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1984
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mods:title Miccosukee clans crier
mods:subject SUBJ650_1 lcsh
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Newspapers
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Mikasuki Indians
Newspapers
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Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Miccosukee Everglades news
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Miccosukee Everglades news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053712/00001
 Material Information
Title: Miccosukee Everglades news
Physical Description: 4 v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: December 1, 1984
Publication Date: 1982-1985
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Indians of North America -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mikasuki Indians -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1982)-v. 7, no. 9 (Nov. 1985).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002033559
oclc - 36179317
notis - AKM1263
lccn - sn 97027662
System ID: UF00053712:00001
 Related Items
Preceded by: Miccosukee clans crier

Full Text









I- IOI


Miccosukee Tribe of Indians, PO Box 440021, Miami, FL 33144 Vol. 6, No. 11
I' IT -I II i I I-I I I I *


Fe tivam.-,-
Program '~! "
Pages: 6,7 +


984


*I


a


It would take others months to
see what visitors to Miccosukee's
Indian Arts Festival will see in one
'day: the art, crafts, music and
S dances of Indians from more than,
440 tribes in the continental
Americas.
The eight-day festival starts
Wednesday, Dec. 26 and ends
Wednesday, Jan. 2 at the tribe's
Indian Village, 25 miles west of the
S Florida Turnpike on U.S. 41
(Tamiami Trail).
] To celebrate the festival's tenth
: anniversary, Richie Havens will
', perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
S 29. The opening act is Miccosukee
1 band Tiger-Tiger at 6:30. Concert
tickets are $7 at the gate. Havens is
S probably best known from the '60s
; for such songs as "Freedom" and
/ "Here Comes the Sun."
SEvery year the tribe hosts the
Popular event "to create positive
awareness of American Indians
through the arts," said Lee Tiger,
{ tribal public relations and
Marketing director. Non-Indians
see the opposite of the stereotyped
Indan at the festival, he said, and
they can learn much from the arts
and by talking to the artists.
+ The dozens of Indian artists will
i display, demonstrate and sell their
native arts, from Stan Hill's award-
winning bone ca vings to pottery,
beadwork, hand-woven rugs, stone
t carvings, basketry, turquoise-and-
Ssilver jewelry, wood carvings,
leather work -and more, to the
+ variety of works by local artists'
I such as LeRoy Osceola, Stephen
'. Tiger and Steve Chrisjohn.
The abundance of Indian art
won't end there, however, because
J two shows a day, each lasting more
;, than two hours feature the Aztec
S dan cingof Esplendor Azdeca; the
^ii- tm dancing of the Bear Clan
Sa r oL as of the Winnebago Tribe,
'.*'* .*MANA"win* 1ktA ^a tl ihm l PrkXi


contemporary dancing of Florida
Seminoles O.B. and Tina Osceola;
and the hoop dancing and flute
playing of Lakota Sioux Kevin
Locke. Miccosukee band Tiger-
Tigerwill als6 perform popular and
original songs, and a fashion show
will feature traditional and modern
Miccosukee apparel.
Three other special events are
scheduled during the festival. Tribal
Chairman Buffalo Tiger will emcee
a 10th anniversary inaugurationat
2 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 26, and at
2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30 he will
present peace pipes to non-tribal
government representatives who
have demonstrated frienship to the
tribe. Earlier Sunday, at 1:l5, the
daily Indian fashion show will be
replaced by a contest among
apparel created by local Indians.
Winners will receive cash prizes
totaling $380.

If that isn't enough to keep
festival goers busy, they can watch
professional alligator wrestling or
browse through the remnants of
history displayed in the
Miccosukee Museum. Or they can
sample Indian burgers and
pumpkin fry bread from traditional
food booths.

Proceeds from the festival go
back into the program, according
to Lee Tiger. "It's an extension of
the education program, an arm of
the education department, that
creates an awareness of Native
Americans positively by communi-
cating with the public."
Festival tickets will be sold at the
festival gate beginning at 10 a.m.,
$6.50 for adults and $4 for children
age 12 and under. Admission
includes all shows,- alligator
wrestling and access to all art
concessions and the museum.
Shows begin at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.


'-`~ r-p-lhib.


Lakota Sioux Kevin Locke, one
Festival, performs his peoples'.


of the dancers to perform at the Indian Arts
hoop dance.


designers hig
Twice daily fashion shows and
a fashion contest for cash prizes
highlight the 10th Annual Indian
Arts Festival taking place at the
Miccosukee Indian Village
Wednesday, Dec. 26 through
Wednesday, Jan. 2.
The shows, featuring about a
dozen traditional and contempo-
rary outfits for men and women,
take place each afternoon at 1:15
and 3:45 in the" amphitheater,
except Sunday, Dec. 30, when the
contest among garments sub-
mitted by community members
takes place at 1:15 p.m.


lights festival
member can enter the contest, but
finished 'garments must be
submitted to Delores Billie, contest
and show coordinator, by
Thursday, Dec. 20. Male or female
apparel may be entered into any of
three categories: traditional,
contemporary and children's
traditional, for ages three to 12.
Participants must provide models
for their entries for a showing on
Saturday, Dec. 29, and for
the competition Sunday, Dec. 30.
Cash prizes totaling $380 will be
awarded to the winners. Firstplace
continued On p-P


AI..


..


C3LJN/llvll


EDI


December 1


ccl


Richie Havens giving

concert one evening of

8-day Indian Arts Festival


Fashion contest among local





To the editor.
Julie Kelsey of the Choctaw
Community News of Philadelphia,
How much Mississippi, suggested that I write
.o tyou.
Sfor this Recently a linguist friend of mine
one? asked me'for the sentence "I love
oeyou" in as- many languages as
Purse underrm, possible. I had 35 for many years,
Marie Jim tonsi- but right now it's 150! Julie Kelsey
de'rs buying a just let me know that in Choctaw it
skirt at the is "Chi-anichali." I have it in
Elderly Co-op's Cherokee, Lakota, Delaware, Hopi,
annual bazaar. Tewa, Seneca and still many more.
The co-op made Do you know someone who
$349, thanks to speaks Miccosukee, or failing that,
community do you have an old vocabulary list,
support, said CAA grammar book or dictionary that
director Betty would give the Miccosukee way of
Cypress. saying "I love you"? Could you also
analyze which parts mean,"I" and
"love" and "you"? Or is another



trib
Exxon fixes pipeline violation


mop


'


:I 1. -. .


2 Miccosukee Everglades News


December 1984


'I


way used?
I have been collecting license
plates. I have American indian
plates frQom M&iominee, Cherokee
(front "plate), Red Lake Chippewa
(pretty!) and Florida Seminole. But
my proudest is the 1969-1970
Miccosukee white-on-green plate. It
is extremely rare.
Are there any around that are
expired now? Please let me know.
Carl Masthay
7271 Lyndover Pl, Apt. 2
Maplewood, Missouri 63143

Editor's note: Perhaps the closest
phrase to "I love you" in Miccosukee is
"Echeenokaachootomle," which can
mean "I care for you," "I adore you,"
"I'm crazy about you" or "I love you,"
depending on who's saying it to whom.


Exxon USA cleaned up a mound of fill outside
its construction-area limit for an oil pipeline the
company is laying through 23 miles of Big
Cypress and Everglades, which includes six
miles through the Miccosukee federal
reservation.
The 100-by-30-foot heap violated the state's
explicit permit, which provided for a construction
area 50 feet wide for the length of the pipeline.
The violation became an issue after hunters,
monitoring the construction on their own
complained, and the Miami Herald reported it
Nov. 23.
By Nov. 28, after state officials inspected the


site and more articles about
printed, the oil company
trenched-up earth.


the violation were
had replaced the


Tribal officials agreed to allow the, pipelil
through the reservation underthe conditions of
the state permit for monetary compensation. The
state required that the pipeline be built as a more
environmentally safe alternative to the current
method of transporting oil from Exxon's well at
Raccoon Point. Two convoys each day of three or
four trucks remove the oil from Raccoon Point via
11-mile Road to U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail), and at
least one spill has occurred.


* I


Indians in the tribe's higher education
program can get financial assistance from the
state if they maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point-
or "C"-average.
Miccosukees have been getting the
scholarships since 1980 when the Seminole and
Miccosukee Indian Scholarship was established,
said Lou Herrera, higher-education coordinator.
But if a student's average falls below 2.0, the
state will cut off the aid.:
"If a student goes below 2.0 one semester, the
state will pay for the following semester only to
bring the average back to 2.0," said Herrera. "If
the student does not bring the average back to
2.0, the state will not pay anymore."
Students having trouble academically should
ask her for help, Herrera said. She currently
advises 18 students in the higher-education
program, nine of which are enrolled in the Miami-
Dade Community College course taught on


the reservation. This semester it's "The Social
Environment."
Next semester, which begins here the week of
Jan. 14, the course is "HLP 1010," a class that
analyzes the role of exercise, diet, nutrition,
stress and physical activity in total well-being. It
includes lab assessments of the students' current
health status as well as lectures and discussions
on developments in the health field.
The course w" selected per student request
because it was a "quired class forall students. It
was chosen over another required class, remedial
math, because no math instructor was available to
commute here.
Anyone interested in taking the course should
register by seeing Herrera as soon as possible.
New students are welcome, and state funds for
those students that are Indians are available, she
said.


Miccosukee Everglades News is published the first
week of each month by the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of
Florida.
Letters to the editor regarding community issues are
encouraged. Al letters must be signed to be considered
for publication, and they may be edited. Published letters
express the opinion of the author and not necessarily that
of the tribal administration or community.


The paper also welcomes contributions of art and
poetry. Contributors can bring their work to the
newspaper office, in the neighborhood buildingor leave
it in the paper's mailbox in the administrative building.
Advertising is accepted. Call or write to the editor at
the above address for rates and more information.
Subscriptions are $10 for one year.


letter


How does one say


F6.v- yo.u'.


in Miccosukee language?


Back to school
Community members can prepare for a high
school equivalency diploma or learn or
improve such skills as math, reading, English
and writing from a new adult-ucation
instructor. Cynthia Greene, who replaced
Chris Ypsilanti after he took a job in
Tavernier, is available in the Learning Center,
neighborhood building, Mondays through
Thursday, 1 to 9 p.m., and Fridays, 8:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. Call extension 390 for details.

Healthy news
Two new positions in the health department
were filled recently. Howard Jim is now the
department's environmental worker and
Ronald Logan is its programs training
developer. Jim will assist in a training. and
monitoring program of the food handling and
sanitation in the kitchens of the Miccosukee
Restaurant, Head Start and school. Logan's
job is to help coordinate health programs that
require special training.

At your service

It took someone who was dependable,
responsible, willing to work on weekends and
experienced with the public to fill the job of
hostess at the Miccosukee Restaurant. Alicia
Tigertail was, so she got the job. It includes
operating the cash register, closing it out
each day and seating customers.

New coach
Miccosukee students have a new science and
physical education instructor. Kathy Pollack
is the teacher/coach replacing Todd Stokes,
who left to work for a fitness company.


al talk


Scholarships depend on grades


Miccosukee
Everglades News
PO Box 440021, Tamiami Station
Miami, Florida 33144
(305) 223-8380
Wendy Cobourne, Editor




December 1984


Miccosukee Everglades .ewt

M 4 ,,
~ ..,


Above: Flags of friendly nations, Indian and non-Indian, adorn wall of Mitcosukee
Cultural Embassy's receiving room. Above left: Tribal Chairman Buffalo Tiger holds
commendation plaque from county mayor (not pictured) presented by John
McDermott (left), executive assistant to the mayor. At right are Lee Tiger, director of
tribal public relations and marketing, and Adela Gonzalez, the mayor's.,
administrative assistant. Second from top: Elmer Savilla (left), executive director of
the National Tribal Chairman's Association (NTCA), converses with NewtonLamar,
NTCA president. Second from bottom: Tribal employee Marilyn Russell (left) shares
a laugh with community members Doris Osceola and Margaret Biie (sitting).
Bottom: Man-made cave under embassy house possibly was built by slaves to store
coontie flour.


with Dade Historic Preservation
Division, wrote the tribe -that he
does not know when the caves were
constructed, but that their carved
limestone was typical of slave
construction during the early to
mid-1800s. Carr said that such
slave construction "was usually
associated with the coontie
plantations that were the principal
industry of Dade County in the
early 19th century."
Coontie, sometimes called
arrowroot, is a tropical woody plant
whose roots can be pounded into a
starchy foodstuff. It was once a
principal food source to Florida
Indians, especially when they could
not plant crops because they were
forced to keep moving from white
soldiers.
Carr said the size of the caves,
known as the Patton Caves,
indicates they were possibly used to
store coontie starch, where the cool
temperatures would help perserve
it.
Whites learned from Indians how
to process the coontie plants, and by
about 1850 "virtually every river
and creek in Dade County had
operating mills. The once plentiful
coontie became very scarce along
the coast because of this heavy
exploitation," said Carr.
About 65 years later the site
became part of Pirate's Cove, a
tourist attraction of citrus groves
and a "substantial" Miccosukee
village that occupied the same area
as does Dodge Hospital today, said
Carr.


SMore-than 150 guests populated
the gardens and caves of the
Miccosukee Cultural Embassy Nov.
15, when a cocktail reception was
held to celebrate its grand opening.
The embassy is a slightly
refurbished, elegant house at 1750
NW South River Drive, on a site
where a young Buffalo Tiger, now
tribal chairman, and other
Indian children once played.
The tribe purchased the home,
which is near the Orange Bowl, to
provide a convenient contact point
for visitors and friends and to
extend "friendship to all peoples
and all nations," said Tiger during
a brief ceremony at the reception.
That effort was recognized not only
by the Dade mayor's office, which
presented the tribe with a plaque of
commendation, but also by the
attendance of consuls from such
countries as Spain, Lebanon, Chile
and Paraguay.
The Miccosukee Cultural
Embassy was so named because its
function is to promote awareness of
the Iibe and the exchange of
Indian and non-Indian cultures
locally, nationally and abroad.
Coincidentally, the embassy site
is on the bank of a waterway where
Miccosukees once canoed to trade
their goods with whites. The house
provides a nearly panoramic view
of the grounds, which are
overgrown with trees around the
edges and full of shady and elevated
spots. The house rests on an
intriguing and somewhat
mysterious bit of history: man-
made caves.
Robert Carr, an archeologist


Miccosukee Embassy


opens to all cultures





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December T984


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Miccosukee Everglades News


^^~~~ *| ThS^ l~ese students were awarded for their good citizenship middle row: Willie D. Osceola, Julie Chrisjohn, Priscillo
GVood cItIsi z es during November. From left, first row: Joshua Buster, Jolene Osceola; back row: Brint Roland,
Osceola, Gregory "Mick" Osceola, Angie Cypress; Pamela Billie, Patricia Bert, Barbara Billie.
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donates $500 fo .day-care stroller,


Day-care rates are currently $5 per child per
day and $3 for each additional child in a family,
said the chairperson, whose committee"hires the
staff, supervises them and keeps an eye on the
whole place."
"Those are very, very low rates as it is," she
said',"but we've got to come up with a student rate
and a sliding rate for people who are on a
minimum-wage income."
But a vacancy in the committee needs to be
filled first; there is no vice chairperson. Anyone
interested in filling the position "should just let
us know that they are interested andwe will
discuss it among the committee," she said.
Other members are treasurer Sue Jane Bert
and secretary Debbie Smith. Besides managing
day care's staff, the committee is responsible for
locating funds to pay the staff and other


expenses.
As parents who attended a meeting two
months ago are aware, the center will soon begin
charging a $30 registration fee to each family
who. has or plans to have their children enrolled.
Parents enrolling their children for the first time
will also be required to pay a deposit of one week's
fees.
The registration fee will "go toward snacks,
coloring books, crayons-little things,"
Cassandra Osceola said. She's hoping to be able
to buy sleeping bags "for the older kids; they're
sleeping on the floor sometimes."
She said she'd also like to see the center operate
on a schedule that, for instance, would provide
time each day for the children to play on the
playground.


A six-child stroller and two cribs worth more
than $500 are being purchased for the tribe's day-
care center with a donation from the Miami
Herald Wish Book.
The Miccosukee Day Care Parent Committee
"went by what the staff said we needed" when it
chose to buy the stroller and cribs.
The staff is Tina Osceola and Rita Attaway,
both of whom only recently became full-time
employees through the Jobs Training and
Partnership Act (JTPA). One works 8 to 4, the
other 9 to 5 to give parents time to drop off their
children before work and pick them up
afterwards. The system works well, said
committee chairperson Cassandra Osceola, as
long as parents are prompt in picking up their
children.


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a gift from the Miccosukee Elderly Co-op
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December 1984


events


Miccosukee Everglades News5


.


I I [I; I1:'TI:::: :::I.::~::: ~1 : :':':: 1 I;~:'


scheduling was changed since publication.
To submit an event for listing, call the,
newspaper at extension 342 or visit the office,
in the neighborhood building.


This listing of community events and
important dates will appear in each issue of
this newspaper. Call the telephone extension
to 223-8380 included next to each event in
parentheses to get more details or to see if


Date
12/19
12/21
12/21
12/24-1/2
1/9
1/9


Event


Time


WIC Christmas Party*(358)
Student Christmas Program (323)
Community Fgst (323)
Holiday break, no school (323)
Head Start parents meeting (362)
School Board meeting (323)
<' ,


Room
Room
Room


noon
11:30
12:30
3:00 PM
1:00 PM


, Round
"Round
Round


Head Start
Round Room


Sundown team

wins tournament

Local women's team Miccosukee Sundown
brought home two trophies recently from
basketball tournaments hosted by the Seminole
Tribe.
Miccosukee Sundown won second place in a
tournament held several weeks ago at Big
Cypress to the Hollywood Seminoles. Next time
around, Sundown beat Hollywood at a Brighton
tournament-- Dec. 15 for a first-place trophy.
Captain of the team is Cassandra Osceola.


Tribal .recreation

Shot ng basketball l

tourney Dec. 20-22

Miccosukee Recreation is hosting a three-day
basketball tournament for men and women that
begins Thursday, Dec. 20.
Six men's and six women's teams will compete
in the double-elimination tournament, with
trophies to be awarded to the most valuable
player and best all-around player in both
divisions. -
The first game starts about 6:30 pm.
Thursday, as approved by the tribal business
council in order that the tournament will end by
10 p.m. Saturday. Competition resumes at 6:30
p.m. Friday, and again at 9 p.m. Saturday.
Spectators get in free, and food and
refreshments will be sold inside the gym. One-
dollar raffle tickets will be sold until the end of
competition, when a $50 gift certificate from
Athlete's Foot will be given away.


i


from page I
for the traditional and contemporary categories
wins $100 each, $50 each for second place. First
prize for the children's traditional category is
$50, with a $30 second prize. Three judges,
probably fashion experts from several Miami
department stores, will choose the winners based
on originality and craftsmanship. Billie said
judges often notice bright colors and the addition
of Indian accessories that complete a look.
There are no entry fees, but those wishing to
enter the contest must fill out an application
form, available from Billie, and return it to her.
The traditional category refers to fashions


worn by Miccosukees during the 1890s, which
were often garments of stripwork, or rows and
rows of fabric of varying colors and widths sewn
together.
Contemporary fashions are those non-Indian
styles that incorporate Indian design, such as
patchwork, the intricate piecing together of tiny,
geometric fabric pieces into rows of repeating,
designs.-
The children's traditional category includes
. such outfits as buckskin leggings, turbans and
capes.


Check this, listing for community


December/January
Calendar-


Local designers to competing fashion






















































I


I


r


6 Micosukee Ever


Seminole Dancers


Kevin Locke Bear Clan Dancers


Aztec Dancers Alligator Wrestling


Tiger-Tiger


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K102 FM
Radison-
Holiday


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WSRF FM Radio
With the support of the Dade County
Council of Arts and Sciences, Tourist
Development Council and Metropolitan
Dade County Board of County




YO4i


I 1 1 1 i I .. .


Mkicosuk


-. r -, '-.., i -' .

.* -.. :
-"" ; .,,'?


10th Annual Indian Arts Festival
Presented by
MICCOSUKEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OFFLORiDA
Dec. 26, 1984-Jan. 2, 1985, 10 a-m. to Sundown


PROGRAM SUBJECT TO CHANGE


r*


All shows take place in amphitheater (east side) except alligator wrestling, which takes
place in the wrestling arena (west side)


ic


**, ^-


Championship Indian Alligator Wrestling ShowI
Introduction hosted by Miss :lccosukee .
Kevin Locke (Lakota Sioux Dancer & Flutist)
Bear Clan Dancers (Winnebago Indians, Wisconsin)
Tina and O.B. Osceola, Jr. (Seminole traditionaland
Tiger-Tiger (Miccosukee Musical Group)
Fashion Show (Provided by Miccosukee Tribe)
Esplendor Azdeca (Aztec Dance Group, Mexico)


1:00
1:25
1:30
1:55
2:25
2:50

1:4015
1:40


AM
AM,
AM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM


contemporary dancers)


Championship Indian Alligator Wrestling Show
Introduction hosted by Miss Miccosukee
Tiger-Tiger (Miccosukee Musical Group)
Kevin Locke (Lakota Sioux Dancer & Flutist)
Tina and O.B. Osceola, Jr. (Seminole traditional and contemporary dancers)
Fashion how (Provided by Miccosuee ,Tribe) i
Bear Clan oDancers (Winnebago Dancers, Wisconjins n
Esplendor Azdeca (Aztec Dance Group, Mexico)


2:00.
2:2.0
2:30
2:55
3*:20
3:451,
4*10-
4:35


PM
PM
PM
PM
PM,
PA
PM


-^


''S' ')6


.-. J


*Soe shows may be delayed or pre-empted by a special event; see below
; .. .. ome sow m ybede y i "e[

SPECIAL EVENTS (Selected days only)
ALL SPECIAL EVENTS TAKE PLACE IN AMPHITHEATER

Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2 PM: 10Oth Anniversary Inauguration hosted b
Chairman Buffalo Tiger
Saturday, Dec. 29, 1:15 PM: Showing of fashions created by Miccosukee
community members
Saturday, Dec. 29, 6:30 PM: Tiger-Tiger opens for RichieHavensconcert
~t Saut..

,(7:30), tickets $7 at gate i
Sunday, Dec. 30' :15 ..PM: Fashio contest with cash prizes to winners in
thIree categories of Miccosukee fashions


;:- ''*


,-/


'".!?
'(*:;* '


Sunday, Dec. 30, 2 PM: Special peace-pipe presentation by Chairman


: I~ i-i-


Continuous Activities Throughout Festival
ALLIGATOR WRESTLING
ARCHERY
FOOD BOOTHS
ARTS/CRAFTS DEMONSTRATIONS, EXHIBITS, SALES


/.


--


I


Morning program


Afternoon program









Injiun Jim Elementary'. is getting a new name


I i i I i


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In business:30 years


I


8M*ccesukee Everglades News


December 1984


4 _


.After nine months of protests by Native
American groups in Plumas County, California,
Injun Jim Elementary School is going to be
renamed.
The controversy began last March when the
U.S. Forest Service renamed the nearby Injun
Jim Campground to James Lee Campground at
the request of Indian groups because the name
was considered derogatory. James Lee was an
Indian miner who sought education for his.
children and encouraged the idea among his
people,
When an Tndian group known as the Obsidian
Nation approached the Plumas Unified School
District Board to likewise change the school's
name, the board referred the matter to the local,
PTA, which refused to do so. The county s


superintendent of public instruction, James
Malarkey, recommended against changing the
name, calling it "affectionate."
Steve Jerome-Wyatt, director of the Obsidian
Nation, an Indian-support group, then
approached the state Department of Education,
and another meeting between the Indian groups
and parents was held Nov. 14, this time at the
school that was originally named in 1957.
Jerome-Wyatt told the group that honoring the
memory of James Lee was commendable, but
that "Injun is a racial slur.
"Native -Americans constitute the largest
minority population within the confines of
Plumas County," he told the -parents of the
school's 21 students. In this issue we are dealing
with a term, the use of which can be shown to be


harmful to the self-awareness levels of Indian
children in the district school system.
"To permit the continued use of the title"Injun
Jim" would be to demonstrate that the distress of
the Native American children as evoked by the
use of this term is of little or no consequence."
Jerome-Wyatt also said 'that it is Indian
people themselves who should be given the first
opportunity to ascertain what is or is not
offensive to themas a people."
Parents initially protested changing the name,
but by the end of the meeting agreed to do so. The
PTA formed a committee to research new names
and ,recommend one to the school board in.
January.


*


.used for religious purposes by Indians, but
most are only now being rediscovered, some
too late.


The United South and Eastern Tribes
(USET) celebrated its 15th anniversary this
month, with a long list of accomplishments
including the establishment of the following:
Eastern Area Office, Bureau ofIndian Affairs;
Nashville Program Office, Indian Health
Services, Indian Member Benefit Fund; $5.2
million Calumet Center; Cherokee Hospital;
Choctaw Hospital; and the USET Scholarship
Program. Miccosukee is one of 12 member
tribes.,


5,000 in one place
The Native American Research Information
Service has compiled a catalog of more than
5,000 research -studies ..that have been
developed about Indians since 1W69.'The data
lists each study, its author, sponsor, location
and date and an abstract of the study's
contents. The, service, located at the
University of Oklahoma, also identified areas
where little or no research has been done. The
service is free to tribes and Indian
organizations; others should write the
university for more information.


Kenneth Smith, assistant Secretary for
Indian Affairs at the Department of Interior,
resigned Dec. 7. He was the first Indian from a
reservation to direct the Bureau of Indian
Affairs. Smith said he had fulfilled his four-
year term and was ready to take on new
challenges. AWasco from the Warm Springs
Reservation in Oregon, Smith will serve as a-
consultant to the Interior for about two
months before returning to his home state. He
has not announced further plans.


Who were they?
Amateur archaeologists digging beside the
Rocky River in UnionCounty, North Carolina
unearthed an Indian campsite About 11,000
years old, possibly the oldest known site in the
Carolinas and maybe in the Southeast. The
find may support a theory by Floyd Painter
that a group of Indians known as the Clovis
people developed from another culture in the
Southeast and not from an unknown culture in
the West, as most experts believe.


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USET turns 15


Secretary resigns


+-Oven on earth
'The site known as Zuni Heaven, or
Kolhu/wala:wa, was recently restored to the
Pueblo of Zuni by Congress. It is the pueblo's
most sacred site, but it was not included when
the Zuni reservation in New Mexico was
established in 1877. Kolhu/wala:wa is in
Arizona.


History in ruins
At least five organizations have filed suit
against the U.S. Forest Service, alleging the
agency has allowed the destruction of more
than 500 known Indian historical sites in the
Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. The suit
calls for the restoration of the damaged ruins
..and thehalt of all timbering activities until the
Forest .Service inventories and takes steps in
accordance with the National Historical
Preservation Act to locate, mark and protect
all historical sites. Some of the sites are still


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December 1984 Miccosukee Everglades News



Big Guy is first panther to survive hit-and-run


L


operated to repair the compound
fracture of his left hind leg, assisted
by six doctors. Two days later, otiher
doctors operated on his right hind
leg and foot. The veterinarians
think both operations were
successful.
Within a week Big Guy was sitting
up, eating meat off a long stick
poked through his cage, and eyeing
a small African deer occupying a
nearby cage.
The game commission has since
transferred him to a $3,000
compound constructed for his full
recuperation. If biologists find he
will not be able to compete for
survival in the wild, however, Big
Guy will be held in captivity for
breeding and further study.,
The Florida panther is the state
animal and is considered by the
FGFWFC to be endangered. The
commission did not indicate
whether Big Guy was a Florida
panther, which is distinguished
from other panthers by white flecks
and whorled hairs on the back qfthe
animal and a crook in the tail.
Big Guy, who weighs 125 pounds
and is estimated to be about three
and a half years old, is the first
panther known to have survived
hit-and-run.


Big Guy, a panther whose hind
legs were broken Nov. 1 by a hit-and-
run driver on U.S. 41 (Tamiami
Trail), is recuperating after being
rescued and treated by at least five
state and federal agencies, with help
from private citizens.
Big Guy was discovered on the
side of the Trail about three miles
east of Ochopee by trucker Ronald
Townsend at about 6:30, who saw
the panther's eyes shining in the
morning darkness. It was too early
to call the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission (FGFWFC)
so Townsend drove to the nearest
Florida Highway Patrol station.
By 10:30 a.m., the Collier County
Sheriffs Department was keeping
traffic and onlookers away from the
traumatized animal,which crawled
into a canal presumably to get to the
swamp. But the cat was too weak to
get himself out of the water onto the
opposite bank.
Then members of the commis-
sion's Panther Recovery Team
climbed into the canal to tranquilize
the animal with a dart gun. After a
second dart the animal was
unconscious, and the team floated
him on a boat across the canal,
where he was treated for shock on
the bank.


Dewey Weaver photo


Big Guy gnaws meat on a stick poked through his cage bars


He was then flown by helicopter to
an animal hospital in Naples, where
two other specialists were airlifted to
assist veterinarian Ned Johnston. It
was 3:30 p.m.
The animal was X-rayed, his
tongue stitched up and his vital
signs stabilized before he was flown
to the University of Florida's


College of Veterinary Medicine in
Gainesville. Meanwhile, a panther
from a small zoo in High Springs
was rushed to the university for a
one-liter blood transfusion for Big
Guy, who was estimated to have lost
about half his blood.
By Saturday, two days after Big
Guy was found, two more doctors


COllared "

panther dies

of unknown
cause in wild

An aging male panther who had
worn a radio-transmitter collar
since 198f died some time during the
last days of November, according to
the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission (FGFWFC). The
cause of death of Panther No. 90 is
yet unknown, but game officials are
sending the animal's body to the
University of Florida for a necropsy
to determine the exact cause of
death. No injuries were apparent.
FGFWFC biologist John Roboski
said the panther's territory was a
100-square-mile range between
Alligator Alley (State Road 84) and
U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail), according
to the signals emitted by the collar
every several days. The collar's
motion sensor began sending a
rapid series of signals on Nov. 29,
indicating the cat had been
immobile for the previous 13 hours.


It took another biologist two days to
get through the thick brush where
the panther went to die. \
Panther No. 90 was the third to die
in 1984. A female was killed Nov. 18
by a motorist on Alligator Alley, and
another female was illegally shot in
the J.W. Corbett Wildlife
Management Area in October.


::


* I


**.


Don' t drink


and drive





, cosukee Everglades News December 1






PIl.






COmmunity.

feasts in spirit
4 4!








of orig ina I
.m I __ --_ ,-







Than ksg iving
... ._ .". .






Few people today can celebrate
Thanskgiving the original way, ..
Indiana and non-Indians eating
together, but hundreds took
Advantage of two opportunities to do
so at the Miccosukee Reservation.
Community members and,,
employees lined up in the
gymnasium' the day before
Thanksgiving for a cafeteria-style
lunchtime feast. They loaded their
plates at least once with a variety of f
foods, cooked and served by staff of
the tribe's Community Actiono9
'Agency and health and education
departments.
Students Anthony Willie, Kenny
Cypress, Agnes Cypress and
Melanie Bert alternated reading a.Oa
poem about th~e spirit of the holiday-
at the feast, and Anthony read aPWo-
brief history of Thanksgiving,
.followed by a translation in
Mic-osukee by Kenny.
~~0 ........ '.' .. : ."
FrTTh anksgiving-

ev n tetovth is hnkgv
Few feople w oa y clbatin beebrtween i ,
Indians and nonindians ofteairnew- "
foungrendhip. b todaunded wtooh ....
C ite kom mueity o Ame ricrs and ..' ,..
eymasiuthn the Idiany we ore almo

loefordsooked andvserved copay.safo .i


Many Americans are. aware,
though, that their forefathers came
to the New World bearing not gifts,
but guns. Their forefathers were
refugees, fleeing the oppression of JLr -. ..
Great Britain's government just as
Cubans and Haitians seek freedom .
from their oppressors here today.
Those pioneers came to inhabit the
land,-but many were not killing to
share it'-or even ask to share it-
with the native people.
And the niew land, the old land, the i Top left: Head Start students Randall
land of the free, suddenly became Huggins, Toni hw et ea
real estate to fight over. Smith,'Savannah Huggins and others
are amused bya Thanksgiving poem.
Eventually, some whites and Middle left: K
some Indians were willing to trust A -&----.. XA :1"
each other enough to try to live
peaceably side by side. They made ,i-
the best of a very bad situation- "
which has gotten comparatively little ( r
better for the Indians since-and -,
thanked God, all their gods, that L-t ,
hey were still alive. .
SThen, together, they filled their Ki"
bellies with nature's bounty.
Centuries later this genuine gesture
Am .i1





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December 1984 Miccosukee Everglades News


I F


















* '^ r.,-ftiss. -^: "! '.*" "- ." \' % '*


. N,


i


''


.


'Hey, do those
guys really
think people
will take
their music
seriously in-
those clothes?'









































































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c^\ Ge Gnerw

Start now to win skinny i

contest for Health Fair l,

Be sure to eat all your holiday goodies before :
Tuesday, Jan. 1, 1985, because that is the n I
beginning date for the Health Fair '85 Weight- l / Ii
Loas Contest. .
.The department to lose the most pounds before | V \ ..1
SMonday, April 1, 1985, will be awarded an r_ \\.
. engraved plaque. The individual who sets the j
record will receive an extra special prize. All
persons wishing to enter the contest must weigh /" L,,
in at the clinic during the first week of January. y "
Then return during the last week of March for the e ,
final tally. All weights will be kept confidential. . ,
For further finfoination, contact Crystal *el
SHipkins at extension 388.,:Good luck 'and eat o tl AlcOo\
hearty-until Jan. 1, that is.



o d
Food poisoning ca n be avo.dede


The regular consumption of food is a
physiological necessity for humans. As long as
the food is safe and nutritious there is no
problem, but if food becomes contaminated
large numbers of people may become ill.
Food poisoning has been recognized as a
problem since before recorded history.
Although we came to recognize that certain
plants and animals were poisonous, the causes
o of most food poisoning was not understood.
With the discovery ofbacteria and the growth of
the science of microbiology, the causes of many
of the food poisonings were discovered, and are
usually divided into five major groups: micro-
organwisms, toxins (poisons), chemical poisons,
animal parasites, and poisonous plants- and
animals. ..
In this issue, we will discuss what is called the
food-bbrne illness chain in relation to the two
most common causes of food poisoning, micro-
organisms and toxins. Both of these causes are
directly related to bacteria and can, result in a
variety of severe infections and diseases.
Micro-organisms enter food in various ways,
multiply and infect the food consumer. This is
the type called a food-borne infection and
includes typhoid fever, bacillary dysentery
,severe diahrrea), salmonella, hepatitis, etc.
SBacteria are the most important common type
Af 'iscro-organism involved in food-borne
illnesses
Toxins, or poisons, given off by certain
bacteria growing in food are called food-borne
intoxication. This category includes the
organism botulism and staphylococcal food
poisoning, which causes severe gastroenteritis,
S 3r. inflammation of the stomach and intestinal
lining.
There are certain facts you must know about
the naturee ..of bacteria in relation to what is
Malled the food-borne chain to prevenrit food-
borne diseases.
The food-bomrne chain is made up of bacteria,
S food, moisture, time,7temperature, and, of
%ourse, man.-
Bacteria are present everywhere: in soil, air,
anilk,-on the surface of fruits and vegetables,
and on the inside and outside of all living
hings, including man.Fortunately; only a few
are harmful.


Food that nourishes man, under certain
conditions (such as contaminated meat) also
nourishes bacteria.
Moisture, especially warm milk, water and
iuices, allows bacteria to grow rapidly.
: Time is another important factor. The
number of bacteria doubles every generation.
One cell becomes two, two become four, four
become eight, etc.; and if growth conditions are
correct a single bacterium could become 1,000
in three hours, one million in seven hours and
)ne billion in 10 hours. Considering that
contaminated foods start off with thousands or
millions of bacteria, the growth or reproduction
possibilities of more bacteria, in terms of
numbers, is staggering.
Temperatures of 45 degrees (Fahrenheit) to
140 will support life and growth of bacteria, and,
between temperatures of 72 and 98 dangerous
bacteria grow rapidly. '
Bacteria cannot always be completely
Eliminated, and combined with food and
moisture, bacteria remain a constant link in the
_hain of food-borne diseases. Time and
temperature are the two weakest links in the
chain, but these two factors can be controlled, -
First, food cannot be kept exposed for more
than four hours after preparation if the other
links of the chain (bacteria, food, moisture and
temperature) are present. Some bacteria are so
well suited to certain foods that when there is a
large enough number of bacteria to start with,
exposure of the food under ideal temperature
conditions for as little as two hours is enoughto
start a serious outbreak of food-bornedisease.

Second, not only must we watch the time link
carefully, butalsothe temperature link, with its
safety zone that aids in the control and defeat of
bacteria: 140 degrees and above will kill
bacteria, and 45 degnes and below will retard,
)r slow the reproduction of, bacteria.
To protect you and your family, remember to
always keep hot food hot and cold food cold.
Next issue: healthful hints for handling,
preparing andstoringfoods.
-Ronald Logan
Health Programs/Training Developer



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health notes


Heal-thb ounndI


One for the roadr

may be last ever
With the holidays coming up I wanted to
remind you to be especially safety-wise. This is
one of the most accident-prone times of the
year. The major cause of most of th accidents
that happen at this time, of year is alcohol.
In the home, because fall the get-togethers to
celebrate the holidays, alcohol consumption is
in greater amounts. We all know that drinking
alcohol reduces not only our reflexes, but our
judgment aswell. Accidents in the.kitchen are
frequently due to the effects of alcohol, burns
and cuts to be specific.-
Children are also injured during this time of
the year. Adults who have been drinking too
much tend to ignore what children are doing,
leaving them open for all kinds of accidents.'
Children need supervision now as well as at
any other time of year.
Of course, the most dangerous thing you can
do is to drink and drive. This is the second most
deadly holiday of the ",year for driving.
Remember to eat before you drink, allow two t
three hours of non-alcoholic drinking to go by
before getting behind the steering wheel, wear
your seat belts and make sure the children are
buckled in. Above all, if you have been drinking
and can't take the time to sober up before going
home, let someone who has not been drinking
drive. Printed below is a chart to let you know
how much alcohol it would take to make you
legally drunk.
Here are also some general safety measures
for the home:
1. DOn't plug in too many pieces of electric
equipment at the same time. This may overload
the power line.
2. Never leave an electrical outlet open where
children can reach it. An outlet cover can be
bought atany hardware store and is well worth
the expense if it saves a child from being
shocked.
3. Keep all electrical equipment- including
radios and TVs-away from water,.
4. Crumbs and grease can start fires. Keep
your stove, oven and toasters clean.
5. Set pots and pans with the handles out of
reach of children. Most of the burns children
get are from trying to find out what's cooking.
6. Be sure long hair is tied back outofthe way
when cooking to keep it from catching on fire.
Have a safe and happy holiday, enjoy your:
family and friends, but be sure to see the new
year in alive and well.
Crystal Hipmns
-Prevention-education coordinator

DRINKS (Two-hour period)
WEIGHT 1.5 ozs. 86 proof liquor or 12-oz. beer


.100

120

140



180

200

220

240


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December- .99A


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Be careful .Driving D not dri
driving impaired .I0%&UP
BAC to .05% .05-.09%


Micc ukee Everglades News


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December 19