Group Title: ARC research report - Jay Agricultural Research Center ; WF-83-6
Title: Cool-season annual pasture mixtures with and without crimson clover receiving different levels of nitrogen fertilization and grazed with growing beef calves
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053566/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cool-season annual pasture mixtures with and without crimson clover receiving different levels of nitrogen fertilization and grazed with growing beef calves
Series Title: Jay, ARC research report
Physical Description: 5 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bertrand, J. E. ( Joseph Ezel ), 1924-
Dunavin, Leonard Sypret, 1930-
Agricultural Research Center, Jay
Publisher: Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Jay Fla
Publication Date: [1983]
 Subjects
Subject: Grasses -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Forage plants -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: J.E. Bertrand and L.S. Dunavin.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1983."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053566
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62301933

Full Text


' E3 e

-- Agricultural Research Center

Jay, Florida 32565-9524

JAY, ARC RESEARCH REPORT WF-83-6 August, 1983

COOL-SEASON ANNUAL PASTURE MIXTURES WITH AND WITHOUT

CRIMSON CLOVER RECEIVING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF NITRG -
HUME LIBRARY
FERTILIZATION AND GRAZED WITH GROWING BEEF CALV S

J. E. Bertrand and L. S. Dunavina JAN i 3

SUMMARY I.F.A.S.- Univ. of Florida

Growing beef steers of predominately Charolaise breeding grazed a pasture

mixture of rye and ryegrass with and without crimson clover and receiving

different levels of nitrogen fertilization. Steers grazing the rye, ryegrass, and

crimson clover pasture mixture receiving 300 lb./acre of ammonium nitrate

(R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots) had an average daily gain of 2.38 lb. for a 154-day

period, followed by an average daily gain of 2.29 lb. with steers grazing the

rye and ryegrass pasture mixture receiving 300 lb./acre of ammonium nitrate

(R+RG+300 pasture plots), and an average daily gain of 2.16 lb. with steers

grazing the rye, ryegrass, and crimson clover pasture mixture receiving 200

lb./acre of ammonium nitrate (R+RG+CC+200 pasture plots). The gain per acre was

585, 563, and 531 lb. for steers grazing the R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots, R+RG+300

pasture plots, and the R+RG+CC+200 pasture plots, respectively. The cost of gain

was slightly lower ($0.01/lb.) with steers grazing the R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots

and the R+RG+300 pasture,plots. The addition of crimson clover to a rye and

ryegrass pasture mixture at the same. level of nitrogen fertilization slightly

increased animal gain. An additional 100 lb. per acre of ammonium nitrate during

the grazing period slightly increased the gain with beef calves grazing a pasture

mixture of rye, ryegrass, and crimson clover.

aAnimal:4ientist and Associate Agronomist, respectively, Agricultural Research

Center, Jay, Florida 32565-9524.






2

INTRODUCTION

Grazing cool-season annual pastures is one of the most economical ways to

add weight to young beef cattle. Small grain crops, ryegrass, and cool-season

annual legumes all produce high-quality, palatable forage on which stocker calves

can make rapid gain. It is highly desirable to plant these species in mixtures

because mixtures extend the grazing season. If a legume growing as a companion

crop in a legume-grass pasture mixture furnishes nitrogen to the grasses, the

value of this nitrogen can not be overlooked. It is important in the development

of low-energy technology to save natural gas (fossil fuel) which would otherwise

be used in the production of ammonium nitrate.
OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare animal performance and economic

data with growing beef calves grazing cool-season annual pasture mixtures with

and without crimson clover and receiving different levels of nitrogen fertiliza-

tion.

PROCEDURE

Thirty-six lightweight (average 460 lb.) feeder steers of predominately

Charolaise breeding, each treated with a 36 mg ear implant of RALGROy (zeranol -

a protein anabolic agent), were utilized. Prior to initiation of the trial, the

steers were allotted at random from weight groups into six experimental groups of

six steers each. The six experimental groups, utilizing two groups (replicates)

per treatment, were assigned to three treatments on pasture: (1) 'Wrens abruzzi'

rye and 'Gulf' ryegrass pasture mixture treated with 300 lb./acre of ammonium

nitrate applied in increments of 100 lb./acre at intervals during the trial period

(R+RG+300 pasture plots), (2) rye, ryegrass, and 'Dixie' crimson clover pasture

mixture treated with 300 lb./acre of ammonium nitrate applied in increments of 100

lb./acre 1 intervals during the trial period (R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots), and (3)

rye, ryegrass, and crimson clover pasture mixture treated with 200 lb./acre of






3


ammonium nitrate applied in increments of 100 lb./acre at intervals during the

trial period (R+RG+CC+200 pasture plots).

On October 26-27, 1982, the seedbed for all pasture plots was prepared by

disking twice. First, the ryegrass and crimson clover seed was broadcasted on

the prepared seedbed with a tractor-mounted spreader at the rates of 20 and 15

lb. per acre, respectively. The rye was then seeded in row widths of 7 inches

with a grain drill at the rate of 77 lb. per acre. All pasture plots were finally

cultipacked to conserve moisture.

A complete fertilizer (8-24-24) was applied to all pastures prior to planting

at the rate of 250 Ib. per acre. Ammonium nitrate was applied as stated above

during the grazing season.

Grazing began on December 14, 1982 and was-terminated when the forage was

essentially depleted on May 17, 1983. Supplemental feed (corn silage, hay, and

corn) was fed for a period of 15 days (February 7-22, 1983) because of inclement

weather (excessive rain and cloudy days) and poor forage growth.

Individual animal weights were recorded after an overnight shrink (fast from

feed and water) at the beginning and end of the trial period. Each group of six

calves grazed three 1.25 acre plots in a rotational system as required for best

utilization of good quality forage. A complete mineral mixture, plain salt, and

clean drinking water were available to the animals at all times.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Performance and economic data with steers on pasture are presented in table

1. During the 154-day period, growing beef steers grazing the R+RG+CC+300 pasture

plots had an average daily gain of 2.38 lb., followed by an average daily gain of

2.29 lb. with steers grazing the R+RG+300 pasture plots, and an average daily gain

of 2.16 lb. with steers grazing the R+RG+CC+200 pasture plots. Therefore, steers

grazing the R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots gained 585 lb. per acre, steers grazing the

R+RG+300 pasture plots gained 563 lb. per acre, and steers grazing the R+RG+CC+200






4


pasture plots gained 531 lb. per acre. Animal performance parameters were not

significantly different between the three pasture treatments.

The cost of gain was slightly lower ($0.01/lb.) for steers grazing the

R+RG+CC+300 pasture plots and the R+RG+300 pasture plots when compared with

that of steers grazing the R+RG+CC+200 pasture plots.

The gain of lightweight feeder steers of predominately Charolaise breeding

grazing cool-season annual pastures was better than that obtained in previous

years with lightweight feeder steers of British breeding. The addition of crimson

clover to a rye and ryegrass pasture mixture at the same level of nitrogen

fertilization slightly increased the gain of grazing beef steers. An additional

100 lb. per acre of ammonium nitrate during the grazing period slightly increased

the gain of beef calves grazing a pasture mixture of rye, ryegrass, and crimson

clover. Thus, the highest beef gain was obtained with beef steer calves grazing

the pasture mixture containing crimson clover with rye and ryegrass and receiving

300 lb. per acre of ammonium nitrate.






5


TABLE 1. PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMIC DATA WITH GROWING BEEF CALVES GRAZING COOL-

SEASON ANNUAL PASTURE MIXTURES WITH AND WITHOUT CRIMSON CLOVER AND

RECEIVING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION (1982-83) ARC,

Jay

Rye and ryegrass Rye, ryegrass, and crimson clover

Item 300a 300a 200b

No. of animals 12c 12 12

Length of trial, days 154 154 154

Initial wt, lb. 460 467 453

Final wt, lb. 813 834 785

Gain/animal, lb. 353 367 332

Daily gain, lb. 2.29 2.38 2.16

Animal days/acre 246 246 246

Stocking rate/acre 1.60 1.60 1.60

Gain/acre, lb. 563 585 531

Gain/acre/day, lb. 3.66 3.81 3.46

Advantage (cost/lb. gain)d $ 0.01 $ 0.01 --

a300 lb./acre of ammonium nitrate applied in increments of 100 lb./acre at

intervals during the trial period.

b200 lb./acre of ammonium nitrate applied in increments of 100 lb./acre at

intervals during the trial period.

CTwo groups of six steer calves each.

dCost of pasture plus supplemental corn silage, hay, and corn.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs