• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 The drive
 In the garden
 The nursery
 Bye-bye, little Dolly
 Three little fishes
 Wonderland
 The pot and the kettle
 Umbrella cottage
 The turtle-dove's nest
 Mischievous Dick
 Singing
 Dolly and her mamma
 Back Cover






Group Title: Mary Bell's series
Title: The little playmates
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053697/00001
 Material Information
Title: The little playmates
Series Title: Mary Bell's series
Physical Description: 6 leaves. : col. illus. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomson, Peter G ( Peter Gibson ), 1851-1931 ( Publisher )
Publisher: Peter G. Thomson
Place of Publication: Cincinnati O
Publication Date: [ca. 1885]
 Subjects
Subject: Publishers' advertisements -- 1885
Children's poetry -- 1885
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Publishers' advertisements
Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Original printed wrappers, included in count of leaves.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053697
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001853610
oclc - 03326322
notis - AJS7972

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    The drive
        Page 1
    In the garden
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The nursery
        Page 3
    Bye-bye, little Dolly
        Page 3
    Three little fishes
        Page 4
    Wonderland
        Page 4
    The pot and the kettle
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Umbrella cottage
        Page 6
    The turtle-dove's nest
        Page 7
    Mischievous Dick
        Page 8
    Singing
        Page 9
    Dolly and her mamma
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Cover
Full Text














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LITTLE PLAYMATES.





THE DRIVE.


"W E two, with babies nice and cdan,- Now, Floss, don't bark I t isn't right;
"B babour two doll I mean,- You'll make the horses both take fright.
My baby could not keep awake, And if they dc;they run so fast,
Behind my seat no harm shell take;- That you'll be left behind at last I
Well, we and babes and puss make five, Mtamma iecohing here, I dee,-
SAll goingfor a barrage drive. Look, Floss I she nods her head to mel



IN THE CARDEIN.

LT'- LE sister come away, Nor will we pliek the pretty flowers
And let us in the garden pa; That growabout the beds and bowers;
For it is a pleasant day. Beause, you know, they are not ours.

On the grss-plat fetusi it; .'l t ike the daisies, white and red;
Or if you please we'll play a bitBca 'Bea maima has often said
And run about all over it. That we mra gather them instead.

But the fruit we will not pick; And much I hope '2 always may
For that would be a naughty trick, Our very dear mamma obey,
And very likely make us sick. And mind whatever she may say.




TheBaldwin Uiby

Irumt;"1 1














LITTLE PLAYMATES.





THE DRIVE.


"W E two, with babies nice and cdan,- Now, Floss, don't bark I t isn't right;
"B babour two doll I mean,- You'll make the horses both take fright.
My baby could not keep awake, And if they dc;they run so fast,
Behind my seat no harm shell take;- That you'll be left behind at last I
Well, we and babes and puss make five, Mtamma iecohing here, I dee,-
SAll goingfor a barrage drive. Look, Floss I she nods her head to mel



IN THE CARDEIN.

LT'- LE sister come away, Nor will we pliek the pretty flowers
And let us in the garden pa; That growabout the beds and bowers;
For it is a pleasant day. Beause, you know, they are not ours.

On the grss-plat fetusi it; .'l t ike the daisies, white and red;
Or if you please we'll play a bitBca 'Bea maima has often said
And run about all over it. That we mra gather them instead.

But the fruit we will not pick; And much I hope '2 always may
For that would be a naughty trick, Our very dear mamma obey,
And very likely make us sick. And mind whatever she may say.




TheBaldwin Uiby

Irumt;"1 1













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LITTLE PLAYMATES.



THE NURSERY.


H ERE we are with our babes-are they not pretty dearsi
They are both made to cry, but they never shed tears.
They have fine rosy lips, with some hard stuff beneath;
But mamma thinks they never will have any teeth I
Their frocks get so dirty, and we can not tell how;
They were quite clean this morning, and look at them nowl
Then their faces get dirty, and dirt sticks so fast!
Meg has been in a bath since the night before last.
I am sure we take pains to teach babies to walk;
We lead them, we jump them, and we coax them to.talk.
We have tried, too, to teach them a nursery rhyme;
But still dolls will be dolls to the end of all time I









BYE-BYE, LITTLE DOLLY.


HEBE, go to sl.ee, olly, in own mother'slap;
I've put on your night-gown and neat little cap:
So sleep, pretty baby, and shut up your eye:
Bye-bye, little Dolly; lie still, and bye-bye..

Pll lay my clean handkerchief over your head,
And then make believe that my lap is your bed:
So hush, little dear, and be sure you don't cry:
Bye-bye,.little Dolly; lie till, and bve-bve.









LITTLE PLAYMATES.



THE NURSERY.


H ERE we are with our babes-are they not pretty dearsi
They are both made to cry, but they never shed tears.
They have fine rosy lips, with some hard stuff beneath;
But mamma thinks they never will have any teeth I
Their frocks get so dirty, and we can not tell how;
They were quite clean this morning, and look at them nowl
Then their faces get dirty, and dirt sticks so fast!
Meg has been in a bath since the night before last.
I am sure we take pains to teach babies to walk;
We lead them, we jump them, and we coax them to.talk.
We have tried, too, to teach them a nursery rhyme;
But still dolls will be dolls to the end of all time I









BYE-BYE, LITTLE DOLLY.


HEBE, go to sl.ee, olly, in own mother'slap;
I've put on your night-gown and neat little cap:
So sleep, pretty baby, and shut up your eye:
Bye-bye, little Dolly; lie still, and bye-bye..

Pll lay my clean handkerchief over your head,
And then make believe that my lap is your bed:
So hush, little dear, and be sure you don't cry:
Bye-bye,.little Dolly; lie till, and bve-bve.









LITTLE PLAYMATES.


THREE LITTLE FISHES.
T HREE little fishes leapt in the sun,
Just as the joyous June day had begun:
Leapt in the sunshine and frolicked with glee,
Pocr little three!

A glad little maiden sat in tlh sun-
Sat on the bridge when thelda -had begun,
Angling for fishes, large, small, or wee,
A shabe qpuld see.

Three little fishes leapt in the umm,
Thinking the fishing was very great fin;
We're not to be caught oh no,.not we "
Wise little three I

Three little fishes leapt in the sun;
The little iass hooked them one by one I
The bait was too tempting-If; them, you see,
Poor little three


WONDERLAND.
S AVE you ever been to Wonderland, Would you like to go to Wonderland,
To Wonderland, to Wonderland? To Wonderland, to Wonderland,
Have you ever seen the heroes grand- then sit by me, and, book in hand,
The giants and gnomes, -t We'll read and read,
The fairy homes, And be indeed
Of the dwellers in Wonderland? With the dwellers in Wonderland


THE POT AND THE KETTLE.
SAID Jack to the kettle- Said the kettle to Jack-
Your blackened old metal Which of us is most black-
Ought by rights to be bright I You the pot, I the kettle-
Pray get out of my sightP' Would be a hard thing to settle









LITTLE PLAYMATES.


THREE LITTLE FISHES.
T HREE little fishes leapt in the sun,
Just as the joyous June day had begun:
Leapt in the sunshine and frolicked with glee,
Pocr little three!

A glad little maiden sat in tlh sun-
Sat on the bridge when thelda -had begun,
Angling for fishes, large, small, or wee,
A shabe qpuld see.

Three little fishes leapt in the umm,
Thinking the fishing was very great fin;
We're not to be caught oh no,.not we "
Wise little three I

Three little fishes leapt in the sun;
The little iass hooked them one by one I
The bait was too tempting-If; them, you see,
Poor little three


WONDERLAND.
S AVE you ever been to Wonderland, Would you like to go to Wonderland,
To Wonderland, to Wonderland? To Wonderland, to Wonderland,
Have you ever seen the heroes grand- then sit by me, and, book in hand,
The giants and gnomes, -t We'll read and read,
The fairy homes, And be indeed
Of the dwellers in Wonderland? With the dwellers in Wonderland


THE POT AND THE KETTLE.
SAID Jack to the kettle- Said the kettle to Jack-
Your blackened old metal Which of us is most black-
Ought by rights to be bright I You the pot, I the kettle-
Pray get out of my sightP' Would be a hard thing to settle









LITTLE PLAYMATES.


THREE LITTLE FISHES.
T HREE little fishes leapt in the sun,
Just as the joyous June day had begun:
Leapt in the sunshine and frolicked with glee,
Pocr little three!

A glad little maiden sat in tlh sun-
Sat on the bridge when thelda -had begun,
Angling for fishes, large, small, or wee,
A shabe qpuld see.

Three little fishes leapt in the umm,
Thinking the fishing was very great fin;
We're not to be caught oh no,.not we "
Wise little three I

Three little fishes leapt in the sun;
The little iass hooked them one by one I
The bait was too tempting-If; them, you see,
Poor little three


WONDERLAND.
S AVE you ever been to Wonderland, Would you like to go to Wonderland,
To Wonderland, to Wonderland? To Wonderland, to Wonderland,
Have you ever seen the heroes grand- then sit by me, and, book in hand,
The giants and gnomes, -t We'll read and read,
The fairy homes, And be indeed
Of the dwellers in Wonderland? With the dwellers in Wonderland


THE POT AND THE KETTLE.
SAID Jack to the kettle- Said the kettle to Jack-
Your blackened old metal Which of us is most black-
Ought by rights to be bright I You the pot, I the kettle-
Pray get out of my sightP' Would be a hard thing to settle

















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LITTLE PLAYMATES.


UMBRELLA COTTAGE.

"W E are pretty well, thank you; and pray how are you
And why do you laugh at our house. It is new,
FoQ we built it to-day; and I'r' sure it is grand,
Though uncle-can carry it off in one hand.
It is open and pleasant, and it is not too small;
And our carpet is made out of Mary's wool shawl.
She wants not a shawl whilst she is having her tea;
And her shawl does well where it is, as you see.
At Umbrella Cottage we merrily live;
And to friends when they call, some nice apple we give.









THE TURTLE-DOVE'S NEST.

VERY high in the pine tree, "Coo," said the little doves.
"The little turtle-dove Coo," said she.
Made a pretty little nursery, And they played together kindly
To please her little love. In the dark pine-tree.
She was gentle, she was soft;
And her large dark eye In this nursery of yours,
Often turned to her mate, Little sister, little brother,
Who was sitting close by. Like the turtle-dove's nest-
Do you love one another ?
The young turtle-doves Are you kind, are you gentle,
Never quarrelled in the nest: As children ought to be?
For th:y dearly loved each other, Then the happiest of nests
Though-they loved. teir- mother best. -Is your own nursery.










LITTLE PLAYMATES.




MISCHIEVOUS DICK.


A TERRIBLE boy was mischievous Dick,
Ripe for all manner of meddlesome trick:
Teasing his sisters or breaking their toys,
Annoying his elders by making a noise,
Apparently thinking it very great fun
To be thought a nuisance by every one.

When his sisters were playing at croquet one day,
Master Dick came rushing along that way
With a face of alarm, and breathlessly said,
"Your kitten is burnt, and I think she is dead !"
'Tis needless to add that the tale was a hoax:
'Twas only an instance of Master Dick's jokes.

In the kitchen one morn, when the servants were out,
Dick and a sister were playing about;
Dick broke a jug, and thought it a game
To leave his sister to bear all the blame 1
He never felt that his conduct was mean,
Nor saw himself as he was seen!

Oh, a terrible boy was mischievous Dick
Ripe for all manner of meddlesome trick:
Teasing his sisters, or breaking their toys,
Cre sting disturbance, and making a noise,
Apparently thinking it very great fun
To b, thought a nuisance by every one !











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LITTLE PLAYMATES.



SINCINC.

W E'RE singing I Floss, be quiet now Now do see Floss How sly he looks --
Your song is only bow-wow-wow I Floss, ours are not real music-books,
You don't keep time,-you can not speak; Ma's album and pa's book of maps
We told you so one day last week. Will do as well for us, perhaps;'
Just wag your tail and hold your tongue Because we have such little throats,
Until our pretty song be sung. And have not learned to sing from notes.










DOLLY AND HER MAMMA.


D OLLY, you're a naughty girl; So I know it's right, you see:
All of your hair is our of curl, For sometimes I'm nanghty, too,
And you've torn your little shoe. Dolly, dear, as well as you.
Oh I what must I do with you ?
You shall only have dry bread,- But I mean to try and grow
y, s g All mamma can wish, you know:
Dolly, you shall go to bed.
Never into passions fly;
Do you hear, miss, what I say ? Or, when thwarted, sulk and cry.
Are you going to obey ? So my Dolly, you must be
That's what mother says to me; Good and gentle,-just like me.




























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