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Group Title: West Florida Station mimeo report ;, WFS64-2
Title: Pecan production in northwest Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053530/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pecan production in northwest Florida
Series Title: West Florida Station mimeo report
Physical Description: 2 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lutrick, M. C ( Monroe Cornealous )
West Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida, West Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Jay Fla
Publication Date: [1964]
 Subjects
Subject: Pecan -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by M.C. Lutrick
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "2/64."
Funding: Mimeo report (West Florida Experiment Station) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053530
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62311077

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
West Florida Experiment Station
Jay, Florida


West Florida Station Mimeo Report WFS64-2









PECAN PRODUCTION IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA


By


I, C, Lutrick


2/64
200 copies









PECAN PRODUCTION IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA


Early settlers grew pecan trees to produce nuts for home consumption. One
of the first orchards in Florida was planted at old Bagdad south of Milton in
about 1848 by John Hunt. Individual trees were planted in Florida prior to this
time according to various records. The pecan orchards are of small acreage and
the number of varieties grown successfully are few although many have been
tried in the state.

The pecan is a type of hickory and is a native American species found in
abundance along the lower Mississippi River, its tributaries and the rivers
of Texas,

The pecan tree produces both pistillate and staminate flowers. Pistillate
flowers are borne terminally on the current season's growth, and the nuts appear
I. a cluster. Staminate flowers, called Catkins, produce the pollen and are
borne on wood that grew the previous season and often appears at the base of
the new growth. This shows the importance of constant care for an orchard and
not just the year nuts are produced.
Insect and
Spacing Fertilize* Disease
Variety in Ft. Per Tree Control
Desirable 60 x 60 2 lbs. 10-10-10 See spray
Elliot for each year schedule,
Farley of age.
Stuart Max. 100 lbs,
Curtis
Plant one year old grafted stock. Cut back about 1/3 of top at planting.
Space branches 12-18 inches apart on trunk as evenly as possible during first
tree years of growth, Remove low or interfering branches when the need
arises, as annual pruning is not required.

In general, pecan trees may be planted any time during the dormant season,
but the period from late December through January is preferable because this
allows time for the soil to settle and roots to become established before
spring growth begins. Trees planted late in the spring are more likely to die
during dry periods the following summer.

Dig holes large enough so that the root system is neither crowded, bent
nor broken. Prune back extra long or broken roots, A small handful of super-
phosphate added to the soil which is to be packed firmly around the plant roots
is desirable. Do not use a coir7lete fertilizer instead of superphosphate
because damage to plants is likely to occur.
Fertilizer should never be applied closer to the tree than 18 inches. All
pecan orchards should have 10 to 20 pounds of zinc oxidea per acre every three to
five years to prevent rosette, a nutritional disease caused by the lack of
available zinc in the soil,
Varieties recommended are resistant to scab. Scab, a fungus disease, is
the greatest problem in the production of pecans. On susceptible varieties,
'cab will injure or destroy the crop, Damage is more severe in hot, humid
weather, Spraying to control scab is not practical when only a few trees are
involved.
The following spray schedule is recommended for large orchards (or for
small orchards if the equipment is already available). Five applications of
Cyprex will control scab on susceptible varieties and two applications will









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control the brown leaf spot which causes premature defoliation of many
varieties that are resistant to scab. Insect control should be maintained each
year and is of particular importance when only a light to medium fruit set is
evident.

For detailed information about pecans, see Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station Bulletin No. 601 and Bulletin No. 619.

SUGGESTED SPRAY PROGRAM FOR CONTROL OF PECAN INSECTS AND DISEASE


Name and Time
of Spray
First application
when first leaves
are half grown

Second application
about the time the
tips of the small
nuts have turned
brown

Third application
three weeks after
second



Fourth application
three weeks after
third


For Control of:
Scab, downy spot,
nursery blight


Scab, nursery
blight, brown
leaf spot, pecan
nut casebearer,
aphids

Scab, nursery
blight, powdery
mildew, blotch,
brown leaf spot,
rosette

Scab, nursery
blight, powdery
mildew, pecan
leaf casebearer,
aphids, mites


Materials
Per 100 Gals. Water
1/2 lb. Dodine
(Cyprex)


1/2 lbs. Dodine
(Cyprex) plus
2 lbs. of 50% wet-
table DDT or I lb.
807. sprayable Sevin

1/2 lbs. Dodine
(Cyprex)




1/2 lb. Dodine
(Cyprex) plus
I qt. 577 Malathion
emulsifiable
concentrate


Fifth application
last week in July
or early in
August


Scab


Same as fourth
application


1. DDT may be used in the fourth and fifth applications if aphids are
not present. Its use may cause aphids or mite buildup.

2. Do not use Sevin or Cyprex after shuck splits.

3. Do not let beef or da1-y animals graze orchard treated with Cyprex.

4. Increase Dodine (Cyp.r:x) to 1-100 in wet seasons if scab becomes
severe. Dodine (Cyprex) causes defoliation o. Moora and Van Deman
pecans when applied in April. Use two pounds of Zinab plus one
quart of summer oil in April and May, then Dodine (Cyprex) in
June, July and August.


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