• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Planning in high school for...
 Choosing a career
 How to select a college
 How to apply for admission...
 Cost of attending college
 List of scholarships and loans...
 List of scholarships and loans...
 List of private schools approved...
 Index
 Back Cover














Group Title: Guide to scholarships in Florida colleges and universities.
Title: A guide to scholarships in Florida colleges and universities
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053487/00001
 Material Information
Title: A guide to scholarships in Florida colleges and universities
Physical Description: iii, 165 p. : maps, ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Dept. of Education
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1962
 Subjects
Subject: Scholarships -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053487
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01742516
lccn - 62063894

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Foreword
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Planning in high school for college
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Choosing a career
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    How to select a college
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    How to apply for admission to college
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Cost of attending college
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    List of scholarships and loans : Florida colleges and universities
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
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        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    List of scholarships and loans : not limited to a specific institution
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
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        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    List of private schools approved by the State Approval Agency
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Index
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 167
    Back Cover
        Page 168
Full Text


















y4 fai
SCHOLARSHIPS IN
FLORIDA COLLEGES
AND UNIVERSITIES
1962


STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent


wift































ROLLINS COLLEGE
LIBRARY


















,4 cid e to

SCHOLARSHIPS IN
FLORIDA COLLEGES
AND UNIVERSITIES
1962

F-(rJ STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent


A






379<.





















Copyright 1962
State Department of Education








Foreword


THIS BULLETIN has been published in response to many
requests from principals, guidance counselors, teachers, and
students. This is a revision of the original Guide to Florida
Scholarships published jointly by the Florida Industrial Com-
mission and the State Department of Education in 1957. In addi-
tion to simplifying the format and up-dating the information
about scholarships, this bulletin has been expanded to include
information on (1) planning for college, (2) choosing a career,
(3) selecting a college, (4) admission requirements, (5) cost of
college attendance, (6) historical background and degrees offered
by Florida colleges, and (7) a list of private schools approved
by the State Approval Agency. It is hoped that the addi-
tional information will prove beneficial to the students and
faculty who have occasion to use this bulletin.
The average Florida high school student planning to attend
college today must give careful consideration to several difficult
problems. For the first time in the history of this state, college
facilities are inadequate to accommodate the students who desire
admission. In 1957 there were 50,000 students enrolled in institu-
tions of higher learning in Florida. In 1960 the enrollment had
increased to 68,000. From reliable studies conducted by the
Florida Board of Control it is estimated that in 1965 Florida's
college enrollment will be 122,000 and in 1970, 158,000.
Much careful planning is being done to provide for the increas-
ing numbers wanting to enter college. The state-wide system of
junior colleges, the new state universities at Tampa and Boca
Raton, the new private colleges in St. Petersburg and Sarasota,
and the expanded facilities at the existing public and private
institutions of higher learning are all part of the effort of the
citizens of this State to provide essential higher educational op-
portunities for its youth.
Recent advances in the scientific and technical fields of
knowledge have brought revolutionary changes in career
planning. It has been estimated that there are more than 40,000
vocational careers in the United States. Most of these require
specialized training and more than ever before require college
level training.








With increasing college enrollment there is a trend toward
more selective admission requirements and higher cost. Prospec-
tive college students should begin early in high school to plan
their program of study to meet the admission requirements of
the college they wish to attend. They must also begin well in
advance of enrollment to investigate the cost of college attendance
and initiate plans for financing it.
The richest natural resource of our state and nation is the
raw brainpower of our youth. To insure the continuation and
advancement of our democratic society, it is imperative that
the talents of all youth be developed and utilized as fully as possi-
ble. The adult citizens must assist in providing facilities and
environment for this development. However, the degree to which
one is able to refine and develop his talents is determined by
his individual desire for growth. Thus, each of our youth must
recognize and accept as his personal responsibility the maxi-
mum development and utilization of his talents for the improve-
ment of himself and his society.
Appreciation is expressed to officials of the colleges and or-
ganizations sponsoring scholarships who furnished information
about individual scholarships and loans. Without the assistance
of these persons this publication would not have been possible.



THOMAS D. BAILEY
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

















Table of Contents

Foreword .......................................... i

Planning in High School for College .................... 1

Choosing a Career ........................................ 7

How to Select a College ................. .............. 16

How to Apply for Admission to College .................. 22

Cost of Attending College ............................... 26

List of Scholarships and Loans: Florida Colleges and
Universities ....................................... 31

List of Scholarships and Loans: Not Limited to a
Specific Institution ..................... ........ 131

List of Private Schools Approved by the State Approval
Agency ......... ....... .............. ......... 155

Index .................... ............................ 162











CHAPTER 1


Planning in High School for College


EACH YEAR several thousand Florida high school students
wrestle with the question, "Should I go to college?" Plan-
ning for college must now begin earlier than ever before. Some
students begin planning in elementary school. No one who
really expects to go to college should wait later than the
beginning of the ninth grade to initiate specific plans.
If you have not already reached a decision about going to
college, you will want to make sure that the decision you reach
is the "right" decision for you. Making this decision will require
much careful planning by you, your family, and your school.
The following suggestions should help you to make the "right"
decision.
You must remember that going to college is strictly volun-
tary. Compulsory school attendance ends on the sixteenth birth-
day in Florida. The decision to continue formal education be-
yond this time is left entirely to you and your parents. Because
of this, the attitude toward the student in college is different
from that in elementary and secondary school. The college feels
that no one should apply for admission who is not willing to
devote his full time and energy to the pursuit of academic
excellence. You go to college because you want to go.
Colleges have always set their entrance standards. Because
of the increasing number of students applying for admission to
colleges the minimum entrance requirements are continually
being raised. The college will accept only the best of those who
apply. Less than ten years ago any graduate of an accredited
Florida high school could be admitted to a State university.








He may not have remained after first semester examinations,
but he was assured of the opportunity to prove to himself and
to others his ability to pass college courses.

This is no longer possible in Florida. Today only the top
40 out of each 100 Florida high school graduates may be admitted
to State universities. (Special qualifying procedures are estab-
lished for those who rank below this level and wish to seek
admission.) Because of limited quotas for freshmen students and
housing shortages, only the best of the top 40 per cent or those
who apply at least a year in advance are usually admitted. Each
year many applicants who meet college entrance requirements
are turned away. Most of these turned away failed to make
application early enough.

Should You Go to College?
The first step in deciding whether or not you should go to
college is to learn where you stand academically in your class
and school. If you are in the top one-fourth of your class you
perhaps will be able to get admitted to a college, if you apply
early enough. You may not be accepted at the college of your first
choice; therefore, you may wish to apply to two or more colleges
at the same time. You can be sure of getting into your first-
choice college only if you are a straight "A" student and apply
early enough.

A guide to your potential academic ability is the score you
earn on the Florida State-Wide Ninth Grade Test. If your score
is above the sixtieth percentile, you should be able to meet
college entrance requirements. Your school may have other
standardized tests that will help you to determine your academic
ability, aptitudes, and interests.

In thinking about whether or not you should go to college
you need to give careful consideration to how you think you
will best enjoy earning a living. If you desire a career in one
of the professions, such as teaching, nursing, law, medicine, etc.,
you will need college training. The same is true for most of the
careers in scientific or technical fields of employment. If the
vocation you wish to follow as a career does not require college-
level training, you should not, in most instances, spend four
years in college before getting started in your career.








Why Go to College?
Approximately one-third of the students of high school age
in Florida do not receive a high school diploma. The job oppor-
tunities for these persons as adults are becoming fewer and fewer
each year. Even the high school graduate who does not have
some specialized training is at a considerable disadvantage on
the labor market today. As automation progresses, jobs require
more skill, training, and intelligence. It is important that you
study carefully several careers before you choose the one best
suited to your interests and aptitudes.
There is a shortage of college-trained individuals in almost
every community in Florida. The demand for individuals who
have professional or technical training beyond high school is
greater today than ever before. The average life-time earnings
of a college graduate is $100,000 more than the average life-time
earnings of a high school graduate. The opportunity of securing
a job in which you may expect advancement and be in a position
to influence social and political change is much greater for the
college graduate than for the individual who has no formal
education beyond high school. In spite of the advantages avail-
able to the college graduate, fewer than one out of five of today's
high school graduates receive a college degree.

Planning Your High School Program
If you want to go to college you must plan your high school
program of studies very carefully. Many large high schools today
offer a comprehensive curriculum designed to meet as nearly
as possible the educational needs of all the students enrolled.
It is important for those who plan to go to college to take a
selective college preparatory course. The exact courses you take
should be determined by the entrance requirements of the college
you wish to attend and the career for which you plan to prepare.
You should plan your program carefully with the assistance of
your guidance counselor or faculty advisor. If you have not chosen
a career or college, you should concentrate your high school
studies on English grammar and composition, the natural sciences,
mathematics, social studies, and languages.

Your decision to attend college should rest entirely upon
your individual ability and desire; however, you may find it
helpful to compare your class with other high schools in the








state. The per cent of Florida high school graduates entering
college in 1960-61 ranged from 98.6 in one county down to 9.1
in another. However, 48.8 per cent of all 1960 Florida high
school graduates entered college in 1960-61. The tables on the
following pages show the number of Florida high school grad-
uates in each county in 1960; also the number and the percent
from each county who went to college.


1960 GRADUATES OF FLORIDA PUBLIC
(By County)

|'.^ ,48'" i\._ AO,
[ 407
389_ "4629___ _-1-89 1 ,8
-. ..' I II4A


Total 37,296


Figures from 1960 Annual Report
Florida Board of Control


HIGH SCHOOLS













ALL INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING
First-Time-in-College Enrollment

(By County)


5|l- 10 J 114 S31 L "3 129 --

-x0
'% "30 -. -,.


Total 18,216















PERCENTAGE THAT THE NUMBER OF FLORIDA FIRST-TIME-
IN-COLLEGE-STUDENTS IS OF THE NUMBER OF 1960
GRADUATES OF FLORIDA PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

(By County)


J Highest Quarl .9. 8 9 o i ..S3 ...
-- Second Quartile 31.6o -4 '













Third Quartile '24.5o 31.4;
1949







SHighest Qurtile 19 -1.8 "9S 60o -' 4 20

Stu s i cond QuorItile 3o1.68 495003 241

SMedian IPolk County 31.5.,' 2 .
209
l Third Quartile 2ad.50u 31.4o0 _

lic Lowet Quartile 91Scho- 2 40- 37,296 -


ta Total Number of Florida First-Tim-in-College
Students in Florida Insnstitutions at is Higher h ,
Learning 18,216

Total Number of 1960 Graduates oft Florida
Public High Schools 37,296

Percentages that Total Number at Florida First-Time-
in College Students in Florida Institutions is of the
Total Number of 1960 Graduates of Florida Public
High Schools 48.8











CHAPTER 2


Choosing a Career


IN THE EARLY period of the development of the United
States and Florida there was a relatively small number of
careers from which one could choose his life's work. Recent
advances in the scientific and technical fields have brought vast
changes in many careers and have created many new careers. It
is estimated that there are more than 40,000 vocational careers
in the United States today. Most of these require specialized
training and more than ever before require college-level training.
Because of the large number of career opportunities and the
pressure for students to decide in high school what they are
going to do for the rest of their lives, many become confused and
discouraged.
Don't let this happen to you. In spite of what you may have
been led to believe, you don't have to decide your entire future
while you are in high school. You must decide only what your
immediate future will be. Career planning should be thought
of as life planning. Plan your career one step at a time for the
rest of your life, but not all of your life at one time. Very few
high school students have enough information to choose their
life's work all at once. Don't be misled by those in your class
who seem to be so sure about their career choice. Most of them
will change their plans as they acquire more information and
experience.
The best way to begin planning for your career is to decide
what you yourself really want to do. No person is ever successful
doing what he does not enjoy. Don't let immediate financial
considerations dominate your choice of a career. If you like your
job, you will work harder, think about your job more, have more
good ideas, produce more, progress further faster, and your







income will increase more rapidly. Don't let pressure from your
friends or family force you into a career in which you have no
interest. When a person is in a job he dislikes, he becomes moody
and nervous, tires easily, has indigestion and insomnia, becomes
rebellious and grows sour on the world. Forcing yourself to work
at a job you dislike is exhausting.
Your high school guidance counselor can help show you how
to go about defining your career desires, but only you can make
the decision. You must examine your inner desires, interests, and
abilities and apply them to the things you want to do. You will
only become confused if you select a vocation and try to adapt
your interests and aptitudes to it.
As a rule, a person's natural abilities point in the same direc-
tion as his likes and dislikes. In all probability you have the
basic abilities to succeed in the kind of job you are most enthu-
siastic about.
It is usually wise to withhold revealing your career desires at
first, even to your family. It is not good to get yourself publicly
committed to some goal you may want to change later. It is
better to say "I haven't decided" than to give some choice just
to have your family and friends pleased. Any attempt to follow
the whims and wishes of others usually results in confusion. If
you hold to the thoughts that you find to be sound, you will be
more likely to develop a purpose and a character of your own.
The world respects the person who has the courage to be himself.
You can do anything you want, within reason, if you want to do
it badly enough. Your greatest energy comes when you want
tremendously to do that very thing which you are doing, and
want to do it well.
Remember that whatever your career choice may be it is best
planned one step at a time rather than planning your entire
life at once.
Reproduced here is a list of sources of career information.
This list was compiled by the Child Welfare Committee of the
American Legion and published in their pamphlet, Need A Lift?,
1961. You may wish to write for free literature in the areas of
greatest interest to you.









A
Accounting
Am. Inst. of Certified Public
Acct's.
270 Madison Avenue
New York 16, New York
Same as Business Schools
Advertising
New York Life Insurance Co.
51 Madison Avenue
New York 10, New York
Aeronautical Technology
Natl. Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Agriculture
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture
Office of Personnel
Washington 25, D. C.
Agricultural Engineering
Am. Society of Agric. Eng.
520 Main Street
St. Joseph, Michigan
Air Force Reserve Officer
Commandant, Air Force ROTC
Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala-
bama
Airlines
Air Transport Ass'n. of America
1000 Connecticut Ave., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Airline Stewardess
American Airlines, Inc.
Mgr. Flight Recruitment
Dallas, Love Field
Dallas 38, Texas
American Red Cross
American Red Cross, Personnel
Washington 6, D. C.
Apprenticeship
Bureau of Apprenticeship and
Training
U .S. Department of Labor
Washington 25, D. C.
Architects
The American Inst. of Architects
1735 New York Ave., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.


Architecture and Bldg. Constr.
Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.


Atomic Scientist
Address same as
for Advertising


listing shown


Aviation
Academy of Aeronautics, Inc.
LaGuardia Airport Station
Flushing 71, N. Y.

Aviation Hostess
Eastern Air Lines
Miami International Airport
Miami 48, Fla.
Trans World Air Lines
10 Richard Road
Kansas City 5, Mo.
United Airlines
5959 S. Cicero Ave.
Chicago 38, Ill.

B
Bacteriology & Microbiology
Am. Society of Microbiology
19875 Mack Ave.
Detroit 36, Michigan

Baking Industry
American Bakers Ass'n.
20 N. Wacker Drive
Chicago 6, Ill.
Banking
Same as Advertising
Beauty Culture
National Am. Cosmetology
Schools
3839 White Plains Road
New York 67, N. Y.
Biologist
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Biophysics
The Biophysical Society
Box 3054 University Station
Columbus 10, Ohio









Boy Scouting
Boy Scouts of America
Div. of Personnel
National Council
Brunswick, N. J.
Business Schools
National Ass'n. and Council of
Business Schools
Suite 407
2400 Sixteenth St., N. W.
Washington 9, D. C.
Business for Yourself
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising

C
Camp Fire Girls
Camp Fire Girls, Inc.
65 Worth St.
New York 13, N. Y.
Chamber of Commerce Manage-
ment
Am. Chamber of Commerce Ex-
ecutives
1627 K Street, N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Chef
The Culinary Institute of Am.,
Inc.
Angell Square, 393 Prospect St.
New Haven, Connecticut
Chemistry
American Chemical Society
1155-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Chiropractic
National Chiropractic Ass'n.
Dept. of Education
National Building
Webster City, Iowa
Civil Engineering Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Civil Engineer
American Society of Civil Eng.
United Nations Plaza
345 E. 47th St.
New York 17, N. Y.


Civil Service Careers
U. S. Civil Service Commission
Bureau of Recruiting and Ex-
amining
Washington 25, D. C.
Clergymen
Natl. Council of the Churches
of Christ in U. S. A.
Dept. of the Ministry
475 Riverside Drive
New York 27, N. Y.
Serra International
Catholic Religious Vocations
Room 500, 22 W. Monroe St.
Chicago 3, Illinois
Synagogue Council of America
110 W. 42nd Street
New York 36, N. Y.
Coal Industry
National Coal Association
Coal Building
1130-17th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Cosmetology
Same as Beauty Culture
Counseling
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Craftsman
Nat'l. Ass'n. of Manufacturers
2 East 48th Street
New York, N. Y.

D
Dental Assistants
American Dental Assistants
Assn.
410 First National Bank Bldg.
LaPorte, Indiana
Dental Hygiene
American Dental Hygienist
Ass'n.
100 E. Ohio Street
Chicago 11, Ill.
Dental Laboratory Technology
Nat'l. Ass'n. Dental Lab., Inc.
201 Mills Bldg.
Washington 6, D. C.
Dentistry
American Association of Dental
Schools









840 N. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago 11, Illinois
Diesel Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Dietetics
American Dietetic Ass'n.
620 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 11, Illinois
Drafting
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
E
Electrical Power Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Electronics
DeVry Technical Inst.
4141 Belmont Avenue
Chicago 41, Ill.
Electronics
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Engineering
Same as Math
Engineering Technician
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.

F
Farming
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Food Retaiilng
Nat'l. Ass'n. of Food Chains
1725 Eye Street, N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Food Service Careers
National Restaurant Ass'n.


1530 N. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago 10, Ill.
Foreign Service
Address same as listing
for Advertising
Forester
Address same as listing
for Advertising


shown


shown


G
Geological Sciences
American Geological Institute
2101 Constitution Avenue
Washington 25, D. C.
Geophysics
Society of Exploration Geophys-
icists
Shell Building
Tulsa 17, Oklahoma
Girl Scouting
Girl Scouts of U. S. A.
830 Third Avenue
New York 22, N. Y.
H
Health Education
School Health Bureau
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
1 Madison Ave.
New York, N. Y.
American Ass'n. of H. P. E. R.
1201-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Home Economics
American Home Economics
Ass'n.
1600 Twentieth Street, N. W.
Washington 9, D. C.
Hospital Administration
American College of Hospital
Adm.
840 N. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago 11, Ill.
Hotel Administration
American Hotel Ass'n.
Education Department
221 W. 57th St.
New York 19, N. Y.
I
Industrial Engineering Technol-
ogy









National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.

J
Journalism
School of Journalism
University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri
L
Law


Address same as
for Advertising
Law Enforcement
Address same as
for Advertising


listing shown



listing shown


Librarian
American Library Ass'n.
50 E. Huron St.
Chicago 11, Ill.
Linotyping
N. Y. Mergenthaler Linotype
School
244 W. 23rd St.
New York 11, N. Y.
M
Management
Same as Business Schools
Math
General Electric Company
Dept. 2-119
Schenectady 5, N. Y.
Mechanical Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.
Medical Record Librarian
American Ass'n. of Med. Record
Librarians
840 N. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago 11, Ill.
Medical Social Work
Nat'l. Ass'n. of Soc. Workers
Medical Social Work Section
95 Madison Ave.
New York 16, N. Y.


Medical Technology
Registry of Med. Technologists
P. O. Box 44
Muncie, Ind.
Medicine
American Medical Ass'n.
535 N. Dearborn St.
Chicago 10, Ill.
Mental Health Careers
The Nat'l. Assoc. of Mental
Health
10 Columbus Circle
New York 19, New York
Mineral Industry
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Mortuary Science
Nat'l. Ass'n. of Colleges of Mor-
tuary Science, Inc.
1974 Broadway
New York 23, N. Y.
Music
Music Educators National Con-
ference
1201-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.

N
Newspapermen
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Nurse Anesthetist
American Ass'n. of Nurse Anes-
thetists
Suite 3010, Prudential Plaza
Chicago 1, Illinois
Nursing Professional or Practical
Committee on Careers
Nat'l. League for Nursing
10 Columbus Circle
New York 19, N. Y.
0
Occupational Therapy
American Occup. Therapy Ass'n.
250 W. 57th St.
New York 19, N. Y.
Oil Industry
American Petroleum Inst.
1271 Avenue of the Americas
New York 20, N. Y.








Optometry
American Optometric Ass'n.
4030 Chouteau Ave.
St. Louis 10, Mo.
Orthoptic
The American Orthoptic Coun-
cil
414 David Whitney Bldg.
Detroit 26, Mich.
Osteopathy
American Osteopathic Ass'n.
212 E. Ohio St.
Chicago 11, Ill.
P
Paper Industry
Paper Industry Career Guidance
Committee
122 E. 42nd St.
New York 17, N. Y.
Personnel
Address same as listing shown
for Advertiisng
Pharmacy
American Pharmaceutical Ass'n.
2215 Constitution Ave, N. W.
Washington 7, D. C.
Pharmacology
Am. Soc. for Pharmacology and
Experimental Therapeutics
9650 Wisconsin Ave.
Washington 14, D. C.
Physical Education
Same as Health Education
Physical Therapy
American Physical Therapy
Ass'n.
1790 Broadway
New York 19, N. Y.
Physics
American Institute of Physics
335 E. 45th Strett
New York 17, N. Y.'
Physiology
The American Physiological So-
ciety
9650 Wisconsin Avenue
Washington 14, D. C.
Podiatry-Chiropody
American Podiatry Ass'n.


3301-16th St., N. W.
Washington 10, D. C.
Printing Industry
Education Council
Graphic Arts, Inc.
5728 Connecticut Ave., N. W.
Washington 15, D. C.
Psychiatrist
American Psychiatric Associa-
tion
1700-18th Street, N. W.
Washington 9, D. C.
Psychiatric Aide
National League for Nursing
10 Columbus Circle
New York 19, N. Y.
Psychology
American Psychological Ass'n.
1333-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Public Health Education
Society of Public Health Edu-
cators
12th Floor, 1790 Broadway
New York 19, N. Y.
Public Servant
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Public Relations
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
Public Welfare
American Public Welfare Ass'n.
1313 E. 60th Street
Chicago 37, Ill.

R

Recreation
Same as Health Education
Recreation Therapist
National Recreation Association
8 West 8th Street
New York 11, N. Y.
Refrigeration, Heating and Air
Conditioning Technology
National Council of Technical
Schools
1507 M Street, Northwest
Washington 5, D. C.









Retailing
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
for Advertising

S
Salesmen
Address same as listing shown
Sanitary Engineering
Dept. of Health, Educ. & Wel-
fare
Public Health Service
Washington 25, D. C.
Science
Same as Math
Science Teaching
Nat'l. Teachers Ass'n.
1201-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Secretary
Address same as listing shown
for Business Schools
Selling
Nat'l. Sales Executives, Inc.
630 Third Avenue
New York 17, N. Y.
Speech & Hearing Disorders
American Speech & Hearing
Ass'n.
1001 Connecticut Ave., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Social Security Administration
Bureau of Old-Age & Survivors
Ins.
Chief, Employment Branch
Room 1-P-23A
Social Security Bldg.
6401 Security Blvd.
Baltimore 35, Md.
Social Work
Council on Social Work Educa-
tion
345 E. 46th Stret
New York 17, N. Y.
Social Work
Address same as listing shown
for Advertising
T
Teaching
Nat'l. Commission on Teacher


Educational and Professional
Standards, NEA
1201-16th St., N. W.
Washington 6, D. C.
Technician
Nat'l. Ass'n. of Manufacturers
2 East 48th Street
New York 17, N. Y.
Tool and Die
Nat'l. Tool, Die & Precision
Machining Association
907 Public Square Bldg.
Cleveland 13, Ohio
Traffic Management
Academy of Advanced Traffic,
Inc.
63 Vesey St.
New York 7, N. Y.
Trucking Industry
National Committee on Educa-
tion
American Trucking Ass'ns., Inc.
1616 P Street
Washington 6, D. C.
U
United States Air Force Officer
Director of Admissions
United States Air Force Acad-
emy
Colorado
United States Army Officer
The Registrar
United States Military Academy
West Point, N. Y.
United States Army Nurse
The Surgeon General
Department of the Army
Washington 25, D. C.
United States Army Reserve Of-
cer
Dept. of the Army
Office of the Chief
U. S. Army Reserve and
R. O. T. C. Affairs
Washington 25, D. C.
United States Coast Guard Offi-
cer
Commandant (PTP)
United States Coast Guard
Washington 25, D. C.








United States Merchant Marine
Officer
Superintendent, U. S. M. M.
Academy
Kings Point, N. Y.
United States Navy Officer
Chief of Naval Personnel
Navy Department
Washington 25, D. C.
U. S. Navy-Marine Regular Of-
ficer
Chief of Naval Personnel
Dept. of the Navy
Washington 25, D. C.

V

Veterinarian
American Veterinary Medical
Ass'n.
600 S. Michigan St.
Chicago 5, Ill.

Vocational Rehabilitation
Office of Vocational Rehabilita-
tion
Dept. of Health, Educ. & Wel-
fare
Washington 25, D. C.


W
Welding
American Welding Society
33 W. 39th Street
New York 18, N. Y.
Hobart Welding School
Troy, Ohio

X
X-ray Technology
American Society of X-ray Tec.
16-14th Street
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin

Y
Y. M. C. A.
Personnel Services
National Council of Y. M. C. A.'s
291 Broadway
New York 7, N. Y.

Y. W. C. A.
Personnel Services
National Board of the
Y. W. C. A.
600 Lexington Avenue
New York 22, N. Y.










CHAPTER 3


How to Select a College


S ELECTING a college is simple and easy for only a small
number of students. If you are among those who find it dif-
ficult to decide which college is best for you, the following
suggestions may prove helpful.
Which Type of College is Best for You?
One of the questions most students face is whether to go to a
large college or a small college. There has been much said about
large colleges versus small colleges. Some small colleges recruit-
ing officers advise that "at the small college you get to know
your professors as people as well as teachers." It is doubtful
that this is a valid reason for selecting one college over another.
Experience shows that students seldom know more than two
or three professors very well, regardless of the size of the college.
At a large college you will know only a few people intimately.
You will join a small clique in your dorm, club, fraternity, soro-
rity, or church, and within this clique you will find your college
social life. The other thousands will be little more than names in
a telephone directory. In a small college you will form close
friendship with a small social group and the other hundreds will
mean little more to you than fellow spectators at a ball game.
The question does not seem to be the size of the college but
the size of you. The friendship that you make will be just as
deep and just as lasting as you make them no matter where you
may go.
Another question for many students is whether to go to a
private college or a state college. This is a matter both of pref-
erence and of money. Usually state colleges are less expensive.
(See list of colleges with average annual cost at the end of this
chapter.) The difference in cost is the tuition. In Florida the








State furnishes the major portion of the salaries and operating
funds for the state colleges and universities. All other expenses
-room, board, books, clothes, and incidentals-are about the
same in all colleges. The quality of instruction in the average
private college and the average state college is about the same.

All church-related colleges are considered private. Private
colleges, and church-related colleges in particular, try to provide
something more than is available at the state colleges. The
atmosphere is different at the church-related college. Usually
the rules are stricter, especially for women students. In political
and academic areas, there is usually much more freedom for
faculty and students in private colleges. If you are interested in
a career in church work you should go to a college of your own
faith. Church-related colleges seldom restrict enrollment to those
of a particular faith. Often they enroll more students of other
faiths than of their own.

State-supported junior colleges are relatively new in Florida.
During recent years many juniors colleges have been established
throughout the entire State. The programs are being developed
on sound educational principles and are designed to meet the
needs of students in both academic and technical areas of study.
The academic preparation of instructors at the junior colleges
is comparable to that of instructors at the same level at the
four-year colleges and universities. Usually there are no dor-
mitories at junior colleges; therefore, the social life at the
junior college is different from that at a college where many of
the students live in dormitories, sorority, and fraternity houses.
The program of studies at the junior college is closely correlated
with the first two years at four-year institutions so that very little
or no loss of credit occurs in transferring. You must remember,
however, that when you transfer to any college your credits
are usually accepted "on condition" until you have completed
a specified number of courses with satisfactory grades at the
receiving college. Most colleges will not accept transferred credits
where the grade earned is below "C." You must remember, also,
that in order to receive a degree from a four-year college you
must meet the graduation requirements of that college with-
out regard to regulations you may have met at a previous college.
Unless you plan very carefully, you may find that you will be
required to take an extra summer or semester of study to meet








some specific graduation requirement when you transfer from
one college to another.
If you are interested in a career which requires at least a
four-year college degree of technical training, such as nursing,
music, or engineering where specialized training begins early
in your college studies, you should select a college which has
an approved department offering a degree in your area of
specialization.
If you find that financing your college education is going to
be a problem, you should consider attending a junior college.
If you are not admitted to a four-year college because of late
application or lack of housing, you may find it advisable to
enroll in a junior college and apply for admission to the four-year
college at the beginning of the second semester or sophomore
year. Because of the drop-out rate during the freshman and
sophomore years it is often easier to get into a college as an
upper classman than it is as a freshman.
If you are definite about what you want to study, you should
try to get admitted to a college offering a strong program in your
field of study. If you are not sure about what you want to study,
you should plan to take a good liberal arts program of English
grammar and composition, literature, music, social science, and
language.
Steps in Selecting a College
The first step in selecting a college is to learn which colleges
are located in Florida and what they offer. If none of the
Florida colleges offer what you want, check with your guidance
counselor to learn the names of several out-of-state colleges
offering a degree in your area of interest.
When you have selected three or four colleges that appeal to
you and offer the program you want, write to the Director of
Admissions for a catalog. Study each catalog carefully for the
following information:
1. General admission requirements (number of units
required in each subject area and special requirements for
such areas as foreign languages).
2. Class standing and entrance tests requirements (Florida
Twelfth Grade Test, College Entrance Examination Board
Tests, or others).








3. Recommendations (high school principal, guidance
counselors, teachers, ministers).
4. Cost (total amount; low, average or high).
5. Estimated cost by items (tuition, room rent or transporta-
tion, meals, laundry, books, laboratory fees, student
activity fees, health).
When you have listed this information for each college, being
careful to check for unusual or special requirements, you are
in a position to begin seriously discussing with your family,
teachers, and others who have been to college, which of these
colleges is best for you.










FLORIDA C(
Institution

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
Florida A. & M. University T
Florida State University T
University of Florida G
University of South Florida T

PRIVATE DEGREE GRANTING INSTITUTIONS

Barry College 1
Bethune-Cookman College E
Edward Waters College J

Florida Normal and Industrial Memorial College S
Florida Presbyterian College S
Florida Southern College L
Jacksonville University J
Rollins College
Stetson University I
University of Miami C
University of Tampa T

PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGES

Brevard Junior College C
Carver Junior College C
Central Florida Junior College (
Chipola Junior College
Collier-Blocker Junior College I


COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
City Type of Institution


'allahassee
allahassee
rainesville
ampa



liami
)aytona Beach
acksonville

It. Augustine
It. Petersburg
"akeland
acksonville
Vinter Park
)eLand
oral Gables
'ampa



ocoa
oocoa
)cala
iarianna
'alatka


Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed



Catholic Women
Private Coed (Methodist)
Private Coed
A.M.E. Church
Baptist Coed
Presbyterian Coed
Methodist Coed
Private Coed
Private Coed
Baptist Coed
Private Coed
Private Coed



Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed


Enrollment Approximate
1960-61 Annual Cost


2,943
9,019
13,100
1,991



804
679
698

296
153
1,836
1,521
1,156
1,982
12,735
1,900


$ 800
$1,200
$1,300
$1,000



$1,800
$1,000
$ 800

$ 800
$1,600
$1,500
$ 800*
$2,235
.$1,500
$2,000
$1,550



$ 200
$ 200
$ 180
$ 160
$ 200









Dade County Junior College
Daytona Beach Junior College
Gibbs Junior College
Gulf Coast Community Junior College
Hampton Junior College
Indian River Junior College
Junior College of Broward County
Lincoln Junior College
Manatee Junior College
North Florida Junior College
Palm Beach Junior College
Pensacola Junior College
Roosevelt Junior College
Rosenwald Junior College
St. Johns River Junior College
St. Petersburg Junior College
Suwannee River Junior College
t Volusia County Community Junior College
SWashington County Junior College


Miami
Daytona Beach
St. Petersburg
Panama City
Ocala
Fort Pierce
Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Pierce
Bradenton
Madison
Lake Worth
Pensacola
West Palm Beach
Panama City
Palatka
St. Petersburg
Madison
Daytona Beach
Pensacola


Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed
Coed


PRIVATE JUNIOR COLLEGES


Florida Christian College
Orlando Junior College
St. Leo College
Webber College


Tampa
Orlando
St. Leo
Babson Park


Private Coed
Private Coed
Catholic Coed
Private Women


*Room and Board Extra


1,388
827
647
503
170
348
687
85
757
351
1,711
2,132
181
72
339
3,302
93
239
190



228
1,059
193
89


$1,200
$ 500*
$1,450
$1,600











CHAPTER 4


How to Apply for Admission to College


A PPLICATION for admission to college should be made nine
to twelve months prior to the beginning of the first term
in which you wish to enroll. Your application may be filed at
the end of your junior year or beginning of your senior year
in high school. September and October of your senior year are
perhaps the best months to apply to Florida colleges. Students
wishing to transfer from a junior college should file application
to the four-year college at least a full semester in advance.
Your application must be filed on special forms supplied by
the college to which you are seeking admission. Unless you
rank academically in the top 15 per cent of your class you may
need to apply to three or four colleges at the same time. Every
effort should be made to see that the instructions on the applica-
tion are followed precisely and that all requested information
is attached. Your application should be neat and all items
answered fully.
Your high school transcript, supplied to the college by your
high school, is a highly important factor in the college's accept-
ance or rejection of your application. Most colleges tentatively
admit applicants on the basis of their high school record in the
ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades. The transcript tells the college
the quantity of academic study you have undertaken and the
quality of your work as indicated by the grades you earned. Both
these factors are extremely important and should be kept in
mind constantly throughout high school.
Since each college sets its own entrance requirements and
the number of units required in each area of study varies from
college to college, especially in mathematics and foreign lan-








guages, you should learn these requirements as early as possible
in high school so you will not be disappointed at the last minute.
Admission Requirement for State Universities
All colleges in Florida require applicants to pass an entrance
examination. Entrance requirements for State universities are
set by the Florida Board of Control. Revised policy of the Board
to become effective with the beginning of the 1962-63 term are
as follows:
(1) A student from an accredited Florida secondary school
who (a) has a satisfactory high school record, including a
C average in all academic subjects, and (b) attains a score
on the Florida State-wide Twelfth Grade Testing Program
tests among the highest 40 per cent of the high school seniors
in the state is academically eligible for admission to any
of the State Universities. Insofar as practicable students
who meet these qualifications shall be given priority in
admissions and in the assignment of university housing over
students with lower scores. Prior to the availability of
F.S.T.G.T.P. scores the Universities may admit students on
the basis of scores on other tests judged to be equivalent to
those prescribed above, or on the basis of other substantial
evidence of superior academic achievement and ability,
including no less than a B average in all academic work
completed in high school.
(2) A student from an accredited Florida secondary school
who is otherwise eligible but whose score on the
F.S.T.G.T.P. tests is below the top 40 per cent but above the
lowest 40 per cent of the high school seniors may be admitted
if it is determined from all appropriate evidence that he
can be expected to do successful academic work in the
institution to which he applies.
(3) A student from an accredited Florida secondary school
who is otherwise eligible but whose F.S.T.G.T.P. test score
is among those attained by the lowest 40 per cent of the
high school seniors shall not be admitted unless an appro-
priate faculty committee judges that he should have an
opportunity to demonstrate ability to do successful work in
the college classroom.
(4) A student from a nonaccredited Florida secondary








school may be admitted to any of the State Universities pro-
vided he meets all of the requirements for students from ac-
credited Florida secondary schools and, in the judgment of
an appropriate faculty committee, can be expected to do suc-
cessful academic work in the institution to which he applies.
Since more students can meet the minimum entrance
requirements than can be accommodated, the colleges can be
selective in admitting students. This means that meeting the
score on the entrance examination is a technicality and that
the real decision to admit or reject an applicant is based on
other factors.
One of the most important things you can do in high school
to insure your acceptance in college is to build up a good foun-
dation in all academic subjects and to make as high grades as
possible while doing it. To say that one could have made better
grades if he had worked is no compliment and is not likely to
make a favorable impression on a Director of Admissions.
There is another important part of your application that
receives considerable attention by the college admissions office.
This is information about your personal characteristics, such
as character, co-operativeness, social attitudes, and other per-
sonal traits; your record of participation in extra class activities;
and your ability for leadership. Colleges are looking for students
who will not only be successful in the academic phases of college
but will succeed in all situations in life.
Admission Requirement for Private Colleges
All private colleges in Florida require applicants to take the
College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test.
This examination is required for almost all large colleges outside
the state. It is also required for most large scholarships.
The College Entrance Examination Board Tests are admin-
istered by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New
Jersey. One examination is a scholastic aptitude test. Individual
achievement tests are available in eighteen subject matter areas.
Some Florida colleges require the scholastic aptitude test score
only. Other require scores from one or more of the achievement
tests in addition to the scholastic aptitude test.
You should make sure of the entrance requirements of the
college or colleges to which you wish to apply for admission. If








the college requires scores from C.E.E.B tests, you should advise
your high school principal or guidance director that you need
to take this examination. If these tests are not already scheduled
to be given in your area, arrangements to give them may be
made by writing to Educational Testing Service, P. O. Box 589,
Princeton, New Jersey. It is important that you take these tests
early in the first semester of your senior year of high school.
You are responsible for having your scores sent to the colleges
when you seek admission.
Getting accepted by a college is only the first step in your
college career. If you are accepted by a college, you have a new
world of experiences awaiting you. You and hundreds of others
will arrive at college alone in the midst of strangers. Neither
the college nor the students who count will be the least bit
impressed with what you own or even how smart you are. The
only thing that makes a lasting impression in college is what
you do. You may be the valedictorian of your class, but at college
you will find that hundreds of others held the same honor in their
class. You may be the prettiest girl in your class or the most
handsome boy, but at college there will be hundreds just as
pretty or just as handsome as you.
About half of those who begin the freshman year of college
with you will not remain until graduation. You should make sure
that you are not one of the casualties. The people in your new
world at college neither like nor dislike you yet, because they
don't know you. Everyone will want to like you. If anyone
doesn't, it may be at least half your fault.
There is a sudden freedom of personal direction when you
leave home to go to college-at college no one is going to tell
you when to go to bed, when to get up, when to eat, when you
can go to a movie or a party, or when to study. You will be on
your own. How well you are able to handle this new freedom will
be entirely up to you. If you don't know that your primary pur-
pose at college is to study, you may suddenly find yourself
packing for home at the end of the first semester. No one at
college will make things easy for you. You must make things
work out for yourself.











CHAPTER 5


Cost of Attending College


T HE COST of attending college is one of the major factors
in selecting a college and in many instances determines
whether or not a student will plan to go to college. The cost of
attending college is increasing rapidly, and all indications are
that it will continue to rise each year during the foreseeable
future. This should not be discouraging to you. A college educa-
tion is an investment in your future. Many studies have been
made which clearly prove that the time and money invested in a
college education pay good dividends. As stated in Chapter 1,
it is estimated that the life-time earnings of the average college
graduate is $100,000 more than that of the average high school
graduate.
The cost of attending college varies widely from college to
college. For some, the cost is little more than that of attending
high school. The cost varies also from one person to another
in the same college. Before you decide that you cannot afford
to go to college you should make a careful study of the cost of
several Florida colleges.
College expenses can be divided into two types. One is the
funds which you must pay to the college. This expenditure is
usually referred to as tuition and fees. These funds are used by
the college to pay salaries and operating expenses. The other
is personal expenses. These are the funds you spend on yourself
-for room rent, food, clothes, and incidental expenses.
By examining the catalog it is easy to determine what the
college charges for each semester of study. Estimating personal
expenses is more difficult. The largest expense items will be
room rent and meals. The college catalog usually gives an
estimate of these expenses. Determining the cost of general








incidental expenses for such things as clothes, recreation, social
life, trips home several times during the year, dues to clubs and
organizations, will depend on the college you attend and your
personal habits. As a general guide to personal expenses you
can estimate the amount of money you spent during your senior
year of high school. You may wish to talk to your guidance
counselor, your teachers, and others who have been to college
to see if you have listed all the things for which you need to plan.
One very important thing to remember is that at college you
will be expected to budget your expenses over a longer period
of time, since you will not be able to ask your parents for each
major item of personal expenditure as the need arises. You
should plan a realistic budget and see that you operate within it.
You may wish to use the following guide to estimate the
cost of several different colleges. You may add items of personal
expenses as you wish.

Estimated Total Cost for One Academic Year
Low $ Average $ High $
Tuition $ Health $
Room Rent $ Student Activity $
Meals $ Laundry $
Books $ Other $
Laboratory Fees $ Other $
As stated earlier, attending college is voluntary; only those
who are determined to get ahead in the world will have the desire
and courage to accomplish it.
Financing a college education is primarily the responsibility
of the individual student and his parents. Through your own
efforts and those of your parents you should attempt to pay as
much of the cost as possible. Generally, it is expected that all
students on enrolling will be able to meet all of the first semes-
ter's cost and preferably the cost of the entire freshman year.
Most scholarships and many loan funds are restricted to students
who have completed the first year. Donors want to be sure the
recipient is a dependable risk. One-fourth to one-half of those
who begin the freshman year with you will not be in the
sophomore class with you. The chances of a sophomore's grad-
uating are considerably higher than those of a beginning fresh-
man.
If you and your parents honestly do not have enough money
for you to go to college for one semester, there are many kinds








of financial help which you may feel free to seek. In general
there are four types of financial aid for college attendance: (1)
scholarships, (2) grants-in-aid, (3) self-help, (4) loan funds.
In almost every case you must have been accepted by a
college before you can be considered for any financial assistance.
Scholarships are outright gifts which the recipient is not
expected to repay. Most scholarships are awarded for outstanding
ability, and the amount is determined by the financial need of the
recipient. Some are awarded entirely on the basis of financial
need, others on the basis of outstanding ability only. Available
scholarship funds vary from college to college. If you need aid
you should apply directly to the college where you have been
accepted. Often the college will help you secure other aid if
you do not qualify for a scholarship. You will note in Part II
of this bulletin that many scholarships contain unusual stip-
ulations. Careful investigation could uncover several scholarships
for you. Unless you are in the top 10 per cent of your class or
meet some unusual requirement, the chances of your receiving
a scholarship are not good. If you are at the top of your class
you may wish to go after one of the really prize scholarships.
Most of these require that you take some type of examination.
Most really large scholarships are awarded on the basis of the
College Entrance Examination Board Scholarship Qualifying
Test. Your guidance counselor will be able to tell you how you
may arrange to take this test if you should desire to take it. All
private colleges in Florida and most large out-of-state colleges
require scores from some of the College Entrance Examination
Board Tests for all applicants. You may use these test scores to
apply for scholarships as well as college admission in most
instances.
If you are unable to secure a scholarship, you might qualify
for a grant-in-aid from the college. The college usually awards
grants-in-aid to carefully selected students who show consider-
able potential and a strong desire for a college education. Special
consideration for grants-in-aid are sometimes given to sons of
ministers, missionaries, students planning to enter full-time
religious work, and students whose families have experienced
unusual crises which restrict their financial contribution to their
education. As a rule, grants-in-aid are not required to be repaid.
High academic standing is required for this type of aid.







It is estimated that 75 per cent of the boys and 50 per cent
of the girls in college work to help pay for their education. Some
students earn all of their college expenses. Many earn half the
funds needed each year. Some work only in the summers, other
work part time during the regular term and full time during
the summers.

Colleges often recommend that a student not plan to work
during the first year of college because of the major adjustment
from high school to college. If you have a good academic foun-
dation from high school you should be able to work without its
affecting your studies. For some students, having a part-time
job helps them maintain higher grades. Because of working,
they must schedule their time more wisely, and they may find
studying easier when they have limited free time.

A part-time job pays off in two ways. It not only earns
money, it saves money you would have spent had you not been
working. It takes time to spend money. If you don't have a lot
of free time you don't spend as much money. Some college
officials feel that most of the students who leave college before
getting a degree spend themselves to failure. They have money
and time but spend both unwisely.

You should be on guard for another major enemy to your
college education. Many students complain about the food served
in the college dining halls. They eat sparingly, then rush to the
campus sweet shop for milk shakes and hot dogs, especially at
night. Eating between meals is one of the most dangerous habits
you can develop at college.

When you have exhausted all other sources of financial aid,
you may turn to loan funds. Realizing that a college education
is an investment in the future, more and more students and their
parents are borrowing to pay for college attendance. The install-
ment plan for purchasing homes, cars, and household appliances
is rapidly being applied to education. The philosophy, "Go to col-
lege now and pay later when your earning power is greater,"
is generally accepted throughout the United States today. In
1957-58, students and their parents borrowed $100 million to
meet college expenses. In 1960-61, college loans were $430
million. Since 1958 the Federal Government, through the National
Defense Student Loan Program, has maae more than $100








million available to colleges for loans to students. Most colleges
have loan funds which may be borrowed on a short-or long-term
basis. Many private non-profit organizations are being estab-
lished each year for the purpose of making loans to meet college
expenses. All loan funds must be repaid. Most loans, however,
carry a low interest rate and are repayable after graduation from
college.
Although the cost of attending college is greater today than
ever before, there is no time in your life when it will be less
expensive than immediately following your graduation from
high school.










CHAPTER 6


List of Scholarships and Loans:

Florida Colleges and Universities


THIS CHAPTER contains information about forty-three pub-
lic and private colleges, universities, and junior colleges
in Florida. The colleges are listed in alphabetical order. A
summary is provided for each college which includes: historical
background, type of college, degrees offered, admission require-
ments, and source of information about financial aid.
Following the summary for each college is a list of individual
scholarships and loans available at the college. The scholarships
have been listed in alphabetical order by title. Opposite each is
the number of scholarships, the annual value, and special require-
ments. Some scholarship donors have specific and unusual
requirements and often a careful study of the special require-
ments will uncover a vacant scholarship or loan. You will note
that most scholarships are not available to students at the
freshman level.
Information about a specific scholarship may be obtained
from the Director of Student Aid at the college. Often the
Director of Student Aid can be of greater assistance if a student
will explain his needs without reference to a specific scholarship.

BARRY COLLEGE
Miami Shores, Florida
Barry College was founded in 1940 by Reverend Mother
Mary Gerald, O.P. and is conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic
of Adrian, Michigan. It is a college of liberal arts offering majors
in History, Sociology, Music, Speech, and Drama leading to the
Bachelor of Arts degree; in Biology, Chemistry, Education, Home








Economics, Mathematics, Medical Technology and Physical Edu-
cation, leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. Majors in
nursing earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Master
of Art degrees are offered with majors in education and English
and Master of Science degrees with majors in education.
Students will be admitted to the College by certificate from
an accredited high school. Students graduating from non-accred-
ited high schools must apply for special consideration. The com-
mittee on admissions requires as part of the entrance credentials
the scores of the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test
taken in the junior or senior year. All applicants for admission
must present a minimum of 15 units of high school courses which
must include the following:
English 4 units
Social Studies 2 "
Mathematics 2
Science (laboratory) 2
Foreign Language (same language) 1
Electives 2
Academic scholarships may be merited at Barry College
through competitive examinations given each year throughout
the State of Florida in early March. Scholarship value ranges
from a partial tuition scholarship to a complete coverage of board,
room, and tuition.
Student aid is available to college students who are able to
do part-time campus work while maintaining acceptable scholas-
tic status. Applications of student aid and information concern-
ing scholarships may be secured by writing to Sister M. Trinita,
O. P., Dean, Barry College.
SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BARRY COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Barry College Alumnae Full Chosen on basis of
Scholarship tuition competitive examination
Barry College Auxiliary Chosen on basis of
Scholarships Part competitive examination
and
Barry College Scholarship full Chosen on basis of
tuition competitive examination









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BARRY COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Bishop Barry Memorial
Scholarship

Bishop Barry Scholarship
Diocese of Saint Augus-
tine Scholarships

Food Fair Stores Founda-
ation Scholarships



Good Citizenship Club of
Notre Dame Academy
Scholarship
Mother Jean Marie
Greeley, O. S. F.
Scholarship

Notre Dame Academy
Guild Scholarship
Royal Castle Scholarship


Foundation of Rotary
Club of Miami
Shores Scholarship
Lauderdale Beach Hos-
pital Auxiliary
Scholarships
The Stone Scholarship


Full Chosen from music majors
tuition who are residents of
St. Patricks Parish


$250
$1,000


$250




$350


$500



$500

$500


$750


$350


$350


Chosen from students of
Diocese on basis of
competitive examination
Chosen from employees or
daughters of employees or
deceased employees who are
residents of Broward, Dade,
or Palm Beach counties

Chosen from graduates of
the Academy

Chosen from nursing majors
with high scholastic
achievement and are in
financial need
Chosen from graduates of
the Academy
Chosen from daughters of
employees of Royal Castle
Corporation
Chosen from students with
good scholastic achievement
and a definite financial need
Given primarily to nursing
students. Occasionally to
medical technology students
Chosen on basis of
competitive examination


BETHUNE-COOKMAN COLLEGE

Daytona Beach, Florida

Bethune-Cookman College, a four-year coeducational institu-
tion, is the result of the merger of two Florida educational
institutions-Cookman Institute, Jacksonville, and the Daytona
Normal and Industrial Institute for Girls, Daytona Beach. Cook-
man Institute, a Methodist School, was founded in 1872 by Rev-








erend D. B. S. Darnell and was the first institution of higher
learning for Negroes in Florida. Daytona Normal and Industrial
Institute for Girls was founded in 1904 by Mary McLeod
Bethune. Cookman Institute and Daytona Normal merged in
1923, establishing a coeducational school known as Daytona-
Cookman Collegiate Institute which was still affiliated with the
Methodist Church. The name was later changed to Bethune-
Cookman College and a dual program of high school and junior
college work was discontinued and the entire emphasis placed
on the junior college. In 1941, the teacher education curriculum
was expanded to the four-year level. Students who satisfactorily
complete a four-year program of studies will be awarded the
Bachelor of Arts degree in Music, History, English, Religion and
Philosophy, or the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, Math-
ematics, Physical Education, Business Education, or Elementary
Education.

Graduates from approved high schools who have the recom-
mendation of their principal and one other faculty member are
eligible to apply for admission provided they have earned the
following credits: English 3, Social Studies 2, Mathematics 2,
Natural Science 2, and Electives 6.
Work-aid scholarships, and grants-in-aid are available to stu-
dents who need financial assistance. For information write to
the Scholarship Loan Committee.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BETHUNE-COOKMAN COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Herbert Burgstahler $100 per Students preparing for the
Ministerial Scholarships year for ministry
4 years

Bertha Cain Tuition 1 $200 Worthy entering freshman
Scholarship girl; may be renewed for 4
years

Mrs. Joseph E. Cannon $300 Student with good moral
Scholarship Fund character, good scholarship
and ability
Dana Albert Dorsey 3 $500 Girl graduates of Dorsey
Memorial scholarship High School in Miami who
are majoring in Business Ed-
ucation









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BETHUNE-COOKMAN COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Nellie B. and Bessie H.
Garrison Scholarships

Edna and Freda Green
Part-Tuition Scholarships


William J. Hale
Memorial Scholarship

Gertrude Hotchkiss Heyn
Tuition Scholarships

Theodore Luce Founda-
tion Scholarships


O. Alton Murphy
Ministerial Scholarship

National Methodist
Scholarship

Lee Nichols Ministerial
Scholarship


E. M. Reynolds Company
Scholarship


Stephen W. Steinecke
Memorial Scholarship


Mary McLeod Bethune
Memorial Scholarship


Dade County Mary
McLeod Bethune
Memorial Scholarship

J. M. Crooms Memorial
Scholarship


Jennie Hall Memorial
Scholarship Fund


2 $200

1 $200 Needy girl student with good
moral character and good
scholastic record

1 $200 Young man or woman ma-
joring in Business

5 $200 Worthy students


2 $750 Must have recommendation
of high school principal and
scholarship committee

1 $100 Student preparing for the
per year ministry; may be renewed
for 4 years
$500 Student with "B" average
(Up to) or better who has been a
Methodist for at least 1 year
1 $100 Student preparing for the
per year the ministry; may be re-
newed for 4 years

1 $600 Needy student with good
per year character and good scholas-
tic record; must have rec-
ommendation of president
2 $500 Needy students who are
per year graduates of a Sarasota
County high school

Grant made possible by El-
jabar Foundation to prom-
ising needy students

Students who are residents
of Dade County and recom-
mended by the President

1 $100 Graduates of Crooms Acad-
per emy, Sanford who main-
year tain a "C" average or better


3 $350
per
year

35


Junior or Senior students
who are preparing for the
ministry or missionary work









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BETHUNE-COOKMAN COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Gertrude Brown
Memorial Fund
Bertha Cann Senior
Scholarship Revolving
Loan Fund
Pearl Cox Scholarship
Fund
Henry Jefferson Davis
Memorial Revolving
Loan Fund
Delta Sigma Theta
Loan Fund
E. R. Scholarship Fund

Charles W. Francis
Scholarships
Nannett Harlo
Scholarship Fund
S. Harley Jones
Memorial Scholarships
Revolving Fund in
Commemoration of
Maggie and John Phillips
Pickett and Hatcher
Educational Fund
Rees Student Loan
Fund
Nellie B. Seibert
Scholarships
E. B. Seward
Scholarship Fund
Vada Somerville
Scholarships
Student Loan Fund of
the Methodist Church
Libby M. Whitney
Memorial Scholarships
Georgia McNeil
Memorial Revolving
Loan Fund
Huber William Hurt
Revolving Loan Fund


Small
loans
Small
loans

Small
loans
Small
loans

Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small


Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans
Small
loans

Small
loans


Seniors only

Seniors only


Seniors only

Juniors and Seniors


No restrictions

No restrictions

No restrictions

No restrictions

Seniors only

Freshmen only


No restrictions

No restrictions

No restrictions

No restrictions

No restrictions

All students

Juniors and Seniors

Must have recommendation
of the President

Juniors and Seniors









BREVARD JUNIOR COLLEGE
Cocoa, Florida

Brevard Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1960, and is operated by Brevard County Board of Public
Instruction under regulations of the State Board of Education.
It is an educational institution offering (1) a program of general
education consisting of classical and scientific courses parallel
to that of the first and second years of work at a senior four-year
institution, (2) terminal courses of technical and vocational
nature and (3) courses beyond the basic education courses for
adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
Applications for student aid and scholarships should be made
as early as possible; however, in every case application must be
made three weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. Infor-
mation and application blanks may be secured by writing to the
Chairman, Brevard Junior College Scholarship and Loan Com-
mittee, Brevard Junior College, Cocoa, Florida.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BREVARD JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Bank of Melbourne and
Trust Company of Mel-
bourne Scholarships
Barnett National Bank of
Cocoa Scholarship

Central Brevard National
Bank Scholarship

Citizens Bank of
Titusville Scholarship

Cocoa Beach State Bank
Scholarship


$200 Chosen from students with
high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
$200 Chosen from students with
high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
$200 Chosen from students with
high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
$200 Chosen from students with
high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
$200 Chosen from students with
high scholastic record, good
character and financial need








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT BREVARD JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Cocoa Rotary Club $200 Chosen from students with
Scholarship high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
First Federal Savings and $200 Chosen from students with
Loan Association of high scholastic record, good
Titusville Scholarship character and financial need
Kiwanis Club of Cocoa $200 Chosen from students with
Scholarship high scholastic record, good
character and financial need
Titusville Woman's $200 Chosen from students with
Club Scholarship high scholastic record, good
character and financial need


JUNIOR COLLEGE OF BROWARD COUNTY
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
The Junior College of Broward County was founded by the
State of Florida in 1960, and is operated by the Board of Public
Instruction of Broward County under regulations of the State
Board of Education. It is an educational institution offering (1)
a program of general education consisting of classical and scien-
tific courses parallel to that of the first and second years of
work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses of
technical and vocational nature and (3) courses beyond the basic
education courses for adults.

All graduates of approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.

Several individuals and organizations within the geographic
area served by the College have provided scholarship awards and
loans to aid worthy students who need financial assistance and
a limited number of students are employed on a part-time basis
on the college campus. Inquiries concerning all programs of
financial assistance provided or administered by the College
should be addressed to the Director of Special Services.








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT JUNIOR COLLEGE
OF BROWARD COUNTY

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Broward Education $150 Broward County High School
Association Scholarship graduates with high scholastic
record; majoring in teacher
education, in financial need
West Broward Kiwanis $150 Graduate of high school in
Club Scholarship Kiwanis Service area with
high scholastic record in
financial need
Women's Civic Club $200 Graduate of Broward County
Scholarship High School; good scholastic
record, financial need


CARVER JUNIOR COLLEGE
Cocoa, Florida

Carver Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1960, and is operated by the Brevard County Board of Public
Instruction under regulations of the State Board of Education.
The college is an educational institution offering (1) a pro-
gram of education consisting of classical and scientific courses
parallel to that of the first and second years of work at a four-
year, senior college, (2) terminal courses of technical and voca-
tional nature, and (3) courses beyond the basic education courses
for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon completion of a full two-year program of studies the
Associate degree is awarded.
For information about available scholarships and loans write
to the President of the college.


CENTRAL FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE
Ocala, Florida

Central Florida Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1957, and is operated by the County Boards of Public









Instruction of Marion, Citrus and Levy counties under regula-
tions of the State Board of Education. It is an educational insti-
tution offering (1) a program of general education consisting of
classical and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and
second years of work at a senior four-year institution,
(2) terminal courses of technical and vocational nature, and
(3) courses beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is conferred.

Many deserving students have an opportunity to secure finan-
cial assistance during their attendance at Central Florida Junior
College from scholarships, loan funds and student employment.
Applications for scholarships and loans may be secured by writing
to the Student Personnel Office.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
CENTRAL FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Browne-Greaton-Cole
Music Scholarship
Citrus County P. T. A.
Council Scholarship
College Work
Scholarship



Lake Weir Kiwanis
Club Scholarship
Colin Lindsey Fund 2
Scholarship men
2
women

W. H. McDonald
Accounting Scholarship


McIntosh Lions
Club Loan


$200

$150

$570




$150

$150




$150


$130


Must be music major

Must be Citrus County High
School graduate
Must work for Central Flor-
ida Junior College 2 hours per
day for 9 months, 5 days per
week, maintain 2.0 average
or above
Graduate of Lake Weir High
School
Must be Florida residents in-
terested in business educa-
tion or administration. Have
good scholastic record, have
financial need
Outstanding student major-
ing in accounting, in finan-
cial need
Must be graduate of North
Marion High School, to be re-
paid at 3% interest








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
CENTRAL FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Ocala Lions Club $130 Marion County High School
graduate
Ocala Rotary Club 6 $100 Marion County High School
graduate
Phillips 66 Dealers $130 Must be Florida Resident
Scholarship (Citrus,
Marion and Levy
counties)
Wildwood Lions Club $170 Must be graduate of Wild-
wood High School



CHIPOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE
Marianna, Florida

Chipola Junior College was founded in 1947 and operated for
one year as a private educational institution. Under the provi-
sions of Florida's Minimum Foundation Law, Chipola Junior
College became a State-supported college. It is operated by the
Boards of Public Instruction of Jackson, Calhoun and Washington
Counties under regulations of the State Board of Education.
Chipola Junior College is an educational institution offering
(1) a program of general education consisting of classical and
scientific courses parallel to that of the first and second years
of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses
of technical and vocational nature, and (3) courses beyond the
basic education courses for adults.
All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
Students who are in need of financial assistance may secure
aid through several scholarships, loan funds and student employ-
ment. Inquiries concerning financial assistance should be
addressed to the President.









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT CHIPOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Chipley Hardware
Company Scholarship

Chipola Science
Scholarship
College Board
Scholarships


$110

3 $110

3 $110


Must be resident of Wash-
ington County

Chosen from winners at Dis-
trict Science Fair
Deserving students recom-
mended by high school
principal who are residents
of Washington, Calhoun, and
Jackson counties


Corcoran, J. C. and
Nobles, W. H., Fund
for Education

Harshbarger Schol-
arship Fund


Marianna Kiwanis
Club Scholarship

Marianna Pilot
Club Scholarship


1
man
1
woman


$110


3 $100
women


Senior Woman's Club 1 $110
of Marianna woman
Scholarship


Inez Shaw
Scholarship


1 $150
woman


Chosen from residents of
Jackson County


Chosen from residents of
Marianna, Greenwood or vi-
cinity



Graduate of Marianna High
School

Must be resident of Junior
College district who will pre-
pare for a business or sec-
retarial career


COLLIER-BLOCKER JUNIOR COLLEGE
Palatka, Florida

Collier-Blocker Junior College was founded in 1960 by the
State of Florida and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruc-
tion of Clay, Putnam and St. Johns Counties under regulations
of the State Board of Education. It is an institution offering (1)
a program of general education consisting of classical and scien-
tific courses parallel to that of the first and second years of
work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses of
technical and vocational nature and (3) courses beyond the basic
education courses for adults.








All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
A few scholarships have been provided for worthy students
who need financial assistance. For information write to the Dean
of Student Personnel.

DADE COUNTY JUNIOR COLLEGE
Miami, Florida
Dade County Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1960 and is operated by the Dade County Board of
Public Instruction under regulations of the State Board of
Education. Dade County Junior College is an educational insti-
tution offering (1) a program of general education consisting of
classical and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and
second years of work at a senior four-year institution (2) ter-
minal and vocational nature, and (3) courses beyond the basic
education courses for adults.
All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
Students who cannot attend college without financial assist-
ance will be provided with aid through scholarships, loans and
student employment. Specific information concerning these oppor-
tunities may be-secured by writing to the Dean of Students.

DAYTONA BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE
Daytona Beach, Florida
Daytona Beach Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1958, and is operated by the Volusia and Flagler
County Boards of Public Instruction under the regulations of
the State Board of Education. It is an educational institution
offering (1) a program of general education consisting of classical
and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and second
years of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal









courses of technical and vocational nature, and (3) courses
beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies the
Associate degree is awarded.

Daytona Beach Junior College provides a number of scholar-
ships and loans for students who need financial assistance. Part
time employment is also provided for students who wish to
defray part of their expenses. Specific information concerning
financial assistance may be secured by writing to the Director
of Services.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT DAYTONA BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Carpenters' Local
No. 1725
Central Labor Union
Classroom Teachers
Association
Daytona Beach
Kennel Club
Emanuel Zimmet
Memorial Scholarship
Emblem Club
No. 204 (Elks)
Florida Council
for the Blind
Halifax Area
Kiwanis Club
Mainland High School
Scholarship
Ormond Beach
Federal Savings and
Loan Association
Ormond Beach
Rotary Club
Peninsula Club
(Service Group)









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT DAYTONA BEACH
JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Peninsula Women's
Club
Pep Club,
New Smyrna Beach
High School
Plumbers Local
No. 295 1
SAYS Club
(Social Activities
Youth Service)
Seabreeze High School
Student Government
Association
Volusia County
Library Association
Zonta Club

EDWARD WATERS COLLEGE
Jacksonville, Florida
Edward Waters College was founded in 1872 in Live Oak,
Florida, and was given the name Brown Theological Institute.
The College has operated at its present site since 1892, when it
was given its present name in honor of the third Bishop of the
African Methodist Episcopal Church under whose direction
the college operates. Edward Waters College is a four-year col-
lege with a comprehensive curriculum specifically designed to
meet the needs of the community.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate of Arts degree is awarded; the Bachelor of Science
degree is awarded upon completion of the full four-year program.
Edward Waters College provides financial assistance to a
limited number of deserving students in order to help them
meet the expenses of attending college. This assistance is in the
form of scholarships, part-time employment at the college and
aid in securing work in the community when possible. Applica-
tion blanks and further information may be secured by writing
to the Scholarship Committee.









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT EDWARD WATERS COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications

Athletic Scholarships $125-$600 Men who show academic
promise in addition to athle-
tic abilities
Special Scholarships $300 Special ability in music and
art
Work Scholarship up to Work aid to student in finan-
$600 cial need. Work in offices,
cafeteria and maintenance


FLORIDA A. AND M. UNIVERSITY
Tallahassee, Florida

Florida A. and M. University was founded by Constitutional
provision and legislative enactment in 1887 as the Colored Normal
School. The direct management of the institution was trans-
ferred from the State Board of Education to the State Board
of Control. The name was changed to The Florida Agriculture
and Mechanical College by the legislature in 1909. One year
later the first degrees were conferred. In 1953 the college was
reorganized and became one of the State Universities.
Graduates of Florida High Schools with a minimum of six-
teen (16) academic credits who have satisfactory scores on the
Florida state-wide twelfth grade test are eligible to apply for
admission. Graduates of accredited high schools outside the state
must have the recommendation of their high school principal
or superintendent and rank in the upper half of his graduating
class.
The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded to students who ful-
fill the requirements with majors in Natural Science, Social
Science, Religion and Philosophy. The Bachelor of Science degree
is awarded to majors in Agriculture, Home Economics, Natural
Science, Social Science, Library Science, Business and Education.
Other professional degrees include: Bachelor of Science in
Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and Bachelor of Laws.
A technical diploma is offered in the following areas of vocational
training: Automotive Technology and Service Management,
Building Construction Technology, Drafting and Design Tech-









nology, Electrical Technology, Printing Technology and Man-
agement, Radio and Electronic Technology, Refrigeration and
Air Conditioning Technology and Machine Shop.

There are a number of scholarships and loan funds available
to students who are in need of financial assistance. A limited
number of part-time job opportunities are also available. For
information concerning financial assistance write to the Director
of Student Activities.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Alpha Phi Alpha
Award

Alumni Loan Fund

American Legion
Auxiliary Scholar-
ship Fund

Caldwell, Millard,
Loan Fund

Clair, Johnny,
Memorial Loan Fund
Clinical Association
Award

Delta Sigma
Loan Fund

English, John and Ida
Loan Fund


Leon Federal
Scholarship


Gilmore Loan Fund

George William
Gore, Jr.
Loan Fund


$25-50 Chosen from outstanding
students


Small
loans
$300



$25,000
total
fund


Chosen from senior class

Chosen from children of de-
ceased world war veterans,
residents of Florida for five
years


To be used for emergency
loans
$50 Sophomore student nurse;
excellence in nursing and
academic performance


Chosen
ability


$500


for outstanding


Chosen from outstanding
high school graduates from
Leon and twelve surround-
ing counties


Small loans


$800


Short term loans to students
in good standing









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Hollingsworth
Loan Fund



Kappa Alpha Psi
Scholarship


Keen, Mary and
J. Velma Scholarship
Loan Fund
Levy, Sara,
Scholarship

MacMillan
Scholarship
Men's Senate
Loan Fund
Pickett and Hatcher
Educational Loan Fund
Sigma Gamma Rho
Scholarship


$1,500 Chosen from students ma-
joring in nursing, nutrition
or social science who expect
to teach in one of these
fields


$150



$400


1 $150


Chosen on basis of best es-
says written while in high
school senior class; fresh-
men only
Chosen for high scholastic
promise

Worthy student from Leon
County who plans to take 4
year college course


$50 Chosen from students major-
ing in vocational agriculture
Chosen from male students


Chosen from freshmen class
members of Aurora Club who
are residents of Leon or sur-
rounding counties


FLORIDA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE
Tampa, Florida

Florida Christian College was founded in 1944 by members
of Churches of Christ of Florida. All members of the Board of
Directors and faculty personnel are active members in good
standing of some local Church of Christ; however, there is no
organizational tie between the College and any church. It is a
co-educational junior college offering a curriculum of liberal
arts with special emphasis placed on the study of the Bible. Some
technical training and vocational work is offered; however, in all
areas liberal education is stressed.

Graduates of approved high schools are eligible to apply for









admission at Florida Christian College. All applicants must take
the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Exami-
nation Board. Twelve academic units are required for admission
and must include the following:


English
Social Studies
Mathematics
Science


3 units
2 "
1 "
1 "


The Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon completion of
a full two-year course.

Financial assistance may be secured at Florida Christian
College in the form of scholarships, loans and work contracts.
All applications for financial aid must be submitted to the
Registrar.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Brent Demarius
Memorial Loan Fund
Cain, Tom,
Loan Fund
Douglas, Jim,
Memorial Loan

Faculty Scholarships

Garland, Grayson,
Memorial Loan Fund
Greenhaw, Amanda
Scholarship Loan Fund
Hall Scholarship
Howard, Minnie Lou
Loan Fund
Investor Loan Fund

Living Link
Scholarship


Small loans


$100 per
semester


Students of good moral
character who maintain an
average of "C"
Deserving students in need


Full Ministerial students; one-
tuition year awards


Chosen from
class: loans


sophomore


Tuition Deserving students in need
$100-400 Loans to be repaid after
graduation
Loans to be repaid after
graduation
$75-full Recipients are required to
Tuition obtain new member for "Liv-
ing Link Program"









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Mintz, John R. Students with high moral
Scholarship Fund character and financial need
Mutual Finance Company Students with high average
Loan Fund majoring in business
Pickett and Hatcher Loans for students studying
Education Fund liberal education or prepar-
ing to be teachers

Russell Loan Fund Chosen from male students
majoring in theology

Scholastic Scholarship Chosen from students who
are valedictorians or saluta-
torians or rank in upper 10%
of graduating class
Shoulders Loan Fund 2 1/ full Loans repayable after grad-
expenses uation
Wheeler, George Loans repayable over several
Scholarship Fund years


FLORIDA NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL MEMORIAL
COLLEGE
St. Augustine, Florida

Florida Normal and Industrial Memorial College was founded
in 1892 by Reverend M. W. Gilbert, Reverend J. T. Brown and
Miss Sarah Blocker and was originally known as Florida
Baptist College and was located in Jacksonville. In 1918 the
college plant was moved to St. Augustine for expansion purposes
and it became known as Florida Normal College. The present
name was adopted in 1950. This is a four-year, co-educational,
liberal arts college under Baptist control, offering the Bachelor
of Science degree with majors in Teacher Education, Music
Education and Religious Education.

All graduates of approved high schools who have the recom-
mendation of their principals are eligible to apply for admission.

Part-time employment is provided to a limited number of
students who need financial assistance. In addition to employ-
ment several scholarships are awarded to worthy students.








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA NORMAL AND
INDUSTRIAL MEMORIAL COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Baptist Convention $35-300
and Association
Scholarships
Freshman Scholarship Tuition Chosen from highest ranking
students in Florida High
School graduating classes
Ministerial Aid $100 per Granted to students prepar-
Scholarship semester ing for the Ministry
Pickett and Hatcher Full Loans available to students
Educational Fund expenses maintaining at least a "C"
average
Work-Aid Scholarship $108 Available to boarding stu-
dents


FLORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE
St. Petersburg, Florida
Florida Presbyterian College was founded in 1958 by the
Presbyterian synods of Florida. It is a four-year, co-educational,
liberal arts college placing special emphasis on Christian faith
and moral excellence in higher education.
Applicants for admission must have completed the graduation
requirements of an accredited high school and earn a satisfactory
score on the College Entrance Examination Board test. The
following secondary school courses are strongly recommended:
Four years of English, two and one-half years of Mathematics,
two years of Language, one year of History and one year of
Science.
The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are
awarded to students who successfully complete the requirements
with majors in Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Art,
Literature, Music, Philosophy, Religion, French, German, Greek,
Latin, Russian, Spanish, History, Psychology, Political Science,
Sociology, Economics and Business Administration.
Florida Presbyterian College has many different ways to
finance an education. For further information on financial aid
write to the Director of Admission.









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


College Honor 8
Scholarships

College Achieve- 6
ment Scholarships

Alfred A. McKethan 6
Achievement
Scholarships

Alfred Fielding Lang Varies
and Katherine Fagan
Lang Scholarship Fund

Mr. and Mrs. Bert
Smith Scholarship


Helen C. and Myron H.
Gibbons Scholarship

E. M. Reynolds Com-
pany, Inc., Scholarship

Milton Roy Sheen
Memorial Scholarship

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Wil-
liams, Jr., Scholarship

George Asha MacMillan
Scholarship Fund

Robert Hamilton
Scholarship Fund

Gene Samuel Cain
Memorial Fund

Partners in Education

Grants-in-Aid



Student work
Scholarship


$1,000 Awarded to incoming fresh-
men after personal inter-
view

up to Incoming freshmen


$500

$500


/2 fees
and
tuition

$1,000



$400


1 up to
$250


Awarded on basis of aca-
demic achievement, charac-
ter and need
Students from St. Petersburg
area given preference

Chosen on basis of aca-
demic achievement, charac-
ter, breadth of interest and
need

Academic achievement, char-
acter scholarly potential and
need

Academic achievement, char-
acter, scholarly potential
and need


1 $500

Varies Student studying to be a
Presbyterian minister

Varies Academic achievement, char-
acter and need

Varies Need

Varies


Varies

up to
$200 a
year

up to
$400 a
year


Need

Students with parents en-
gaged in a religious voca-
tion or to students planning
a religious vocation

To be repaid within 5 year
period immediately follow-
ing graduation








FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
SLakeland, Florida
Florida Southern College, a co-educational liberal arts col-
lege, was founded as the Florida Conference College by the
Methodist Church in 1885, located in Leesburg. In 1902 the
school was opened as the Florida Seminary at Sutherland, now
Palm Harbor, on the Gulf Coast. In 1906 the name was changed
to Southern College. Following a fire which destroyed the build-
ings and a temporary location in Clearwater, Lakeland was
selected as the permanent site in 1921. Under the administration
of Dr. Ludd M. Spivey the name was changed to Florida Southern
College.

All candidates for admission who are graduates of Florida
secondary schools must take the state-wide twelfth grade place-
ment test. If this test has not been taken because of exceptional
circumstances, the student will be required to take either the
College Entrance Board Examination or a college aptitude test
selected by Florida Southern College. All out-of-state applicants
must take scholastic aptitude tests of the College Entrance Exam-
ination Board or other comparable tests.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is awarded to students who
fulfill the requirements with a major concentration in Art,
English, French, German, History, Music, Philosophy, Religion,
Sociology, Spanish and Speech. The Bachelor of Science degree
is awarded to majors in Business Administration, Biology, Chem-
istry, Citrus, Education, Home Economics, Industrial Arts and
Physics. The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science may be
earned for majors in Journalism, Mathematics or Psychology.
The degree conferred depends on whether the foreign language
requirement is met and the degree field of the minor.

The college offers a number of scholarships to deserving
students each year. Students who are qualified may earn a
portion of their expenses by working on campus. Information
concerning scholarships, loans and part-time employment may
be obtained by writing to the office of the President.









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Anderson, Helen R.,
Student Loan Fund

Ball, Hal Charles, Jr.,
Scholarship

Belknap, Dora S.
Scholarship Loan Fund

Bennett, Lawrence E.
Student Loan Fund

Betts, Muriel,
Scholarship Loan Fund

Borden Company Foun-
dation Scholarship

Bronson, John R.,
Memorial Scholarship
Fund

Brooks, Thurston, Inc.
Scholarship Loan Fund

Callahan, Marquerite
Wills, Scholarship
Loan Fund

Carter, Cora,
Student Loan Fund

Carter, Grover J.,
Loan Fund

Civic and Business
Groups Scholarships

Davis Brothers
Scholarship Fund

Davis, H. J.,
Educational Loan Fund

Dawkins, Mr. and Mrs.
D. C., Sr., Revolving
Loan Fund

Dupont, Mrs. Alfred J.
Scholarship Fund


Tuition Deserving student who is a
resident of Miami Area

Available to students of all
classes


Small
loans

$200


Freshmen with outstanding
scholarship


Chosen from students ma-
joring in "The American
Idea."

Chosen from students major-
ing in speech




Loans to deserving students


$500


Chosen from freshmen and
sophomore students with no
grade below "C"; Junior and
senior students with no
grade below "B"









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Florida Bankers
Educational Foundation
Scholarships

Gilbert, R. B.,
Loan Fund


Goldman, Nathan C.
Scholarship Loan Fund

Goodman, Mr. & Mrs. R. E.
Student Loan Fund


Guyton, Alice Coffee
Scholarship Loan Fund

Home Economics,
Laura Long
Scholarship Loan Fund

Ingraham, James E.
Scholarship Loan Fund

Johnson, Neill
Scholarship Loan Fund

Kappa Delta Pi and
Future Teachers of
America Loan Fund

Melvin, William H.
Family Endowment Fund
Scholarship
Methodist Church Loan
Fund of Madison

Methodist Student
Loan Fund

Methodist National
Scholarships



Miller, Dalsie
Scholarship Loan Fund
Monroe, Lucy and Graham
Loan Fund


Tuition Chosen from juniors and
and seniors who are Florida resi-
books dents majoring in banking
and finance

Chosen from Methodist stu-
dents preparing for the Min-
istry

Chosen from students major-
ing in "The American Idea"

Chosen from students of
Methodist junior and senior
classes who are preparing
for the Methodist Ministry


Chosen from junior and sen-
ior women who are major-
ing in home economics



Chosen from ministerial
students

Chosen from students pre-
paring to teach in the public
schools




Chosen from graduates of
Madison High School

Chosen from Methodist stu-
dents

Chosen from upper 15% of
the class according to par-
ticipation in church activi-
ties and need; must be mem-
ber of Methodist Church
Chosen from deserving stu-
,dents majoring in speech
Chosen from junior and sen-
ior class








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Peeler Revolving Fund Chosen from junior and sen-
ior class
Pickett and Hatcher
Educational Loan Fund
Strickland Student Chosen from students study-
Loan Fund ing art
Teachers, Future of Chosen from students pre-
America Scholarship paring to teach in the pub-
lic schools
Ward, W. F., $500 Chosen from worthy and
Citriculture Scholarship needy junior and senior stu-
dents majoring in citrus
Winn and Lovett Food
Stores Foundation
Scholarship
Zonta International
Club of Tampa,
Scholarship


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
Tallahassee, Florida

Florida State University was established in 1857, by the State
of Florida and was originally called West Florida Seminary. The
institution later became the Florida State College and continued
in operation until 1905, at which time it was discontinued. It
was re-established the same year as a woman's college under
the direction of a Board of Control and was named Florida State
College for Women. In 1947, the Legislature passed a bill making
the College co-educational and changed the name to the Florida
State University.
Graduates of accredited Florida secondary schools who have
satisfactory high school records and who attain satisfactory scores
on the Florida State-wide twelfth grade testing program are
academically eligible for admission. High school graduates who
do not meet the above requirements may apply for special con-
sideration. In each case the applicant will be considered on an
individual basis.








Curricula in liberal arts lead to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor
of Science degrees in the following departmental fields:

I. The Humanities: Art, Classical Literature, Greek, Latin,
English, French, German, Spanish, History, Music
(courses for major offered in School of Music), Phi-
losophy, Religion and Speech.
II. The Social Sciences: Anthropology and Archaeology,
Economics, Geography, Government, History, Psychol-
ogy, Sociology, Speech.
III. The Natural Sciences: Bacteriology, Biology, Chemis-
try, Engineering, Science, Geology, Mathematics, Meteor-
ology, Physics, Statistics.
Professional degrees including Bachelor of Arts in Education,
Home Economics, Social Welfare, Business, and Radio and
Television; Bachelor of Science in Education, Home Economics,
Social Welfare, Business, Nursing, Hotel and Restaurant Man-
agement, and Baking Science.

The office of Financial Aid, through the use of scholarships,
loans and student employment, endeavors to make it possible
for persons whose resources are limited to attend the Univer-
sity. Information concerning student aid may be secured by
writing to the Director of Financial Aid.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Air Force Aid Society Chosen from children of Air
Assistance Force personnel
Alexander, Martha King Chosen from senior class or
Memorial Scholarship graduate students majoring
Fund in education who are resi-
dents of Hillsborough county
Alpha Kappa Psi $500 Chosen from male students
Professional Fraternity majoring in business
Loan Fund
Alpha Lambda Delta- $100 Chosen from male or female
Phi Eta Sigma first semester freshmen of
Scholarship high scholastic standing in
financial need, and with ac-
ceptable personal qualities









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Alumni Club Scholarship


Alumni Loan Funds

American Association of
University Women
Loan Fund
Pensacola Chapter

American Association of
University Women
Loan Fund
Gainesville Chapter

American Bankers
Association Loan Fund


American Legion
Auxiliary Scholarship
Fund Scholarships


Amy Gertrude Jones
Memorial Scholarship
for Music Majors

Bakers, University Loan



Bankers Association
Educational Fund,
Florida


Bankers Association,
Florida,
Scholarship Awards

Beach, Louise Sears,
Loan Scholarship



Benevolent and Protective
Order of The Elks
Scholarship


$100




$100


Chosen from Washington
County residents



Young woman from junior
and senior classes who is a
resident of Escambia county


$100 Young women from second
semester freshmen, sopho-
more, junior or senior classes


$250 Chosen from senior students
who are majoring in eco-
nomics or allied subjects

$300-500 Chosen from children of de-
ceased world war veterans
who have been residents of
Florida for 5 years

Varies Music majors



Up to Chosen from students ma-
$600 joring in baking science and
per year management

$250 -Chosen from junior and senior
students majoring in bank-
ing and finance who are legal
residents of Florida

$100 Chosen from membership of
Florida Chapter of Future
Farmers of America

$100 Chosen from senior women
enrolled in College of Arts
and Science or home eco-
nomics

$1,000 Chosen from second semes-
ter freshmen classes, sopho-
more, junior, or senior
classes, a young woman is
preferred









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Bigbee, Mary, Memorial
Gift Scholarship

Bohnenberger, Carl,
Memorial Award Loan Fund

Borden Home Economics
Award

Bristol Social Work
Loan Fund

Business and Professional
Women's Club Scholarship
State

Campbell Taggart
Research Corporation
Scholarship

Chaires, Anna,
Loan Scholarship

Chapman, Low T.,
Scholarship Loan Fund

Chemistry Department
Scholarship


Chemstrand Scholarship


Chi Omega Award

Chi Omega Loan Fund


Christian Scientists
Education



Class of 1919 Loan Fund


$250


$250


Chosen from young women
who are graduates of West
Palm Beach High School

Chosen from graduate stu-
dents of the Library School


Up to Chosen from senior class or
$500 graduate students majoring
in social work

Chosen from upper class
students

Sons of employees of Camp-
bell Taggart, majoring in
Baking Science

Varies Chosen from students inter-
ested or majoring in "Early
Childhood Education"

Varies Chosen from senior class


$250


Chosen from high school sen-
iors who plan to major in
chemistry and are residents
of Florida or south Georgia


$500 Awarded to a senior of su-
perior ability who is a resi-
dent of the United States
$25 Chosen from female students
majoring in sociology

Varies Financial need, satisfactory
grades, acceptable citizenship


$300




$100


Chosen from young women
whose membership is held
by the Christian Science
Church who are majoring in
elementary education

Chosen from juniors or
seniors









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Class of 1958 Loan Fund


Compton, Miriam Terrell
Memorial Loan Scholarship

Confederate Memorial
Gift Scholarship Fund


Conradi, Augusta,
Loan Fund

Conradi, Edward
Memorial Scholarship

Continental Baking
Company Scholarships

Culpepper, Varina Bower
Scholarship




Daughters of the American
Revolution, Everglades
Chapter, Student Loan Fund


Daughters of the American
Revolution, Jacksonville
Chapter, Loan Fund


Daughters of the American
Revolution, Katherine
Livingston Chapter
Daughters of The American
Revolution, State

Daughters of The
Confederacy, United,
Florida Division,
William H. Milton Chapter,
Loan Scholarship


Varies Financial need, satisfactory
grades and acceptable citi-
zenship

Up to Men or women who are mem-
$250 per bers of the senior class
semester

$150 Chosen on basis of high
scholarship; recipient must
be a direct descendant of a
Confederate Veteran

Chosen from undergraduate
or graduate classes

$200 Chosen from junior or senior
class
$1,500 Chosen from sons of em-
ployees of Continental Bak-
ing Company
$400 Chosen from female graduat-
ing seniors of Leon High
School who are interested in
becoming nurses and whose
family head is a member of
the building industry

Chosen from junior and sen-
ior class, must be graduate
of a Florida high school
and a resident of Greater
Miami

$200 Chosen from junior and sen-
ior classes: Must be Flor-
ida resident who was en-
rolled in a Florida school
during past two years
Chosen from young women
who are residents of Florida

Chosen from sophomore,
junior and senior classes or
from graduate students
$200 Chosen from junior or sen-
ior class; retricted to mem-
bers or past members of the
Children of the Confederacy









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Daughters of The
Confederacy, United,
Jacksonville Chapter

Daughters of The
Confederacy, United,
Martha Reid
Scholarship Loan Fund


Delta Delta Delta
Scholarship
Delta Kappa Gamma
Memorial Scholarship

Denham, Rose, Memorial
Loan Scholarship Fund

Dobbs Brothers
Scholarship


Dohnanyi-Gridley
Scholarships


DuPont Gift
Scholarship

Duval High School
Memorial Scholarship

Edwards, Agnes,
Loan Fund

Emergency Loan Fund

English, John and Ida
Loan Fund

Faculty Memorial
Loan Fund

Faculty Wives Loan Fund


$200


$300





$200


Chosen from junior and sen-
ior classes

Chosen from upperclassmen;
must have Confederate an-
cestry (proof from Adju-
tant General's Office, Depart-
ment of the Army, Washing-
ton, D. C.)
Chosen from young women


$100 Chosen from young women
who are undergraduates ma-
joring in education

$400 Chosen from young women
in the senior class who are
residents of Florida

$500 A junior of pleasing person-
ality who is a resident of
Florida, and has earned good
grades in Library Science

$100 Chosen from majors in
music, with special prefer-
ence given to piano or organ
students
Young women who are in
need and have excellent
grades

$275 Chosen from graduates of
Duval County public high
schools

$150 Chosen from senior class
students in arts and science

Up to To be repaid within 60 days
$25 or before end of semester



Varies Financial need, good grades,
acceptable personality

Varies Students in financial need
who have satisfactory grades
and acceptable character









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Florida Association Vari
Future Homemakers






George Washington $275
Memorial Loan

Gilchrist Memorial $175
Gift Scholarship appr
imat

Green, Theresa, $100
Loan Scholarship

Gresham, Bob, Loan $500
Fund

Gridley, C. Asbury $250
Vocal Award

Haggard, Estelle Avinger $125
Gift Scholarship

Hamilton, Francis F. $100
Award

Hay, Harry H., $300
Memorial Scholarship

Hentz, Alice M., $100
Memorial Loan Scholarship



Home Demonstration; $100
State Council Loans




Home Economics, Borden's $300
Scholarship Award


es High school seniors who plan
to major in Home Economics;
2 years active membership
in FHA; 2 years in home-
making education; "B" av-
erage; must write theme
"Why I Will Major in Home
Economics."

Junior or Senior; must read
a biography of George Wash-
ington

Chosen from junior or senior
ox- class students with superior
e achievement and need




Chosen from majors in res-
taurant and hotel manage-
ment

Majors in voice, financial
need

Chosen from freshmen stu-
dents

High scholastic standing,
majors in restaurant and
hotel management

Education majors

Junior and senior students
majoring in music education
with piano as principal in-
strument

-400 Former 4-H Club girls with
4 years club work; home eco-
nomics majors preferred.
Must be recommended by
own county council of home
demonstration work

Home economic major with
highest average with 2
courses completed in food
and nutrition









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Hotel, Florida
Association Scholarship
Fund

Howard Johnson's
Scholarship Fund

Humble Oil Company
Loan Fund

International Milling
Company

Junior Woman's Club
of Tallahassee

Koch, Gladys Olive
Memorial Emergency
Loan Fund

Levy, Sara
Leon County
Gift Scholarship

Liddell, Anna Forbes
Loan Fund

Longmire, Rowena

Moore, Beth Walton
Loan Scholarship

Mortarboard
Scholarship

Music Faculty Loan
Scholarship

Music-Presser
Foundation Scholarship

National Secretaries
Association, Tallahassee
Chapter Scholarship

Olivia Nelson Dorman



Omicron Nu Loan
Scholarship


$100


$500

$300


Majors in restaurant and
hotel management

Restaurant and hotel man-
agement major


Baking Science


$200


Young woman in financial
need, good grades, planning
to work with children


Music majors


Small
gifts


Leon county residents


Young woman talented in
music


$200

$300

$150







$300



$300



$75


Young woman, good scholar,
junior or senior

Undergraduates majoring in
music

Students preparing to be
music teachers

Junior or senior woman ma-
joring in secretarial science,
financial need, high scholar-
ship

High school senior planning
to major in Latin or Greek:
modern language may be
considered
Home economics major









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


P. E. O. Loan Fund


Opperman, Mary Scoble
Loan Scholarship

Orchestral Scholarships
Service League of
Tallahassee
Panhellenic-Miami
Scholarship

Panhellenic-West Palm
Beach, Scholarship

Phillips, Marrion C.
Memorial Gift
Scholarship

Pickett and Hatcher
Educational Loan Fund

Pilot Club of Ocala
Loan Fund

Restaurant and Hotel
Management Scholarship
Fund

Restaurant, Florida
Association
Scholarship

Reynolds, Melissa
Elizabeth, Welfare
Fund Scholarship
Rotary Club Loan Fund

Roy H. Brown

Ruge, Fannie F.
Scholarship


Up to Woman undergraduates above
$1,000 first semester freshmen

Varies Young woman music major

Varies Outstanding talent, string
instrument, freshman


$350





$250





$200





$100


$100




$750

$250


Ruge, John G.
and Fannie


Young woman graduate of a
Dade County High School

Upperclassman; preference
given to woman graduate of
Palm Beach Junior College
Upperclassman majoring in
physical education or sci-
ence; woman is preferred



Young woman graduate of
Marion County high school
Majors in restaurant and
hotel management

Majors in restaurant and
hotel management


Available every 3 years; first
award 1960

Sophomore, junior or senior

Majors in baking science,
financial need, good grades
Woman graduate of Chap-
man High School, Apalachi-
cola; high scholastic, high
rating in general activities,
freshman, sophomore or jun-
ior
Sophomores, juniors, or sen-
iors. Florida residents pre-
ferred









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Ruge, Memorial
Scholarships

Sears Roebuck
Foundation

Southern Scholarship
and Research Founda-
tion Incorporated

Southern Maid
Scholarship


Sperry and Hutchinson
Scholarships


Symphony, University
Scholarship Fund

Thompson, Ollin Young
Memorial Scholarship
Fund
Traffic Court Fee
Scholarship for
Freshmen
Tufts Scholarship



Uihlein Scholarship


Vocational Rehabilitation
Division State Depart-
ment of Education

University Loan Fund

Washington County
Alumni Loan
Scholarship

Woman's Club,
Ft. Lauderdale
Loan Fund


Sophomore, junior, or senior,
preferable Florida residents
for 5 years
$300 High school seniors from
rural homes planning to ma-
jor in home economics

Limited grants and loan
funds, 30 scholarships which
provide rent-free housing

Regis- High scholastic rating-4
tration from northern Florida coun-
fee ties; 4 from southern Florida
counties
Juniors or seniors in school
of business; financial need,
high scholastic average, good
character

$25-100 Full time students in orches-
tra

Freshman with "B" average
in high school


Freshmen who are legal resi-
dents of Florida


Graduates of public high
school in Hillsborough Coun-
ty with American born par-
ents
Varies Majors in hotel and res-
taurant management; good
grades; financial need
Full Students with physical or
tuition mental disabilities

Juniors and seniors


$250


Graduates of Ft. Lauderdale
High School; women pre-
ferred








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Woman's Clubs, $450 for All classes; women only
Florida Federation freshmen;
Loan Fund $300 for
upper
classes;
$250 for
nursing
students
Woman's Club, $200 Lake Worth residents
Lake Worth


GIBBS JUNIOR COLLEGE
St. Petersburg, Florida

Gibbs Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1957 and is operated by the Pinellas County Board of Public
Instruction under regulations of the State Board of Education.
It is an educational institution offering (1) a program of general
education consisting of classical and scientific courses parallel
to that of the first and second years of work as a senior four-year
institution, (2) terminal courses of technical and vocational
nature, and (3) courses beyond the basic educational courses for
adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies,
the Associate degree is awarded.

Part-time employment is available for sophomore students
who need financial assistance. Scholarships and loans are also
a means of financial aid. Information concerning student aid
may be secured by writing to the Director of Student Personnel.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT GIBBS JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


American Association
of University Women
Scholarship


$100


Senior, young women









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT GIBBS JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Scholarship

Eastern Star
110 Rosa Royal Chapter,
Scholarship

First Federal Savings
and Loan Association of
St. Petersburg Award

Gulf Finance Company
Scholarship

Honor Student
Scholarship


Iota Phi Lambda
Sorority Delta Omicron
Chapter Scholarship

McRae, Edward,
Memorial Award

Music Awards


Pallbearers Grand
Union Scholarship

P. I. O. Educational
Fund



Parent-Teacher Asso-
ciation Scholarship

Perkins, George Wesley
Memorial Award

Presidents Award

Rotary Club of St.
Petersburg Scholarship

Teachers, Progressive
Association Award,
Pinellas County


$250


Young woman, high school
graduate with good grades
and character


$100


$150


$100 Honor graduate of Gibbs
High School

$100-$150 Graduates in upper 10% of
Gibbs High and Pinellas
High

$100 Young woman, high school
graduate, good character and
grades

$50 Majors in business


Tuition Freshman and sophomore mu-
sic majors

$300 Member or child of member


$500- Women students who have
$1,000 completed one semester of
college work or technical
training

Honor graduate of Gibbs or
Pinellas High Schools

$25


$150

$100


$150


Honor graduate of Gibbs
High School

Members of Gibbs or Pinellas
High School Future Teach-
ers of America Clubs








GULF COAST COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE
Panama City, Florida

Gulf Coast Community Junior College was founded by the
State of Florida in 1957, and is operated by the Bay County
Board of Public Instruction under regulations of the State Board
of Education. It is an educational institution offering (1) two
years of college work acceptable for transfer to four-year colleges
and universities (2) terminal programs that will fit the students
for employment in business and industry (3) suitable courses
for adults who wish to further their education, enrich their
cultural lives and/or improve their personal efficiency.
All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies,
the Associate degree is awarded.
Scholarships, loan funds and part-time employment have
been provided to aid worthy students in paying all or part of
their college expenses. Applications for a scholarship or aid
should be made at least one month before the beginning of the
semester and should be addressed to the Chairman of the Scholar-
ship Committee, or the President.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Coca-Cola Bottling Full Bay County student with
Company Scholarship tuition good grades, and financial
and need
books
Morley, Richard E. Varies Pre-ministerial or religious
Assistantship or education students with
Work School evidenced Christian leader-
ship
Panama City Insurance $75 per Bay County resident with "C"
Agents Association semester average who is in financial
Scholarship need
Panama City Kiwanis Varies Financial need
Club Loan Plan








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Panama City Varies Interest-free loans for emer-
Lions Club agency need

Panama City Rotary Varies Need and scholastic stand-
Club Scholarship ing; Bay County residents
only.

United Daughters of the $100 Southern ancestry of three
Confederacy Salt generations or more, gradu-
Works Chapter ate of Bay County High
School; personal letter pledg-
ing to make best possible use
of opportunity



HAMPTON JUNIOR COLLEGE
Ocala, Florida

Hampton Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1957, and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruction of
Citrus, Levy and Marion Counties under regulations of the State
Board of Education. It is an educational institution offering (1) a
program of general education consisting of classical and scientific
courses parallel to that of the first and second years of work at a
senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses of technical
and vocational nature, and (3) courses beyond the basic educa-
tion courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon completion of a full two-year program of studies the
Associate degree is awarded.

Scholarships and loans are available to qualified students
in need of financial assistance. Information may be obtained by
writing to the college.








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT HAMPTON JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Alpha Phi Alpha $100 Full time student with out-
Scholarship Award standing leadership and
achievement
Blocker Award $55 Full time student of good aca-
demic standing
Eastern Star, Stanley $50 Full time student of good
Chapter No. 138 academic standing
Scholarship Award
Hampton Memorial $50 Full time student of good aca-
Scholarship demic standing
Kappa Alpha Psi $150 High school senior of supe-
Fraternity Ocala rior scholastic achievement
Alumni Chapter
Lily White Security $25 Children of members of Lily
Benefit Association White organization graduat-
ing senior
Marion County $100 Marion County High School
Teachers Association seniors
Scholarship


INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE
Fort Pierce, Florida

Indian River Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1960, and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruc-
tion of Indian River, Martin, Okeechobee and St. Lucie Counties
under regulations of the State Board of Education. It is an
educational institution offering (1) programs that fit the student
for employment in industry and business in local area, (2) two
years of college work acceptable for transfer to a four-year
college or university, (3) suitable courses for adult students who
wish to further their education, to improve their personal or
business efficiency or to enrich their cultural lives.
All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Several scholarships are available from local citizens and
organizations. Students desiring information should write to the
Guidance Director.









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Benevolent and Pro-
tective Order of the
Elks of Ft. Pierce

Benevolent and Pro-
tective Order of the
Elks (Anna Miller Circle)

Civitan Scholarship

First Federal
Scholarship

Jay-Cee Scholarship

Junior Women's Club
Scholarship

Navy Mothers
Scholarship

Parent Teacher Asso-
ciation of Dan McCarty
High School

Private Grants

St. Lucie County
Classroom Teacher's
Association

St. Lucie Primary School
P. T. A. Scholarship

Women's Club Scholar-
ship, Ft. Pierce Club

Women's Club Scholar-
ship, Stuart Club


$325

$450

$150

$100

$150

$200


Varies

$50


$150

$50

$130


Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship

Financial need
scholarship


JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY
Jacksonville, Florida

Jacksonville University was founded in 1934, then a two-year
institution, it was called Jacksonville Junior College. During its
first decade it operated entirely as an evening institution. In
1944, a full program of day classes for freshmen was inaugurated.

71


and good


and good


and

and

and

and

and

and


good

good

good

good

good

good


and good

and good


good

good

good








During the summer of 1956 plans were made to expand to
four-year status and the new name, Jacksonville University, was
adopted. The first four-year degrees were awarded in 1959. The
University is supported by the City of Jacksonville, Duval County
and through contributions from civic-minded individuals, founda-
tions and business establishments. Jacksonville University is a
liberal arts college offering the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and
Bachelor of Science in majors as follows: Accounting, Biology,
Chemistry, General Business, Education, English, History and
Government, Mathematics, Music, Psychology, Speech and
Drama.
Students who have graduated from approved Florida high
schools who ranked in the upper three-fourths of their graduating
classes with a minimum of 15 acceptable units of credit are
eligible to apply for admission. Students who do not qualify as
stated above must pass an entrance examination prescribed by
the University.
There are four types of financial assistance available to
students at Jacksonville University: Scholarships, Service
Awards, Grants-in-aid and Loans. Information about the financial
assistance program may be obtained from the office of the Dean
of Students of Jacksonville University.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications

Altrusa Club Young women
Scholarship
Barnett National
Bank Scholarship
B'Nai B'Rith
Commander, Charles E.
Company Scholarship
Dupont, Alfred I., Mrs.
Exchange Club of Entering freshman every 4
Jacksonville 1 years
Food Fair Scholarship $250
Friday Musicale








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Peeler, C. B., Loan Fund
Penwomen of Jacksonville
Reynolds Piano Company
Senior Scholarship
Service Awards
Smith, Kirby, Loan Fund

Swisher and Son,
Incorporated, John H.
Scholarship
United Daughters of The
Confederacy, Robert E.
Lee Chapter
University Scholarship
and Loans

Vogue Scholarships
Winn Dixie
Scholarship
Woman's Club
Scholarship


Auditions
Persons 65 years or older
Work scholarships
Graduate of Andrew Jackson
Senior High School
Full Dependent of employee of
tuition Swisher and Son, Inc.


Southern parentage


Previous Jacksonville Uni-
versity students with 3.25
grade average
Freshman girl


"B" average


LINCOLN JUNIOR COLLEGE
Fort Pierce, Florida
Lincoln Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1960 and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruction of
Indian River, Martin, Okeechobee and St. Lucie counties under
regulations of the State Board of Education. It is an educational
institution offering (1) a program of general education consist-
ing of classical and scientific courses parallel to that of the first
and second years of work at the senior four-year institutions,
(2) terminal courses of technical and vocational nature, and (3)
courses beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates of approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.








Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
Information concerning scholarships and student aid may be
obtained by writing to the President of the College.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT LINCOLN JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications

Alpha Kappa Alpha $130 Young woman in financial
Sorority Scholarship need, good scholarship and
character
Elks (Pride of St. Lucie $70 Character, need, scholarship
No. 1189) Scholarship
First Federal Savings $150 Character, need, scholarship
and Loan Scholarship
Socio Civic Club $50 Character, need, scholarship
Scholarship
Zenith Club $50 Character, need, scholarship
Scholarship
Anonymous Scholarship $25 Character, need, scholarship

Anonymous Scholarship $105 Character, need, scholarship
Anonymous Scholarship $150 Character, need, scholarship

MANATEE JUNIOR COLLEGE
Bradenton, Florida

Manatee Junior College was founded by the State of Florida
in 1957, and is operated by the Board of Public Instruction of
Manatee County. Sarasota and DeSoto Counties also cooperate
by paying out of County tuition for their students who attend
Manatee Junior College. The College is operated under regu-
lations of the State Board of Education.
Manatee Junior College is an educational institution offering
(1) a program of general education consisting of classical and
scientific courses parallel to that of the first and second years
of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses
of technical and vocational nature, and (3) courses beyond the
basic education courses for adults.








All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
A number of scholarships and loans are available to qualified
students. Information and application blanks may be secured
by writing to the Student Personnel Office.


NORTH FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE
Madison, Florida
North Florida Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1958 and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruc-
tion of Hamilton, Madison, Lafayette, Suwannee and Taylor
Counties under regulations of the State Board of Education.
North Florida Junior College is an educational institution
offering (1) a program of general education consisting of classical
and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and second
years of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal
courses of technical and vocational nature and (3) courses beyond
the basic education courses for adults.
All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies
the Associate degree is awarded.
A number of scholarships and loans are available to qualified
students. Information and application blanks may be secured by
writing to the Student Personnel Office.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT NORTH FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Bank of Greenville $116 Greenville Public School
students
Beggs, T. J. and 1 All Young man
Company Scholarship general
fees









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT NORTH FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Buckeye Cellulose
Corporation Scholarship

Burnett, Lawton,
Scholarship
Business and Profes-
sional Women's Club
of Perry
Commercial Bank of
Live Oak
Eva and Hyem Kramer
Loan Fund
Florida Bank of
Madison
Florida Power
Corporation

Gibson, L. P. "Pete"
Scholarship
Greenville Alumni Asso-
tion Loan Fund
Hardee, Constance,
Mrs. Loan Fund
Honor Scholarship






Howerton, T. M., Jr.



Junior Woman's Club
of Live Oak

Junior Woman's Club
of Madison

Kramer, I., Loan Fund

Madison County
Education Association


8 $150


1 $116

1 $125


1 $100

1 $122

1 $150

2 $50


3 $100




1 $100

All
matricu-
lation,
labora-
tory and
towel
fees

1 $125



1 $185

$50


1 $61

1 $100


Four freshmen, four sopho-
mores; students from Taylor
County



Girl from Taylor County


Any student of North Florida
Junior College
Any student of North Florida
Junior College
Student from Madison County

Students from Madison, Tay-
lor, Jefferson and Hamilton
Counties
Students from Hamilton
Madison, and Taylor Counties
Short term loans

Any student of North Florida
Junior College
Highest ranking senior in
high schools of college area.
Awards made to first and
second ranking senior in
school with graduating
classes of 75 or more


Student from Madison or
Hamilton counties, prefer-
ence given to students in-
tested in forestry

Young woman designated by
the club

Student from Madison County

Student of North Florida
Junior College
Student from Madison
County









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT NORTH FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Madison County Junior
Chamber of Commerce
Madison County Medi-
cal Association
Madison Garden Club
Madison Lions Club

Madison Rotary Club


Madison Woman's
Club

Mayo Rotary Club
Loan Fund
Merchant, T. C., Jr.
Scholarship
Monticello Kiwanis
Club
North Florida Tele-
phone Company, Live
Oak, Scholarship
Priest, Van H., Com-
pany Scholarship



Simpson Nursery
Stanley, James E.
Loan Fund


Taylor County School
Administrative and
Supervisory Personnel
Scholarship
White Springs P.T.A.
Scholarship
Williams Insurance
Agency Scholarship
Winn-Dixie Corporation
Scholarship


$100

$120

$100
$100

$100


2 $100


1 $150

$150

1 $100

1 $100


5 $50


$100
$100


1 $100


$75

$116

$300


Madison County student

Madison County student

Madison County student
Student from Madison Pub-
lic School area
One freshman, one sopho-
more, students within North
Florida Junior College area
One freshman, one sopho-
more, students in Madison
area
Lafayette County students

Suwannee County students
are given preference
Jefferson County student

Student from Hamilton, Su-
wannee and Lafayette coun-
ties
Students from Jefferson,
Hamilton, Madison, Suwan-
nee and Taylor Counties. One
scholarship to the county per
year
Jefferson County student
J. B. Bird Loan to Green-
ville High School graduates;
A. B. Lanier to Madison High
School graduates
Taylor County student



Student within White Springs
area
Madison County student

Grants of not less than $50
to students from Florida,
Georgia, Alabama, or South
Carolina








ORLANDO JUNIOR COLLEGE
Orlando, Florida
The Orlando Junior College, an independent, co-educational
institution was founded in 1941 by a group of private citizens
from Orlando and Central Florida. Although the College is
neither church-related nor church-supported it is professedly a
Christian College. The educational aims of Orlando Junior Col-
lege are: (1) To give two years of College work acceptable for
transfer to four-year colleges, universities and other professional
schools (2) To offer two years of study for those persons who
plan to complete their formal education upon graduation from
Orlando Junior College (3) To serve the community of Orlando,
Orange county and Central Florida by offering certain courses,
activities and services for adults and special students in keeping
with the needs and requests of individuals and organizations.

Graduates of accredited secondary schools or persons awarded
high school equivalency diplomas by the State Department of
Education are eligible to apply for admission.

The Associate in Arts degree is awarded to students who
successfully complete a full two-year course of study.

Because of the extensive opportunity for part-time employ-
ment in Orlando and Orange county, student scholarships are
not as essential for deserving persons as they are in many colleges.
Even so, a modest scholarship program is being developed. The
philosophy of the college is that those students should be assisted
who have demonstrated that they are not afraid to work and are
making a real effort to help themselves. For this reason, appli-
cations for scholarships are generally not accepted, except in
the case of work scholarships or where applications are specially
called for. Inquiries concerning financial assistance should be
directed to the Dean of Students.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ORLANDO JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications

American Federal 1 $300 Graduating high school sen-
Savings and Loan ior in financial need
Association









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ORLANDO JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Calkins Scholars



Chester C. Fosgate /
Company

Hershell Stuart Schol-
arship Loan Fund

Optimist Club
Scholarship


Orlando Chapter of
the National Secretaries
Association


Orlando Junior College
Scholarship Fund



Panhellenic
Association



Pearl Davidson Reese
Memorial Fund

P. W. DuBose Memo-
rial Scholarship Fund


Sorosis Scholarship

University Club of
Orlando


Work Scholarships



Zonta Club of Orlando
Winter Park


2 $300



$200


Small
loans

Up to
$200


1 $300


1






1


1


Selected by Mr. Calkins on
basis of christian character
and demonstrated ability

Recipient must earn other
half of tuition and fees

Payable two or three years
after graduation

Students engaged in activity
dealing directly with growth
and development of youth

Girl studying for career in
secretarial science


Awarded on the recommen-
dation of the Dean of Stu-
dents for outstanding schol-
arship

$250 Girl with outstanding scho-
lastic record in high school
on recommendation of Prin-
cipal and faculty members

Varies Worthy students


$400 Graduates of Hampden Du-
Bose Academy


$300 Half gift, half loan

$300 Worthy student who has
worked for his education un-
der difficulties

$300-$400 Biology laboratory assistant,
Chemistry laboratory assist-
ant, Library assistants, Office
assistants

$100 Girl preparing for a career
in business is given prefer-
ence








PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE
Lake Worth, Florida

Palm Beach Junior College was established in 1933, with the
co-operation of the County Superintendent of Public Instruction,
the Board of Public Instruction, representatives of civic organ-
izations of West Palm Beach and members of Palm Beach High
School faculty. The college was originally located in West Palm
Beach but because of insufficient space it was moved first to
another location in West Palm Beach and finally in 1955 to its
present 114 acre site in Lake Worth.

Palm Beach Junior College is an educational institution
offering (1) a program of general education consisting of class-
ical and scientific courses paralled to that of the first and second
years of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal
courses of technical and vocational nature, and (3) courses
beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools and accredi-
ted high schools from other states are eligible for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies,
the Associate degree is awarded.

A number of scholarships are offered by local organizations
and individuals to properly qualified students. They are awarded
on the basis of the applicant's personal and professional worth
and financial need. Information concerning student aid may be
secured by writing to the Scholarship Committee, Palm Beach
Junior College, 400 S. Congress Avenue, Lake Worth.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


American Association of $100 Graduating sophomores for
University Women upper division study
Arnold, J. Y., Jr., $100
Scholarship
Beta Club of Seacrest $100 Seacrest High School gradu-
High School ates
Scholarship









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Boynton Beach
Business and Profes-
sional Woman's Club
Scholarship

Boynton Beach
Woman's Club
Scholarship

Campbell, Calvin W.
Memorial Scholarship


Consolidated National
Gas System Educa-
tional Foundation

Daughters of The
Confederacy, United

Delta Kappa Gamma
Society

Exchange Club of
Lake Worth

First Federal Savings
and Loan Association
-Robert S. Erskine
Scholarship

Florida Nurses Asso-
ciation, District 21,
Ft. Lauderdale

Future Teachers Club
Scholarship, Palm
Beach High School

Jayceettes of Lake
Worth Scholarship

Jaycee Wives Club
of Palm Beach
Scholarship

Junior Woman's Club
of Boca Raton
Scholarship

Junior Civitan, Palm
Beach High School
Scholarship


2 $100


$100


Seacrest High School grad-
uates from Boynton Beach


$1,000 Palm Beach Junior College
graduate on basis of scho-
lastic achievement "B" av-
erage

$175


$100 Students of Confederate an-
cestry.

$50 Woman student planning to
teach

2 $125


$250



$300


$100


Renewable for 3 years if
scholastic standing remains
satisfactory

Nursing student


Awarded during 2nd
semester


5 $100


$100


$150









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Kiwanis Club of
Boca Raton
Edward G. Newell
Scholarship

Kiwanis Club of
Lake Worth

Lake Worth High
School Glee Club
Scholarship
Lake Worth
Lions Club

Leonard, John I.,
Scholarship Fund

Moores, H. C.,
Scholarship

Palm Beach
Lions Club

Review Club of Lan-
tana Scholarship
Rinker, M. E.,
Scholarship, Rinker
Materials Corporation
Secretaries Association
National Scholarship

Siniwak Club
Scholarship



Soroptimist Club of
Lake Worth
Lantana and Boynton
Scholarship
Palm Beach County
Claimsmen
Association
Palm Beach County
Restaurant
Association


$200



$150

$100


For first semester


$100 Lake Worth High School
graduate

4 $100 Work scholarship


$100


2 $100 One given to student pre-
paring to teach

$25 Awarded in the fall


2 $180


$100


1st year's
fees and
textbooks;
2nd year
textbooks
$100


$500


High School graduating sen-
ior who plans to major in
secretarial science
Graduating senior from Lake
Worth High School


Palm Beach Junior College
graduate who plans to ma-
jor in restaurant manage-
ment at Florida State Uni-
versity who is a Florida
resident








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Palm Beach Junior
College Loan Fund
Palm Beach Secre-
tarial Association
Loan Fund
Panhellenic Associa-
tion of Ft. Lauderdale
Loan Fund
Perry, John H.,
Palm Beach
Post-Times
Rotary Club of West
Palm Beach South
Rotary Club of
West Palm Beach-
Red Whittington
Scholarship Fund

Teachers Associa-
tion, Palm Beach
County Classroom,
Henry A. Newell
Scholarship in
Education
Veterans of Foreign
Wars Scholarship
Woman's Club of
Lake Worth
Woman's Club of
West Palm Beach
Young Men's Christian
Association, Palm
Beach Hi-Y
Joe Pucciarelli
Scholarship

Zonta International
Club Scholarship


Small
loans
$150


Good academic record, and
be repaid at 2% interest


$250


$177 for Deserving son or daughter
2 years of employee of Palm Beach
Post-Times
$100 Valedictorian of Palm Beach
Junior College
$200


2 $125


Recipient must take one
course in education


$100

$150

2 $100


$50




$100


Graduating seniors of Palm
Beach High School



Girl graduate of Palm Beach
High School


PENSACOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE
Pensacola, Florida

Pensacola Junior College was established by the Escambia
and Santa Rosa County Boards of Public Instruction during the









summer of 1948. It is operated jointly by these two counties
under regulations of the State Board of Education. The college
has grown steadily since it was founded and is now loaded on
a new 80 acre site provided by the city of Pensacola and the
Barrs' Estate. The academic program is designed to offer (1) a
program of general education consisting of classical and scientific
courses parallel to that of the first and second years of work at
a senior four-year institution, (2) terminal courses of technical
and vocational nature, and (3) courses beyond the basic educa-
tion courses for adults.
Candidates for admission who have been graduated from
approved Florida high schools, from an accredited out-of-State
secondary school, and transfers from any recognized college or
university will be admitted. Candidates may also enter who
possess an equivalency certificate from the State Department of
Education.
Upon completion of a full two-year program of studies, the
Associate degree is awarded.
Several types of scholarships, loans, and student employment
are available to assist qualified students. Information concerning
student aid may be secured by writing to the Office of Student
Personnel.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PENSACOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Academic Cost of Highest score on senior
Scholarship fees placement test of all vale-
dictorians in Escambia
County
American Business $175 Student planning to major
Women's Associa- in business administration
tion Scholarship
Bear, Max L. and 2 $133 Need, character and aca-
Belle Scholarship demic ability
Business Education Cost of Awarded on basis of exam
Scholarship fees in typing, shorthand, ana
bookkeeping
Florida Peace Officers $150
Auxiliary Scholarship









SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT PENSACOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


IBM Scholarship


4 $165


Full time student enrolled
in the business curriculum


Inter-Club Council
of Escambia
High School
Kohn, Robert H.,
Scholarship
Kappa Delta Gamma
ETA Chapter
National Secretaries
Association,
Pensacola Chapter

Officers Wives League
Greater Pensacola

Pensacola Alumni
Chapter of
Kappa Delta Pi
Pensacola Junior
College Student
Loan Fund
Pensacola Kiwanis
Club Scholarship
Pensacola Sports
Association
Pensacola Warehouse-
men and Truckers
Association
Sindilar, Frank J.
Scholarship
Suburban West
Scholarship and
Loan Fund
Winn-Dixie
Scholarships


$500


$150

$125

$200


Need, character and scholas-
tic ability



Student specializing in busi-
ness education


2 $200


$150


Student planing to train
for teaching career


Up to Need, character, and scho-
$40 plastic ability

$150


$120


Winners of the annual Divot
Derby


2 $250




Up to Need, character, and scho-
$40 plastic ability


$250


Limited to employees or chil-
dren of employee of the
Winn-Dixie Corporation


RINGLING SCHOOL OF ART
Sarasota, Florida

The establishment of the John and Mable Ringling Museum
of Art in 1931, by John Ringling, furnished the opportunity for








the founding of an institution which is recognized as one of
the country's foremost art schools. The museum became the
property of the State of Florida in 1946 under the terms of Mr.
Ringling's will. It is the purpose of the school to give the student
a thorough foundation in the basic principals of the visual arts.
Ringling School of Art offers the following courses:
Fine Arts-a four year certificate course.
Commercial Design-a three year certificate course.
Illustration-a four year certificate course.
Fashion Arts-a three year certificate course.
Interior design-a three year certificate course.
The school offers the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts for
those desiring a degree. Thirty semester hours of approved
college academic work plus a three year prescribed course in
the field of art are required.
Students working for credit must be high school graduates of
good character. Previous art training is not necessary. High
school graduation is not necessary for entrance as a non-credit
special student if the applicant can furnish evidence of special
aptitude or experience in the art field. All applicants must have
reached their sixteenth birthday before entrance.
The only scholarships available are through competitions
sponsored by the organizations offering the awards.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT RINGLING SCHOOL OF ART

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Art, Florida Federa- High school graduating
tion of, Scholarship seniors
Latham Foundation
Scholastic Magazine Entering freshmen
Scholarship

/ r/ '/ ~ ROLLINS COLLEGE
Winter Park, Florida

Rollins is a four-year coeducational college of liberal arts
and sciences. Founded in 1885 under the auspices of the Congre-








national Churches, it is the oldest degree-granting institution
of higher learning in Florida. Although Rollins maintains the
spiritual ideas of its early heritage, it has always been open to
all denominations.

Graduates of accredited secondary schools, if certified and
recommended by their principals, are eligible to apply for admis-
sion upon receipt of the three and one-half year record and the
results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance
Examination Board.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is awarded to students who
fulfill the requirements with major in Art, Business Adminis-
tration, Economics, Elementary Education, English, Foreign
Language (French, German, Spanish), General Science, History
and Government, Human Relations, Music, Philosophy, Psy-
chology, Sociology and Anthropology, and Theatre Arts. The
Bachelor 'of Science may be earned with the following majors:
Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and Pre-
Medical. Fields leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music in-
clude: Choral Conducting, Composition, Piano, Violin, Violon-
cello, Organ, Voice, and Music Education.

Scholarships are awarded competitively to those students
who give evidence of academic attainment and future promise.
Such awards are based on financial need. Loans are also available
to qualified students. Information concerning student aid may
be obtained by writing to the Office of the Cashier.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ROLLINS COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications

Achievement Good record, special talent
Scholarship in field of music, drama, etc.
Achievement Scholar- Good record, special talent
ships for Day Student in field of music, drama, etc.
Angler Scholarship $50 Upperclass students
Bassett, Carolyn Halbert Good scholarship, financial
Scholarship need
Burleigh Scholarship $50 Upperclass students










SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ROLLINS COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Burt, Anna G.,
Scholarship

Chase Scholarship

DuPont, Jessie Ball
Scholarship

Duval Scholarship

Fishback-Galey
Scholarship

Hall Scholarship

Hollandec, Theodore
Clarence Scholarship

Holt, Hamilton,
Scholarship
Honor Scholarships


Honor Scholarships,
Florida





Mallett, Blanche,
Scholarship

Mark Scholarship

Meyer, Edward S.

Mowbray, Henry
Buckingham

Music Scholarship


Music-Presser
Foundation


Palmer Scholarship

Pearson Scholarship


$400

$50


Woman student who is a
Florida resident

Upperclass students

A worthy student


$50 Upperclass students

Varies Outstanding student in Fine
Arts who is in financial need

$50 Upperclass students

$1,000 Residents of Boston vicinity,
students who are earning
part of their college expenses
$1,000

$200- Outstanding first-year stu-
$2,000 dents on high school princi-
pal's recommendation
Outstanding first-year stu-
dents who have attended
Florida secondary schools
not less than 3 years includ-
ing the senior year and
whose parents are legal Flor-
ida residents
Girl student studying busi-
ness and economics

$50 Upperclass students

$300 Modern Language majors

Needy student known for
truthfulness

Music major with special
talent

Music majors with special
talent; preference given to
student planning to become
music teachers

$50 Upperclass students

$50 Upperclass students








SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ROLLINS COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Plant, Caroline G. $1,150
Scholarship Fund
Rollins Student $500 Outstanding first year stu-
Association dents upon recommenda-
tions of high school princi-
pal
Scott Scholarship $50 Upperclass students
Southworth, Alice H. Worthy student
Scholarship
Worthington $50
Scholarship
Wyeth Scholarship $50



ROOSEVELT JUNIOR COLLEGE
West Palm Beach, Florida

Roosevelt Junior College was established in 1958 by the Board
of Public Instruction of Palm Beach County as a two-year
coeducational community college. The college is authorized and
jointly supported by the State of Florida. It is operated by the
Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction under regula-
tions of the State Board of Education.
The college seeks to provide the following: (1) A college
transfer program (first two years) for those who seek sound
preparation for continuing their education (2) A program of
Terminal Education for those who intend to enter gainful occupa-
tions at the end of two years of college or less (3) A program of
General Education for those seeking to broaden their cultural
knowledge.
Candidates for admission must be graduates of standard
accredited high schools. Graduates from non-accredited high
schools may apply for special consideration upon the presentation
of 16 Carnegie Units. An equivalency of graduation certification
or an adult diploma obtained through the State Department of
Education may be accepted in lieu of high school graduation.









Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies,
the Associate degree is awarded.

A limited number of scholarships are available for worthy
students at Roosevelt Junior College. Information concerning
student aid may be obtained by writing to the Dean-Registrar.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ROOSEVELT JUNIOR COLLEGE


Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority
Boosters Club

Custodians Club
Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority
French Jerome
Gardenia
Lit-So Club
Halsey-Griffith
Company

Mickens, Alice G.
Palm Beach
County Teachers
Association
Roosevelt High
School P.T.A.
Sayles, Leonora


$100

$100

$100
$200

$100
$150

$100


$100
$100


$400

$100


Need, character, scholarship

Graduate of Roosevelt High
School
Worthy High School graduate
Deserving high school and
junior college graduates
Worthy high school student
Need, character, scholarship

High school graduate plan-
ning to study in the field of
business
Need, character, scholarship
Graduate of Palm Beach
County High School

Graduating seniors of Roose-
velt High School
Need, character, scholarship


ROSENWALD JUNIOR COLLEGE
Panama City, Florida

Rosenwald Junior College was founded by the State of Flor-
ida in 1958, and is operated by the Bay County Board of Public
Instruction under regulations of the State Board of Education.
The college offers (1) A program of general education consisting
of classical and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and








second years of work at a senior four-year institution (2)
Terminal courses of technical and vocational nature, and (3)
Courses beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.
Upon the completion of a full two-year program of studies,
the Associate degree is awarded.
A limited number of scholarships are available to students
who have (1) financial need (2) high moral character (3)
specific educational objectives, and (4) above-average scholastic
ability.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT ROSENWALD JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Bethel A.M.E. Church $50
Scholarship
La Rena De Clubes $50
Macedonia Baptist $100
Church
Men's and Women's $50
Club
Panama City $42
Game Officials
Association
Pathfinders $50
Civic Club
Rosenwald High $21
School Future
Teachers Club
Rosenwald Hosts and $25
Hostesses Club
(High School Club)
Rosenwald Junior $150
College Work
Scholarship
St. John Baptist $100
Church
St. Luke Baptist $25
Church








ST. JOHNS RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE
Palatka, Florida

St. Johns River Junior College was founded by the State of
Florida in 1958 and is operated by the Boards of Public Instruc-
tion of Clay, Putnam, and St. Johns Counties under regulations
of the State Board of Education. It is an educational institution
offering (1) A program of General education consisting of clas-
sical and scientific courses parallel to that of the first and second
years of work at a senior four-year institution, (2) Terminal
courses of technical and vocational nature, and (3) Courses
beyond the basic education courses for adults.

All graduates from approved Florida high schools are eligible
to apply for admission.

Upon completion of a full two-year program of studies the
Associate degree is awarded.

There are a limited number of scholarships and loan funds
available to worthy students. Information concerning financial
aid may be secured by writing to the Registrar.


SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
ST. JOHNS RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


Private Scholarships $20-$120 Good scholarship
Putnam County $150 Good scholarship and finan-
Parents and Teachers cial need
Association
Revolving Loan Fund Varies Loans made on presentation
of promissory note signed by
parent and student; must
be able to repay loan prior
to graduation
St. Johns River $50 per Part-time work to repay
Junior College semester funds
Work Scholarship
Vocational Varies Students with physical dis-
Rehabilitation abilities
Scholarship-State








ST. PETERSBURG JUNIOR COLLEGE
St. Petersburg, Florida
St. Petersburg Junior College was founded in 1927, as a
private, non-profit corporation. During 1948, the college con-
verted from private to public school status and is today a part
of the Pineallas County Public School System. It is under the
direct control of the Board of Public Instruction and the
Superintendent of Schools.
The purposes of St. Petersburg Junior College are as follows:
1. To serve those who wish to transfer and complete at
least four years of college education.
2. To serve those who wish to complete their formal educa-
tion upon graduation from St. Petersburg Junior
College.
3. To serve the entire community through an adult pro-
gram based on community needs and demands.
Graduates of regionally accredited high schools are auto-
matically eligible for admission provided they have earned a
minimum of sixteen (16) Carnegie units. Graduates of non-
accredited high schools will be accepted on academic probation;
the sixteen (16) unit requirement must be met however. Appli-
cants who have obtained a high school equivalency diploma
through the General Education Development Testing Program
and issued by the State Department of Education are also eligible
for admission.
Qualified students are aided financially through several
scholarships and loan funds. A limited amount of part-time
employment is also available. Information about these various
means of student aid may be secured by writing to the office of
Student Personnel Services.

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED AT
ST. PETERSBURG JUNIOR COLLEGE

Scholarship Title No. Value Specifications


American Associa- $100 Graduate of a St. Petersburg
tion of University High School
Women Scholarship




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