman was rushed to a hospital with
her foot elevated and on ice. Her foot started
swelling soon after being bitten and the pain
and swelling gradually crept up the leg to her
groin. The snake was killed with a pipe and
later identified as a young Florida
Cottoninnuth.
Later, at the hospital emergency room, she
was given antivenom and a rabies shot, and
a hole was cut in her foot to remove dead
tissue. After two nights in intensive care she
was able to return home to recuperate.
Before her encounter with the snake she did
not like to wear shoes; now she does not plan
on walking outside without them.
The odds in favor of this woman's survival
are high since the death rate from poisonous
snakebites is very low. It has been found that
one-third to one-half of the people who have
been bitten by poisonous snakes show little or
no sign of venom injection. The large
number of bites where there is no
envenomation should not be surprising. One
must take into account that snake venom
is meant to subdue prey. Humans are not
preyed on by snakes. Therefore, a snake is
wasting energy if it injects venom into a
human.
Poisonous snakes have large, modified
salivary glands" that secrete venom. The
venom is transported through ducts to a pair
of hollow fangs, which resemble curved
hypodermic needles. There are two different
delivery systems. Coral snakes have short,
erect fangs that inject venom while biting. Pit
vipers have long, hinged fangs that fold up
against the roof of the mouth when the mouth
is closed. The fangs spring erect when the
mouth is opened. These snakes can inject
venom by either striking with the mouth wide
open or by biting. The amount of venom
injected depends upon many different factors
such as irritability of the snake, recency of
feeding, temperature and general health oi
the snake.

Florida's poisonous snakes
The four venomous snake species to watch


out for in, southern Florida are the Coral
Snake, Florida Cottonmouth, Dusky Pigmy
Rattlesnake and Eastern Diamondback
Rattlesnake.
A Coral Snake can be identified by its-
black snout followed by a broad yellow band
across the back of the head and neck. The
body has a-pattern of black and red bands
separated by narrow yellow rings. Coral
Snakes average 25 inches long. A
nonpoisonous snake that is often mistaken for
a Coral Snake is a Scarlet Kingsnake, which
can be identified by its pointed red snout and
broad red boly bands bordered by thin black
Iands. ,


South Florida is home to four

species of poisonous snakes


CHEVRO-LET


NEW CARS


NEW PICKUPS

NEW BLAZER 4x4s


7220 Kendall Drive 0 661-2521


ACROSS FROM


DABELAND










History of Miccosukee Tribe soon to be published


I


I '


6 Mecosekee Evergiodes News


April 1985


and hopes to publish the book "very soon,"
within months.
Yonah, a part Cherokee who has been a
journalist for 25 years, was commissioned by the
tribal business council to write the history a year
ago.
"I was the one who initially brought up the idea
of writing a book," he said, "because when I was
doing the [freelance Gulf Shore Life] magazine
article and trying to research it, there was simply
nothing."
He said there was no single source of
information; he traveled the state to collect all
the data he could find. The Florida Room at the
University of Florida Library in Gainesville
"had more stuff" than any other source,
including the office of the assistant secretary for
Indian affairs, said Yonah.


the most aggressive and they continued to fight
when the other Indians gave up." .
More such discoveries are contained in
chronological detail in the soon-to-be-published
The Story of the Miccosukee Indians. Yonah is
currently on the reservation gathering first-hand
information for the last part of the book, which
deals with the tribe as it is now.
It was the early history of the tribe-from
before the emergence of the Miccosukees from the
Creeks in the mid-1700s until the Seminole
Wars-that was the most difficult to research,
said Yonah, and it is this period that constitutes
the major part of the book.
While the early period takes up 150 pages of the
book, Yonah said he will "only touch on" the
wars because of the many books already
available on the subject. He expects to finish
writing the remainder of the book within weeks,


Trying to write a book has rarely been easy, but
trying to write an accurate and thorough history
of the Miccosukee Tribe was more the job of a
detective than Tsani "Bear" Yonah had
expected.
"One of the biggest problems is that during the
Spanish-English occupation of Florida, they
made some attempt to distinguish between the
tribes, but the Americans made almost none.
Every Indian was a Seminole and better dead,"
said Yonah.


"When you get
themselves, you
distinguishing who


into the Seminole Wars
have a heck of a time
did particular things."


Nevertheless, Yonah said, he discovered that
"it was the Miccoonkees who carried the brunt of
all the Seminole Wars, simply because they were


9L
0


v


Sudden Impackdt is managed by local resident Doris Osceola and tribal Ordonez, lead guitar; Keith Clementson, rhythm guitar; and Mark
employee Stella McLaughlan. From left are Moses Davidson, drummer; Rakhead, bass guitar.
Luther McKenzie, keyboards; David "Becky" Morrion, lead singer; Cecil


when it performed before audiences of 10,000 and
15,000 in a bullfight arena in Cartegena,
Colombia, as part of the Caribbean Music
Festival. The band was one of about 15
representing their home countries.
The band hopes to play- at the Reggae
Sunsplash in Jamaica this August, said Osceola,
but in the meantime will play clubs in South
Florida. No dates were confirmed at press time,
but Osceola and McLaughlan, who both work at
the Miccosukee Village and Gift Shop, should
know the latest.


Criteria Studio in North Miami.
Sudden Impack occurred, according to founder
Luther McKenzie, when he and three other
members of the now defunct Sons of Creation met
with two members of the uprooted Roots
Uprising. Sons of Creation was one of the most
popular bands to play at the Miccosukee Tribe's
annual Everglades Music Festival in July 1984.
Roots Uprising also had a solid following in
South Florida.
The new band was well received in March


Reggae band Sudden Impack will release a
"disco 45" and an extended-play (EP) disc
sometime in May in the United States and
Jamaica, according to Doris Osceola, who
manages the group with non-Indian Stella
McLaughlan.
The single features "Misty Day" and its dance
mix on the flip side and the EP features longer
versions of the same. Dean Frazier, probably
Jamaica's most prominent saxophonists, is
guest o% the mixes, which were recorded at


Barbeque restaurant.
In the meantime, Southern Bell has arranged
for one of its employees to remain at the tribal
complex to monitor every problem until the
service is fully restored.
In the letter to the PSC that got the phone
company's attention, Tribal Chairman Buffalo
Tiger said "these problems have escalated to the
degree that it is almost impossible to rely on the'
telephone system to conduct business. In fact the
situation. .has now reached the point of
embarrassment. .It appears that just as
the cost for our phone service has increased over
the years, so has the quality of service declined-'


received. The callers would hear the line ringing,
however, and would be "given the impression
that no one is in the office," stated the letter.
Another major complaint, which occurs most
frequently when it rains, is screeching static on
the line,' often followed by disconnection and
then dead lines.
Jim Smith, a district manager of installation
and maintenance for Southern Bell, said some of
the problem was the result of people shooting one
of the cable "repeaters." The company said it will
erect a cement wall around the metal box, which
is near the arches, a popular, illegal shooting site
off Tamiami Trail (U.S. 41) east of the Pit


Users of telephones in the Everglades area
should be'able to rely on their service by May as a
result of a campaign by the Miccosukee Tribe.
Frustrated by years of unreliable service, the
tribe in March sent a letter to all five members of
the Public Service CommisPon, (PSC), which
tea Southern Bell.. ,jhat action swiftly
relted in a meeting at trib;alheadquarters April
3&:ended by seven top-levelofficials from the
phone company and a representative of the
commianion.
:The tribe's main complaint, existent since 1980
aind whichrworsened in the last year, according to
the letter, was that incoming calls were often not


Indian and tribal employee manage local reggae band


Phone service in Everglades should be dependable by May






























































.Bill
Bill


Will


\.. *^ ''' ''. \
..L *T i *'i 7 i'
.Mioconfk-e cvrclldt~n rtw'"-, '"'-


F_-V-__wvu --w-- ---


Aril I95


Tribe offers copter

rides to reservation

in tour package

The Miccosukee Tribe and Dade Helicopters
are jointly offering "VIP tours" of the Tndian
Village and Everglades for tourists who are in
the city.
The tourists are flown from Dade Helicopter's
headquarters on Key Biscayne to the reservation
for an aerial tour of the Everglades, a ground tour
of the village, mnsee nm and gift shop, and a ride
on a airboat. They ep-' a typical Indian lunch
before they are flown back to Key Biscayne. Some
hotels make the arrangements for their guests.
For more information, call the Miccosukee
Village at 223-8380, or Dade Helicopter at 374-
3737.



Exhibitors invited

to Indian Market

Indian artists who want more exposure of their
work can consider traveling to Boulder,
Colorado, for the fifth annual Indian,.Market.
For $150 outside or $300 inside, the
exhibitors-who must be Native American'-can
display their work in a provided booth from 9 to 9
for four of the busiest days of the year: July 4-7,
Thursday through Sunday.
More than 100 cash awards are to be given in a
juried show, including a $1,000 Best of Show. All
attending artists are also invited to compete for
cash using the theme "The American Indian and
the American Flag."
A list of the rules and copies of the application
form are available free in the newspaper office.



Correction

Conchita Torano was inadequately identified
as a translator in a photo on page seven in the
March 1985 edition of this newspaper. While
Torano did translate during a recent visit to
Spain, her proper title is Director of Promotions
and Public Relations of Hispanic Affairs
Division. Torano said she is also a consultant to
Tribal Chairman Buffalo Tiger.


information ask for personnel or Max Billie at
223-8380. The other position is a Jobs Training
and Placement Act (JTPA) secretary for the
employment and training office. The salary is
$4.75 per hour, and applicants need a
"considerable knowledge of recordkeeping
and secretarial procedures" among other
requirements. See Florence Doty in the
employment and training office,
neighborhood building, for more info.



Half-price animals

Metrozoo is offering half-price admission to
any senior citizen and up to six guests. The
offer, which is sponsored by International
Medical Centers (IMC), is available through
Tuesday, April 30. IMC Gold Plus members
simply present their identification cards at the
zoo, but any other senior citizens and their
guests can get the deal by calling ahead, 624-
5252, or toll free, 1-800-IMC-PLUS.



Front-page news

The Miccosukee Village made the front page
of the first issue of Florida News, a full-color
tabloid published by the Florida Division of
Tourism for distribution in the United
Kingdom. The slick newspaper is mailed to
travel agencies to keep them informed of what
Florida has to offer tourists.




Managing well
Hugo Romero had experience managing
hospital cafeterias and concessions at airports
before the tribe hired him. Romero replaced
Fred Scarola as Miccosukee Restaurant
manager March 29.



Something for everyone
From the Blackfeet Tribal News: "If you find
mistakes in this publication, please consider
that they are there for a purpose. We publish
something for everyone, and some people are
always looking for mistakes."


A


v


-"-*A


R;ckte


7;gccg


~- 2~~:d:S


-tribal talk



Do you know me?

The March 25 Seminole Tribune reproduced
an old photograph of an Indian man from
Tamiami Trail, asking readers for his name or
any information about him.The photo appears
on page two, and anyone with information can
notify this newspaper or the Seminole
Tribune.



Events update
Here's what's happening between mid-April
and when the next issue of this paper is
published in mid-May. Wednesday, April 17,
is Open House in the Miccosukee School,
probably beginning right after school. Friday,
April 19, is the tribal Carnival of Health, from
12:30 to 8:30 p.m. outside the gymnasium. And
culture day in the tribal school is Friday, April
26. Parents of students are invited to join in the
traditional activities.



Getting the job done
Miccosukee School students have a new bus
driver and the education department has a
new secretary all in one. Lisa Billie was hired
to get the job done, a position vacated by Eteau
Huggins.



Moving up
Stella McLaughlan was recently promoted
to manage the Miccosukee Indian Village. She
formerly assisted Lee Tiger in public relations
work.



Apply now
If they haven't been filled by time of this
publication two jobs are open in the tribe. One
is for a buildings and grounds custodian that
pays depending on experience. For more







___ _


Healthbound



Treating high blood-pressure is a family affair


t ... 'A


8 MWc w-- Evoo" Now


April 1985


May is National High-Blood Pressure
Month. All ,uoiath you will hear facts about
high b/p on radio and TV. They will be
reminders to cut down on salt, to take your b/p
medications every day and to get your pressure
checked. The following information is adapted
from a py4kphlet prepared in cooperation with
the National B/P Education Program.
They need you
High blood-pressure is a lifelong disease
that affects many people. A member of your
family may have high blood-pressure (or
hypertension). This person needs your help
and support. Your help may make the
difference in how well your family member
stays on treatment. And the only way high
blood-pressure can be controlled is by
following the treatment plan. It is up to the
person who has high b/p to follow the plan.
But this article will tell how you can make it
easier for the one you care about.
Do you know about high b/p and its
treatment?
Because someone in your family may have
high b/p, you should know a little about it.
High blood-pressure occurs when the blood
vessels are too narrow and the heart has to
pump harder to move blood through the body.
High blood-pressure cannot be cured, but it
can be controlled. There are no early warning
symptoms of high b/p. And people cannot tell
when their blood pressure is high. But those
who are controlling their high b/p with
medication can continue with their usual
activities. The only way to control high blood-
pressure is by taking medicine every day.
Many people start by taking their medicine
every day, but then for some reason stop. If
they stop, their blood pressure will go up again.
They are taking a chance of having other
medical problems later, like heart attack,


stroke or kidney damage if they do not stay on
treatment Because you care, don't you want to
do all you can to help them stay on treatment?
Working together
Working together to control high blood-
pressure takes special caring and
understanding. There may be some problems
and decisions to make. The way the family
works together is important for high b/p
control. In whatever way your family makes
decisions you should consider these points:
-Treating high b/p means the family may
have to make special plans to help one of its
members follow treatment every day.
-The whole family should understand the
patient's treatment for high b/p.
-High b/p may not be the family's only
health concern.
Changes for the family
Treating high b/p may also mean changes
for the whole family. The one in the family
with high b/p may have to make a change in
what a/he eats. Changing eating habits is
hard. It is harder if the person is doing it alone.
It is much easier if the whole family is on the
same diet plan. Cutting calories and reducing
salt will not only help the person with high
b/p, but this is a good health habit for the
whole family.
You should know
There are some special things you should
know to help someone with high b/p. When a
person finds out s/he has high b/p and has to
treat it for life, he may become upset or
angry and have some fears. Let your family
member know you care. Listening to these
concerns is one way to help.
The family should help the patient stay on
treatment, identify questions to ask the doctor
and support the doctor's advice. Your interest
and support are very important.


The feelings of other family members may
also be affected by the changes the whole
family must make. This is natural.
Decide how you can help
Talk about it together and decide how the
family can help. More help may be needed with
some things than with others. Everyone can
do a small part. Here are some suggestions on
what the family can do:
*Help with medication: Remind the patient
to take the medicine everyday, by putting the
medicine out at the right time or by leaving
notes where they can be seen. Refill the
prescription before it runs out or leave
reminders by marking the date on the
calendar.
*Help with clinic visits: Go with the patient
to the clinic for company and support. This is a
good time for family members to ask questions
and learn more about high blood-pressure. The
nurse-practitioner can explain the patient's
treatment and how the family can help.
*Help follow progress: Remind the patient to
record b/p measurements on a chart. Look at
the chart together, and follow the progress.
Talk over any problems the patient has in
reaching his goal of a lower b/p reading.
*Help patient stay on diet: the whole family
should cut calories and reduce salt. It is a good
health habit. It can be fun to find new recipes
that the family can enjoy. Remove the salt
shaker from the table. Don't buy food that is
not part of the patient's diet. If others want
food that is not part of the patient's diet, they
can have them outside of the home.
*Other ways to help: Suggest exercise the
family can do together such as walking or bike
riding.

--Crystal Hipkins
Prevention-education coordinator


~1
;4
1

t
II


r







ij


S A S E L B A T E G E VCD T

T N X S D E N T I S T D D I A


I B R B 0 R Q


G U M S C F P S O


Word List
gums
decay
plaque
bacteria
floss
toothbrush
toothpaste
flouride
sugar
acid
calculus
disclose
tooth
periodontal
enamel
bone
saliva
molar
bicuspid
cuspid
incisor
'dentist
hygienist
assistant
milk
meat
vegetables
fruits
cereals
permanent


U E O L C L G A F O A P L S S T

R N S K G Y F Y E L P A U U I H

F A I B Z E 'J E O A H B 0 C S B

A M C V U C X U N R T X R I T R


R E N I F ~J I Q


U L O P I B A U


K L I M D E C A Y V O H D P N S

Z W Y D O S H L D N T A E M T H


F E Q


T O Z P J E H R I P ~-O M


The clinic will be closed every day between 12
and 1 p.m. for the nurse's lunch break. The last
appointment with the nurse will be at 4 p.m.
unless it is an emergency. This gives the nurse a
chance to work on the charts.
Your cooperation with this schedule will be
greatly appreciated.

Indian Kids
Love Them.
Itimmunize
Them
^----ff '^- iL-'^Se~afil'^ it'''F-^ >yz*^.**
Wl~~3 A .^ ^ ^m:s*:^E^ B '*w^a^ C-''<-1-.-;
xEYnil1 :':3 ^e S


C A L C U L U S G S I-N A E H P

X R T T U.C S H U Q P I K R Y U

T I EA Y SE J D R R M I M G

H T 0 0 T I P 0 W W X V S A I V


LHGKQ


DNITQ


F U V N E F


Z W T S K T G C D S I W Q E N D


M S


U G A R A B C B L J M N I N


L X Q L P- B- 0 N E D Y R Z T S A

S A L I V A C S L A E R E C- T M


i
r,

n


health notes


Word search