Group Title: ARC research report - Jay Agricultural Research Center ; WF-83-5
Title: Cool-season annual pastures stubble-seeded (no-till drilled) following early soybeans and grazed by growing beef steers
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 Material Information
Title: Cool-season annual pastures stubble-seeded (no-till drilled) following early soybeans and grazed by growing beef steers
Series Title: Jay, ARC research report
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bertrand, J. E. ( Joseph Ezel ), 1924-
Dunavin, Leonard Sypret, 1930-
Agricultural Research Center, Jay
Publisher: Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Jay Fla
Publication Date: [1983]
 Subjects
Subject: Grasses -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Forage plants -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: J.E. Bertrand and L.S. Dunavin.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July, 1983."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053568
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62301981

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Agricultural Research Center

Jay, Florida 32565-9524

JAY, ARC RESEARCH REPORT WF-83-5 July, 1983

COOL-SEASON ANNUAL PASTURES STUBBLE-SEEDED (NO-TILL DRILLED)

FOLLOWING EARLY SOYBEANS AND GRAZED BY GROWING BEEF STEERS

J. E. Bertrand and L. S. Dunavina

SUMMARY

Growing beef steers of British breeding grazed a pasture mixture of rye,

ryegrass, and crimson clover seeded by different methods following early soybeans.

Steers grazing stubble-seeded (no-till drilled) pastures gained 1.60 lb. per head

daily for a 146-day period compared with 1.52 lb. per head daily for steers

grazing conventional-seeded (prepared seedbed) pastures. Because of the slightly

higher daily gain, steers grazing stubble-seeded pastures produced 20 lb. more

gain per acre (395 versus 375 Ib.). The cost of gain was slightly lower ($0.03/lb.)

for steers grazing stubble-seeded pastures. No-till drilling reduced the cost of

establishing cool-season pastures by reducing the use of land preparation equip-

ment and required less labor and fossil fuel.

INTRODUCTION

Cool-season annual pastures work well in a double cropping system with early

soybeans in northwest Florida. Farmers are interested in initiating the grazing

of these pastures as early as possible in the fall. Also, savings in time, labor,

use of land preparation equipment, and fossil fuel are of primary concern.

Stubble-seedirng with a no-till drill eliminates the preparation (breaking and

disking) of a seedbed. Additionally, seeding without breaking the sod is beneficial

in the preservation of topsoil because of less erosion from wind and water.



aAnimal Scientist.and Associate Agronomist, respectively, Agricultural Research

Center,,Jay, Florida 32565-9524.







OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare the animal performance and economic

data with growing beef steers grazing cool-season annual pastures seeded on a

prepared seedbed versus those stubble-seeded (no-till drilled) immediately after

harvest of early soybeans.

PROCEDURE

Thirty-two lightweight (average 479 lb.) feeder steers of British breeding,

each treated with a 36 mg ear implant of zeranol, were utilized. Prior to

initiation of the trial, the steers were allotted at random from weight groups

into four experimental groups of eight steers each. Two groups (replicates) were

assigned to each of two pasture treatments.

The cool-season pastures consisted of a mixture of 'Wrens abruzzi' rye,

'Gulf' ryegrass, and 'Dixie' crimson clover. Each group of eight animals grazed

four 1.25 acre pasture plots in a rotational system as required for utilization of

good quality forage.

The conventional-seeded (prepared seedbed) pasture plots were planted on

October 29, 1981. First, the ryegrass and crimson clover seed were broadcasted on

the seedbed with a tractor-mounted spreader at the rates of 14.5 and 9 lb. per

acre, respectively. The rye was then seeded in row widths of 7 inches with a grain

drill at the rate of 90 lb. per acre. All plots were then cultipacked to conserve

moisture.

The stubble-seeded (no-till drilled) pasture plots were planted on October

28, 1981. FirSt, the ryegrass and crimson clover were broadcasted as stated above

in the soybean stubble at the rates of 17 and 10 lb. per acre, respectively. The

rye was then seeded in row widths of 10 inches with a no-till drill at the rate of

90 lb. per acre. All plots were cultipacked to conserve moisture.

A complete fertilizer (8-24-24) was applied at the rate of 250 lb./acre prior

to planting. Three applications of 100 lb./acre each of ammonium nitrate were made

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during the grazing season to all pastures.

Grazing began on December 15, 1981 and was terminated when the forage was

essentially depleted on May 10, 1982. Supplemental feed (corn silage and hay) was

fed for a period of 13 days (January 14-27, 1982) because of inclement weather

(sleet, ice, and snow) and poor forage growth.

Individual animal weights were recorded after an overnight shrink (fast from

feed and water) at the beginning and end of the trial period. Additional grazer

animals of the same type and size were added and removed as needed to keep the

forage uniformly grazed. A complete mineral mixture, plain salt, and clean drinking

water were available to the animals at all times.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Performance and economic data with steers on pasture are presented in table

1. During the 146-day grazing period, growing beef steers on stubble-seeded

(no-till drilled) pastures had an average daily gain of 1.60 lb. while steers

grazing conventional-seeded (prepared seedbed) pastures had an average daily

gain of 1.52 lb. Because of the slightly higher daily gain, steers grazing stubble-

seeded pastures produced 20 Ib. more gain per acre (395 versus 375 lb.). Animal

performance parameters were not significantly different between the two pasture

treatments.

The cost of gain was slightly lower ($0.03/lb.) for steers grazing stubble-

seeded pastures when compared with that of steers grazing conventional-seeded

pastures. This was due to slightly higher gains .by steers grazing stubble-seeded

pastures and
with a no-till drill eliminated the breaking and disking of soil necessary for

preparation of a seedbed and thus required less labor, land preparation equipment,

and fossil fuel.


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Table 1. PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMIC DATA WITH GROWING BEEF STEERS WHEN GRAZING

COOL-SEASON ANNUAL PASTURES SEEDED BY DIFFERENT METHODS (1981-82)a

Conventional- Stubble-

Item seeded seeded

Initial no. of animals 16 16

Length of trial, days 146 146

Initial wt, lb. 480 477

Final wt, lb. 702 710

Gain/animal, lb. 222 233

Daily gain, lb. 1.52 1.60

Animal days/acred 247 247

Stocking rate/acred 1.69 1.69

Gain/acre, lb.e 375 395

Gain/acre/day, Ib.e 2.57 2.70

Advantage (cost/lb.gain) ------ $ 0.03

aRotational grazing of a mixture of rye, ryegrass, and crimson clover.

bSeeded on a prepared seedbed after harvest of early soybeans.

CStubble-seeded immediately after harvest of early soybeans with a no-till drill.

dAdditional grazer animals of the same type and size were added and removed as

needed to keep the forage uniformly consumed.

eThe gain with grazer steers was considered at the same rate as that with

experimental steers.

fCost of pastture plus. supplemental corn silage and hay.


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