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UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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1985
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mods:titleInfo
mods:title Miccosukee clans crier
mods:subject SUBJ650_1 lcsh
mods:topic Indians of North America
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Newspapers
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Mikasuki Indians
Newspapers
SUBJ651_1
Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Miccosukee Everglades news
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Miccosukee Everglades news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053712/00003
 Material Information
Title: Miccosukee Everglades news
Physical Description: 4 v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: March 1, 1985
Publication Date: 1982-1985
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Indians of North America -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mikasuki Indians -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002033559
oclc - 36179317
notis - AKM1263
lccn - sn 97027662
System ID: UF00053712:00003
 Related Items
Preceded by: Miccosukee clans crier

Full Text
. .. .. .. .. .I


4


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Miccosukee Tribe of Indians, PO Box 440021, Miami, FL 33144 Vol. 7, No. 3
i f ii l II I


Carnival of Health, this year's "new and
improved" outdoor version of the tribal health
fair, will for the first time extend into the evening,
:I" said coordinator Crystal Hipkins. ,
The carnival begins on the baseball feld at
12:30 p.m., Friday, April 19, and lasts through
Games, contests, a community dinner and other
events until the grand-finale fireworks at 8:30.
S11 'ih~e later hours are so that people who work at
the [tribal) enterprises will have a chance to
come," Hipkins said.
1.="] + ii She said the new theme is about "just having
fun and learning stuff." Funseeikercan playand
m i 1 ..... learn at 13- booths featuring such games as Fill
the Cavity,-Fact Pon&d and- Rolle Up arld Normal
Blood Pressureo, They can also comp ete in re
-eithy talent or breakdance contestssampe ,'unjunk
,,1 ll~ hklfood,'-or buy a $1 raffle ticket tohave a chanceat
S", Heather Cypress gets a innion a ..
S laughfrm hvingherHipkins promises a prize towhoeveristhe most
re-r blood pressure taken. entertaining at the carnival, as long as the
SThe tribal health depart- entertaining takes place during the fair's first
ment did the task free talent show ever
S.- ., for all those who came to '"hey can do anything they want," said
: i+its health mini-fair in Hipkins. "They can sing, dance, lip sine, play
"'' February. Anyon who guitar, be funny, whatever."
missed the mini-fair can Each act should last about three to five
.have the same done at the minutes, she said. The department can supply a
tribal Carnival of Health turntable or cassette player, if needed. Details
in April. are pending, but interested persons cangetmore
information from Hipkins.



Non-lndi ans must get permits for camps by April 30
Nonn I ge


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the reservation has not been issued a tribal
permit by April 30, 1985, any non-Indians there
can be charged with trespassing.

Those camp owners who missed the meeting
can get an application for a permit and more
information by calling the tribe at (305) 223-
8380.T t
The tribe developed the policy because "it


doesn't want indiscriminate public use of the
reservation," according to Carol Kruse,
planning director. "It wants to control public
access to and use of the reservation. It is the
tribe's private property."
Most of the 50 to 80 camps estimated to exist
on the 76,000-acre tract in Broward were built
years before the land was legally transferred
into federal trust for the tribe in June 1984.


Owners of hunting camps on the Miccosukee
Tribe's Alligator Alley Reservation who missed
a public meeting March 18 at tribal
headquarters should contact the tribe
immediately if they wish to continue using their
weekend -getaways.
The tribe has established a policy of annually
permitting the camps for $1,200. If a camp on


reservations, lessen tribal dependence on federal
monies and programs, and reduce the stifling
federal presence in Indian affairs."
NTCA's executive board already rejected 22 of
the recommendations and-deemed three
irrelevant to the purpose of the study. The board
agreed with seven recommendations and
suggested revisions to five others that would


The National Tribal Chairmen's Association
(NTCA) will meet in Miami Friday, March 29; to
develop a final response to the Reagan
administration on the recent report of the
President's Commission on Indian Reservation
Economies.
The report-which took one year and $1 million
to- complete-contains 37 recommendations


recommendations, and at the meeting this month
it plans to develop a comprehensive response to
give to President Reagan.
The Miccosukee Tribe found --more or the
commission's report acceptable than did NTCA,
agreeing with at least .seven rcommaendetion
that the association rejected.


i-ursaPI-a*-


Carnival of


Health includes


talent contest


and fireworks


NTCA rejects two-thirds of reservation economies report





















I


I _


;


: -I I 1


New parents can learn what it's all about


. -


2 Mcouk- Evegldes N"w


March 1985


New parents usually could use all
the help they can get, and beginning
March 19 they can get a good deal of
it every Tuesday night.
The tribal departments of child
welfare and health are
beginning a new five-week series of
Teenage Parent Training classes
focusing on prenatal (before birth)
and postpartum (following birth)
care.
'"here are a lot of new pregnant


nursing women, what a woman
can expect during labor, and how to
care for the newborn and new
mother.
"We'll be talking about the value
of breastfeeding, showing them
products such as a breast poump
and baby items, giving them
coupons, showing films. There'll be
a lot of audio-visual aids," said
Topping.
The free classes take place in the


people and a lot of people that have
just given birth," said Laura
Topping, child welfare worker,
"I hope we are going to have some
new people because it's different this
time" from the past classes.

Topping, along with assistant Sue
Jane Bert and Prevention
Education Coordinator Crystal
Hipkins,will discuss the nutritional
and other needs of pregnant and


Learning Center, in the neighbor-
hood building, from 5 to 6:30 every
Tuesday night. Babysitting will be
provided, as well as light
refreshments.
Topping said fathers are
encouraged to come, and that "it's
not strictly limited to teenagers. We
had 20- and 22-year-olds coming
before, and really anyone who
wants to attend is welcome."


It's justice for all those cases of "children under
17 not admitted without an adult."
At the Easter Youth-Social Dance no one older
than 17 will be admitted, and anyone as young as
six can attend. The tribe's youth recreation
program is hosting the dance in the recreation
hall Saturday, April 7, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
"The objective of this dance will be to offer the
youth an alcohol-free environment in which they
may enjoy themselves and be with youth their
age," said Recreation Supervisor Cassandra
Osceola in a memo to the tribal business council
requesting approval for the event.
Admission to the dance is 50- cents, and
refreshments are free inside. Besides games, the
event includes boy's and girls' dance contests.
A bake sale to raise funds for decorations for
the dance will take place Friday, April 5, in the
neighborhood building.


Patricia "Eelao" Bert learns on an IBM personal
computer, donated to ,the school for a test project


a year ago. Helping Eelao help herself is teacher
Joanne Junker.


in the tribal day-care center, but they could use
more. Alice "Peanuts" Daye, Jr., is working in
the center every weekday afternoon, but
mornings there's still just two people.
Interested persons should see Cassandra
Osceola in the Community Action Agency
office.,


A new alternative and contemporary judge
were recently appointed to the tribal court, but
the position of prosecutor remains vacant.
Agnes Cypress was named alternate judge
and Minnie Bert was appointed contemporary
judge. Persons interested in becoming
prosecutor can get details from Lucille
Jumper, court clerk.


Adult ed on Saturdays
Adult-education has convenient new hours
that include Saturdays. Now high-school
dropouts can drop that label with the help of
instructor Cynthia Greene. Greene teaches
General Equivalency Diploma (GED)
preparation classes-and a long list of'
others-every Monday through Thursday, 5 to
9 p.m., and every Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Miccosukee Everglades News is published on or
about the 15th of each month by the Miccosukee
Tribe of Indians of Florida.
Letters to the editor regarding community issues
are invited. All letters must be signed to be
considered for publication. Published letters, which
may be edited, express the opinion of the author and
not necessarily that of the tribal adlministrntin ar


news articles. Contributors can bring their work to the
newspaper office, in the neighborhood building, or
leave it in the paper's mailbox in the administrative
building.
Advertising is accepted. Call or write to the editor
at the address at the left for rates and more
information.
Subscriptions are $10 for ,an vwlr i_ l fiw tse


Miccosukee
Everglades News
PO Box 440021, Tamiami Station
Miami, Florida 33144-
305/223-8380


Easter Dance


set for


April 6


tribal talk




Something in common
Gary James McKinley Poole and Meggie
Christina Osceola will have something in
common as long as they live: their birthdays.
Mothers Roberta Sanders and Claudia
Osceola gave birth March 6.


Talk it out *
Young women 13 to 18 years old have
someone to go to when they need to talk: each
other. Child-welfare worker Laura Topping
said any girls between those ages can join the
regulars who get together every Monday night
from 5 to 6 in the Learning Center,
neighborhood building.


Job opening
Minnie Lou Billie and Morningstar Osceola
have some help caring for infants and toddlers


GED awarded

Eleanor Billie has joined the ranks of high-
school graduates. Billie recently received
notification that she passed the required tests
and earned a General Equivalency Diploma
(GED).


Prosecutor needed


Volunteer to camp
High-school students interested in volunteer
conservation jobs off the reservation for up to a
month should apply as soon as possible
through Florence Doty in the employment and
training office, neighborhood building. No
specific skills or experience is required, but
participants should expect to camp primitively
during the program.


Signs of fire
Dry-season brush fires, which continue to
foul the air in parts of South Florida, burned
up seven wooden billboards along the Trail,
U.S. 41, that advertised the Miccosukee Indian
Village.













Petting zoo ..
Students at the Miccosukee school get first-hand lessons in biology in science _
teacher Kathy Pollack's classroom. Kevin Bert, both photos, prefers to take ,
fewer risks by letting someone else hold the animal while he admires it. Below, I 1
Chorlotte Billie cuddles Thumper, a floppy-eared rabbit. Right, Jeffrey
Chrisjohn babies Oscar, an affectionate ferret. The animals are usually in cages
in the science room, along with mice, gerbils, rats, hamsters and a turtle.





.,*. -.. '


























issues of gaming on reservations, such as bingo, incorrect. Keith Lionel is being held by mother
and the recent and controversial report of the Diane Rockwell.


























Economies. OffPicer nominated

,ft l rejected nearly two-thirds of the '
Srecommendations and discredited the report





0 W ash ngten DC saying there was little opportunity or search for Benevolent Association has nomiah James
S" tribalinut) Thurston of the Miccosukee Police Dpartment
for Officer of the Year~. The nomination is the
sai pro oh k ht sa ne-rblwonl dniida elyFak0 ae7
'~~~~? Coni;UETwudmstlkl ddesteOnpg hefrtaesomte adsnwr
USET If de tak issue fB gain nsrain'sc sbn n~ c'KihL~e binghld bYmter
and* the reen and ontrverial rpr fteDin okel
ea~ ~ ~~l rs eLoore.Peidn' Comsso onlda Rsraio iern t d
tri es pr bl m (Th NainlTiahimnsAscainCoi e
gt n C .l:ria reece nerytotido h eeoen:eDd:sctoC~ny hptra omtdfh aePl
Ar~~'"* '( a reomnaineaddsrdtdterpr


South and Eastern Tribes (USET) converged on appropriate politicians about Miccosukee which a kilo of cocaine was confiscated from
the Capitol mid-March for USET's "Washington concerns, including the need for more funds for motorist passing through the reservation on U.S.
Impact Week." It was the fourth year the tribal particular programs and that tribal elections 41 (Tamiami Trail.) Thurston has been on the
leaders personally explained the problems of take place in November. force for a year.


- r! a r? rr: ear I~


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Miccosukee Evergldes News


momrh im8


/


11 03 S. Dixie Hwy. (Next to Pumpernik's) Miarri, PL 33156 "
(305) 235-5525
1 -* Kip & Krista
Fabrics Patterns Notions Trims
Indian Jewelry Moccasins Crafts
Boutique Cothing & Gifts 7
"Thank you for your business -for over 35 years"
Lynn Paskewich, Owner


i


Discount on


Parts


ONE ~~. ADMOSSIO.
I wi odb tkelrt or one free. chiM io
Ofnt coupo pop m&#-^
1 S BCoupon aexp 8/83V85 j
smORY.JUNmG.
3 v> 1A4805 SW 2M6 Sert, Mamis P.


I


OPEN 7 DAYS:


Monday Friday:
Saturday:
Sunday:


8 -
8-
9-


8
6
3


t:


3


Western Trail Auto

-6698 SW 8th Street
Miami, Florida 33144

Service and parts departments: 261-1 141





**r nccosn evergiaces News


Seminole Recreation Schedule


SIGN OF SERVICE
for VISA / Commercial Checking Accounts / Certificates of
Deposit / NOW Accounts / NOW-Plus Accounts / IRA Ac-
counts / Savings Accounts / "Money Market Plus" Accounts /
Safe Deposit Boxes/ Drive-In Tellers / Bank by Mail / 24-Hour
Depository / Publix and HONOR Automatic Tellers / Com-
mercial Loans / Real Estate Loans / Installment Loans / U.S.
Savings Bonds / Collections / Travelers Checks / Christmas
Plan Accounts / Cashier Checks, Bank Money Orders / Payrolls
/ Depository for Federal Social Security, Withholding Taxes.
950 SW 57th AVENUE / MIAMI, FLA. 33144 / 266-1000
Branches: 6600 SW 8th Street and 11439 Bird Road / Miami
Member FDIC / An Equal Housing Lender / Affiliate of Flori-
da Commercial Banks, Inc., a registered bank holding company.
I I I


Mccosuk Evrglades News 5


March 1985


Florida Elite of Hollywood lost its
undefeated status to Immokalee Motown
during the final games of Miccosukee Youth
Recreation's recent basketball tournament,
but nevertheless won the men's
championship over Motown.
Another Hollywood team, Arrowhead
Development, beat Trail II for the women's
championship.
Florida Elite won the title over six other


Anyone interested in participating in these
events can do so by contacting Cassandra
Osceola, recreation supervisor for Miccosukee,
at 223-8380, extension 372, or by calling
Seminole's recreation department at (305) 583-
7112.

7th Annual Fishing Tournament
.st Annual Herman Osceola Basketball
tournament (All Indian)
ith Annual USET Youth Basketball Tournament
3ig Cypress Co-ed Softball Tournament
5th Annual Howard Tiger Memorial
Basketball Tournament
3th Annual 1-Pitch Softball Tournament
;oftball Tournament
leminole Softball Tournament
)nd Annual Josiah Johns Memorial Roping
P-ball & Little Girls Softball Tournament
annual Play Day


This schedule of-the Seminole Tribe
recreation activities is published as a service to
those members of the Miccosukee community
who want to participate or attend. A schedule
of this tribeM activities is pending.


Mousing around


Solem Jim makes like an airplane with the help of Crystal Hipkins during a "Mousercize"
exercise session. Above, Lea Osceola (left), Summer Rockwell and Emily Osceola-Branch face
off each other on all fours. Hipkins, tribal prevention-education coordinator leads the Head
Start students in the exercises three times a week. She also visits other grades regularly for
prevention-oriented activities.


March 15 & 16
March 21, 22, 21

April 4, 5, 6
April 13
April 19 & 20

May 3 & 4
May 17 & 18
May 24 & 25
June 1
June 8
June 29


Big Cypress
Big Cypress

Hollywood
Big Cypress
Hollywood

Big Cypress
Brighton
Hollywood

Brighton
Brighton
Big Cypress


April 1 through Tuesday, April 9 for
spring break and a teacher's work day.
A week after that parents are invited to
Open House, Wednesday, April 17 to see
their child's classwork and to talk
personally with the child's teacher.
The previous school board voted to leave
the school calendar unchanged, with the
last day being Friday, May 24, even
though Corn Dance begins Wednesday,
May 22. The annual awards ceremony,
however, will take place Friday, May 17
instead of the last day. The ceremony
includes grade promotions and Head
Start graduation.


Jennie Billie was elected this month to
serve one year as president of the
Miccosukee School Board; Nancy Jim was
voted vice president and Andy Buster was
elected secretary, also for one year.
The beginning of their term coincides
with a school-wide attendance contest.
Every class with 75 percent perfect
attendance between Monday, March 4
and Friday, May 10 will be allowed an
end-of-school field trip. Principal Marie
Osceola urges parents to get their children
to school on time as attendance is reported
every morning at 8:45.
Students will be out of school Monday,


:


Survey:


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marriage generally felt that love is more
important than age.
I agree with those that felt that young
people should not get married and depend
on their parents to support them. I believe
that this would be unfair to the parents
and in the long run, not good for the
young people. On the other hand if a
young couple can afford to support
themselves and are really in love, I think
they should get married.
I enjoyed doing this survey because it
taught me to look at a problem from all
sides. It helped me to clear up my own
values concerning teenage marriage.
Editor's note: The above was an
assignment in Barbara Billie's seventh-
grade class at the Miccosukee School.


By Barbara Billie
Recently I did a survey on how people
feel about teenage marriage. I chose this
subject because I know some people who
were married as teenagers, and I wanted
to know how they and others feel about the
subject. I found people to survey in
classes, offices and at home. I surveyed
teachers, students and other people in the
Miccosukee community.
I surveyed 16 people and found out that
12 of them thought teenagers should not
get married. The basic idea of these people
was that young people shouldn't rush into
marriage, and that if they do they might
have problems with money and housing.
The four who approved of teenage


Top, Randy Schannendoah stitches the sole to a buffalo-
hide moccasin. Bottom, Brint Roland made this squirrel-
hide knife sheath. Both items are exhibited at the Dade
County Youth Fair.


Douglas Daye made these silver-and-turquoise bracelets and the pony-tail holder to exhibit in the Dade
County Youth Fair.


Hollywood


win tournament

teams, and Arrowhead was the top team
among three.
Bruce Clark of Florida Elite and Claudia
Gore of Arrowhead were each awarded clock
trophies for most valuable players.
The next tribal sponsored competition-the
Annual Dr. Rehbein Tournament-is
tentatively scheduled for Friday and
Saturday, May 3 and 4. Interested teams
should contact Cassandra Osceola, recreation
supervisor, at 223-8380, extension 372.


teams


Jennie Billie voted president of

Miccosukee School Board


70117


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_ _


Snowy egrets have pure white plumage. The
bills and legs are black and the feet are bright
yellow.
Another heron that is commonly found in an
aggregation of foraging long-legged wading
birds is the Louisiana heron or tricolored heron.
A tricolored heron is identified by its slate-
gray head, neck, wings, back and tail, and white
throat, belly, rump and underwing. Tricolored
herons can often be seen walking slowly in
shallow water gazing intently downward in
search of prey while flicking a wing out and back,
apparently to startle fish with a studded shadow
overhead. Another feeding strategy tricolored
herons use is walking with wings outstretched,
rapidly striking at fish as they come into view.
One member of the heron family that's hard to
miss when scanning a mixed flock of wading
birds is the great egret. The majestic birds have
entirely white plumage, black legs and feet,
yellow bills, and they stand about three feet tall.
The large and powerful great egrets play a
dominant role when they associate with smaller
birds. A great egret may aggressively defend its
feeding site by stabbing with its bill at an
intruding bird.
Occasionally, great egrets can be seen doing
aggressive aerial displays where one bird will fly
towards another with its feathers erect, giving a
low-pitched "kraak. .kraak," then landing
either on the spot vacated by the opponent or
right on top of the opponent. In addition, if a
great egret sees another bird with prey, it may
attack and steal the prey. These aggressive
encounters require a lot of energy so they are
normally kept to a minimum. Usually great
egrets are found standing motionless waiting for
prey to come into view or walking slowly in
search of prey.
Shortly before sunset the wading birds fly back
to a colonial roost for the evening. The roost at
sunset is a place of high activity, which is made
evident by the unceasing chatter that fills the air
as the birds settle in for the night.
The next opportunity you have to observe long-
legged wading birds, take the time to study their
appearance and actions: you will be rewarded for
you efforts. Happy birding.


Editor's note. Arthur C. Webster, III, is a park
ranger naturalist at Everglades National Park
(Shark Valley). He wrote the above article at this
newspaper's request as a public service.


Mlcosukee Everglades News


6


March,1985


Two great egrets in an Ever-
glades waterway challenge
each other over the same
choice fishing spot.


Thoughts quickly change with the sound of
wings ripping through the air overhead. A large
flock of white ibis flying in a V-formation, their
white plumage transformed to orange by the
rising sun, beat their wings at a fast tempo.
Occasionally they all break rhythm at the same
time and soar quietly, swooping low over the
hammocks and eawgrass prairie.
The early morning sky seems to be filled with
birds: mixed flocks of little blue herons and
tricolored herons, tightly flying flocks of snowy
egrets, and individual great egrets. Before long,
the birds settle down to sites that look good for
foraging.
During the winter and spring dry season, water
levels in the Everglades gradually ddriop, driving
the fish to seek out the remaining olpen-water
areas. As a result,l the fish are highly
concentrated and attract large aggregations, or
groups, of long-legged wading birds.
Many different species of birds can be found
feeding in groups throughout the day. Not only
do the birds find safety in numbers, they can also
assist one another in locating food. White ibises
and little blue herons are frequently found
feeding together.
An adult white ibis is snow white with black
wing tips. It has a long, downward curved pink
bill, and pink legs. Ibises feed in shallow water by
walking slowly and probing with their bills in the
mud and vegetation in' search of crayfish, fish,
frogs, small snakes, snails and aquatic insects.
This activity scares up prey that the little blue
herons grasp or impale with their long stiletto-
like bills.
An adult little blue heron is identified by
its medium size, slate-blue back, bkiast and
wings, and its reddish-brown head and neck. The
bill is bicolored with a light gray base and black
tip. The legs and feet are grayish-green. (With a
little practice, the long-legged wading birds are
really very easy to identify.)
Little blue herons like to feed on fish, frogs,
insects and crayfish. Their habit of walking
slowly, stalking prey, can stimulate some prey
items to hide under vegetation or muckwhere the
probing ibises may find them.
While looking over an aggregation of long-
legged wading birds one may come across a bird
doing some fancy footwork. A feeding strategy
that snowy egrets frequently use is scaring fish
into view by standing on one foot and using the
other to stir, rake, probe or paddle the mud or
vegetation.


You don't need binocu-
lars to admire the
wading birds of the
Everglades. But you
might want to know
who's who among the
Louisiana herons, little
blue herons, great blue
herons, snowy egrets,
great egrets and white
ibises,
By Arthur C. Webster, III
From dawn to dusk, whether you are a local
resident or a visitor to the Everglades, you cannot
help but notice the abundant bird life.
The casual observer may notice a flock of birds
decorating a canal bank or birds just standing in
a field. On the other hand, if a person takes the
time to closely observe birds, it is soon evident
that there is plenty of fascinating activity taking
place.
The long-legged wading birds such as the
herons, egrets and ibises are the most abundant
and visible birds found in the Everglades. For the
early risers, an exciting time to begin observing
these birds is a half-hour to fifteen minutes before
sunrise. At this time of day the delicate beads of
dew on thousands of spider webs reflect the red-
and orange-hued eastern sky. This is also the
tm.e that the long-legged wading birds leave
their nighttime roosts and fly to their feeding
grounds.
First, lone individuals may be seen. A great
blue heron lifts off from its cocoplum perch, gains
altitude with slow, powerful wing beats, legs
dangling, long slender neck fully extended. It
sends a message that it is aloft with a harsh,
drawn out, "kraak ..kraak. .kraak." Once it
gains speed, the heron tucks its neck back'onto its
shoulders in an S shape and pulls up its legs till
they are trailing straight behind.
Great blie herons, standing about four feet
tall, are the largest herons in North America.
They can be identified by their dark gray bodies,
white crown, cheeks and throat, and black stripe
on the side of the crown. Silhouetted against the
morning sky, the great blue heron in flight looks
. prehistoric, a link to the distant past. .
~'- .


Watching the wading birds in the Everglades





I : : 1 I i : : : I I L I : -


-election of NTCA officers and executive
board
-speech by Secretary of the Interior Donald
Hodel
-development of a "national tribal position"
on the recent report of the President's
Commission on Indian Reservation Economies
-development of position papers on issues of
tribal health, education and housing, and on the
Bureau of Indian Affairs


March 1985 Miccosukee Evrgades Ne


The Miccosukee and Seminole Tribes of
Florida are cohosting the fourteenth annual
convention of the National Tribal Chairmen's
Association (NTCA) at Omni International
Hotel in downtown Miami, Monday, April 15
through the following Friday.

The conference theme is "Unity, from
Diversity." Among items included on the agenda
are the following:


translated-formed the basis for Miccosukee's
1982 Settlement Agreement, which, among other
things, transferred about 76,000 acres of Florida
land into federal trust for the tribe.

Tiger met their majesties at the convention,
where tribal public-relations workers Conchita
Torano and Mirta Cenal translated. In addition
to presenting the jacket and skirt, Tiger
presented King Juan Carlos I with a handcarved
peace pipe "for the country, to show that we as a
nation are at peace with them and other
countries."


During the rest of the six-day convention, Tiger
and the representatives-including his sons
Stephen and Lee and Lakota Sioux dancer Kevin
Locke and his daughter-promoted the
reservation, Dade County and Florida as prime
places to vacation.

"People knew about us already, they knew we
were coming again this year," said the chairman.
"Some of the them said, 'Oh, we saw you in the
Everglades.' We told new people to come, and I
even had to draw maps for some people."


After more than two years trying, Miccosukee
Tribal Chairman Buffalo Tiger got to personally
acknowledge the centuries-old friendship
between Spain and the tribe by presenting the
King and Queen with an Indian patchwork
jacket and skirt.
Tiger was in Spain, along with six tribal
representatives, to publicize the tribe at the
annual Fitur Convention, one of the world's
largest tourism trade shows.
The relationship between the tribe and Spain
stems from treaties established in the early
1700s. Those documents--only recently


* ~ < *' I i 6


. ^< -4 0% W 6 -- .- f :


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Miccosukee and

Seminole Tribes

to host convention


Royal
: affair
Lee Tiger, in center with
1'' tiS back to camera, presents
4 A: the Queen of Spain with
; am 11~ a Miccosukee patchwork
skirt. King Juan Carlos I,

patchwork jacket..Also
involved in the
gift-giving was Tribal
Chairman Buffalo Tiger,
S, far left, and translator
-, " onchita Toran at ft
Trcf oin patchwork vest.




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Bill & Will






111W II I I


Healthbound


..


Place garbage, used disposable diapers, etc., in
tightly sealed plastic bags and place in a sturdy,
covered garbage can. The garbage can could be
located away from the house or chickee and
placed on a platform about one foot high.
Store food in heavy containers.
Immediately dispose of animal litter.
Inspect your doors. It may be necessary to
cover the bottom of doors with strips of sheet
metal. Make certain that a space no larger than
1/2-inch exists between the door and the frame.
Pieces of sheet metal may need to be placed
around pipes,under kitchen and bathroom sinks.
If necessary, set traps.
Inspect your home to identify rat and mice
litter, or the health department will be glad to
come in and inspect your house for you. Call
Howard -Jim, tribal environmental health
worker.
As an extreme measure, use rat poisons;
however, be aware that such poisons are
extremely dangerous to use and should never be
used near children, pets or food supplies,
-Ron Logan
Programs/training developer


``
.


8 Miccosakee Evergiades News


March 1985


This month I am writing my column
especially to parents to give you some
information on what you can do to reduce the
likelihood of alcohol and drug use/abuse by
your children.
There are six areas to discuss, and although
I don't guarantee 100 percent alcohol/drug-
free youths, I do know that if you practice all
six, the majority of children can be saved from
the destructive life of alcohol/drug addiction.
But you must remember that this is not an
overnight miracle; you will have to stick to it
until your children are grown.
The first weapon we need as parents is
knowledge. We need to know all we can about
the effects alcohol/drugs can have on our
children, such as changes in behavior. For
example, if your child is in the habit of being
physically active and all of a sudden s/he
begins to not care to play basketball or
whatever anymore, you should find out why.
Even a small child can tell when someone is
falling-down drunk, but it takes someone a
little more knowledgable to see some of the
negative signs of certain drug use/abuse.
Depression, red eyes, runny nose, changes in
behavior and loss of concentration are just a
few of the side effects you need to look out for.
This is why it is so very important for you to
find out all you possibly can.
You may ask yourself, "Where can I find this
out?" That is one of the things our human
services program is here for. Come by the


neighborhood building and talk with me, or
leave a question in the "healthbound"
envelope and I will answer in the newspaper.
Don Epps, our human services counselor, or
Andy Buster, youth counselor, is available
to talk to you also. And the library has many
good, clear books that will give you the
information you need.
The next thing is to know who your
children are friends with. Are their friends
people you feel will help teach thesame kind of
ideas you are teaching? Are the friends able to
influence your children in ways that are not
acceptable to the way you are teaching your
children to behave? If so, it is your
responsibility to tell your children how you feel
and encourage them to seek more acceptable
friends.
In addition to knowing who your children
are friends with, you also must know where
and how they are spending their spare
time. Ask yourself: Are they doing things that
will help them to grow strong and healthy; or
are they "just hanging out?" If they are just
hanging out, it is up to you to encourage them
to spend their time in a more positive way.
Participating in sports is just one example.
Idleness gives more~opportunity to
experiment with alcohol/drugs.
Interwoven in knowing your children's
friends and where they spend their spare time
is that you as parents should set guidelines
for your children. All children need and want


to know what the limits are. The best way you
can teach thisis by setting a good example.
You can talk all day and night about not
using/abusing alcohol or drugs, butifyougo
out and get drunk, the children are going to
become confused and do what you do instead
of what you say.
The fifth effort is for you to spend time
with your children. By promoting family
togetherness you give your children a feeling
of belonging, and they don't need to go outside
for that. This increases their self-esteem and
decreases the amount of time spend just
hanging around.
Lastly, take care of yourself. Make'
friends who will share with you the joys and
frustrations of being a parent. If after you have
done everything in your power to prevent your
children from becoming abusers/users, and it
turns out that they are, don't wait to get help.
Get it for yourself as well as your children.'
Both of you need support, and it is available to
you. That is another of the services provided
by our human services staff. Laura Topping,
, child welfare worker, and Lou Herrera, school
psychologist, are also available to help you
and your children. But it is up to you to make
the first move. You have done all that you
possibly could on your own. Asking for help in
dealing with a very tough situation is the best
thing you can do for yourself and your
children.
--Crystal Hipkins
Prevention-education coordinator


Like insects and unsanitary habits, which we
discussed in the past several issues, rodents can
easily cause illness in or transmit diseases to
humans.
Rats and mice are responsible for spreading a
number of serious diseases, both directly and
indirectly. Directly, they litter in food, which
contaminates the food and causes
gastroenteritis. Indirectly, by ectroparasites-
'fleas, lice and mites-that live on the bodies of
rats and mice, the rodents transmit parasitic
infections. Some diseases from fleas of rats and
mice are "rat-bite fever, infectious jaundice,
trichinosis, acute food poisoning, typhoid,
dysentery, marine typhus fever and plague.
Rats and mice are attracted by stored food,
trash piles, uncovered garbage and rubbish that
has not yet been disposed of. Whether you reside
in a chickee or house, steps must be taken to
eliminate rats and mice. The suggestions listed
below will alter the rodents' environment by
destroying their food supplies and habitats.
Ratproofing a house or chickee includes the
following steps:


B R D O


E M K S Z N L J E


H I T R b W P I X M B


E I S I WT V HAD E


EQ


L Y P N H S J U F T B I E

E U R M B 0 T P, A S E A N

G C N D G E M S B I P R K

B X 0 G Y V U R I 'L T 0 P
A D I R E S I S T A N C E


i.


s


Z N I Q X M B D C C


WAE


G H R S O P P U M R A W D
Puzzle by Crystal Hipkins


Words "
AEROBICS
BACK
CALISTHEkNICS
DEEP KNEE BENDS
EFFORT
HIPS
ISOMETRICS
JOGGING


LEG
LUNGE
MAT
RESISTANCE
SITUPS
TWIST
WAIST
WARM UP


.,.-.-.I -~e


health notes


Parents: help your kids resist alcohol,


drug abuse


Control rodents, protect family's health


Fitness Word Search

A U A E RO B I C. S T I S

W X S F A H A W K C J 0 D

Y 0 -T F M I C L E I N H N


It'


Here


Carnival


of


Health