Baby world

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Baby world stories, rhymes and pictures for little folks
Uniform Title:
St. Nicholas (New York, N.Y.)
Physical Description:
xiii, 303, 1 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 ( Compiler )
Century Company ( Publisher )
Theodore L. De Vinne & Co ( Printer )
Publisher:
Century Co.
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Theo. L. de Vinne & Co.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1884   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1884   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1884   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1884
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
compiled from St. Nicholas by Mary Mapes Dodge.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002224625
notis - ALG4891
oclc - 11528969
System ID:
UF00053671:00001

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BABY WORLD


STORIES, RHYMES, AND PICTURES


FOR LITTLE FOLKS


COMPILED FROM ST. NICHOLAS
BY MARY MAPES DODGE






THE CENTURY CO. NEW-YORK


















































Copyright, 1884, by THE CENTURY Co.




































Press of Theo. L. De Vinne & Co.
New-York.




































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i) THE BABIES, bARGE AND MALL;

0 THE CHILDREN, ONE AND jLL.



Baby world is a busy world,-
Is n't it, children dear ?
Full of silbts you must see and know,
Full of sounds you must bear,
Full of tHings tbat you must not toucb,"
Full of pussles, both great and small,
Full of people you love so- mucb !
And, ob, such a pleasant world after all

That is your aby world, spicl[ and span;
And here is a book on the self-same plan.
Perhaps you 'II find it alive and glad
As any world you ever bave bad.
Tbere are dogs and horses, kittens, birds,
And songs and stories and happy words;
Funny doings to ma[e you laupb;
Sheep and goat, and tiger and calf,
Reindeer and lion, and marmosets
(Those are queer little oouselold pets)
And otber animals, too, you II' find,-
Some quite cruel, and some rigit kind,
And skates and booples, sleds and toys
Merry girls and frolicsome boys,







Flowers and trees, and landscapes fair;-
Why, you '1l tbinl you are out in the open air!
Well from its pages may sunlipbt stine,
For Baby world floats in a ligt divine.

Yes, Baby world is full of joy,
Full of merriment, love and lift;
And you, my girl! and you, my boy 1
Can belp to keep it fair and bripbt.
Pleasant speech and a cheerful face,
A willing beart and gentle grace,
A love of God, and a soul that is true,-
These are the lilbt that can shine from you.

Glad Baby world I bripbt Baby world
Witb joy lile a great blue sly unfurled!
With your $lumberland, Fairyland, otoryland, all;
Your stars so great, and your clouds so small;
Your torrents of tears tlat are pone in the sun,
Your mountains of trouble that vanish in fun,-
What could we big foll do without you
We witb our sweet loving trouble about you
Wby, we could do nothing but cry all day
*If Baby world ever should pass away

Then up and around us, ye little foll Lool
We 've a map of your world in this beautiful bool.
And just as long as you please you may stay
And whenever you please you may scamper away.








































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MIRROR UP
































PUBLIfHfER' JVOTE.

T HE selections which make up aby World" are from ten
years of St. ]Ticholas," The Century Co's Ilustrated Jfag-
azire for Young Folcs. fj few of the favorite pictures, stories,
and verses included in a" aby gays," published seven years ago
and now out of print, have been retained in this volume, but
most of the selections are here published in their present form
for the first time.


Tew-York, October, I1V4.



flw ^





















CONTENTS.
PAGE
ALICE'S SUPPER .................... .Laura E. Richards 196
"ALL ABOARD FOR THE MOON!". Picture, drawn by. . V. Ne'lig. ...... .103
ALPHABET OF CHILDREN, AN . . . . . . . Isabel Frances Bellows 112
AMONG THE POND-LILIES . Picture, drawn by . . . .Will H. Low . 259
ANT'S VISIT, THE .................... .. F Butls.... 136
APRIL GIRL, AN . . . ... ... .. ... . D. . . .. 150
APRIL GIRL, AN . Picture, drawn by . . Rosina Emmet . 51
"AROUND A DUSTY LITTLE ROOM ". . . . .. . Margaret Johnson . 154
ARTHUR AND HIS PONY ........... ..... S......... 57
As GOOD AS A MOTHER Picture . . . . . . . . . . . 267
ASKING A BLESSING. Picture ... ..... ............. . .. 220
BABY-BO ... ... ................ .. ..Laura E. Richards 6
BABY'S JOURNEY . . . . . . . .. . . Laura E. Richards 28
BABY'S SKIES .. . .. . ... . .. .. .. M. C. Bartlet ... 81
BED-TIME SONG, A ....... .. ..... ....... .. ..... .15
BEE AND THE BUTTERFLY, THE . . . . . .. . . . . . .139
BELL-RINGERS, THE ......... .... .... M. . . 186
BICYCLE BOYS, THE ... .. ... ....... ...Joel Stacy ...... 9
BIG GRAY DOG AND THE BIG GRAY GOAT, THE . .. A. illiams. . i8
BIRD AND ITS MOTHER, THE . . . . . . .. .Bessie Hill. . . 59
BIRD-MOUSE, THE. Condensed from a paper by ..... .Mrs. H. Mann .. 278
BIRDS' BATH, THE . . . .. . . . . . . ..... . .53
BIRDS IN THE RAIN ................... .Celia Thaxter ..... 266
BIRTHDAY-PAGES With blanks for names.. . . . . . . . . 134
BOBBY'S SUPPER . . . . .. . .... . B. W .. . . 211
BOBOLINK AND CHICKADEE . . . . . . . M. Ella Preston. . 95
BOLD HUNTER, THE . . . . . . . . Uncle Jack.. . . 285
BONNIE BABIE STUART . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
BOY AND THE TOOT, THE ........ .. ......M. S ........ 97
BROOM GIANT, THE . . . . . . . .Sarah J.Prichard. 42
BROWNIES' RIDE, THE . . . . . . . .Palmer Cox. . .. 237
BROWNIES' SKATING FROLIC, THE . . . . . . S . . . . 236
BUMBLE-BEE AND THE GRASSHOPPER, THE . . . . . . . . . 268
BUMBLE-BEE, THE . . . . . . . . . Laura E. Richards . 85
CALLING THE FLOWERS .. . . . . . .M.. . . . 227
VII








PAGE
CALL OF THE SEA, THE ............ ..... . . . S. . 94
" CAN YOU COUNT US ? . Picture, drawn by . . F. S. Church . .. 138
CARLO, JANE, AND ME .............. ... . . D .. . . 70
CAT-AND-DOG MANNERS . A Picture Story, drawn by . Nora Stoughton . 41
CAT AND THE MOUSE, THE . Picture Story, drawn by . Palmer Cox . 213
CAT PRANKS .Pictures, drawn by . . . . . . G. Francis .. 164
CHANGING BABIES . . . . . . . . Sydney Dayre . 204
CHICKADEE ...................... .. Henry Ripley Dorr. 259
CHILDREN OF THE WEEK. Old Rhyme, illustrated by . Addie Ledyard .. io8
CHRISTMAS EVE ..................... Lucy G. Morse ... 218
CIRCUS ELEPHANTS HAVING A GOOD TIME. Picture, drawn j C. Brd 252
by . . . . . . . . . . . .252
CIRCUS ELEPHANT'S SATURDAY-NIGHT BATH, THE . Picture, C. eard
drawn by .. . . . . . . . . . . . 252
CITY CHILD, THE ............. ....... Alfred Tennyson . 288
COCK AND THE SUN, THE. . . . . . . . Julia P Ballard . 16
COMB AND BRUSH . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .281
COULD N'T YOU, MAMMA? . . . . .. . ............ 250
COUNT BUMPO AND BUFF . . . . . . . . Joel Stacy . . .. 228
COUNTERS . . . . . . . . . . Aunt Sue . . . 22
Cow AND HER CALF, THE . . . . . . . . F . . . 168
COWS AND THE DUCKS, THE . . .. ........... ........ 122
CRADLE SONG . . .. . . ..... Margaret Johnson. . 289
CRY-BABY, THE .. . . .. . . . . .. Emily Shaw Forman 79
" DAISY-TIME . Picture, drawn by. . . . . . Laura E. ills . . 89
DANDELION ................... .... ..Nellie M. Garabrant 253
DAY AND NIGHT. ................... ..Margaret Johnson... 234
DEAD DOLL, THE . . . . . .... .Margaret Vandegrift. 282
DICK'S STRAW-RIDE . . . . . . . . . Caroline Hansell . 172
D ID YOU ? . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . 221
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UP AND DOWN, THE . Two Pictures, He Stull 29
drawn by . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
DISCONTENTED POLLY ...... ........... ............ 161
DOCTOR WILLIE . . . . . . . . . . Aunt Fanny .. ... 146
DoG THAT DROVE HIS MASTER'S HORSE, THE .. . . . . . . . . 119
DONKEY AND HIS COMPANY, THE . . . . . .. S. C. Stone ...... 262
DOWN IN THE MEADOW . . . . . . . . Ruth Hall . . 288
DOZEN LITTLE DOLLS, A . . . . . ...... Bessie Hill . ... 192
DRESSING MARY ANN.................. M. M.D ...... .130
DRUMMING-LESSON, THE . . . . . . . . S . . . . 3
EDDY'S BALLOON . . . . . . . . . . Elizabeth Lloyd. . 87
ELEPHANT RINGING THE BELL FOR DINNER . Picture, drawn C. Beard .. .. 8
by . . . . . . . . . . . .
FAMILY DRIVE, A.. . . . . . . . Stephen Smith . 96
FARM-BOY GOING TO HIS WORK, THE . Picture, drawn by . F HLungren . . 253
FAST GOAT LINE, THE. ....... . . ...... John Lewees.... 200
FATE OF A GINGER-BREAD MAN, THE . . . . .. Hannah R. Hudson.. 60
VIII









PAGE
FIDDLE-DIDDLE-DEE.................. E. MDavis 66
FINE TURN-OUT, A Picture, drawn by . . . . . R. B. Birch .. .. 45
"FIRST BIRD TO FLY FROM THE NEST, THE . Picture, drawn H Gom. .
by . . .Gacomelli.. . 145
y..... ......................o...... .n "e .....
FIVE-FINGER FOLK, THE . . . . . . . . Olive A. Wadsworth 88
FIVE LITTLE MICE ................ ... William Wye Smith.. 156
FLOWER FAIRIES . Picture, drawn by . . . . .Laura E. Hills. . 91
FLUFFY AND SNUFFY . . .......... .... .Carrie W. Thompson.. 202
FOUR KINDS OF KITTENS . . . . . . . Joel Stacy . .. 185
FOUR LITTLE BIRDS .. ................. . . . 33
"FOUR PRETTY LITTLE BIRDS" . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
FROGS' PICNIC, THE . . . . . . . .. . F. R. S . . . 279
GETTING ACQUAINTED . Picture, drawn by. . . . A. Nortam . 189
GINGER-BREAD BOY, THE .............. .. ...... .... .. 120
GIRAFFE EXCURSION, THE . . . . . . . G. Francis .. .. 193
GOATS WITH LONG HAIR . . . . . . . .. L. MG.orse .. 27
GOING TO SEEK HIS FORTUNE . Picture, drawn by Laura E. Hills .. 287
GOING TO THE MOON . . . . . . . . . S. . . . 102
GOOD FRIENDS ...... ............... W. F. C . 179
GOOD-MORNING ......... . . ...... ... M. M . . 12
GRANDMA'S NAP . . . . . . . . Mary Mes Dodge o104
GRANDMOTHER . Picture, drawn by . . . . . Mary Hallock Foote .235
"HA, HA, HA, OFF THEY Go!" . . . . . ...C. S ...... 4
HALLOA, OLD SCUTTLE! .. . ..... ... . ..Af . . 32
HAPPY BUD, THE ................... ..Eudora May Stone 257
HAPPY DANDELION, THE . . . . . . . . .Willis B. Allen . 80
HAPPY DAYS BY THE LAKE . Picture, drawn by .. . . H. Cocks. . 62
"HAPPY FIELDS OF SUMMER" ... . . . . . .Lucy Larcom . 95
HAPPY PAIR, A. Picture, drawn by... . . .. H Giacomelli . 144
HARK! HARK! . . .. . . . . ... . . M .D. . . . 172
HARP-SEAL MOTHER AND HER BABY, A .Picture, drawn by J. C. Beard . 143
HEIGH-HO SAYS BRIDGET.. . . . . . . . Laura E. Richards .. 159
HELLO! OR, BABY'S TELEPHONE . . . . . . . B . . . 184
HELPING MOTHER . Picture, from a painting by . . . Jan Verhas . . 11
" HERE 'S YOUR SLIPPER!" . Picture, drawn by .. . . H.P. Share . . 188
HERE THEY COME! Picture, drawn by . . . .. . A. Johnson . 163
HER NAME .. . . ............ . ....Mrs. L.P. Wheeler 148
HIs LORDSHIP'S BED-TIME . Picture, drawn by . . H. HBlasfield . 49
Hoop SONG .... .... .. ....... ..Barr Hill. 24
How DO BIRDIES LEARN TO SING? . . . . . . M D . . 81
How HAROLD CAME TO TELL HIMSELF A STORY . . L.G. M. . . ... 99
How ROB COUNTED THE STARS . . . . . .. W. B . . . . 136
HUNGRY LITTLE GIRL, A ..... . .. . ....... ....... 10o9
HURL . Taken from Alphabet Verses, by . . . .. Isabel Frances Bellows 284
"I CAN'T GROW TO BE A GOOD GIRL UNLESS I EAT GOOD Ade .e .
THINGS.". Picture, drawn by . . . . . .Adde 82
I KNOW A LITTLE MAIDEN.... . . . . . M. .J D. . . 163
IX









PAGE
IN THE GARDEN. .. . ..... .. ..... Margaret Johnson . 133
IRONING SONG ...... ...... . ..... ..Bessie Hill ..... 260
"IS N'T IT ABOUT TIME TO GET OUT OF THE WAY? . a B
Picture, drawn by . . . . . . . Bo e 214
JACK AND JILL ....... ... .... ..... ... Joel Stacy.. ... 51
JAPANESE MAMMA AND BABY, THE . . . . . . E. Griffis . 102
JEMIMA BROWN . . . . . . . . Laura E. Richards 189
JINGLING RHYME, A. From Verses, by .. . . . .Emily S. Oakey. . o0
JOE AND THE SEAL. .. ... .... .........C. Drake. .... 142
JOHN THOMAS DE SPINNET . . . . . . . W. Harrington. 226
KATE AND JOE . . . . . . . .. .. . .... . . . 232
KITTY AND DDO. . ......... .... .... .W. Holt ......33
KITTY-CAT'S CRIB. . . . . ......... . . . . . .
KNIT, DOROTHY, KNIT.... .. . . . . .. .Margaret Johnson. .. 78
LAND OF NODDY, THE .. From a Lullaby, by . . . Rossiter Johnson . .283
LAZY GIRL, THE ... .. .. .... ........ Bessie Hill 39
LAZY PUSSY, THE ... ........... Palmer Cox . 17
LEARNING THE LETTERS . . . . . . . . D ...... 214
LEARNING TO SEW ................ ..Mary L. B. Branch 242
LEFT OUT IN THE RAIN . Picture, drawn by .. . . Jessie Curtis Shepherd. 21
LEOPARDESS AND HER CHILDREN. A Picture . . . . . . . . 244
LION, THE .. .. . .. .... ....... JoZn Lewees ...... IIo
LITTLE BERTIE .... ..... .......... .. . M. D. .......
LITTLE BIG WOMAN AND THE BIG LITTLE GIRL, THE .. D. M .D . . OI
LITTLE BOY BLUE." .. Picture ..... . . . . . . . 195
LITTLE BOY JOHN IS SLEEPY . . . ... . . . . . . 29
LITTLE BROOK... ... ... ..... ...... MF. ........ .229
LITTLE CHICK THAT TRIED, THE.. . . . .. . .. John Lewees .... . 73
LITTLE ELSIE ... ........... .... .............. 96
LITTLE GIRL'S LETTER, A....... . . . ..... Kittie R. D ... 37
LITTLE GIRL WHO WOULD N'T SAY PLEASE, THE . ... M. S. P . . . 169
LITTLE Goo-GOO .. . . . . . . . . . Scott Canmpbell .. 35
LITTLE GRETCHEN .. ..... .... ...... . .. . .. 65
LITTLE GUSTAVA. . .. . ... . . . . . Celia Thaxter .. 286
LITTLE JOHNNY AND THE MOSQUITO. A Story in Pictures . . .. . . 208
"LITTLE KINDERGARTEN GIRL, THE .. . .... . Bessie Hill . . 182
LITTLE LIGHTFOOT ..... . . . .... L. G.W.. ... 139
LITTLE MAUD'S STORY . . . . . .. . M. M Gow .... 254
LITTLE MISCHIEF .. . . . . .. . . . . .I D . . .18
LITTLE MISs KITTY . .... . . . . . .Joel Stacy . ... 285
LITTLE OLD BACHELOR, A. Picture, drawn by . . .. P. Share . .. .268
LITTLE PERI-WINKLE .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 141
LITTLE SINGING MAIDENS . ..... .. . . . . . Bessie Hill . .. o
" LITTLE SOLDIERS" .Picture, drawn by . . . . douard Frre . 43
LITTLE SQUIRRELS . . . .. * B. . . 38
"LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER" . Picture, drawn by .. . M. I. S. Scannell. .. 85
LITTLE TO-TOTE . . . . . . . Clara Doty Bates .. . 86
x










PAGE
LITTLE TWEET ............. ...... . ........ 152
"LOOK OUT, THERE!" Picture, drawn by . ... . Jos. Lauber . 249
LULLABY, A .Verse, illustrated by .. . . . . . Mary A. Lathbury 148
MAMMA'S PETS Picture, drawn by . . . . .... G. Kruell . . .. 82
MARMOSETS ... .. ..... . . . .J... ... 94
" MASTER SELF .. .. ............ . Janet Ruutz Rees... 245
MERaRY RAIN ........... ...... ......Fleta Forrester. 20
MISUNDERSTANDING, A . . ... . . . . ... Margaret Johnson . 9
MONDAY RIDDLE, A. . ... .. ............ ... ..... 156
MY BONNY BLUE BOWL AND SILVER SPOON .. .. Margaret Johnson .. i50
MY LADY IS EATING HER MUSH . . .. .. . .t. M. F.u ... 177
NED'S STILTS ............. ......... Lucy G. Morse .... 261
NEW MOTHER HUBBARD, A . . . .. . .. Eleanor A. Hunter . 25
" NOON, NOON!"... . . . . . . .. Frederic Palmer 50
"Now, LITTLE DAUGHTER" . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
"Now, YOU CAN FLY AWAY! Picture . . . . . . .. . . 203
"OH! I'M MY MAMMA'S LADY-GIRL" . . . . . M. M. D.. . . 126
"OH, LOOK AT THIS GREAT BIG TIGER!". ..Picture . . . . . . . 210
" OH, WHAT A DEEP WELL!" . Picture, drawn by . .. Addie Ledyard . 183
OH, WHAT A GREEDY BOY! . . . . . A. C. Davis . .. 150
OLD FOLKS' CONCERT, AN Picture. ..... . . . . . . . 185
OLD MAN BY THE GATE, THE. . . . . . . . Thomas S. Collier . o6
OLD SIMON . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . ..... .. .221
ONE OF HIS NAMES . . . . . . . . Josephine Pollard. 255
ONE, Two, THREE! . . . . . . . .. . Margaret Johnson 155
ON THE ICE . Picture, drawn by .. ...... ... L. Hokins . . .. 123
OUR SKATING BRIGADE . . . . . .. . . . Mary La Salle Wing 25
OWL, THE EEL, AND THE WARMING-PAN, THE .. ... .Laura E. Richards . 141
PAIR OF BROTHERS, A .Picture..... ............. ..... 209
PAIR OF RABBITS, A . Picture.. ....... .. .. .... ... .. . 231
PERSEVERANCE . . . .... . . . . . . Sarah Orne Jewett . 258
" PHILOPENA !". . ..... . . ...... .. ... .M. D. ....56
POMPEY AND THE FLY .. .. .. .... .. . L ......... 198
POOR JACK-IN-THE-BOX .... .. ... ........... J.S... .. .. 245.
POOR THINGS! . . ... .. .. . . .. Joel Stacy . . 158
PORTRAIT OF A LITTLE GIRL, A . Picture, by .. . . Sir Joshua Reynolds.. 98
PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN . . . . . . .. Laura E. Richards 141
" PUPS . Picture, after a painting by .. . . . G. Brown . .. 16o
PUSSY AND HER ELEPHANT . . . . . . . Hannah More Johnson. 76
PUSSY PAGE, A . Pictures, by. . . . . . .... J. G. Francis . . .44
PUSSY WILLOW . . . . . . ... . . .. Ella Gardner . 173
QUEEN'S GIFT, THE . . . . . . . . . Rose Hartwick Thorpe .272
QUITE A HISTORY ......... . . . Arlo Bates .. . 248
RACE IN THE AIR, A .. Picture...... .... . ........ 248
RED-TOP SEEING THE WORLD .. . . . . . . Mrs. Fanny arrow . 230
REMINDING THE HEN .. . . . . . . . Bessie Chandler . 138
XI









PAGE
RHYME FOR BOY, A . . . . ..... . .Lillian Coggeshall... 158
RHYME OF THE WEEK, A . .. . . . . William Wye Smith 157
RIDDLE, A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
RIDING ON THERAIL .............. ... H. F. King . .. 123
ROBIN'S VISIT, THE . . . . . .... .f M M. D... . I.. 170
ROY'S SUGAR GOAT-CARRIAGE .Picture . . . . . . . . . 14
"ROY'S VISIT.. . . . . . . . . . . L. E.F . . . 40
SANTA CLAUS........ . . . . . . .Aunt anny ..... .63
SEED, THE ... .. ...... . . ..... . M F. B '.. ..... 251
SEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS . . . . . . . . Joel Stacy . . .. 44
" SHALL WE BE FRIENDS ? . Picture, drawn by . .. H P. Share .. 174
" SHE DOES N'T SEEM TO KNOW THAT SHE 'S ME!" .ary Wyman Wallace. 251
Picture, drawn by . . . . . . . ..
SHOWER,A.. .. ................. ... M.F. Butts ..... 185
SIGNS OF MAY .................... ..M. M. D . .. 168
SING-A-SING .......................S. .C. Stone...... 32
"SING, SING! WHAT SHALL WE SING? .. Picture, drawn by. J. G. Francis.. . .164
SMART BOY, A .... .. .. .. ... .. .. ..... .Joel Stacy . .. 281
SNOW-BIRDS' CHRISTMAS-TREE, THE .. . . .... .Mfabel Jones . . 12
" SOMEBODY STOP HIM! Picture . . . . . . . . ... . .. 93
SOME FUN WITH A TOY SPIDER. Picture, drawn by. . . G. Francis.. ....165
SONG OF THE BROOK, THE. . . . . . .. . .Bu.lsF B. 73
SONG OF THE ROLLER SKATES, THE ... . . .. . A. C.. . . . 149
Sow, SEW, AND SO .. .......... . . . .Rosa Graham. .... 7
SQUIRRELS AND THE CHESTNUT-BURR, THE . . . . . . . ..... 221
STORY LITTLE NELL READ, THE . . . . . .. L. G. M. . . ... 256
STORY OF ROB, THE . . . . . . . ... . S S P. . . 36
STORY OF THE LITTLE RED HEN, THE. . .. .. s. r Weed . .. 92
STORY OF THE PAPER DOLLIES, THE . . . .. . .. Bessie Hill . . 83
STRAWBERRY GIRL, THE . . .. . . . . B. -H . . . 137
STREET LAMP, A. .. ....... ... . MAL. F. B.... ... 276
SWEET RED ROSE, THE . . . . . . . . Joel Stacy . . .. 38
TAME BIRD, THE . Picture, drawn by . . . . . douard Frere . . 2
TAME CROW AND THE EGG, THE . . . . .... Charles Barnard . 52
TAMING A WILD HORSE . Picture, drawn by. .... .Addie Ledyard 243
TED AND KATE .................... Joel Stacy... .. 222
TEN LITTLE GENTLEMEN. ...... . . . Joel Stacy . . .. 140
TERRIBLE TIGER, A.. .. ...... ........ . J S. . . 277
THERE'S A SHIP ON THE SEA . . . . M. .. ... .271
THERE WAS A SMALL SERVANT CALLED KATE . . E. L. Sylvester . 154
"THEY DID N'T HAVE A PENNY". . . . . . G. J Francis. .. ..192
"THIS IS THE WAY MY GRANDMAMMA DANCED . Milais 48
Picture, drawn by.......... . . .. . .illa
THREE ANGORA GOATS Picture..... . . . . . . . . 26
THREE KINDS OF SEE-SAW.... . . . . . .. D. . . . 54
THREE LITTLE SISTERS. Picture, from a painting by . William Page . 178
THREE SMART LITTLE FOXES . . . . . . . . . 190
XII









PAGE
THREE TIGERS, THE . . . . . . . . . Joel Stacy .. ...... 50
TICK, TOCK! TICK, TOCK! ............ .. .....W. Grant .. ..... 29
TIDY AND VIOLET; OR, THE TWO DONKEYS . . . . . . . . . 269
TIMID KITTENS, THE . . . . . . . ... S. B.Ricord . 165
TOMMY HOPPER'S CHOICE . . . . ... Paul Fort . . . 175
TONY, THE DOCTOR'S PET . . . . .. . . J. L .. . 199
TRAY AND MISS PUSS. ....... .... ..... ......... . 276
TRIO, THE . . . . . .. . . . . Mary A. Latbury . 229
TURKEY-COCK, MR . .. . . . . . . . . Bessie F. Parker . 46
Two BY Two .......... .. .. ........ M. M. D. .. .. 243
Two SUNFLOWERS, THE . . . . .. M. JD. . . . 124
UNEXPECTED . Picture, drawn by .. . ........ Jessie McDermott . 188
UP IN A BALLOON......... .. . . . . Bessie Hill .. 265
UP THE ROAD AND DOWN THE ROAD.. . . . . Mrargaret Johnson .. 219
VAIN LITTLE GIRL, THE . . . . . . . . Joel Stacy . . .. 107
VELOCIPEDE EXPRESS, THE . . . . . . . . S. . .. 258
VERY STRANGE RIDE ON A REINDEER, A . Picture, drawn by Henry Sandham .. . 277
VICTOR'S WONDERFUL ANIMALS AND WHAT THEY ALMOST DID M. MD. .. . 215
WAIT.......... ... ............. Dora Read Goodale 62
WALKING MATCH, A . Picture, drawn by . . . . Rose Mueller .. ... 226
WAS HE CAUGHT? ... . . . .... ..... Bessie Hill...... .166
"WEE LITTLE HOUSE".. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . 57
WEE MOTHER HUBBARD . . . . . ... .. . A. Brennan ..... 56
"WHAT DOES THIS MEAN, SIR?" .Picture . . . . . . . . 241
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN.. Picture, drawn by .. ...... .Frank Beard. .. 209
WHAT ONE YEAR MAKES OF A LITTLE KITTEN . . . Aunt Fanny . . 72
WHAT ROBBY SAW.... ........... .......Joel Stacy .. ... 240
WHAT THE COLT SAYS Picture, drawn by . . . . Bellew ... 8
" WHERE Do ALL THE TOYS COME FROM ? Picture, drawn by. W H. Drake .. 64
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE BOYS LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE? E .lise Bhm .
Silhouette Pictures, drawn by . . . . . .
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE GIRLS LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE ? Elie Bhm 3
Silhouette Pictures, drawn by. . ... ..
WILLIE AND ROSA ................... Emma Gilbert. .. 127
WINTER AND SUMMER .. ............... .H 0. Knowlton.... 211
WINTER SPORT . Picture, drawn by .. . . . .... .Rose Mueller. . 109
WISDOM IN THE WELL .................. Philo' Geo...s . 195
WISE LITTLE CHICK, THE .. . . . . . . . Hylie Morrel ... 35
WONDERFUL GIRL, A .. ... ........... .. Hattie S. Russell... 91
WORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE . . . . . .. . Annie E. De Friese . 15
YOUNG MARCH WIND ........... .... ... F.Butts .. 173

A FEW WAYS OF AMUSING LITTLE FOLKS . . .. ... . . 291
I. A PAPER JACOB'S LADDER... . . . . . .. Henry W Troy . 293
II. MADE WITH A HANDKERCHIEF . . . . .. Daniel Beard . 294-298
III. A PAIR OF SLATE PICTURES. . ..... L. Hopkins .... .299-300
IV. HAND-SHADOWS .. . . ........... J SS. . . . 301-303
XIII






































































































































SNi
























































S o








11













































i-s7-
















































ATT














BABY WORLD.



LITTLE BERTIE.

ONE day little Bertie Green came running in from the
garden. She held something in her apron, but no one could
see what it was. Oh, Mamma," she said, "let 's play
three wishes. Play you 're a poor woman and I 'm a
be-yoo-tiful fairy. Will you, Mamma ? "
Mamma laughed, and said she would try.
Very well," said Bertie, "you '11 see what a splendid
game it is. Now, shut your eyes tight, we 're going to
begin! I'm a fairy, and I '11 grant you three wishes.
There 's something in my apron, you know, Mamma, but
it 's .tsecret. Now, WISH!
': "ll," said mamma, closing her eyes, let me think."
That's right, Mamma; wish for something real nice-
a rose, or a cherry, or anything "
I wish for a rose," said her mamma, very slowly.
Here it is! cried Bertie, laughing with joy, and hand-
ing her mamma a lovely rose. "Nowwish again, Mamma."
2 i







"Let-me-think," said mamma again; "now what
SHALL I wish for ? " Something to eat! the fairy hinted.
"Oh, yes, something to eat!" mamma said; "well, I
wish-I wish for two nice cherries! "
"Good! good!" shouted Bertie, giving mamma a bright
little red bunch. How DID you know? Are they sweet ?"
"Yes, indeed," said mamma, "and I thank you very much,
good fairy! But I can have another wish, you know!"
"Y-e-s!" said Bertie, looking troubled, and letting go of
the little empty apron; "only, I don't know how to play
any more wishes."
I do! said mamma; I wish for a kiss! Then you
should have seen the happy fairy climb up, throw her little
arms around mamma's neck and kiss her again and again!
That was the very best wish of all," said mamma.



THE TAME BIRD.












BIPPO KNOWS THAT THE CHILDREN WILL NOT HARM HIM.
2







THE DRUMMING-LESSON.


THIS little boy lives in France. His name is Auguste,
and he is learning how to drum in the. right way. He
does not think it
is nice to go about
the house mak-
ing only a great
racket ; so his
brother is showing
him how the little
drummer-boys
play, rub-a-dub-
dub, rub-a-dub-
dub sometimes
softly, sometimes
loudly, but always
in good time.
Auguste hopes to
be a real drummer-
boy himself as soon
as he can make ALPHONSE GIVES AUGUSTE A DRUMMING-LESSON.
From a picture by Edouard Frere.
good drum music, and then he can march with his brother
and the other boys up and down the village street. His
brother Alphonse will play the fife, and another boy will
play the trumpet, while little Auguste drums.
0








/






































Ow; 11 *. fecav
r .























iw I IO Si o cc o-


4













































.. .... ..o .





SCtarlie raby nlT hc ac^ e a
i ^alr ^^ .0 ).
-K'
-- -/






















i' ---~-3~-I- 5








BABY-BO.







'" .. ." '-" "











One three, four, five !





...... our, and a little wee thumb !














Shut them up under the bed-clothes tight,
.. ..... ... .
.....- ....






-l .4 g - ------...

























How many eyes has the Baby Bo ?
Two, so shining and bright !








Shut them up under the little white lids,
And kiss them a loving good-night.


6
,: . .













One, two, three, four, five!




,: ::... ,, .. ...... \ :" . C.i .. ': " .. .. : 6 i ,









SOW, SEW, AND SO.

BY ROSA GRAHAM.

Sow, sow, sow, Sew, sew, sew,
So the farmers sow! So the mothers sew!
Busy, busy, all the day, Busy, busy all the day,
While the children are at play, While the children are at play,
Stowing, stowing close away Sewing, sewing fast away,
Baby wheat and rye in bed, So the children may have frocks,
So the children may be fed, Trowsers, coats, and pretty socks,
So, so, so. So, so, so.
Sow, sew, so,
So they sow and sew;
S, and 0, and W,
This is what the farmers do;
Put an E in place of O,
This is how the mothers sew,-
So they sow and sew for you,
So without the W,
So, so, so.
















GRANDPAPA'S new slipper, Humpy little gray back,
Lying on the rug; Arched above the toes;
Little saucy kitty-cat Does she think she's out of sight
Thinks it wondrous snug. If she hides her nose?
7

















: -.* ; ', f ,?"

j' ":*"

64 IF ,*.4


. -









MR. ELEPHANT RINGING THE BELL FOR DINNER.







































THIS LITTLE COLT SAYS: "WHY, MA! I'M ALMOST AS TALL AS YOU ARE!"
Y-I~1

TH S LT LE C L AY : H ) A M L O T AS T L S O R V
"8 -c~









THE BICYCLE BOYS.






I1,




I,








"OH, the bicycle boys,
The bicycle boys!
They care not for tops
Or babyish toys;
They're done with their hobbies
And that sort of play,
As mounted on nothing
They're off, and away!

II. III.
Oh, the bicycle boys, They race with each other,
The bicycle boys! They race with a horse,
They travel along All sure they will beat
Without any noise. As a matter of course;
They travel so softly, And often they win,
They travel so fast, And often they fall;-
They always get somewhere, Then down comes bicycle,
I 'm told, at the last. Boy, and all!"
9









A JINGLING RHYME.

There was a Dog, and he barked and barked and
barked so loud, they say, (
That he frightened all the rats and mice a hun-
dred miles away.



h' 4












I F















There was a Cat all sleek and fat.
^ and she had naught to do
SBut softly purr and smooth her fur
and sit and look at you T



10





















F 05I A PANTN B V H S.
















tI i





H E L P Iii IIi I N G MOTHER


FROM A PAINTING BY JAN VERHAS.i i









GOOD-MORNING.

GOOD-MORNING, Mamma! Good-morning, bright sun!
Good-morning, Papa! The day is begun.
Good-morning to ev'ry one, pussy as well:
Does he sleep like the rest, till he hears the first bell?

Good morning it is, for the sky is all blue,
The green grass is shining and sparkling with dew;
The birds all are singing their merriest song,
And the air through the window comes sunny and strong.

Good morning it is, for dark was the night,
And chilly and still; but the morning is bright.
If God did not watch us and bring us the day,
We 'd never be able to get up and play.

Good-morning, new Day! I 'm glad we're awake,
Your work and your sunshine, and frolic to take;
And I 'm glad we are able so gayly to call
Good-morning! good-morning! Good-morning to all!


---^----


THE SNOW-BIRDS' CHRISTMAS-TREE.
BY MABEL JONES.

YES, the snow-birds had a Christ-mas-tree at our house last year-a
re-al tree, just big e-nough for the dear lit-tle things. I '11 tell you a-bout it.
We were as hap-py as we could be a-round our own beau-ti-ful tree,
when all at once Roy gave a shout, and point-ed to the win-dow. (Roy is
my lit-tlest broth-er. He has love-ly brown hair, and it's banged in front
and hangs down be-hind. Mam-ma says he is the pet of the house, or
that Lulu and he are the pets of the house. For Lulu looks ver-y much
like Roy, and has the same kind of love-ly hair, and it's banged in front
and long be-hind, just like Roy's. Only Lulu is old-er than Roy.)
Well, when Roy point-ed to the win-dow that morn-ing we thought at
first that some-thing had hap-pened to the lit-tle toy goat car-riage that
12









GOOD-MORNING.

GOOD-MORNING, Mamma! Good-morning, bright sun!
Good-morning, Papa! The day is begun.
Good-morning to ev'ry one, pussy as well:
Does he sleep like the rest, till he hears the first bell?

Good morning it is, for the sky is all blue,
The green grass is shining and sparkling with dew;
The birds all are singing their merriest song,
And the air through the window comes sunny and strong.

Good morning it is, for dark was the night,
And chilly and still; but the morning is bright.
If God did not watch us and bring us the day,
We 'd never be able to get up and play.

Good-morning, new Day! I 'm glad we're awake,
Your work and your sunshine, and frolic to take;
And I 'm glad we are able so gayly to call
Good-morning! good-morning! Good-morning to all!


---^----


THE SNOW-BIRDS' CHRISTMAS-TREE.
BY MABEL JONES.

YES, the snow-birds had a Christ-mas-tree at our house last year-a
re-al tree, just big e-nough for the dear lit-tle things. I '11 tell you a-bout it.
We were as hap-py as we could be a-round our own beau-ti-ful tree,
when all at once Roy gave a shout, and point-ed to the win-dow. (Roy is
my lit-tlest broth-er. He has love-ly brown hair, and it's banged in front
and hangs down be-hind. Mam-ma says he is the pet of the house, or
that Lulu and he are the pets of the house. For Lulu looks ver-y much
like Roy, and has the same kind of love-ly hair, and it's banged in front
and long be-hind, just like Roy's. Only Lulu is old-er than Roy.)
Well, when Roy point-ed to the win-dow that morn-ing we thought at
first that some-thing had hap-pened to the lit-tle toy goat car-riage that
12









had been giv-en to him at East-er. He oft-en put it up-on the broad
win-dow-shelf, be-cause he could gent-ly pull it up and down there be-
fore the win-dow.--It was a very queer lit-tle car-riage, made of a sug-ar
egg-shell, with a lit-tle sug-ar rab-bit, up-on the seat, driv-ing a ti-ny goat.
But no, The car-riage was safe e-nourh; and
Roy was call-ing out: "See! See!
they want a Kis-mas tree,




























too And we all looked
a-round, and-- what do you
think ? There on the win-dow-sill were four
love-ly lit-tie snow-birds, look-ing in at our tree! And they would peck,
peck, at the pane, as if they want-ed us to o-pen the win-dow.
Let them in Let them in!" shout-ed Lulu, and she ran to raise the
win-dow. Then the poor lit-tle birds were a-fraid of her, and flew a-way.
13








They did not fly ver-y far a-way on-ly to a big tree out in the yard.
And we o-pened the win-dow and called, Bird-ie! Bird-ie!" a-gain and
a-gain, and tried to coax them to come in. But just then it be-gan to
snow hard, and the lit-tie birds flew down into a lit-tle, low ev-er-green, and
a-way into the cen-ter of it, where the snow could n't fall on them at all.
But the best thing is to come yet. Lulu thought of it. Just when
we said the poor lit-tle birds would have a very dull Christ-mas-day, Lulu
said: Oh, I know! We 'll make them a Christ-mas-tree of their own! and
take it out and give it to them."
And then Lulu and Mam-ma cut off a lit-tle bough from our Christ-mas-
tree, and they stood it up in a strong pa-per box, and packed the box tight-ly
with pret-ty blue pa-per, so that the bough would stand up straight in it.
And then she hung the lit-tle tree all o-ver with bread-crumbs, and made it
a per-fect lit-tle Snow-birds' Christ-mas-tree !
Then Lulu and Roy put on their new red caps, with a big round but-ton
at the top, and their warm coats, and took the lit-tle Christ-mas-tree out
in-to the yard, and set the lit-tie box and the lit-tle tree very near the ever-
green, where it stood up straight. And if you '11 be-lieve it those
birds nev-er flew a-way at all, but looked just as if they had ex-pect-ed it
all a-long! And Lulu and Roy went a few steps off, and turned a-round
and stood per-fect-ly still, and in a min-ute all four of those lit-tle birds flew
down, and helped them-selves from their pret-ty lit-tle Christ-mas-tree, and
were just as hap-py o-ver it as we were o-ver ours. Lulu and Roy stood
out there in the snow and watched them ev-er so long. And we could see
them from the win-dow, too.
We hope the same lit-tle snow-birds will come back this win-ter; and if
they do, we 're go-ing to give them an-oth-er and a fin-er Christ-mas-tree.













ROY'S SUGAR GOAT-CARRIAGE.
14









WORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE.










KN 0 :





















A BED-TIME SONG.

Open the snowy little bed,
And put the baby in it;
Lay down her pretty curly hea.d,
She go to sleep n a minute.













Tuck the sheet down rounnd her neck,
And cover the dimples over,
Till she looks like a rose-buLd peeping out
From a bed of sweet white clover.
,. ,. '; T0 ,.









WORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE.










KN 0 :





















A BED-TIME SONG.

Open the snowy little bed,
And put the baby in it;
Lay down her pretty curly hea.d,
She go to sleep n a minute.













Tuck the sheet down rounnd her neck,
And cover the dimples over,
Till she looks like a rose-buLd peeping out
From a bed of sweet white clover.
,. ,. '; T0 ,.









THE COCK AND THE SUN.

By J. P. B.





\ \i






















Good-morning, Sir Sun, it 's high time you appear;
I 've been calling you up for an hour at least;
I 'm ashamed of your slowness at this time of year!"

The sun, as he quietly rose into view,
Looked down on the cock with a show of fine scorn;
"You may not be aware, my young friend, but it's true,
That I rose once or twice before you, sir, were born "

Was the proud fowl abashed ? Not a bit; for you see
He was all the more silly because he was vain;
" Cock-a-doo he exclaimed. Do you dare dazzle ME?
"Cock-a-doo-dle! Now don't let this happen again !"
16










THE LAZY PUSSY.

BY PALMER COX.

THERE lives a good-for-nothing cat,
So lazy, it appears,
That chirping birds can safely come
And light upon her ears.
The rats and mice can venture out
To nibble at her toes,
Or climb around and pull her tail,
And boldly scratch her nose.
Fine servants brush her silken coat
And give her cream for tea;-
Yet she 's a good-for-nothing cat,
As all the world may see.











Y J
N,, :" -
"' .
.. ', --" -- 9*
















17









LITTLE MISCHIEF.

ONCE there was. a little boy named Leslie. He lived in New York,
quite near the Central Park. He would have been a good boy if he had not
been so full of mischief. One day at the breakfast table, he upset his bowl
of milk to make his papa laugh. And when his papa did not laugh, Leslie
r AP-. 1 .
















began to cry. Ihen he was very
sorry for doing such mischief. He
did not have any more milk for that






breakfast, and he thought he never
would upset his bowl again. On the next day his nurse was going to the
Central Park with him and a little boy named Vic, who was coming to
spend the afternoon with him, so Leslie soon became very happy, and he
talked a good deal about the Park, and all he was going to show Vic there.
I '11 show him the ammamuls," said Leslie (for he had not yet learned
to say animals plainly), "and the Olbisct that great high stone thing
with writing' on it; and I 'm goin' to take him to see the sheep and the lambs
all jumping' and playing' like everything. Can't I, Mamma ? "
Oh, yes," said his mamma; "but that high stone thing in the Park is

Olbisct," said Leslie, with such a funny twinkle in his bright eyes-that
his mamma thought he could say it better if he tried very hard.
Well, at last, it was nearly time for Vie to come. Nurse washed Leslie's
face and dressed him finely to go to the Park. Then she told him he could
go down-stairs and wait till she was ready. Leslie went straight to papa's
w ith w. .-.. I'm...go.. '.'o -, k" ',t e t',h',a't, .b




4t t s,.th-


facenbedan tds crygk. Then she tolas very







talked a good deal about the Park, and all he was going to show Vic there.













18









room, but papa had gone up the street. So the little boy threw his
pretty velvet hat on the table, and looked about for something to do.
And now something very bad happened. A pair of scissors lay on
papa's table, and Leslie was up to mischief at once. He took the scissors
and sat down on a bench close to some books and pictures that were lying
on a big chair -and oh! what do you think he did? It was dreadful.
He cut two pages of one of the books; and he pulled the pictures to
the floor. Then he began to cut one of the fine pictures!
........... .. .. ... ...... ... .......... ..... ........
















iS-i


0 ..













Just then papa came in. He shouted to Les- lie to stop, and
then he said he must punish his little boy for / such mischief.
Leslie cried very hard, for he knew he had done wrong, but
as soon as he heard the door-bell ring, he stopped crying, and said:
19








Oh, Papa! there's Vic! I must go now. We are going with nursey
to see the ammamuls and lambs in the Park! I '11 let you punish me
a little when we get back."
But his papa said: No, sir, you can not go to the Park to-day. You
must GO RIGHT TO BED. Then you will remember not to do mis-
chief again." Papa knew that this was a severe punishment.
Leslie cried and cried and cried, but he had to go to bed.
Papa felt very sad, but he told Victor that Leslie could not go out
at all. Then he took Victor to the Park, himself, and showed him the
Obelisk and the lambs,, and the seals, and a good many things besides.
That same evening papa carried up Leslie's supper, and talked with him
a while. He told the little boy what harm he had done, and how very
naughty it was to injure books or pictures or anything of value, and
how he hoped that after this he always could trust his little son. Then
Leslie kissed him, and promised never, never, never to do such mischief
again.







MERRY RAIN.

BY FLETA FORRESTER.

SPRINKLE, sprinkle, comes the rain,
Tapping on the window-pane;
Trickling, coursing,
Crowding, forcing
Tiny rills
To the dripping window-sills.

Every blade of grass around
Is a ladder to the ground;
Clinging, striding,
Slipping, sliding,
On they come
With their busy zip and hum!
20








Laughing rain-drops, light and swift, In the woods, by twig and spray,
Through the air they fall and sift; To the roots they find their way;
Dancing, tripping, Pushing, creeping,
Bounding, skipping Doubling, leaping,
Thro' the street, Down they go
With their thousand merry feet. To the waiting life below.

Oh, the brisk and merry rain,
Bringing gladness in its train!
Falling, glancing,
Tinkling, dancing
All around,-
Listen to its cheery sound!





""..... .;.i












.- ,< .:': -. "% ,.








COUNTERS.
BY AUNT SUE.


I.-ONE little lady, very nicely dressed.








2.-TWO little dickey-birds,
perched upon a nest.




3 -THREE little chickies
feeding from a plate.




4.-FoUR little children,

S0 ' "
swinging on a gate.

,- -_ K----- --- _


S5.-FIVE little rabbits,
Frightened by a gun.


22









6.--Mx little piggi running
like fu n.
















8.--EIGHT nice apples,
hanging up high.





-iN INE little sparrows,

picking up crumbs.





10.-TEN little fingers, but
: 'NM -


























two of them are thumbs
.---EIGHT nice apples











23
:-.. "=_ .___ -- -
two_ of"them-are--h-,

.... -:.- 'i'23








J4 0 0 6 0 DnD
o r *BE a 1r4 Q11


ST run dle u ndle -undle
o aunid and round ondiound !
90 Jfe hoops, in lfifff troops
a mlle ia. the jrJuand.


iumb umle--umbuble le
Ever up and down, ,
The Ille irls wih fl in curls
]riVe tCem rhaT0 Ike town. -









2 4- l t o s e -

24























0,whQwouIwlwal alonq demurTG,
Or who would Tj e in salel? s
ot an/ of uL,Ou ynay be suTc;
e everT one e an ate!

S1




r












'Rose ^u ler
25









































































THREE ANGORA GOATS.
26









GOATS WITH LONG HAIR.
BY L. G. MORSE.

DID you ev-er see goats climb the mount-ains? They run up the
rock-y sides and a-long such lit-tle, nar-row places, that it seems, ev-er-y
min-ute, as if they would sure-ly roll off and be killed at the next step.
They will stop high, high up on a spot, where there does not seem to
be e-nough ground for their feet to rest up-on, and look a-round them as
qui-et-ly as if they were stand-ing in a field, and be-gin to nib-ble the
bits of grass near by. They are not at all a-fraid.
Little boys and girls who live near, look up at them a-way up-ever
so high-and wish that they could climb as fast and well. Some-times,
if you saw a goat in such a place, you might won-der how he could
move at all; but, sud-den-ly, you would see him draw back his horn-y
head, bend his fore legs un-der his bod-y, and spring through the air from
one rock to an-oth-er, com-ing down, at last, safe and sound, up-on a
ledge as nar-row as the one he had left. But it would be more fun for
you to see them in the fields, where they can skip and play near you.
They are in a field in the pict-ure; but one of them is look-ing at
the mount-ains, I think. You can see how long and thick their hair is.
Those goats ly-ing down would make nice, soft pil-lows for your heads.
But these goats are not like those that you have seen at home. You
would have to go far a-way, to the oth-er side of the world, to a place
called An-go-ra, to find goats with long, silk-y, curl-y hair like that.
The hair of the cats, dogs and rab-bits, as well as of the goats that live
at that place, is very fine and soft.
It is ea-sy to make any goat tame and gen-tle. If you were to pet
and feed one for a few days, it would soon fol-low you a-bout, like
" Ma-ry's lit-tle lamb." They are al-most al-ways ver-y po-lite, too; if
you of-fer them e-ven an old piece of pa-per, they do not sniff at it and
turn a-way their heads, as dogs, or cats, or most oth-er pets would; but
they take it pret-ti-ly and eat it up, as if they were much o-bliged to
you for it.
Did you ev-er taste goat's milk ? It is ver-y nice, and good for lit-tle
ba-bies. Sick peo-ple oft-en drink it, be-cause it is bet-ter for them than
cow's milk. Once I knew two lit-tle girls, named An-nie and Ma-rie,
who went a-cross the big sea in a ship. Their pa-pa bought two goats,
27








which were put in a pen on board of the ship, and so went all the way
with the lit-tle girls. An-nie and Ma-rie had some of their milk ev-er-y
day, and they fed their pret-ty goats with bread.
The goats were named "Muff" and Tuf-ty," and they were so glad
when the lit-tle girls came to see them, that they would lick their hands
and frol-ic as much as they could in the lit-tle pen. When An-nie and
Ma-rie left the ship, they gave Muff and Tuf-ty to a poor wom-an, who
led them home for her own lit-tle chil-dren to pet.




BABY'S JOURNEY.

BY LAURA E. RICHARDS.

OP-PET-Y, hop-pet-y, ho!
H /Where shall the ba-by go ?
O-ver dale and down,
To Lim-er-ick town,
And there shall the ba-by go.

Hop-pet-y, hop-pet-y, ho!
H ,How shall the ba-by go ?
In a coach and four,
"And pos-si-bly more,
And so shall the ba-by go.

Hop-pet-y, hop-pet-y, ho!
When shall the ba-by go ?
In the aft-er-noon,
By the light of the moon,
And then shall the ba-by go.

Hop-pet-y, hop-pet-y, ho!
Why shall the baby go ?
To learn a new jig,
And to buy a new wig,
And that 's why the ba-by shall go.

28
















,HARKEE, harkee to the clock,-
__ T-ick, lock, tick, lock!"
: This the pretty clock doth say
S.L All the night and all .the day.
Tick, tlock, lick, stock !"

Tell me, tell me, pretty clock,-
Tick, stock, tick, lock /"-
Is this all that you can say
All the night and all the day?
,And the clock makes answer quick,
Tock, lick, lock, lick ",




LITTLE BOY JOHN IS SLEEPY.

LITTLE boy John is sleepy,
Little boy John can rest,
Now that the sun all its labor has done,
And gone to its bed in the west.

Little boy John to-morrow
Shall laugh and sport all day;
Little boy wise is shutting his eyes, .
He will wake in the morning and play.

Rattle goes into the closet, .
Letter-blocks go there too;
Wait till the morn for the cow in the corn.
And the horn of the Little Boy Blue.-
29
















,HARKEE, harkee to the clock,-
__ T-ick, lock, tick, lock!"
: This the pretty clock doth say
S.L All the night and all .the day.
Tick, tlock, lick, stock !"

Tell me, tell me, pretty clock,-
Tick, stock, tick, lock /"-
Is this all that you can say
All the night and all the day?
,And the clock makes answer quick,
Tock, lick, lock, lick ",




LITTLE BOY JOHN IS SLEEPY.

LITTLE boy John is sleepy,
Little boy John can rest,
Now that the sun all its labor has done,
And gone to its bed in the west.

Little boy John to-morrow
Shall laugh and sport all day;
Little boy wise is shutting his eyes, .
He will wake in the morning and play.

Rattle goes into the closet, .
Letter-blocks go there too;
Wait till the morn for the cow in the corn.
And the horn of the Little Boy Blue.-
29






















I -_
,0,











-)0

























WHICH of these little boys lives in your house?
30
,0


























































WHICH of these little girls lives in your house?
31









HALLOA, OLD SCUTTLE!

HALLOA, old scuttle! good old soul,
.What 's become of all your coal?
"Why, the tongs he came with a gobbledy-gun,
And took my coals out, one by one;
And the blaze ran in with a tricksy-spire
And set the pretty things afire;
And the blower came with a roaring roar,
And made them burn up more and more;
And the poker with kloppity-hop,
He poked their ashes and made 'em drop,-
And that, O Gobbledy-kloppity-dole!
Is what's become of all my coal."



"SIN G-A-S ING !"

-' -2 /













Q,)



LISTEN! Hear the tea-kettle sing: Listen Hear the tea-kettle sing:
"Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!" "Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing "
It matters not how hot the fire, As if 't were task of fret and toil
It only sends its voice up higher: To bring cold water to a boil!
"Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing! "Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!
Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!" Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing! "
32









HALLOA, OLD SCUTTLE!

HALLOA, old scuttle! good old soul,
.What 's become of all your coal?
"Why, the tongs he came with a gobbledy-gun,
And took my coals out, one by one;
And the blaze ran in with a tricksy-spire
And set the pretty things afire;
And the blower came with a roaring roar,
And made them burn up more and more;
And the poker with kloppity-hop,
He poked their ashes and made 'em drop,-
And that, O Gobbledy-kloppity-dole!
Is what's become of all my coal."



"SIN G-A-S ING !"

-' -2 /













Q,)



LISTEN! Hear the tea-kettle sing: Listen Hear the tea-kettle sing:
"Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!" "Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing "
It matters not how hot the fire, As if 't were task of fret and toil
It only sends its voice up higher: To bring cold water to a boil!
"Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing! "Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!
Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing!" Sing a-sing a-sing a-sing! "
32









FOUR LITTLE BIRDS.















FOUR little birds all flew from their nest,-
Flew north, flew south, to the east and the west;
They could think of nothing so good to do,
So they spread their wings and away they flew.
And I don't know whither they went. Do you?
Perhaps they all will return next spring,
As light of heart, and fleet of wing.





KITTY AND DODO.

BY W. S. H.

OH! Kitty and Sir Dodo And Kitty wore a blue silk dress
Went out to take a ride; With ninety-seven bows;
And Dodo sat upon the seat, And Dodo's coat had buttons fine
With Kitty by his side. Sewed on in double rows.
Now, Kitty had a bonnet on, And Kitty had a parasol
All trimmed with ostrich feathers; Of yellow, white, and red;
And Dodo had pink ribbons hung And Dodo wore a jaunty cap
Upon the bridle leathers. Upon his curly head.
4 33









FOUR LITTLE BIRDS.















FOUR little birds all flew from their nest,-
Flew north, flew south, to the east and the west;
They could think of nothing so good to do,
So they spread their wings and away they flew.
And I don't know whither they went. Do you?
Perhaps they all will return next spring,
As light of heart, and fleet of wing.





KITTY AND DODO.

BY W. S. H.

OH! Kitty and Sir Dodo And Kitty wore a blue silk dress
Went out to take a ride; With ninety-seven bows;
And Dodo sat upon the seat, And Dodo's coat had buttons fine
With Kitty by his side. Sewed on in double rows.
Now, Kitty had a bonnet on, And Kitty had a parasol
All trimmed with ostrich feathers; Of yellow, white, and red;
And Dodo had pink ribbons hung And Dodo wore a jaunty cap
Upon the bridle leathers. Upon his curly head.
4 33








Says Dodo to Miss Kitty: "I know a lovely street
"Where shall we drive to-day ?" Where we can get some good ice-
"Just where you please," says Kitty; cream
" I 'm sure you know the way." And strawberries to eat."
Now Dodo had a famous whip, How charming says Miss Kitty;
That glistened in the sun, I 'm sure I 'm fond of cream,
And when he cracked the silken lash But of eating ice and strawberries,
It made the horses run. I never yet did dream."
"Oh, my! said timid Kitty, With that he smoothed the lap-robe
"I fear they 'll run away." up,-
"Don't be afraid," said Dodo, 'T was made of leopard's skin,-
"I can hold them any day." And put his arm around the seat
Sweet flowers were blooming all And tucked Miss Kitty in,
around, And said, I hope, Miss Kitty,
The birds sang soft and low, Your pretty feet are warm ? "
While, in the west, the setting sun "Oh, thank you !" said Miss Kitty;
Set all the sky aglow. "I think they '11 take no harm."
Says Dodo to Miss Kitty: Thus Dodo and Miss Kitty
"You are my pet and pride. Enjoyed their pleasant ride,
I love to go a-driving, Likewise the cream and straw-
With Kitty by my side." berries;
And then says happy Dodo: And came home side by side.





















S..34............
: ,' -- ". ,,.\








THE WISE LITTLE CHICK.
(A story founded strictly on Jact.)
BY HYLIE MORREL.
ONCE there was a wise lit-tle chick, who felt ver-y, ver-y hun-gry; so
hun-gry that for a long time he did not know what to do a-bout it. So he
thought, and he thought, and he thought, and he thought:
And at last he made up his mind that he would go
and find some-thing to eat.
So he went, and he went, and he went, and he
went, and he went, and he went, and he went, and
he went, and he went. Now, was not this a wise /
lit-tie chick ? /










LITTLE GOO-GOO.
WE have in our house a brave little chap,
Who loves to be in his dear mamma's lap;
He is laughing and singing the whole day long,
And Goo-goo-goo!" is all of his song.

I catch up the darling and throw him high,
And he reaches his hands to touch the sky;
But all that he says, to show his delight,
Is "Goo-goo-goo!" with his baby might.

He shakes his fists and kicks his feet,
Because he is waiting for something to eat;
And then speaks up, very loud and strong,
And his Goo-goo" means "I can't wait long."

The little birdies say, Cheep! cheep!"
Ba! Ba! Ba! says the baby-sheep;
But the sweetest song, I think-don't you ?-
Is our little darling's Goo-goo-goo!"
35








THE WISE LITTLE CHICK.
(A story founded strictly on Jact.)
BY HYLIE MORREL.
ONCE there was a wise lit-tle chick, who felt ver-y, ver-y hun-gry; so
hun-gry that for a long time he did not know what to do a-bout it. So he
thought, and he thought, and he thought, and he thought:
And at last he made up his mind that he would go
and find some-thing to eat.
So he went, and he went, and he went, and he
went, and he went, and he went, and he went, and
he went, and he went. Now, was not this a wise /
lit-tie chick ? /










LITTLE GOO-GOO.
WE have in our house a brave little chap,
Who loves to be in his dear mamma's lap;
He is laughing and singing the whole day long,
And Goo-goo-goo!" is all of his song.

I catch up the darling and throw him high,
And he reaches his hands to touch the sky;
But all that he says, to show his delight,
Is "Goo-goo-goo!" with his baby might.

He shakes his fists and kicks his feet,
Because he is waiting for something to eat;
And then speaks up, very loud and strong,
And his Goo-goo" means "I can't wait long."

The little birdies say, Cheep! cheep!"
Ba! Ba! Ba! says the baby-sheep;
But the sweetest song, I think-don't you ?-
Is our little darling's Goo-goo-goo!"
35









THE STORY OF ROB.-TOLD BY HIS LITTLE MAMMA.

ROB is my boy doll. No-bod-y knows what he says but me. Rob
ran a-way one day-when he was young-er than he is now-and he was
gone a long time. I was a-fraid he would nev-er come back; and Pa-pa
went out one day and brought home Nee-na. Nee-na is a ba-by-doll,
with-out an-y hair; but
she has blue eyes like
Rob's, and is just too
sweet for an-y-thing.
One day it was my
birth-day, and I had
a birth-day par-ty, and
we had real dish-es,
and I poured the tea,
same as Mam-ma does;
and the door-bell rang,
and who do you think
was there ?
Si It was Rob, come
3-, home And he had on
a Scotch cap and an Ul-
ster coat. Yes, and he
had a car-pet bag, too,
and there he stood in
the hall, look-ing up at
me, and hold-ing out
his arms. He had come
to my birth-day par-
ty, just as Pa-pa said
he would. Oh, how
splen-did he looked,
and how glad I was to
m see him! And when
"he saw Nee-na he was
ROB AND NINA. glad, and I knew he
would nev-er run a-way an-y more. And now he stays home ev-er-y day and
helps nurse his sis-ter, and he is a good boy. Not a speck of naugh-ty
in him. This is a true sto-ry, and here is Rob tak-ing care of Nee-na.
36









A LITTLE GIRL'S LETTER ABOUT HER DOLLS.

LOWELL, 1883.
DEAR GIRLS: Perhaps you would like to see a picture of my children.
My Mamma says I may send you one that was made the same day that my
picture was taken for Papa. It is perfect, and shows you just how they
look at me. So I send it with this letter. I call it my dear little six.
Shall I tell you their names? The biggest child is the baby,-but you
know that doll
children do not
grow as other
children do. Her
name is Reba.
She has blue
eyes, and one
little curl, and is
as sweet as can
be. The oldest
child is Mary.
She is ten years
old. She sits by N O
the baby, and
helps me a great 1:7..
deal in taking -
care of her. The' ''I-
little girl with the
long hair and 1,
lace cap is Mabel,
and her brother, .
in the Scotch
dress, is Colie.
Lu Sin and Yung
Wing are twins. They came from Japan, and are really adopted chil-
dren; but I would n't have them know this for anything. Lu Sin is the
little girl, Yung Wing is the boy. He is the one sitting in front of Mabel.
They are all very nice children; but, of course, with such a big family,
Mamma says I must expect a good lot of care and trouble. But I do not
mind that. I expect to make all their clothes as long as they live. I
am very fond of reading aloud to them, and they seem to like it, too.
Your friend, KITTY R.
37









STHE SWEET RED ROSE.

By Joel Stacy.

"> w "Good-morrow, little rose-bush,
S \ Now prythee tell me true:
To be as sweet as a sweet red rose
/j What must a body do ?"


"To be as sweet as a sweet red
Sf rose
/
A little girl like you
Sf/ / Just grows and grows and grows
iF" it ^and grows-
And that's what she must do."



---------.---



LITTLE SQUIRRELS.


Little squirrels, crack your nuts; Hear you not their merry shout,
Chip your busy tune; Song, and happy laughter ?
Sound your merry rut-a-tuts- Sure as leaping, boys are out
Boys are coming soon T Girls are coming after.
Hide to-day, and pile to-day, Hide and pile, then, while you may,
Hoard a goodly store; Hoard a goodly store;
When the boys are gone away, If the children come this way,
You may find no more. You may find no more.








8
\









STHE SWEET RED ROSE.

By Joel Stacy.

"> w "Good-morrow, little rose-bush,
S \ Now prythee tell me true:
To be as sweet as a sweet red rose
/j What must a body do ?"


"To be as sweet as a sweet red
Sf rose
/
A little girl like you
Sf/ / Just grows and grows and grows
iF" it ^and grows-
And that's what she must do."



---------.---



LITTLE SQUIRRELS.


Little squirrels, crack your nuts; Hear you not their merry shout,
Chip your busy tune; Song, and happy laughter ?
Sound your merry rut-a-tuts- Sure as leaping, boys are out
Boys are coming soon T Girls are coming after.
Hide to-day, and pile to-day, Hide and pile, then, while you may,
Hoard a goodly store; Hoard a goodly store;
When the boys are gone away, If the children come this way,
You may find no more. You may find no more.








8
\









A RIDDLE.-WHO CAN GUESS IT?

I know a little creature
In a green bed,
With the softest of wrappings
All 'round her head.


When she grows old
She 's hard and can't feel,
So they take her to the mill
And make her into meal.






THE LAZY GIRL. _

By Bessie Hill.

When I work in the
A house I always
I7 ? say
How I 'd like to toil
out of doors all
day!"
And when they send '
Sme to weed the
Flowers
"The day seems made
of a hundred
hours T "


39









A RIDDLE.-WHO CAN GUESS IT?

I know a little creature
In a green bed,
With the softest of wrappings
All 'round her head.


When she grows old
She 's hard and can't feel,
So they take her to the mill
And make her into meal.






THE LAZY GIRL. _

By Bessie Hill.

When I work in the
A house I always
I7 ? say
How I 'd like to toil
out of doors all
day!"
And when they send '
Sme to weed the
Flowers
"The day seems made
of a hundred
hours T "


39









ROY'S VIS-IT.

THESE two lit-tle boys lived next door to each oth-er, but there was
a high board fence be-tween the two gar-dens. One day Roy felt ver-y
lone-lv, and, when he looked to-ward
How-ard's house, he saw a step-lad- .
ider lean-ing a-gainst the hi-h board .
fence. Roy ran to it, and climbed up .i i
to the top step, and looked o-\-er. The
first thing he saw was How-ard, sit-tingc
on a lit-tle grass mound; and just then .
How-ard looked up and saw\ Roy.
"Hal-lo !" said How-ard; "cant you
come and play with me ?
----. ------ --






_. ..Yes, I am com-incr no1,"
said Roy; and he stepped dolown
Hfrom the lad-der, and went
throuo-.h the front o-ates in-to
the oth-er yard. Then the boys
sat down on the grass mound,
and talked and playecdl for an
hour. But they were ver-y
kind and po-lite to each oth-er,
and so they had a hap-py time.
Ro-'s nu rse did not know
heree hRe had (-one, and looked
.e --er-y-w.here for him', and, at
last, she climnibed up the step-
HOW-ARD. lad-der, and saw the two lit-tie
boys. Roy was just bid-ding How-ard good-bye, and tell-ing him what
a pleas-ant vis-it he had had. "Sakes a-live !" said the nurse to her-
self. ",How po-lite these lit-tle fel-lows are! A great ma-ny boys, when
they vis-it each oth-er, act just like cats and dogs "
40










CAT-AND-DOG MANNERS.




Pon-to, a so-cia-ble dog, de-
cides to go and see Miss Puss.













O I I












'I

















The Vis-it.


41
,, _. i .---
..,j .2,i .d:'
h V "IS-it,

'. . .. ,,".








THE BROOM GIANT.
Two swallows sat on a telegraph wire. Their wise little eyes were
looking all about, in search of a good place to build a nest.
"There is that nice low house, with the porch, over there," said one;
"let us .go and look at it."
So, over they flew, and soon they stood side by side on a lovely place
to build a nest in.
It 's a long way to go to fetch the mud," said one bird, "but I like
the place. Let us build here."
"Agreed," said the other one; and we 'll build right away."
And off they flew toward the sea. They alighted on a sedge-bog and
pecked about for marsh mud, because they knew it was just what they
needed. They carried it to the porch and laid it on the ledge.
The blue and green and purple wings were very happy little wings
as they went and came full fifty times within the next hour.
Now, you can go alone this time, and I '11 pick up straws and sticks
before the mud dries too hard," said one swallow, and away flew the
other to the blue sea. As he came back, when he flew over the tel-
egraph wire, he thought he heard his mate calling, Here! here!"
Giving a little swoop down, he found her sitting on the wire.
No use! no use," said she. "A dreadful giant came out of the house,
and when I just flew quietly over her big head with my straws, she looked
up to the ledge, and said she: 'Laura, Laura, come here! The swallows
are nesting in the porch. Fetch a broom, quick!' Then another giant came
with a broom and swept away all the foundations of our nest. It's too bad !"
Oh, never mind," said the other bird. Plenty of good places to
build nests in, and we '11 go right away and find another spot."
Off they flew, and they went to the biggest barn they could find,
and, in the very tip-toppest part of the roof they found a tiny window;
so in they flew, and there was a ledge just as good, and every way
safer than the one in the porch; for no house-cleaning had been done
there or would be done while the barn should last. Here the swallows
built their nest, and to this barn they come back from year to year, and
every year they tear down the old nest and build a new one, and say
each time:
"After all, it was a good thing for us that the giant did n't let us
build in the porch, for there is no telling what might have happened to
the baby swallows there; and here, we are as safe as safe can be."
42





































i1-
"LIT SOLDIERS"
























AAS
MR:r~~r~ ~~~i''"" UHB~IJ11.E,~ I'";~S~~ LC~AU~;III;I



M:-:W 1M MP





"LTL OLIR.

AFTE A PINTIG BYIDOARD R~kE. (Y PEMISSON O GOUIL &CO.










A PUSSY PAGE.





-V 0










*. To )ee so ll oils frc Ksince,
Sci. KeirjMoiliher caamLe itao o enjoy view,
Ay Ji leftewils play for the auice.
.. B tha l~dettsWere rua&gra'becLihieixfao^L
R fId eale oDol jeers
oWhicld causc their JVolhar an acting heart
---- -seven or el kt large tears.
------ *!*--------













SEYEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS.

By Joel Stacy.










Seven little pussy-cats, invited out to tea,
Cried: "Mother, let us go. Oh, do for good we 'll surely be.
We '11 wear our bibs and hold our things as you have shown us how -
Spoons in right paws, cups in left and make a pretty bow;
We '11 always say 'Yes, if you please,' and 'Only half of that.'"
" Then go, my darling children," said the happy Mother Cat.
44










A PUSSY PAGE.





-V 0










*. To )ee so ll oils frc Ksince,
Sci. KeirjMoiliher caamLe itao o enjoy view,
Ay Ji leftewils play for the auice.
.. B tha l~dettsWere rua&gra'becLihieixfao^L
R fId eale oDol jeers
oWhicld causc their JVolhar an acting heart
---- -seven or el kt large tears.
------ *!*--------













SEYEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS.

By Joel Stacy.










Seven little pussy-cats, invited out to tea,
Cried: "Mother, let us go. Oh, do for good we 'll surely be.
We '11 wear our bibs and hold our things as you have shown us how -
Spoons in right paws, cups in left and make a pretty bow;
We '11 always say 'Yes, if you please,' and 'Only half of that.'"
" Then go, my darling children," said the happy Mother Cat.
44












The seven little pussy-cats went out that night to tea,
Their heads were smooth and glossy, their tails were swinging free;
They held their things as they had learned, and tried to be polite;-
With snowy bibs beneath their chins they were a pretty sight.
But, alas for manners beautiful, and coats as soft as silk!
The moment that the little kits were asked to take some milk
They dropped their spoons, forgot to bow, and oh, what do you think!
They put their noses in the cups and all began to drink!
Yes, every naughty little kit set up a "me-ouw!" for more,
Then knocked the tea-cup over, and scampered through the door.








A FINE TURN-OUT.












"I,























THIS IS THE WAY THE PRINCESS RODE A HUNDRED YEARS AGO.
45
2~~

Vj
t. 1 L~5A4,



~
.'~~X L 41
n'N t~


THS S H WY H PINES OD AHNDEDYAR AO











I ' , ,.-. -. - -' -


! ', .; a. .... .







S...M R T U R K E Y C O C K .

'. YOUNG Mr. Tur-key-Cock came out
of the barn one fine morn-ing. He shook
out his feath-ers and stretched his neck, and then, see-ing
some ti-ny lit-tle chick-ens close by, he ran to-ward them with his tail
set up proud-ly like a fan, and mak-ing a sort of drum-ming noise with his
wings. The lit-tle things, who had left their egg-shells on-ly the day be-
fore, were fright-ened, and ran a-way as fast as they could to the old hen,
who spread her wings o-ver them. This as-ton-ished the young tur-key-
cock, who had nev-er be-fore sup-posed that a-ny one could be a-fraid of him.
"I won-der if I could make a-ny-thing else run a-way," thought he. He
looked a-round the barn-yard, and saw a lit-tle calf; so he walked qui-et-ly
o-ver to it, with his feath-ers ly-ing smooth. The calf looked up, and then
turned a-way and rubbed a fly off its side with its nose. Then Mr. Tur-key
swelled up his feath-ers, and gave a long "gob-ble," and rushed drum-ming
up to the calf. Boss-y gave one quick look, then jumped
*-4 ~ ~side-wise, and took an-oth-er look, and then shook its
"h'ead, kicked up its heels, cut two or three
S*' f fun-ny cap-ers, and ran a-way.
.Now the tur-key was proud in-deed,
-^ ^ for he had fright-ened the calf, which
S--:Y was big-ger than he. So he looked a-bout
i 'to find some oth-er creat-ure to try his
trick up-on. At last he saw a horse
crop-ping the grass. So he flew down and walked qui-et-ly to-ward it.
When quite close, he ran at it, gob-bling and drum-ming, and the horse,
"which had not seen him com-ing, gal-loped a-way in a fright.
46









"Ah!" thought Mr. Tur-key, "I can scare ev-ery-thing! What fun
it is!" --- Just then a long, shrill whis-tle was heard, and an en-gine
came a-long on the oth-er side of the
mead-ow, draw-ing a train of cars. Mr.
Tur-key knew noth-ing a-bout trains or
rail-roads, and he looked hard at the
en-gine.
.ii. "That can be noth-ing but a ver-y big,
S- black sort of a horse," thought he. "I will
S- go o-ver there and wait for it to come back
S--- a-gain." So he strut-ted a-cross the field,
S' he was, since ev-ery-body was a-fraid of
"him. He walked a-long the rail-road track, all
Sread-y to run at the black i-ron horse when it
should come. He had
not long to wait.
"The whis-tle : .
was heard, and he puffed him- .),
self up and ran at the great '-'7iJ -
black thing as it came whizz-
ing a-long. Did the en-gine
run a-way ? Yes, but it car-ried Mr. Tur-key with it, which was more than
he had bar-gained for. A great wind seemed to sweep him up on a big
black thing, and he was car-ried a-long at a ter-ri-ble rate un-til a
bell rang, and the train stopped at a sta-tion, and a man shout-ed:
" Hel-lo! look at that tur-key on the cow-catch-er "
Mr. Tur-key got safe-ly home, but, to the lat-
est day of his life, he ne-er a-gain tried to
fright-en e-ven a chick-en.












47














































































THIS IS THE WAY MY GRANDMAMMA DANCED.
FROM A PAINTING BY J. E. MILLAIS.

48

















































































HIS LORDSHIP'S BED-TIME.
DRAWN BY E. H. BLASHFIELD.

5 49










"! NOODN NODN "












-A,









Noon ND !
--- ---- -_








.- AA
.........1.








Noon Nuoon /
Laughh aInd stolp the Baby's tears!
1 anie, anild drive away his fearsF
Kiss) and stop the swellin, of it)-
EBay fell aid humped his head
And all the -nloks Ere tslloinw osf it,





















5^
"" THE THREE TI -3ERSI


SThree, tiers went to take a drink;
AnlR what do you think 7 What do
ymi think ?
They drank as munh as heart could
wish)
....--:-I-- AnI never swallowed a sinle fish!
50










"! NOODN NODN "












-A,









Noon ND !
--- ---- -_








.- AA
.........1.








Noon Nuoon /
Laughh aInd stolp the Baby's tears!
1 anie, anild drive away his fearsF
Kiss) and stop the swellin, of it)-
EBay fell aid humped his head
And all the -nloks Ere tslloinw osf it,





















5^
"" THE THREE TI -3ERSI


SThree, tiers went to take a drink;
AnlR what do you think 7 What do
ymi think ?
They drank as munh as heart could
wish)
....--:-I-- AnI never swallowed a sinle fish!
50









JAZK AN IN JILL

LongL long agol a MothEr said
Unto her children small!
" Now Jack and Jill, go up the hill-
And see that you don't fall,
FEtch me a pail of watEr back,
And hurry with a will,"
f Ohj no, miammaj" said Lazy Jack,
"r Ohj yes; mammaE" said Jill,

The Mother frowned an angry frown;
They WEint as she directEd-
Alasj she saw them coming down,
SoMner than she expected !
You know the story, children all ?-
If Jack had scorned to grumble,
Perhaps he 'd not have had that fall,
And made his sister tumblE,










51\\\









AIn





51








THE TAME CROW AND THE EGG.


ONCE up-on a time there lived a tame crow who was ver-y fond of
eggs. He would some-times steal hens' eggs, and fly a-way with them
to the mead-ow be-hind the barn, where he would break them and eat
them. He found that a nice way to break an egg was to take one in
his claws and fly up in the air and let it fall on the ground. He would
then fly down and eat it as it ran out of the bro-ken shell. Some-times
the egg would fall on the grass, or on the soft earth, and would not
break. Then he would pick it up a-gain and fly up high-er, so that he
could be sure to break it.
One day, Mis-ter Crow found a nice, shin-y white egg in a nest, and
picked it up and flew a-way to feast upon it.
My !" said Mis-ter Crow, as he flew a-long. "This is a ver-y heav-y
egg. Per-haps it has a doub-le yolk. Here is a nice hard place. I '11
let it fall on the gar-den walk, where it will be sure to break."
He let it fall, but it did not break.
"That is strange! said Mis-ter Crow. "I must try a-gain."
So he did. He flew up high-er in the air, and let the egg fall right
on some stones. It did not break this time.
"The third time nev-er fails," said Mis-ter Crow. "I '11 try once
more."
A-gain he flew up with the egg and let it fall. It did not break e-ven
this time, but just bounced like a rub-ber ball on the stones.
Now, this is strange," said Mis-ter Crow. "It is the hard-est egg I
ev-er saw. Per-haps it has been boiled for four.min-utes."
He flew down and looked at the egg. It did not look like a hard-
boiled egg, and he took it up a-gain, and flew as high as the wood-en
roost-er on top of the barn.
"This time it must break," said Mis-ter Crow. And it only bounced
high-er than be-fore, and was as whole as ev-er.
I nev-er saw'such an egg," said Mis-ter Crow. "I am a-fraid it is not
good. I am ver-y hun-gry, and this is tire-some work. I '11 sit on the
top of the barn and rest."
Just then the dai-ry-maid came a-long, and see-ing the egg on the
path, she picked it up and said: Gra-cious me! Here is one of those
Chi-na nest-eggs out in the gar-den!"
Do you won-der that Mis-ter Crow could not break it?
52













"SEE how the lite birds, And dash a t, ad s h a t,












































Come to the murmuring water's And look askance with bright black
And freely drink their fill. And flirt their dripping wings."
w _






., ~ .. ._o








......- .. .., --



:Z- --













"SEE how the little gentle birds, And dash about, and splash about,
Without a fear of ill, The merry little things!
Come to the murmuring water's And look askance with bright black
edge eyes,
And freely drink their fill. And flirt their dripping wings."
53










THREE KINDS OF SEE-SAW1

* See-saw I saw in the fields one day;
A SEE-saw you 'll SEe when the children play;-
Andi oh! thE vEry funniest way


























.: ; .: ...... ..











% : '::' ..: .i
WA o













IN THE FIELD.


To SEE a see-saw; I kinow you ll say,
Is when at the biggEst show in to wn,
ThE ElEphants sEE-saw, up and. down
54






















6, '

:v .




















97-
MARY ANN: "EDDY WHITE, IF YOU DARE TO JUMP OFF, I 'LL NEVER SPEAK TO YOU '
4 Ai
,'..,' ,--- ..
^ ^ i' -a ,-

















































TRAINED BABY ELEPHANTS PLAYING SEE-SAW.

55
TRAINED BA ELEPHAT PLAING SEE-SAW.




5,'










., ,:1 . 1., .
,, ." . .
,"i ?,i ,. .



e ;, ,'~l
TRAINED~ ,,' ,AB "LPAT 'LYN 'E-S
S" 4 :











W'ee Mothcr H-ubbard.


"Vee AMother HIubawd-
J? an to the. Cupboard-
7But finding the Cupboatrdz bare ^- J
Pulled, ouUt'of the press i -
-A ay satin dreSS i l
Jtgst matchinT hlr golden hair. -




11A)















"PHILOPEN A!

The pretty Princess Wilhelmina
Thought she 'd eat a Philopena.
She asked the Prince. He answered W| 7f,'

"And "caught was he that very day
The present came in course of time;
No jewel it, nor gold nor delf.
The Prince just waited for his prime,
Then gave the Princess fair,- himself! THE PRINCE AND THE PRINCESS EAT A PHILOPENA.
56











W'ee Mothcr H-ubbard.


"Vee AMother HIubawd-
J? an to the. Cupboard-
7But finding the Cupboatrdz bare ^- J
Pulled, ouUt'of the press i -
-A ay satin dreSS i l
Jtgst matchinT hlr golden hair. -




11A)















"PHILOPEN A!

The pretty Princess Wilhelmina
Thought she 'd eat a Philopena.
She asked the Prince. He answered W| 7f,'

"And "caught was he that very day
The present came in course of time;
No jewel it, nor gold nor delf.
The Prince just waited for his prime,
Then gave the Princess fair,- himself! THE PRINCE AND THE PRINCESS EAT A PHILOPENA.
56









ARTHUR AND HIS PONY.

ABOUT the middle of the summer, little Arthur, who lived in the country,
went to see his grandmother, whose house was three or four miles away
from Arthur's home. He staid there a week, and when he came home
and had been welcomed by all the family, his father took him out on the
front piazza and said to him:
Now, Arthur, if you are not tired, how would you like to take a ride ?"
Oh! I 'm not tired," said Arthur. I 'd like a ride ever so much.
Will you take me ? "
"No," said his father. I meant for you to take a ride by yourself."
But I can't drive," said little Arthur.
"I know that," his father said, with a smile, but I think we can
manage it. Here, Joseph !" he called out to the hired man, "hurry and
bring Arthur's horse."
Oh, papa!" cried Arthur, I don't want my horse. I can't take a
real ride on him. He 's wooden, and I was tired of him long ago. I
thought you meant for me to take a real ride," and the little fellow's eyes
filled with tears.
"So I do, my son," said his father, "and here comes the horse on
which you are to take it. Is that animal real enough for you, sir ?"
Around the corner came Joseph, leading a plump little black pony,
with a long tail and mane, and a saddle, and bridle, and stirrups.
Arthur was so astonished and delighted that at first he could not speak.
"Well, what do you think of him?" said his father.
"Is that my horse?" said Arthur.
Yes, all your own."
Arthur did not go to look at his pony. He turned and ran into the
house, screaming at the top of his voice:
"Mother! mother! I've got a pony! Come quick! I've got a pony
-a real pony! Aunt Rachel! I 've got- a pony. Laura! Laura! come,
I 've got a pony !"
When he came out again, his father said: Come now, get on and try
your new horse. He has been waiting here long enough."
But Arthur was so excited and delighted, and wanted so much to run
around his pony and look at him on all sides, and kept on telling his
father how glad he was to get it, and how ever so much obliged he was
to him for it, and what a good man he was, and what a lovely pony the
57









pony was, that his father could hardly get him still enough to sit in the
saddle.
However, he quieted down after a while, and his father put him on the
pony's back, and shortened the stirrups so that they should be the right
length for him, and put the reins in his hands. Now he was all ready
for a ride, and Arthur wanted to gallop away.
No, no !" said his father, "you cannot do that. You do not know
how to ride yet. At first your pony must walk."
So Arthur's father took hold of the pony's bridle and led him along







MI
--___ '1 ___
-~-~ -`_- Z

_- -- -_- -






















___ ,.

ARTHUR ON HIS PONY.
the carriage-way in front of the house, and as the little boy rode off,
sitting up straight in the saddle, and holding proudly to the reins, his
mother and his aunt and his sister Laura clapped their hands, and cheered
him; and this made Arthur feel prouder than ever.
58








He had a good long ride, up and down, and up and down, and the
next day his father took him out again, and taught him how to sit and
how to guide his pony.
In a week or two Arthur could ride by himself, even when the pony
was trotting gently; and before long he rode all over the grounds, trot-
ting or cantering or walking, just as he pleased.
The pony was a very gentle, quiet creature, and Arthur's father felt
quite willing to trust his little boy to ride about on him, provided he did
not go far from home.
Arthur rode that pony until he became a big boy. Then he gave
the good little animal to a young cousin.
But he never liked any horse so much as this pony, which was his
own, real horse, when he was such a little boy.








THE BIRD AND ITS MOTHER.

(A Kinder-Garten Dialogue for Baby to Learn with Mamma.)

Mamn-ma. HERE we are in our nice warm nest-I and my lit-tle bird.
I won-der if he is a-wake? I must list-en.
Ba-by. Peep! peep!
Mam-ma. Oh, yes. He is wide a-wake. What do you want, lit-tle bird?
Ba-by. Peep! peep! peep!
Mam-ma. Oh, you want your break-fast, do you ? Well, I must fly a-way
and find you some-thing nice.
Ba-by. Peep! peep! peep! peep!
Manm-ma. What! Do you wish to go, too ?
Ba-by. Peep!
Mam-ma Ver-y well. The sky is blue, and it is a nice bright day. Let
me see if your lit-tle wings are strong. (Mam-ma works
Ba-by's arms gent-ly up and down.) Yes, the wings are
strong. Now, come! (Mam-ma lakes hold of Ba-by's
hands and lets him skip with her a-cross the room.)
59








THE FATE OF A GINGER-BREAD MAN.

HERE'S a nice brown ginger-bread man,
Freshly baked in the baker's pan,
Spiced and sugared, and spick and span;
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie-
Oh, what a nice sweet man to buy!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
S4i ,L o o k in g in a t th e g in g e r -b re a d m a n
(Spiced and sugared, and spick and span,
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie),
"Wondering whether the price is high.

"Here are Felix and Mary Ann
"*4 Going home with the ginger-bread man
STh a t w a s b a k e d in th e b a k e r's p a n .
S" Far too nice to be eaten," they said;
"Keep the man for a dolly, instead."

B-*- Here behold the ginger-bread man,
That was baked in the baker's pan,
S. In the doll-house of Mary Ann.
SSee him stand, with his round, fat face,
Among the dolls in silk and lace!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
__ Sleeping sound as ever they can,
Dreaming about the ginger-bread man
Left in the doll-house, set away,
Till they wake in the morn to play.

See this rat; since the night began
He has prowled to get what he can.
Ah, he smells the ginger-bread man!
There's the doll-house under the shelf,
Just where the rat can climb himself!
60








Every rat will get what he can.
. .,^ .Ah, the poor, sweet ginger-bread man
"1,- Wake, O Felix and Mary Ann!
There 's a patter, a jump, a squeak-
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could speak

See the rat,' as quick as he can,
Climbing up for the ginger-bread man
In the doll-house of Mary Ann!
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could run
S- Oh, to see what the rat has done

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Come to play with the ginger-bread man,
S Spiced and sugared, and spick and span.
Ah, behold, where he stood before,
Only crumbs on the doll-house floor!

























61


















-Ef-


















HAPPY DAYS BY THE LAKE.





WAIT.

BY DORA READ GOODALE.

WHEN the icy snow is deep, When the cruel north winds sigh,
Covering the frozen land, When 't is cold with wind and rain,
Do the little flowerets peep Do the birdies homeward fly
To be crushed by Winter's hand? Only to go back again ?

No, they wait for brighter days, No, they wait for Spring to come,
Wait for bees and butterflies; Wait for kindly sun and showers;
Then their dainty heads they raise Then they seek their northern home,
To the sunny, sunny skies. Seek its leafy, fragrant bowers.
62


















-Ef-


















HAPPY DAYS BY THE LAKE.





WAIT.

BY DORA READ GOODALE.

WHEN the icy snow is deep, When the cruel north winds sigh,
Covering the frozen land, When 't is cold with wind and rain,
Do the little flowerets peep Do the birdies homeward fly
To be crushed by Winter's hand? Only to go back again ?

No, they wait for brighter days, No, they wait for Spring to come,
Wait for bees and butterflies; Wait for kindly sun and showers;
Then their dainty heads they raise Then they seek their northern home,
To the sunny, sunny skies. Seek its leafy, fragrant bowers.
62








SANTA CLAUS.
"I so awful bad! Santy Claus wont come down the chim-
ney one bit," said little Bertie, and he began to cry. Bertie
was not four years old, and he did not know
just how to act. He had pulled the cat's
tail, and upset the milk-pan, and, oh, dear!
worse than all, he had gone behind his
grandma when she was bending over the ,. _
fire, and said Boo! so loud that it made her
jump, and drop her spectacles, pop! into the
tea-kettle. So he sat down on the floor, with his old fur cap
on, to think about it; for this was Christmas eve.
But bless his heart! Grandma loved him if he did say
Boo! at her. So did Mamma and Papa, and so did Pussy,
and so did Santa Claus When it was bed-time for Bertie,
he wanted Grandma to go to bed, too, though it was not
dark, so that Santa Claus would be sure to come. Grandma
put on a funny cap, and hid under the bed-clothes, and
( I Bertie hung up his stocking before he said
"his prayers. Then he squeezed his eyes
S. .; i tig h t sh u t a n d w e n t t o sle e p I n t h e
night Santa Claus came, and before he
p"I went, a candy cat, a top, a ball, an or-
S. ange, a barking dog
,IF---1 -iT7 j and a jumping Jack,
S. .i all went softly into
'III all r l *si



"' was when he woke in
S- the morning!
63







"WHERE DO ALL THE TOYS COME FROM?"

____ I / f----






























WHERE do all the toys come from ? thought Jamie, as
he sat by the fire one night last winter, half asleep. And
then he remembered hearing his papa once say that thousands
of toys came from a queer old city in Germany, where they
were made by poor children and their parents.
64








LITTLE GRETCHEN.




























LITTLE Gretchen has a lesson to study, and she knows that
the breakfast-bell soon will be ringing; so she is trying to
study her book and braid her hair at the same time. It is
not a very hard lesson to learn. I hope she will not be late
at school. Don't you hope so, too ?
6 65









"FIDD LE-D ID D LE-D E !"

LITTLE DAVIE ran through the garden,-a great slice of bread and butter
in one hand, and his spelling-book in the other. He was going to study
his lesson for to-morrow.
You could not imagine a prettier spot than Davie's "study," as he called
it. It was under a great oak-tree, that
/ / stood at the edge of a small wood. The
"'N ,/ '4 /' \
S/ i / \ I little boy sat down on one of the roots
.' ; and opened his book.
'' I But first," thought he, I finish
'W \" -my bread and butter."
".- -So he let his book drop, and, as he
S- W- "ate, he began to sing a little song with
THIS IS THE LITTLE \VEN. ,
which his mother sometimes put the
baby to sleep. This is the way the song began:

I bought a bird, and my bird pleased me:
I tied my bird behind a tree;
Bird said--"

Fiddle-diddle-dee sang something, or somebody, behind the oak.
Davie looked a little frightened, for that was just what he was about to
sing in his song. But he jumped up and ran around to the other side
of the tree. And there was a little brown wren, and it had a little golden
thread around its neck, and the thread was tied to a root of the big tree.
Hello !" said Davie, "was that you?"
Now, of course Davie had not expected the wren to answer him. But
the bird turned her head on one side, and, looking up at Davie, said:
Yes, of course it was me! Who
else did you suppose it could be?" , i I ,
"Oh yes !" said Davie, very much i 1
astonished. Oh yes, of course But ''l /j
"I thought you only did it in the song "
"Well," said the wren, '' were not you ,
singing the song, and am not I in the
song, and what else could I ldo"
III" I IS I 1, life N.. --
Yes, I suppose so," said I)avie. '
Well, go, then," said the wren, and don't bother me."
Davie felt very queer. He stopped a moment, but soon thought that
66









he must do as he was bid, and he began
to sing again:

S" I bought a h en, and m y h en pleased m e ;
I tied my hen behind a tree:
Hen said l

Shinny-shack shinny-shack! in-
,,, ~" terrupted another voice, so loudly that
THIS IS THE GL(INEA-HEN. ,
THIS THE tiNA--. Davie's heart gave a great thump, as he
turned around. There, behind the wren, stood a little Bantam hen, and
around her neck was a little golden cord that fastened her to the wren's leg.
"I suppose that was you ?" said Davie.
Yes, indeed," replied the hen. "I know when my time comes in, in
a song. But it was provoking for you to call me away from my chicks."
I ?" cried Davie. I did n't call you!"
Oh, indeed said the Bantam. It was n't you, then, who were sing-
ing 'Tied my hen,' just now Oh no, not you!"
I 'm sorry," said Davie. I did n't mean to."
"Well, go on, then," said the little hen, "and don't bother."
Davie was so full of wonder that he did not know what to think of it
all. He went back to his seat, and sang again:

I had a guinea, and my guinea pleased me;
I tied my guinea behind a tree '

But here he stopped, with his mouth wide open; for up a tiny brown
path that led into the wood, came a little
red man about a foot high, dressed in
green, and leading by a long yellow N -
string a plump, speckled guinea-hen ''
The little old man came whistling along
until he reached the Bantam, when he
fastened the yellow string to her leg, ,
and went back again down the path,.,.S THEI DCK.
and disappeared among the trees.
Davie looked and wondered. Presently, the guinea stretched out her
neck and called to him in a funny voice:
"Why in the world don't you go on? Do you think I want to wait
all day for my turn to come ?"
Davie began to sing again : Guinea said "
Pot-rack! pot-rack instantly squeaked the speckled guinea-hen.
67








Davie jumped up. He was fairly
frightened now. But his courage soon
came back. I 'm not afraid," he said .
"to himself; I '11 see what the end of
this song will be! "-and he began to
sing again: ,
I bought a duck, and my duck pleased me; D\i
I tied my duck behind a tree ', \-
Duck said "
"Quack! quack!" came from around the oak. But Davie went on:

"I bought a dog, and the dog pleased me;
I tied my dog behind a tree;
Dog said --"

Bow-wow !" said a little curly dog, as Davie came around the spread-
ing roots of the tree. There stood a little short-legged duck tied to the
guinea's leg, and to the duck's leg was fastened the wisest-looking Scotch
terrier, with spectacles on his nose and a walking-cane in his paw.
The whole group looked up at Davie, who now felt perfectly confident.
He sat down on a stone close by, and continued his song:

I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree."

Davie stopped and looked down the little brown path. Then he clapped
his hands in great delight; for there came the little old man leading by a
golden bridle a snow-white pony, no bigger than Davie's Newfoundland dog.
Sure enough, it is a boy !" said the pony, as the old man tied his
bridle to the dog's hind leg, and then hurried away. I thought so!
Boys are always bothering people."
Who are you, and where did you
all come from ? asked delighted Davie.
\ "Why," said the pony, "we belong
S,.', to the court of Her Majesty the Oueen
yi" of the Fairies. But, of course, when
the song in which any of the court
,.. V"""' ,, ^ voices are wanted, is sung, they all
have to go."
I 'm sure I 'm very sorry," said Davie. But why have n't I ever seen
you all before ?"
"Because," said the pony, you have never sung the song down here
68









before." And then he added: Don't you think, now that we are all here,
you'd better sing the song right end first, and be done with it ?"
Oh, certainly!" cried Davie, "certainly!" beginning to sing.
If you could but have heard that song! As Davie sang, each fowl
or animal took up its part, and sang it, with its own peculiar tone and
manner, until they all joined in.

"I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree.
Horse said, Neigh! neigh!'
Dog said, Bow-wow !'
Duck said, Quack quack!'
Guinea said, Pot-rack pot-rack!'
Hen said, 'Shinny-shack shinny-shack!'
Bird said,' Fiddle-diddle-dee !' "

Davie was overjoyed. He thought he would sing it all over again.
But just then he was sure that his mother called him.














"Wait a minute !" he said to his companions. "Wait a minute! I 'm
coming back! Oh, it's just like a fairy-tale !" he cried to himself, as he
bounded up the garden-walk. I wonder what mother'll think ?"
But his mother said she had not called him, and so he ran back as
fast as his legs would carry him.
But they were all gone. His speller lay on the ground, open at the
page of his lesson; a crumb or two of bread was scattered about; but
not a sign of the white pony and the rest of the singers.
Well," said Davie, as he picked up his book, I guess I wont sing it
again, for I bothered them so. But I wish they had stayed a little longer."


69