• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Romps at the seaside
 Back Cover






Title: Romps at the seaside
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053692/00001
 Material Information
Title: Romps at the seaside
Physical Description: 28 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Furniss, Harry, 1854-1925
Lennard, Horace
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Printer )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [1885]
 Subjects
Subject: Seashore -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Osborne Coll.,
Citation/Reference: NUC pre-1956,
Statement of Responsibility: illustrations by Harry Furniss ; with verses by Horace Lennard ; engraved and printed by Edmund Evans.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from Osborne cited below.
General Note: Wrappers included in pagination.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053692
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001844493
oclc - 17291215
notis - AJR8765

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Romps at the seaside
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text


PRICE ONE SHILLING.













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WE'LL romp and play, and all the day

Have seaside recreations;

For all we need to well succeed

Are strong imaginations.





























The Baldwin Library
University
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ROMPs AT THE SEASIDE




WIT VERSES BY HORACE LENNARD
ENGRAVEDED ArTr, ;Rit E NNr RD












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GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONs
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COME for a romp with Neptune!
He is King of the Sea,
Where the lobsters and crabs,
The soles and the dabs,
Dance in the waves with glee.
At his Court there is health,
And his boundless wealth
Of mirth to the world is free.

2
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THE 'BUS IS WAITING AT THE STATION, TO BEAR US TO OUR DESTINATION.
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THE ARRIVALS.-NEW CLOTHES.

DowN to the sands,
To baths and bands,
The new arrivals run;
In clothes so neat,
All new and sweet;
A picture every one!


4















AFTER A WEEK. (

THE moments fly, '. .
A week rolls by,
Behold a wond'rous change!
In clothes once new
We now can view
A transformation strange!






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-, ROMPS ON THE DOWNS.
CLIMB the cliff,
S, The hill is stiff
For that we do not care;
t There's joy at the top,
So do not stop
SUntil we all are there.


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THE PIRATES' CAVE.

BENEATH an umbrella
Some mischief is brewing;
I'm sure you can't tell a
Bit what they are doing.
From school the big brother
Has lately arrived,
And some fun or other
At once has contrived.



7

















- To his propositions
The children agree,

They modern editions

SOf pirates will be.
No longer they tarry,

There's plunder to share:

And captives to carry

SAway to their lair.















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WITH pistols and daggers
(Of wood they are made,)
Each pirate now swaggers,
Correctly arrayed;
And all are enraptured,
When down on the rocks,
By force there are captured
Two victims in frocks.






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THE PIRATES' CAVE.
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THE PIRATES' CAVE

















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THE babes on the morrow

Can nowhere be found;

Their parents, in sorrow,

The crier send round.


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A TOUR of inspection

Is made on the shore;

In every direction

The cliffs they explore;

And there with their banners

The pirates are caught,

And back to good manners

Are speedily brought.


12























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THE two little prisoners,

Now being free,

Arrive at home-his an' hers,-
In time for tea.

The others by Thomas

Led off in a train,

Will never, they promise,

Be pirates again.





13








A WET DAY.
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IT rains! it rains! what shall we do ? But never mind, although it pours, BEDSTEAD and box will form the rocks, Bathing-machines with chairs and screens
Sme li ee an inor A ath will m a boat We clearly can denote.
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ITris tris wa hl ed Btnvrmnathuhi or, BDSEDadbxwl fr h o Bthn-ahnswt car n cen
Ifwegoot e etwt hrug; Wellmaebeiee exr snd ndor. at wllmkea oa;Weclaryca dnoe







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JACK'S RETURN.

HERE'S Jack come back from foreign lands,

A sailor brave and tall;






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GRACE DARLING.

AND here's the face of little Grace,
The Darling of us all.




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THE FISHWIFE.

" PRETTY little fishwife, tell me, I pray,
Have you any soles that are cheap to-day?'
'Yes, ma'am, these are a shilling a pair;
At such a price no feet should go bare."



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MR. LONG is tall and lean,

Mr. Short is stout;

One morning, as above is seen,

Each chose a separate "machine,"

And for a swim went out.



20

















WHILE they indulged in dives and floats,

Two romps upon the shore

Thought wouldd be fun to change their coats,

And other things they wore.















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And this way they were photographed.



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A ROMP ON THE ROCKS.












ROMPING on the rocks,

Slipping as we climb,

Laughter danger mocks,

What a merry time!

Now, join hands, and jump around,

O'er the boulders leap and bound,

Skipping,

Slipping,

Oh! what fun!

Stumble,

Tumble,

Every one!













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24

































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OUT we get,

Dripping wet,

Clothes all shrunk and shrinking;

Off they come,

Lips are dumb,

Spirits all are sinking.

25

















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HANG the garments out to dry,





26






































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Pa will fetch us by-and-by.




27



















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ALAS! all Romps must have an end,

But we'll enjoy them while they last;
S When done, may Recollection lend

S A present pleasure to the past.


















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Swears ^ Wells'

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