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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Letter of transmittal
 Public assistance reviewed
 Services to children
 Services to state agencies and...
 War services
 Personnel
 New welfare legislation
 Report of the twelve welfare...


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Annual report of the State Welfare Board as made to Governor ... for the period ..
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the State Welfare Board as made to Governor ... for the period ..
Physical Description: 14 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Welfare Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1944
Publication Date: 1938-1951
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Public welfare -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (1937/38)-14th (1950/51).
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: "With reports of the twelve Florida welfare districts."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02253169
lccn - sf 98086789
System ID: UF00053473:00002
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report of the State Department of Public Welfare

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Public assistance reviewed
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Services to children
        Page 8
    Services to state agencies and institutions
        Page 9
    War services
        Page 10
    Personnel
        Page 11
    New welfare legislation
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Report of the twelve welfare districts
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
Full Text




Eighth Annual Report


State


Welfare


Board


JULY 1, 1944


* JUNE 30, 1945


-- -




*'*< ; t- 3-o,


C


STATE OF FLORIDA


Eighth Annual Report
OF THE

State Welfare Board
AS MADE TO
GOVERNOR MILLARD F. CALDWELL
FOR THE PERIOD

July 1, 1944-June 30, 1945
as required by
The State Welfare Act



With Reports of the
Twelve Welfare Districts


STATE WELFARE BOARD MEMBERS: Emmet Safay, Jackson-
ville, Chairman; David W. Ireland, Ft. Myers, Vice-Chairman; J.
D. Carroll, Pensacola, Secretary; Mrs. Hollis Rinehart, Jr., Miami;
W. J. Gardiner, Daytona Beach; James W. Warren, Tampa; War-
ren T. Zeuch, Vero Beach.
Leland W. Hiatt, Commissioner


.3 t e, .C~ 7s~~`
JGI&q3 i~ rr_


F-Gtf*-,-A r;e
























































HON. ML.T.ARD F. CALDWELL
GOVERNOR



2



















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Honorable Millard F. Caldwell
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
We have the honor to submit herewith a report of the administra-
tion of Florida's public welfare program for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1945, which includes a complete accounting of all funds
received and disbursed.
At this time we consider it appropriate to express our appreciation
of the cordial support which we have received from your administra-
tion and from the State Legislature.

STATE WELFARE BOARD


Emmet Safay, chairman
D. W. Ireland, vice-chairman
J. D. Carroll, secretary
Mrs. Hollis Rinehart, Jr.
James W. Warren
W. J. Gardiner
Warren T. Zeuch


Leland W. Hiatt, commissioner













PUBLIC ASSISTANCE REVIEWED


A satisfying aspect of public assistance administration in Florida
during the fiscal year reviewed in this report was the ability of the
State Welfare Board and the district welfare boards to relieve much of
the distress of eligible dependent groups through the distribution of
state-federal funds during a period of high living costs.
While wartime conditions had enabled a considerable number of
recipients to become self-supporting and to withdraw from the rolls,
at least temporarily, they had imposed economic penalties upon those
unable to accept employment opportunities or ineligible for military
allotments. The purchasing power of the dollar had appreciably de-
clined. Realistically viewed this was the equivalent of a reduction in
cash public assistance payments.
National plenty, in this instance, was no doubt confusing so far as
the public was concerned. Only the observant and analytical would
have been likely to arrive at a fair conclusion of the plight of those
dependent upon public support. A natural assumption would have
been that all classes were sharing the general prosperity.
Of the three public assistance groups, the needy aged required the
most assistance. Numerically they were preponderant. In addition,
many were largely unemployable, as their average age was 74 years and
they were enfeebled by physical and mental decline, chronically ill
and in some instances bedridden. Children and relatives were handi-
capped in contributing to their support as liberally as before because
of their own increased obligations.
PURCHASING POWER MAINTAINED.-Aware of its responsibility
to provide purchasing power for the dependent aged and blind equal
to that which they had previously received, if suffering was to be
avoided, the State Welfare Board authorized an increase in the average
grant, budgeting racing revenues allocated for the payment of old-
age assistance in the same amount as received the previous year, as
well as an unexpended balance. With the unexpected suspension of
racing on January 3, the Board found itself confronted with a deficit
instead of an anticipated surplus of $400,000. To meet this situation
it asked an expression of opinion from members of the Legislature as
to whether it should reduce assistance payments. Legislators went on
record as strongly opposed to any cut and early in the 1945 session
unanimously voted a deficiency appropriation of $600,000 for the
final month of the fiscal year.
Average payments to the needy blind and near-blind were increased
in proportion to those of the needy aged, and investigations of all
applications were made on practically a current basis.
In the aid to dependent children category, relief was brought to
additional numbers by opening all pending applications for investiga-
tion to determine eligibility and increasing state payments to the
maximum amounts which the federal government would match under
the provisions of the Social Security Act.
In meeting need on the current inflation basis, the number of
recipients of old-age assistance receiving the maximum payment of
$40 per month was increased to 7,439 as of June, 1945, and of aid to
the blind to 543. The legal ceilings, however, did not always permit
the meeting of full budgetary need.
In addition to economic assistance, the State Welfare Board and
the district welfare boards contributed further to the well-being of
eligible dependents through the rendering of various social services.
These do not follow a fixed pattern but vary according to conditions










and individual necessities. The general policy is to promote to the
fullest possible extent the welfare of all recipients within statutory
and staff limitations.
LOCAL RESOURCES MOBILIZED.-Recognizing that the assist-
ance which they can render is often inadequate to meet the full need
of dependents, the State Welfare Board and the district welfare boards
have sought to supplement it through encouraging the mobilizing of
all available local resources. To accomplish this aim the district wel-
fare boards, district and unit offices work closely with local welfare
agencies, charitably inclined organizations and individuals, with
counties and municipalities and with federated welfare groups, where
such exist. Through coordination of effort, not only can more effective
results be obtained but waste and duplication can be avoided.
By serving as a clearing house, local offices of the district welfare
board can direct those in need to other community agencies which
can contribute to their particular wants. Since there are numerous
organizations that have specific welfare objectives, it is often possible
to obtain the definite assistance required in individual cases. Recipi-
ents whose dependency has already been established by the district
welfare boards can be referred directly to these cooperating groups
and individuals at a saving of time and effort. Referrals can also be
made to counties and municipalities upon request, the State Welfare
Board being authorized by the State Welfare Act to accept such duties
"as may be delegated to it by any agency of the Federal government,
State government or municipal government."
MEETING FUTURE NEED.-The Legislature, upon the recommen-
dation of the Governor and without a dissenting vote increased the
annual appropriation of state funds to $4,600,000 in addition to the
continuing appropriation of $3,400,000 for the payment of old-age
assistance, aid to the blind and administrative costs of the state wel-
fare program, a total of $8,000,000; and the appropriation for the
payment of aid to dependent children to $825,000, in addition to the
continuing appropriation of $400,000, a total of $1,225,000.
The funds appropriated are sufficient to carry the program on the
same basis as for the fiscal year July 1, 1944-June 30, 1945 for the
ensuing biennium. Their adequacy to meet future need is dependent
upon contingencies that may arise and that are directly related to the
duration of the War and to conditions that will follow the conclusion
of hostilities. In this connection, the records of the State Welfare
Board show that the number of recipients of old-age assistance in-
creased from 38,395 as of June, 1944, to 40,651 as of June, 1945, the
number of families receiving aid to dependent children from 3,115
to 5,470, while the number of recipients of aid to the blind decreased
from 2,306 to 2,262.
The increase in the number of aged recipients is attributed to the
return to the rolls because of the loss of employment, as wartime pro-
duction slowed, of some who had become self-sustaining, and to the
necessity which caused others to apply for assistance because their
meagre income could no longer be stretched to meet their minimum
need. With the restoration of peace it is anticipated that still others
will be adversely affected by loss of military allotments, by the inability
of relatives to assist and by other depletion of income. Fluctuations
in the number of recipients of aid to dependent children during the
fiscal year have been governed to an extent by increased state funds
which made possible the opening of all pending applications and by a
reduction in the number of applicants because of improved family
resources.
Florida's average monthly payments to the needy aged and blind are
closely in line with those of the majority of states at this time. Its
payments to dependent children do not compare so favorably with the
national average of $47.46 per family for June, 1945.










ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR
Net expenditures for public assistance during the fiscal year, July
1, 1944-June 30, 1945, by months:

Aid to
MONTH Total Old Age Assistance Aid to Blind Dependent
Children

July, 1944....... $1,091,337.00 $ 935,399.00 $ 58,907.50 $ 97,030.50
August .......... 1,267,842.50 1,088,130.50 67,009.50 112,702.50
September ....... 1,288,528.00 1,098,349.00 67,033.50 123,145.50
October ......... 1,303,506.00 1,105,946.00 67,056.50 130,503.50
November ....... 1,329,051.00 1,121,938.50 67,755.50 139,357.00
December ....... 1,345,641.50 1,130,700.50 67,443.00 147,498.00
January, 1945..... 1,354,731.00 1,135,094.50 67,371.00 152,265.50
February ......... 1,369,278.00 1,141,514.00 67,593.00 160,171.00
March ........... 1,381,394.00 1,147,138.50 67,456.00 166,799.50
April............. 1,396,592.50 1,157,445.50 67,407.00 171,740.00
May............. 1,409,362.00 1,163,983.00 67,588.50 177,790.50
June............. 1,425,105.50 1,174,108.00 67,707.50 183,290.00
$15,962,369.00 $13,399,747.00 $800,328.50 $1,762,293.50



NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS AND AVERAGE GRANTS
The number of recipients of public assistance at the beginning and
end of the fiscal year were:

June, 1944 June, 1945
OAA............ 38,395 OAA........... 40,651
AB.............. 2,306 AB............. 2,262
ADC. ........... 3,115 (families) ADC ........... 5,470 (families)
7,165 (children) 12,581 (children)

AVERAGE MONTHLY PAYMENT IN JUNE 1944 AND JUNE, 1945:
June, 1944 June, 1945
OAA............ $24.11 OAA........... $28.88
AB.............. $25.42 AB............ $29.93
ADC............ $29.23 ADC ........... $33.51


NEXT YEAR'S BUDGET
The State Welfare Board has budgeted $18,708,167 in state-federal
funds for the payment of public assistance and administrative costs
of the State Welfare program for the fiscal year July 1, 1945-June
30, 1946. The budget is based on the following average grants and
number of recipients:

NUMBER RECIPIENTS AVERAGE PAYMENT


Old-Age Assistance ............. 41,000 $28.90
Aid to the Blind ............... 2,300 30.00
Aid to Dependent Children ..... 6,000 families 33.50









State funds appropriated by the 1945 session of the Legislature for
the payment of public assistance and administrative costs total
$9,225,000 per anum for the biennium. Unexpended balances were
reappropriated.
The Federal Government matches state funds for the payment of
old-age assistance, aid to the blind and aid to dependent children and
also shares administrative costs.


DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS BY YEARS

The Federal Social Security Act, which provides Federal funds in
equal amount with State funds for the payment of public assistance
in those States having approved plans, has been in effect since August
14, 1935. During eight years of that decade Florida has distributed
cash assistance to the needy aged and blind and dependent children
otherwise eligible, its state-federal public assistance program dating
from July 1, 1937.
Cash distributions, with the exception of the first year when time-
consuming original investigations were required to establish the eligi-
bility of a large number of applicants, have been governed almost
entirely by state financial participation in the program. To a small
extent they have been affected by inability at times to obtain suffi-
cient staff. As funds have increased a correspondingly larger percent-
age of budgetary need has been met. For the fiscal year included in
this report it has been possible to meet 100 per cent of such need,
subject to maximums imposed by law. These limit payments to re-
cipients of old-age assistance and aid to the blind to $40 per month
and to recipients of aid to dependent children to $18 per month for
the first child under 16 years of age, or under 18 if attending school.
and $12 to other children in the family.
Distribution of funds by category and years follows:

SAid to
YEAR Total Old Age Assistance Aid to Blind Dependent
Children

1937-38.......... $4,057,639.24 $3,986,031.24 $ 71,608.00 ..........
1938-39 .......... 6,347,012.33 5,659,715.33 375,536.00 $ 311,761.00
1939-40.......... 6,202,799.75 5,077,284.75 333,357.00 792,158.00
1940-41.......... 6,882,609.66 5,590,180.66 391,057.00 901,372.00
1941-42 .......... 8,224,008.00 6,509,923.00 465,364.00 1,248,721.00
1942-43.......... 9,081,171.00 7,327,980.00 483,037.00 1,270,154.00
1943-44 ......... 10,066,684.85 8,544,509.85 544,470.50 977,704.50
1944-45.......... 15,962,369.00 13,399,747.00 800,328.50 1,762,293.50
Totals...... $66,824,293.83 $56,095,371.83 $3,464,758.00 $7,264,164.00



SERVICES TO CHILDREN

In addition to services to children receiving financial assistance
through the Aid to Dependent Children program, the State Welfare
Board has continued to develop social services for children, serving
five thousand children during this fiscal year. They were children for
whom the main problem was not solely an economic one. They were
children whose parents were unable to give them good care, whose
parent or parents were absent from the home, and children who were
handicapped or disadvantaged in other ways. Services were given, for









example, in helping the parent understand the child's problems, re-
ferring the parent to health, recreational and other resources within
the community, providing temporary care for the child away from his
own home, arranging for supervision of the child in his own. home
during the temporary absence of the parents. Where there were no
local resources available, the State Welfare Board has used limited
funds to provide emergency shelter care for children, housekeeper
service, certain educational opportunities, maintenance and transpor-
tation for abandoned, stranded or run-away children and services to
children born out of wedlock.
In twelve counties, state and federal money has been used to pay
for the services of trained child-welfare workers. Local funds in these
areas made possible more extensive and specialized services, including
foster home care for children. In these twelve counties, $27,934.56 was
made available by county and city governments, civic groups and
individuals to provide direct care for children. This was an increase
of $10,096.45 over the local funds received during the fiscal year ending
July 1, 1944. These counties included Alachua, Broward, Duval,
Escambia, Jackson, Hillsborough, Indian River, Monroe, Orange, Palm
Beach, St. Lucie and Volusia. The child-welfare services program in
Dade County has been limited to the licensing of commercial boarding
homes and no local funds have been made available for general services
to children.
The State Welfare Board granted licenses to individuals and insti-
tutions providing care for dependent children and to five child-placing
agencies. All child-caring and child-placing agencies were visited, not
only to determine whether standards of child care were being main-
tained, but also to offer consultative services. Under a law applicable
during the past year only to Dade County commercial boarding homes
providing care for children were licensed.
Under the Adoption Law, the State Welfare Board is, for the pur-
poses of adoption, designated as the official guardian of children who
have no parents or guardian, or who have been abandoned or released
by the natural parents, and who have not been permanently committed
to a licensed child-placing agency. As provided by law, the State
Welfare Board, in instances in which the child has not been perma-
nently committed to a licensed child-placing agency, has made a study
of the adoptive parents to determine their suitability and study of the
child to determine that he is a proper subject for adoption and has
made recommendations to the Circuit Court as to the desirability of
the proposed adoption.
From July 1, 1943 through June 30, 1945, 1,517 petitions for adop-
tion were filed in Florida. In 135 petitions (8 4/5%) the children had
been permanently committed and placed by licensed child-placing
agencies. The State Welfare Board was responsible for the study and
filing of recommendations for 1,382 petitions.


SERVICES TO STATE AGENCIES AND INSTITUTIONS
The services of the State Welfare Board have been available not only
to individual citizens of the state who have requested assistance but
also to state agencies and institutions upon request.
The State Welfare Board has continued its plan of furnishing to the
Florida State Hospital certain social data needed by the institution in
planning for the admission or discharge of individual patients. Ap-
proximately one hundred such studies were made during the past year
by the staff of the State Welfare Board.
In April the State Welfare Board was asked to cooperate in the spec-
ial study of the Florida Farm Colony. The agency assumed responsi-
bility for furnishing current medical and social data on ninety-two
children who were awaiting admission to the institution. Since the









Florida Farm Colony has requested the agency to continue this type of
service on a permanent basis, plans are being developed toward that
end.
The-Crippled Children's Commission and the State Tuberculosis San-
atorium have also requested the help of the agency in special instances
where case work service was needed to supplement the medical care be-
ing provided.
The State Welfare Board maintains a close working relationship
with other state departments particularly the State Board of Health,
and the State Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabil-
itation in order that persons needing the specific type of care offered by
these departments might be referred for service.

WAR SERVICES
During the past year the State Welfare Board has continued to
assist Federal, state, and local agencies in handling some of the social
problems which have been created by the war. This has been achieved
not only through granting financial assistance to individuals, but in
extending the services of the staff to those persons who need help in
adjusting to new situations.
CIVILIAN WAR ASSISTANCE.-The State Welfare Board is the
agency designated by the Social Security Board to assist civilians who
are in need as a result of enemy attack. Although continental United
States suffered no attack by the enemy, many of our citizens living
in the Philippines and other war stricken areas have been returned
to this country and have received assistance and medical care because
of the hardships experienced in prison camps. Assistance is given on
a temporary basis as most repatriates are able to assume their normal
responsibilities after a period of recuperation. All costs for this pro-
gram are borne by the Federal government.
ASSISTANCE TO ENEMY ALIENS AND OTHERS.-Acting for the
Federal government, the agency has also given assistance and service
to enemy aliens and others whose activities were affected by the
restrictive action of the government. Many persons who were interned
as a protective measure are being encouraged to resettle in other sec-
tions of the country and although most of them are able to maintain
themselves financially, they need the help of the staff through the
period of readjustment to community life. The Federal government
bears all costs of operating this program.
SERVICES TO SELECTIVE SERVICE BOARDS.-Throughout the
war period the staff of the agency has made investigations for the
local Selective Service Boards on all registrants requesting deferment
on the basis of dependency.
Perhaps the most important service to the Selective Service Boards
has been the agency's participation in the Medical Survey program.
At the request of local draft boards, medical and social information is
secured on all registrants whose ability to fit into military service is
questioned. These reports are sent to the examining physicians who
determine the registrant's fitness for military duty.
Recently the State Welfare Board agreed to give further service
to Selective Service Boards by investigating the status of persons re-
questing discharge from the Armed Forces on the basis of dependency
of relatives. Through contacts made at the request of the Selective
Service Board, the agency has been able to give case work service to
many persons who had no previous experience with social agencies.
WOMEN'S ARMY CORPS.-During the past year, the agency has
assisted the Women's Army Corps in its selection of applicants for
enlistment. At the request of the WAC, the staff has secured social
and medical information on those recruits whose ability to adjust to
military service was questioned.
SOCIAL PROTECTION SERVICES.-The staff of the agency has
been active throughout the war period in developing plans for the










social protection of young girls, large numbers of whom have gotten
into difficulty. Cooperating with the State Board of Health and local
welfare agencies, plans have been made for the rehabilitation of girls
and women who were being treated for venereal infection. Experience
has revealed that the problem must be solved collectively since it is
one in which law enforcement officers, public health officials, and
social welfare agencies are concerned.

PERSONNEL

Realizing that social work is a profession and that the social worker,
like the teacher, the nutritionist, the nurse and medical technician,
and those employed in similar pursuits, requires a high degree of skill
and experience, the State Welfare Board has sought to build up and
retain a social work staff of superior quality. In doing this it was
mindful of the fact that such a staff in the long run would be more
economical because of the efficiency acquired through training, and
more capable because of its proficiency in meeting human problems.
From the beginning of the program social work staff has been
selected through merit system examinations based on high entrance
qualifications and retained on merit as established by periodical evalu-
ations. Clerical staff, also, has been selected from merit system
registers since the amending of the Social Security Act, effective
January 1, 1940, to impose such a requirement.
Although competitive demand for trained social workers has con-
tinuously drained State Welfare Board social work staff during the war
period, standards have nevertheless been well maintained and the
merit system principle has been kept in effect. In some instances,
however, it has been necessary to employ personnel on a provisional or
even an emergency basis. Due to the scarcity of district welfare visi-
tors, the position of "War-Duration Visitor" was created during the
year, so that vacancies might be filled and agency services continued
without interruption. This action was taken with the advice and con-
sent of the Merit System Council. By being able to offer temporary
employment the Agency was able to enlist the services of many "war
wives" who had come to the State and who had acquired social work
experience in other fields, as well as teachers during the vacation
months and others who for various reasons could not accept perma-
nent employment.

COMMODITY DISTRIBUTION DURING YEAR
The Commodity Distribution Division of the State Welfare Board
distributed commodities furnished by the Federal Government with-
out cost in the amount of 3,385,179 pounds of an aggregate wholesale
value of $233,722.78 during the fiscal year.
Distribution was made to 780 schools and 183,605 children in 65
counties, to 6 State institutions with 7,452 inmates and to 36 charitable
institutions with 2,557 inmates.
Wholesale value of commodities distributed, broken down:
To schools ..--............... ........................... $142,984.12
To State Institutions ............................... ........ 81,856.22
To charitable institutions ...................................... 8,882.44
Cost of distribution was borne largely by benefited institutions and
counties in which schools were located, the State Welfare Board act-
ing as the distributor because it was the sole state agency charged
with such a responsibility by law. Failure upon its part to make the
distribution might have deprived Florida's children, state and chari-
table institutions of badly needed foodstuffs during a period of scarci-
ty, as well as of the opportunity to share Federal allocations to the
states.









FLORIDA COUNCIL FOR THE BLIND
The State Welfare Board contributes to the welfare of the sightless
by cooperating with the Florida Council for the Blind, an independent
governing board, as well as by the distribution of cash assistance to
those who are in need and otherwise eligible.
Through its District welfare offices, the State Welfare Board serves
as the Council's local in-take offices. Applications are taken on
specialized analysis forms by district staff of persons desiring Council
service and these are forwarded to its State headquarters at Tampa
where they are evaluated and referred to that department best suited
to give the required service. District welfare board staff also assists
the Council in arrangements pertaining to transportation of clients,
doctor's appointments and such other services as are required to meet
the need of the individual applicant.
Of the estimated 4,000 blind or near-blind population of the State,
1,922 have been registered with the Florida Council for the Blind
since it began to function three years ago. During the past year the
number of applicants has more than doubled. On June 30, 1945, 859
persons in 58 counties were receiving service or awaiting service. Of
these, 401 were considered potentially employable and are active with
the Employment Division of the Council where substantial employ-
ment has been found for 53. The remainder are either receiving re-
habilitation services, including medical care, or will receive such
services during the year with the view that they may obtain eventual
paid employment.
NEW WELFARE LEGISLATION

The 1945 session of the Legislature enacted a number of laws that
relate directly or indirectly to the administration of public welfare in
Florida.
These included two amendments to the State Welfare Act.
One of these provided for the partial removal of salary restrictions
on six positions, at the discretion of the State Welfare Board, so that
key supervisory personnel might be obtained or retained during the
period of strong competition in the labor market, and so that a well-
balanced compensation plan might be made effective.
The other, entirely permissive in nature, authorized the State Wel-
fare Board to render financial assistance to political units operating
institutions and boarding homes for the care of or board of the aged,
blind and dependent children. This legislation, enacted after welfare
appropriations had been made, did not provide funds for the purpose
prescribed. The Social Security Act does not permit the use of match-
ing federal funds for such a purpose.
Under a general State Officers and Employees Retirement Plan
made effective by the Legislature as of July 1, 1945, employees of the
State Welfare Board and the district welfare boards were extended
the privilege of qualifying for retirement pay after .reaching the age
of 60. Participation in the plan is optional.
Another general law grants to honorably discharged war veterans
who have been bonafide residents of the State for three years, and the
widows of such persons, a preference of 10 points in addition to the
rating earned by them, and priority on the list of eligibles having the
same rating, in merit system and civil service examinations.
The State Welfare Board and "all state agencies created by legis-
lative act and supported by any form of taxation" come within the
provisions of the new Budget Commission bill.
The Legislature also diverted all beverage revenues to the General
Revenue Fund. These had previously provided $3,800,000 annually in
public assistance funds. This continuing appropriation will be obtained
from the General Revenue Fund for the next biennium, as will sup-










elementary appropriations, less such amounts as may be appropriated
from the "Old-Age Assistance Tax Fund", allocated for the payment of
old-age assistance, and the truck maintenance tax, ear-marked for
the payment of aid to dependent children. A considerable increase in
public assistance revenue is expected from a new 2 per cent tax levied
on pari-mutuel pools at dog tracks and Jai Alai frontons and a tax of
half the "breakage" at both. In the event revenues credited to the
"Old-Age Assistance Tax Fund" are in excess of $4,600,000 per year
the overage would be expendable in the payment of old-age assistance.











ANALYSIS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
July 1, 1944, through June 30, 1945


Fund Balance July 1, 1944-State OAA and AB..........
State Appropriations for OAA and AB ..................

Fund Balance July 1, 1944-State ADC .................
State Appropriations for ADC ..........................

TOTAL STATE FUNDS. ....................
Fund Balance July 1, 1944-Federal OAA................
Federal Grants for OAA ...............................

Fund Balance July 1, 1944-Federal AB.................
Federal Grants for AB.................................

Fund Balance July 1, 1944-Federal ADC................
Federal Grants for ADC ...............................

TOTAL FEDERAL FUNDS ..................
Miscellaneous Funds Received:
Contributions to Commodity Program ..............
Reimbursement for W.A.C. Program ................
Reimbursement for Medical Survey .................

TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR PERIOD......


RECEIPTS
$ 1,531,957.27
5.999,991.00

$ 371,216.92
987,385.35

$ 173,321.25
6,878,922.80

$ 17,933.21
417,808.94

$ 153,386.62
843,750.45


$ 7,531,948.27

1,358,602.27


$ 7,052,244.05


435,742.15


997,137.07


$ 7,800.00
70.00
5,221.50


8 8,890,550.54


8,485,132.27


13,091.50


$ 17,388,765.31


DISBURSEMENTS


For Old Age Assistance................................
Less: Cancellatiors............................... $
Refunds ...................................


89,452.00
1,734.50


S 13,490,933.50

91,186.50









Net OAA Payments ...................................
From State OAA Fund ...........................
From Federal OAA Fund .........................
For Aid to the Blind ..................................
Less: Cancellations............. ..... .......... .
R efunds...................................

N et AB Paym ents ....................................
From State AB Fund .............................
From Federal AB Fund .................. ........
For Aid to Dependent Children.........................
Less: Cancellations ...............................
Refunds ....................................

Net ADC Payments ..................................
From State ADC Fund............................
From Federal ADC Fund........................
For ADC-Special Services to Children..................
From State ADC Fund ............................

TOTAL ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS. .............
For Administrative Expenditures
From State Funds-
For Old Age Assistance ........................
For Aid to the Blind.........................
For Aid to Dependent Children.................
For All Other Services.........................

From Federal Funds-
For Old Age Assistance........................
For Aid to the Blind ..........................
For Aid to Dependent Children.................

TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENDITURES .....

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FOR PERIOD. ...................
r f D ; R T%; t Di+b


4,136.00
None




3,460.00
56.00


308,282.43
22,999.55
104,478.29
129,950.19


$ 335,037.05
22,999.55
104,478.29


S 13,399,747.00

804,464.50

4,136.00

$ 800,328.50


1,765,809.50

3,516.00

$ 1,762,293.50

1,158.57


$ 6,699,873.50
6,699,873.50




400,164.25
400,164.25




881,146.75
881,146.75

1,158.57

$ 15,963,527.57


565,710.46


462,514.89


$ 1,028,225.35
$ 16,991.752.92

$ 397,012.39


xcess o ecep s over s u s . . .
















PROOF OF EXCESS OF RECEIPTS OVER DISBURSEMENTS


Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-State OAA and AB..........................
Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-State ADC .................. .............
Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-ADC Special Services.......................
Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-Federal OAA........... ..........
Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-Federal AB .............. .............
Fund Balance, June 30, 1945-Federal ADC.............................


TOTAL FUND BALANCES-June 30, 1945.....................
Supplies Inventory-On Hand June 30, 1945.............................


$ 30,825.47
289,097.96
23,841.43
26,273.47
13,320.84
12,085.72


$ 395,444.89
1,567.50


TOTAL ....................................................


S 397,012.39










PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS TO RECIPIENTS BY COUNTIES
July, 1944-June, 1945
(Cases shown are those receiving assistance as of June, 1945. Assistance shown is the total amount received for the period July, 1944-June, 1945.)

AID TO
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE AID TO THE BLIND DEPENDENT CHILDREN

Cases Cases Cases TOTAL
Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of All Assistance
Financial Payments* Financial Payments Financial Payments Payments *
Assistance Assistance Assistance


DISTRICT NO. 1-
B ay ..................................
Escambia. ............................
Holmes ..............................
Okaloosa.......... ..................
Santa R osa ...........................
Walton...................... .......
Washington...........................

TOTAL........................

DISTRICT No. 2-
Calhoun..............................
Franklin..............................
G adsden.............................
Gulf.................................
Jackson ..............................
Jefferson..............................
L eon ................... ..............
L iberty...............................
W akulla ..............................

TOTAL........................


154,898.50
385,887.00
136,987.50
175,045.50
201,529.50
178,557.50
164,964.50


4,563 $1,397,870.00


$ 80,636.50
44,764.00
214,373.50
38,078.00
383,076.50
153,244.50
264,144.50.
56,235.50
72,992.00

$1,307,545.00


282 $


9,687.50
19,171.50
11,287.50
7,133.50
17,743.50
11,438.00
14,456.00


90,917.50


7,006.50
2,690.00
9,809.50
1,955.50
15,196.50
6,734.50
13,120.50
2,880.00
4,549.00


204 $ 63,942.00


25,242.50
66,235.00
32,576.00
35,560.00
35,654.00
44,546.50
47,585.00


$ 189,828.50
471,293.50
180,851.00
217,739.00
254,927.00
234,542.00
227,005.50


931 $ 287,399.00 $1,776,186.50


S 15,887.50
5,559.00
15,171.00
5,986.00
49,671.50
8,860.00
27,153.50
5,938.00
11,253.50

$ 145,480.00


$ 103,530.50
53,013.00
239,354.00
46,019.50
447,944.50
168,839.00
304,418.50
65,053.50
88,794.50

$1,516,967.00


479
1,297
499
542
605
599
542


233
154
738
117
1,365
581
946
160
216

4,510


''











PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS TO RECIPIENTS BY COUNTIES

July, 1944-June, 1945
(Cases shown are those receiving assistance as of June, 1945. Assistance shown is the total amount received for the period July, 1044-June, 1045.)


DISTRICT No. 3-
Columbia ...........................
D ixie ................................
G ilchrist.............................
I H am ilton ........... ................
co Lafayette..............................
L evy ................................
Madison.. ..........................
Suw annee..................... .....
Taylor .. ....................... ..

TOTAL........................

DISTRICT No. 4-
C itrus........................... ...
H ernando............................
Pasco. .. ............................
P inellas..............................

TOTAL .......................

DISTRICT No. 5-
Alachua ............................ .
Baker ...............................


OLD AGE ASSISTANCE


Cases
Receiving
Financial
Assistance


609
134
103
365
164
466
642
664
343

3,490


223
207
392
1,840

2,662


1,313
215


Amount of
Payments*


AID TO THE BLIND


Cases
SReceiving
Financial
Assistance


Amount of
Payments *


AID TO
DEPENDENT CHILDREN


Cases
Receiving
Financial
Assistance


Amount of
Payments *


I 1-, I I--- 1 I ~-I-


3 190,687.00
43,574.50
30,792.50
98,257.00
49,772.50
140,132.50
209,272.00
193,447.50
104,072.50

$1,060,008.00


$ 67,803.00
66,311.00
128,109.00
644,991.50

$ 907,214.50


$ 404,563.00
72,879.00


21
14
6
17
7
23
22
32
18

160


16
6
21
58

101


78
16


S 7,712.50
5,304.50
2,061.50
5,035.50
1,934.50
6,378.00
7,226.00
10,061.50
6,334.00

$ 52,048.00


S 5,212.00
2,074.00
6,880.00
22,221.00

$ 36,387.00


$ 27,377.00
4,950.00


86
58
36
53
35
77
99
101
88

633


21
11
27
138

197


236
74


S 26,224.00
16,228.50
13,219.50
19,519.00
9,569.00
24,077.50
34,821.00
33,575.00
26,270.50

$ 203,504.00


$ 5,362.00
2,624.50
8,293.00
45,037.00

$ 61,316.50


TOTAL
All Assistance
Payments *


3 224,623.50
65,107.50
46,073.50
122,811.50
61,276.00
170,588.00
251,319.00
237,084.00
136,677.00

$1,315,560.00


$ 78,377.00
71,009.50
143,282.00
712,249.50

$1,004,918.00


67,102.00 $ 499,042.00
23,460.50 101,289.50










B radford ................ .............
C lay ... ............................. .
F lagler ..............................
Nassau ...............................
Putnam .............................
St. Johns .............................
Union . . . . . . . ..

TOTAL. ........................

DISTRICT No. 6-
D uval................................

DISTRICT No. 7-
Hillsborough ..........................

DISTRICT No. 8-
C harlotte .............................
Collier ................... ...........
De Soto ..............................
Glades ..............................
Hardee ............................
H endry..............................
H ighlands ...........................
Lee .................................
M anatee.............................
Sarasota.............................

TOTAL ............... .......

DISTRICT No. 9-
Dade ..............................

DIsTRICT No. 10-
Broward..............................
Indian R iver ..........................
Martin...............................


293
224
93
330
714
635
191

4,008


3,241


91,175.00
76,173.50
30,581.50
108,828.00
230,912.00
205,910.00
62,465.00

$1,283,487.00


$1,121,780.50


2,928 $ 917,401.50


145
59
212
69
329
101
193
348
537
232

2,225


S45,538.50
20,157.00
75,531.00
24,333.00
112,356.00
33,619.00
65,366.50
128,561.50
173,234.50
73,301.50

$ 751,998.50


2,720 $1,052,473.50


$ 131,314.00
51,464.50
30,319.50


12
6
5
14
61
27
4

223


218

169


4
3
8
2
14
4
10
19
20
9

93


120


3,952.00
2,014.50
1,125.50
4,931.00
20,747.00
9,917.00
1,113.00

$ 76,127.00


$ 78,878.50


S 58,722.00


$ 1,502.50
1,598.00
3,490.50
677.50
5,477.50
1,468.50
4,056.50
6,488.50
5,946.00
3,844.00

$ 34,549.50


$ 49,523.00


$ 13,446.00
6,538.50
1,721.50


55
36
4
57
67
50
32

611


322 $


327 $


209 $


38 $
27


15,464.00
14,264.00
1,362.00
20,001.00
20,027.50
18,020.00
10,314.50

$ 190,015.50


110,591.00
92,452.00
33,069.00
133,760.00
271,686.50
233,847.00
73,892.50

$1,549,629.50


95,805.50 $1,296,464.50


92,893.00 $1,069,016.50


$ 3,931.00
2,395.50
7,217.50
2,754.50
15,951.50
3,274.00
7,294.00
13,046.00
10,223.50
5,735.00

$ 71,822.50


$ 50,972.00
24,150.50
86,239.00
27,765.00
133,785.00
38,361.50
76,717.00
148,096.00
189,404.00
82,880.50

$ 858,370.50


79,821.50 $1,181,818.00


15,471.50
10,835.50
2,796.00


160,231.50
68,838.50
34,837.00








PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS TO RECIPIENTS BY COUNTIES
July, 1944-June, 1945
(Cases shown are those receiving assistance as of June, 1945. Assistance shown is the total amount received for the period July, 1944-June, 1945.)

AID TO
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE AID TO THE BLIND DEPENDENT CHILDREN

Cases Cases Cases TOTAL
Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of All Assistance
Financial Payments Financial Payments Financial Payments Payments
Assistance Assistance Assistance


M onroe ...............................
Okeechobee. ..........................
Palm Beach...........................
St. Lucie .............................

TOTAL. ........................

b, DISTRICT NO. 11-
0 L ake.................................
M arion...............................
Polk.................................
Sum ter ...............................

T OTAL ............ ............

DISTRICT No. 12-
Brevard..............................
O range ...............................
O sceola...............................
Sem inole..............................
Volusia ..............................

TOTAL ........................


112,750.50
35,412.50
298,413.00
56,680.50


31,166.00
7,190.00
20,849.00
4,980.50


19,351.50
5,278.00
45,738.50
14,961.00


163,268.00
47,880.50
365,000.50
76,622.00


2,024 $ 716,354.50 231 $ 85,891.50 299 $ 114,432.00 $ 916,678.00


665 $ 235,021.50 42 $ 14,788.50 110 $ 33,902.00 $ 283,712.00
1,283 375,208.00 64 21,057.00 248 73,608.00 469,873.00
2,080 744,142.00 120 47,734.00 394 139,258.50 931,134.50
439 152,932.50 24 8,337.00 76 26,175.50 187,445.00

4,467 $1,507,304.00 250 $ 91,916.50 828 $ 272,944.00 $1,872,164.50


411 $ 140,493.50 12 $ 4,533.50 45 $ 19,801.00 $ 164,828.00
1,349 492,123.00 70 28,240.50 233 70,077.00 590,440.50
399 150,995.00 24 8,355.00 41 11,617.00 170,967.00
550 194,598.50 20 6,764.50 41 13,912.00 215,275.00
1,268 459,334.00 91 35,650.00 111 33,319.00 528,303.00


3,977 $1,437,544.00


217 $


83,543.50


471 $ 148,726.00 $1,669,813.50


STATE TOTAL ............................. 40,815 $13,460,981.00* 2,268 $ 802,446.00* 5,476 $1,764,159.50*$16,027,586.50*

Assistance payments shown on this table are gross and represent obligations incurred by the Agency at the time payrolls were written.
For net total amounts see table showing analysis of receipts and disbursements.










ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT
July 1, 1944-June 30, 1945
(State Total)

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age __________________ Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible. ........... 1,698 180 368 59
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 567 58 116 12

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1944)......... 1,765 5,838 15,428 85
Received (July 1, 1944 to
June 30, 1945) .............. 7,880 2,304 6,186 347
Total During Period........... 9,645 8,142 21,614 432
Total Disposed of ............. 7,784 7,155 18,863 306
Approved for Payment....... 6,376 3,069 8,170 179
Denied as Ineligible .......... 1,158 3,021 7,782 110
Other Reasons .............. 250 1,065 2,911 17
Pending (June 30, 1945) ........ 1,861 987 2,751 126

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1944)* ............. 38,563 3,122 7,335 2,307
Added (July 1, 1944 to June
30, 1945)** ............... 8,240 3,516 9,097 299
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1944 to June 30, 1945)....... 46,803 6,638 16,432 2,606
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1944 to June 30, 1945)*** .... 5,988 1,162 2,884 338
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1945)****.......... 40,815 5,476 13,548 2,268

Cases receiving assistance are from the statistical records of the agency
and are gross.
** Include new cases approved for payment, transfers from other districts,
and reinstatements of suspended cases.
*** Include closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended cases.
**** Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.



Aid to
Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind


Total Reviews Completed
(July 1, 1944, to June 30, 1945) 35,625 6,471 2,116 44,212










OTHER ACTIVITIES


Services to-
Intake Services................... .................... .. 8,825
Active Service Cases ........................................ 5,417
M ental H hospitals ......................................... .. 65
Penal Insitutions........................................... 52
Children's Institutions ...................................... 79
Juvenile Courts .............................. ............. 96
Courts on Adult Cases ...................................... 81
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 1,919
Crippled Children's Commission ............................. 50
States- R ciprocal ......... ........................ ................. 5,468
Selective Service Investigations-
Deferments.................................... ... .... 421
D ischarges.. .............................................. 120
M medical Survey Completed............................... 3,383
W .A.C. Investigations Completed ............................ 28
Interpretation Activities..................................... 3,030
O thers............... .. .................................. 839


















REPORT OF THE

TWELVE

FLORIDA WELFARE

DISTRICTS


July 1, 1944-June 30, 1945













DISTRICT DIRECTORS
(AS OF JUNE 30, 1945)

District 1. Mrs. Anna Hollingsworth ........................DeFuniak Springs
District 2. Miss Sada Bostick ......................... ........ ............. Quincy
District 3. Miss Scott Turnbull ........................................ Live Oak
District 4. Mrs. Nenabelle G. Dame ........................... Clearwater
District 5. Miss Estelle Long ....................................Green Cove Springs
District 6. Mrs. Agnes D. Warn .........................................Jacksonville
District 7. Mrs. Furma DeWitt ................................ .......... Tampa
District 8. Mrs. Mina E. Taylor (acting) .........-...................Fort Myers
District 9. M rs. Dorothy M years .......................................................M iami
District 10. Mrs. Ruth Champagne .... ..............West Palm Beach
District 11. Mrs. Lucile B. Harrison ..................................... Leesburg
District 12. Mrs. Evelyn F. Cummins ....................................... Orlando


DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS
(AS OF JUNE 30, 1945)
District 1. Mr. A. G. Campbell, Jr., DeFuniak Springs, Chairman; Mrs.
F. E. Mitchell, Valparaiso, Vice-chairman; Mr. J. T. Evans, Boni-
fay; Mrs. A. L. McDuffie, Chipley; Mr. J. D. Carroll, Pensacola;
Mrs. J. E. Daniel, Pensacola; Mr. H. A. Brosnaham, Pensacola; Mr.
J. A. Jacobi, Molino; Mr. T. W. Jones, Milton.
District 2. Mrs. O. O. Mickler, Tallahassee, Chairman; Mrs. W. N.
Faircloth, Quincy, Vice-chairman; Mr. R. B. Wells, Blountstown;
Mrs. Eleanor Floyd, Apalachicola; Rev. M. A. DuRant, Marianna;
Mr. H. D. Ward, Cottondale; Miss Sallie Puleston, Monticello; Mr.
Parley Shuler, Bristol; Rev. Tenney I. Deane, Quincy; Mr. C.
Edgerton Patterson, Tallahassee; Mr. Robert Bellows, Port St. Joe.
District 3. Mr. B. W. Helvenston, Jr., Live Oak, Chairman; Mr. S. B.
Hardee, Trenton, Vice-chairman; Dr. E. F. Montgomery, Lake City;
Mr. W. R. Pratt, Cross City; Mrs. Barney Howard, Jasper; Mrs.
Maude Adamson, Mayo; Mr. J. P. Kimble, Bronson; Mrs. Van H.
Priest, Madison; Mr. John Rowland, Perry.
District 4. Mr. Frank J. Booth, Clearwater, Chairman; Mr. Jasper C.
Carter, Dade City, Vice-chairman; Mrs. Niel W. Upham, St.
Petersburg; Dr. Grace Whitford, Ozona; Mrs. A. B. Endsley,
Brooksville; Mr. Henry D. Bassett, Inverness.
District 5. Mr. Ira Thomas, Green Cove Springs, Chairman; Mr. H.
M. Agin, Waldo, Vice-chairman; Mrs. J. W. McCollum, Gaines-
ville; Mrs. William Knabb, Macclenny; Mr. L. A. Rennolds, Starke;
Mrs. Nell L. Allen, Bunnell; Mrs. Adele S. Fisher, Fernandina;
Mrs. Jean L. B. Burt, Palatka; Mr. George B. Gorman, St. Augus-
tine; Mrs. Joe Hill Williams, Lake Butler.
District 6. Dr. Robert H. Cleveland, Jacksonville, Chairman; Mrs. Ben
Stein, Jacksonville, Vice-chairman; Mrs. Francis B. Childress,
Jacksonville; Mrs. Charles Norton, Jacksonville; Mr. Milton C.
Moore, Jacksonville; Mr. George L. Rosborough, Jacksonville; Mr.
Lucien Boggs, Jacksonville; Mr. George M. Tanner, Baldwin.
District 7. Mr. Gettis B. Henderson, Tampa, Chairman; Mr. L. B.
Poston, Tampa, Vice-chairman; Mrs. Maude Hough, Tampa; Mrs.
R. W. Simpson, Tampa; Mrs. R. A. Marsicano, Tampa; Mr. Raul
Vega, Tampa; Rev. A. R. Larrick, Plant City.









District 8. Mr. C. Parke Anderson, Avon Park, Chairman; Mr. Sam
W. Johnston, Fort Myers, Vice-chairman; Mrs. May D. Durrance,
Punta Gorda; Mrs. T. C. Barfield, Collier City; Mr. Howard W.
Robarts, Arcadia; Mr. Lloyd M. Lilly, Moore Haven; Mrs. Ralph
G. Lott, Wauchula; Mrs. J. A. McGehee, Clewiston; Judge W. H.
Tucker, Bradenton; Mr. A. B. Shogren, Sarasota.
District 9. Mr. Troy C. Davis, Miami, Chairman; Mrs. Bernard Simon,
Miami, Vice-chairman; Miss Marie Anderson, Miami; Mr. C. Clyde
Atkins, Miami; Mrs. J. R. Brooks, Homestead; Mrs. S. S. McCahill,
Miami; Mr. Denis V. Renuart, Coral Gables; Mr. A. L. Reynolds,
Miami.
District 10. Dr. Carl N. Herman,'West Palm Beach, Chairman; Mr.
Joe Hill, West Palm Beach; Mr. H. B. Kraft, Stuart; Mrs. S. B.
Taylor, Vero Beach; Mr. E. H. Hunt, Okeechobee; Dr. Allen W.
Graves, Fort Pierce; Mrs. R. L. Murray, Belle Glade; Rev. M. J.
Pilkenton, Fort Lauderdale; Mr. Gerald Saunders, Key West.
District 11. Mrs. J. M. Douglas, Weirsdale, Chairman; Mr. R. B. Fuller,
Mulberry, Vice-chairman; Mr. Nye E. Jordan, Bartow; Mr. J.
Boyd McLean, Lakeland; Mr. L. C. Sinclair, Winter Haven; Mr.
Merrill M. Shaw, Ocala; Mr. S. H. Bowman, Clermont; Mrs. A. B.
Dean, Eustis; Mrs. Elmer Boring, Wildwood.
District 12. Mr. W. F. Cappleman, Winter Garden, Chairman; Mr.
George I. Fullerton, New Smyrna Beach, Vice-chairman; Mr. H.
H. Hudson, Titusville; Mr. Eldridge Hart, Winter Park; Mrs. Ruth
Maguire, Orlando; Mrs. P. K. Weaver, Kissimmee; Mrs. Mary G.
Holler, Sanford; Mr. John A. Holder, DeLand; Mrs. L. W. Summer-
lin, Daytona Beach.


SPECIAL DISTRICT WELFARE SERVICES

In addition to regular activities which include investigations to
determine the eligibility of applicants for public assistance and the
continuing eligibility of recipients, the district welfare boards through
their staffs render special services as varied as the necessities of those
whose welfare requires more than the economic assistance made pos-
sible by state-federal appropriations. Without such services, many of
the more vital needs of the aged, the blind and dependent children
would go unmet and the benefits of a public welfare program would
be minimized.
The district welfare boards, in connection with their responsibility
as administrative units of the State Welfare Board, and their staffs,
are closely identified with local movements that have as their objective
the advancement of the public welfare. They cooperate with interested
persons, civic and church groups, organizations of many kinds, coun-
ties and municipalities, State and Federal agencies in planning for
and providing relief and rehabilitation of the individual in need, and
in efforts to develop additional resources to meet these needs. Board
members and staff in many instances lend their efforts and give their
time, outside their regular duties, to the promotion of worth-while
welfare causes.
These services, which give consideration to the emotional and spiri-
tual needs of the individual, as well as his material wants, differ in
scope and character in differing areas of the State.
SERVICES TO COUNTIES AND MUNICIPALITIES.-In rendering
services delegated to it by counties and municipalities, as authorized by
the State Welfare Act, the State welfare agency functions largely
through the local district boards and staffs. Such services are limited
by the amount of available funds and trained social work personnel
and are extended only upon request, so that even seeming infringe-
ment upon the prerogatives of these political sub-divisions may be









avoided. As the public welfare program becomes better understood and
as savings in administrative costs and through avoiding duplication
demonstrate the practical value of coordination, the number of coun-
ties and municipalities served increases. Each year finds a growing
appreciation of the value of unity of effort.
Briefly illustrating the nature and variety of services extended:
Staff members have worked with police and health officials in planning
for girls with venereal infection; with county commissioners and chair-
man of the Tuberculosis Association in planning for families of per-
sons admitted to the State Sanitarium; with school officials in
instances of juvenile delinquency; in arousing community interest in
the securing of a health unit; with the county judge in cases involving
children; with county commissioners in regard to providing funds for
emergency grocery and medical orders. In one instance the unit super-
visor serves as a member of a county welfare board which approves all
direct relief cases. In another, the staff, at the request of the sheriff,
gives consultation services on all juvenile cases in an effort to work out
some plan other than commitment to an institution. Through special
arrangement, one district has administered a general relief fund for the
county and a grocery fund for the county seat. In a county where
health facilities were limited, a visitor worked with county commis-
sioners on plans for the treatment and hospitalization of indigent
persons.
SERVICES TO ORGANIZATIONS.-Inasmuch as many civic clubs
and fraternal organizations sponsor special welfare projects, as well
as contributing generously to emergency situations, they jointly make
a substantial contribution to the relief of community need. Realizing
the value of such contributions in supplementing limited public as-
sistance grants, the district welfare boards cooperate with them by
supplying the names of persons known to be in need, upon request.
Through this source many benefits which could not be provided by the
agency because of limitation of funds or legal restrictions are obtained.
A sampling of these special district activities, as obtained from the
reports of the respective district directors: Through interpretation to
civic and church organizations, assistance was made available for ex-
isting emergency situations known to the agency; staff assisted in a
survey of local resources in one community, thereby obtaining the
opportunity to point out unmet needs; staff cooperated with communi-
ty organizations in efforts to extend the recreational program by citing
the needs of children known to the agency; a staff member was active
in calling to the attention of a woman's club the need of boarding
home care for children; agency visitors planned with civic and church
organizations for the use of certain of their funds for general relief.
In numerous instances staff has enlisted the interest of local organiza-
tions in planning for the care of families not eligible under existing
programs. They have been equally alert in securing their cooperation
in providing tonsillectomies, eye-glasses, medical examinations and
treatment, hospitalization, shelter care and nursing care for those of
inadequate income who are in need of such services. In one community
a luncheon club has sponsored a program to provide eye examinations
for all school children. Referrals are often made to organizations in
connection with Christmas benevolences.
SERVICES TO ASSOCIATED SOCIAL AGENCIES.-In those com-
munities, mostly metropolitan, where federated groups of social agen-
cies exist, the district welfare boards cooperate directly with them in
community welfare programs. Through this concert of effort the cost
of administering welfare funds is kept down and the spread of funds
is consequently more extensive, promptness and efficiency of service
is improved, overlapping is avoided and those in need are cared for
more systematically and to better advantage.
District board members and staff serve as members of such associa-
ted groups, serve on their committees and share in their councils and
planning. The district board, as a rule, has representation in the cen-










tral organization. Through its direct contacts with the needy aged,
blind and dependent children, and in the larger centers through its
licensing responsibility, the agency is in excellent position to under-
stand local needs. Through its affiliation with the amalgamated
agencies, it becomes more quickly aware of supplementary benefits
available from local sources to recipients of public assistance and
children in need of care, if state-federal assistance and services prove
inadequate. The cooperating agencies are also benefited through a
saving in time and cost of Investigating need already known to the
district welfare office.
SERVICES TO CATEGORICAL RECIPIENTS.-Due to war-time
conditions, district staffs have been called on to a larger extent than
ever before to supplement cash assistance to the eligible aged, blind
and near-blind and dependent children with a wide variety of services.
This is especially true of that large number of aged recipients who
are without friends or relatives to assist them and who must depend
upon the agency for counsel and further help. Since even the maxi-
mum old-age assistance payment of $40 per month does not go far in
defraying total living costs, especially in congested centers, the single
problem of securing suitable boarding homes for those who are alone
in the world is a considerable one. There are many others. If they
are ill, in need of medical attention or nursing care their plight is in-
tensified. In nearly all such cases additional community resources
must be found if health and well-being are to be safeguarded.
Although Florida's blind and near-blind receive cash assistance
payments in the same amount as recipients of old-age assistance, if
in need and otherwise eligible, and are also extended special services
by the Florida Council for the Blind, their condition is not entirely
alleviated. District welfare staff, through their contacts with local
clubs which sponsor sight-betterment projects, are often able to obtain
eye-glasses, eye-treatments and in some cases surgical operations for
sight-restoration for these handicapped persons.
Limitation of state funds, together with the restriction of Federal
matching to $18 per month for the first child and $12 per month for
other children in the family in itself precludes the ability to meet the
full financial need of dependent children in many instances, especially
during the present period of inflated values. Other problems which
war-time conditions have presented include need of care of children
of working mothers and children away from their own homes. Eco-
nomic and emotional stress have both contributed to the delinquency
of children. A few of the agency services to children during the year,
as gleaned from reports of district directors: Efforts to obtain shelter
care for children through newspaper publicity and direct appeals to
individuals and groups; a conference with a county nurse to plan a
dental clinic for children; plans to better meet the nutritional needs
of children; a staff-sponsored community-wide meeting to work out
plans for meeting children's problems; assistance to high school chil-
dren in establishing a Youth Center; consultations with juvenile au-
thorities in cases involving the delinquency of children; investigations
for the Child-Care Committee of the Defense Council and similar
organizations; securing boarding homes for children of men in the
armed forces; securing a donation of $1,000 from one Junior League
for demonstrating a good foster-home program.
EXPLANATORY: The foregoing brief recital, which obviously
must be inadequate because of limitations of space, is based on in-
formation culled from the annual reports of the twelve district welfare
boards, as submitted through their directors. It is intended to con-
vey only a general idea of the services that are required in the proper
administration of a state-wide public welfare program and of the
extent of existing need. It is hoped that better understanding will
stimulate cooperation upon the part of all persons and agencies that
have the public welfare at heart.










MONTHLY ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS BY DISTRICTS*
(July 31, 1944-June 30, 1945)
DISTRICT I


MONTH

July, 1944..........
August.............
September..........
October............
November..........
December ..........
January, 1945.......
February...........
March.............
A pril...............
M ay...............
June...............


Old Age
Assistance

$ 97,304.50
113,941.00
114,515.50
115,423.00
117,296.50
118,614.50
119,384.00
119,234.00
119,267.00
119,874.50
121,152.50
121,863.00


Aid to Dependent Aid to the
Children Blind


$ 15,352.50
18,598.50
19,901.50
20,877.00
22,180.00
23,912.50
24,691.00
26,529.00
27,463.00
28,322.00
29,351.50
30,220.50


TOTAL ....... $1,397,870.00 $287,399.00


$ 6,631.00
7,486.50
7,513.50
7,538.50
7,580.50
7,581.00
7,677.50
7,743.00
7,741.00
7,781.50
7,787.00
7,856.50

5 90,917.50


Total

$ 119,288.00
140,026.00
141,930.50
143,838.50
147,057.00
150,108.00
151,752.50
153,506.00
154,471.00
155,978.00
158,291.00
159,940.00

$1,776,186.50


DISTRICT II


July, 1944.........
August.............
September..........
October...........
November .........
December ..........
January, 1945.......
February...........
March .............
April...............
M ay...............
June...............


$ 88,111.50
107,582.50
107,796.00
109,014.50
109,900.00
110,303.00
110,765.00
111,506.50
111,560.00
112,269.00
113,724.00
115,013.00


S 8,511.00
10,347.50
10,901.00
11,490.00
12,185.50
12,591.00
12,697.00
12,934.50
13,139.00
13,265.00
13,537.50
13,881.00


TOTAL....... $1,307,545.00 $145,480.00


4,541.50
5,362.00
5,301.50
5,247.50
5,329.00
5,317.50
5,354.50
5,436.50
5,531.00
5,529.50
5,515.00
5,476.50

63,942.00


$ 101,164.00
123,292.00
123,998.50
125,752.00
127,414.50
128,211.50
128,816.50
129,877.50
130,230.00
131,063.50
132,776.50
134,370.50

$1,516,967.00


DISTRICT III


July, 1944..........
August.............
September..........
October............
November.........
December..........
January, 1945.......
February...........
March .............
April...............
M ay...............
June...............


$ 69,403.50
84,816.00
85,506.00
87,070.50
88,041.50
89,656.00
90,667.00
91,193.00
91,749.00
92 927.00
93,728.50
95,250.00


$10,914.50
13,918.00
14,641.00
15,597.00
16,724.00
16,706.00
17,843.50
18,549.50
18,904.00
19,097.50
20,006.50
20,602.50


$ 3,621.00
4,307.50
4,289.00
4,245.50
4,256.50
4,292.00
4,386.50
4,406.00
4,422.00
4,596.50
4,555.50
4,670.00


TOTAL....... $1,060,008.00


3 83,939.00
103,041.50
104,436.00
106,913.00
109,022.00
110,654.00
112,897.00
114,148.50
115,075.00
116,621.00
118,290.50
120,522.50

$1,315,560.00


$203,504.00 $ 52,048.00











MONTHLY ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS BY DISTRICTS
(July 31, 1944-June 30, 1945)
DISTRICT IV


MONTH

July, 1944..........
August.............
September..........
October............
November..........
December ..........
January, 1945 .......
February...........
M arch .............
April...............
M ay......... ......
June...............

TOTAL. ......


Old Age
Assistance

$ 64,194.50
74,156.50
74,724.50
76,039.00
76,415.00
76,691.50
76,859.00
76,945.00
77,432.50
77,806.50
77,778.00
78,172.50

$907,214.50


Aid to Dependent
Children

$ 3,717.CO
4,167.00
4,330.50
4,383.50
4,558.50
4,827.00
4,867.50
5,358.00
5,851.50
6,137.50
6,536.00
6,582.50


Aid to the
Blind

$ 2,636.50
3,012.50
3,037.50
3,141.50
3,156.00
3,142.00
3,097.00
3,090.00
3,016.50
2,990.50
3,019.50
3,047.50


61,316.50 $ 36,387.00


Total

$ 70,548.00
81,336.00
82,092.50
83,564.00
84,129.50
84,660.50
84,823.50
85,393.00
86,300.50
86,934.50
87,333.50
87,802.50

$1,004,918.00


DISTRICT V

July, 1944.......... $ 89,289.50 $ 8,984.00 $ 5,526.00 $ 103,799.50
August............. 103,347.50 10,520.00 6,348.50 120,216.00
September ......... 104,016.00 12,154.50 6,285.00 122,455.50
October ............ 104,792.50 13,021.00 6,368.00 124,181.50
November.......... 105,885.50 14,012.00 6,408.00 126,305.50
December. ......... 107,075.00 16,017.50 6,379.00 129,471.50
January, 1945 ...... 108,024.50 17,156.00 6,462.00 131,642.50
February........... 108,433.00 17,864.50 6,488.00 132,785.50
March............. 110,307.00 19,112.00 6,450.50 135,869.50
April............... 112,979.50 19,932.00 6,445.50 139,357.00
May............... 114,016.50 20,391.50 6,575.00 140,983.00
June............... 115,320.50 20,850.50 6,391.50 142,562.50
TOTAL....... $1,283,487.00 $190,015.50 $ 76,127.00 $1,549,629.50



DISTRICT VI

July, 1944.......... $ 80,218.00 $ 6,400.50 $ 5,875.50 $ 92,494.00
August............. 91,424.00 6,491.00 6,568.00 104,483.00
September.......... 92,101.50 6,662.00 6,537.50 105,301.00
October ............ 92,105.00 6,810.00 6,455.00 105,370.00
November.......... 92,975.50 7,048.00 6,628.00 106,651.50
December.......... 93,540.00 7,080.00 6,603.50 107,223.50
January, 1945 ....... 94,553.00 7,294.50 6,586.50 108,434.00
February........... 95,450.50 8,209.00 6,675.50 110,335.00
March............. 96,825.00 8,821.00 6,765.50 112,411.50
April ............... 96,944.50 9,519.00 6,672.00 113,135.50
May............... 97,498.00 10,312.50 6,709.00 114,519.50
June............... 98,145.50 11,158:00 6,802.50 116,106.00

TOTAL ....... $1,121,780.50 $ 95,805.50 $ 78,878.50 $1,296,464.50










MONTHLY ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS BY DISTRICTS
(July 31, 1944-June 30, 1945)
DISTRICT VII

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1944.........$ 64,127.00 $ 4,985.00 $ 4,491.50 $ 73,603.50
August............. 72,859.00 5,295.50 4,998.50 83,153.00
September.......... 74,073.50 5,580.50 5,021.50 84,675.50
October............ 75,357.50 6,286.00 4,991.00 86,634.50
November.......... 76,273.00 6,885.00 4,923.50 88,081.50
December. ......... 77,314.00 7,303.00 4,918.00 89,535.00
January, 1945 ...... 77,722.00 7,710.00 4,834.00 90,266.00
February........... 78,161.50 8,768.00 4,864.00 91,793.50
March............ 79,211.00 9,399.00 4,907.00 93,517.00
April............... 79,964.00 9,661.00 4,948.00 94,573.00
May............... 80,712.00 10,331.50 4,901.00 95,944.50
June............... 81,627.00 10,688.50 4,924.00 97,239.50

TOTAL....... $917,401-.50 $ 92,893.00 $ 58,722.00 $1,069,016.50



DISTRICT VIII

July, 1944.......... 51,541.00 $ 4,230.50 $ 2,634.00 $ 58,405.50
August............. 60,552.50 4,616.00 2,909.00 68,077.50
September........... 61,136.00 5,052.00 2,977.50 69,165.50
October............ 61,964.50 5,104.50 2,913.00 69,982.00
November.......... 63,192.50 5,414.50 2,960.50 71,567.50
December. ......... 64,146.50 5,816.00 2,922.00 72,884.50
January,1945....... 64,277.00 5,952.50 2,950.00 73,179.50
February............ 64,543.00 6,088.00 2,926.00 73,557.00
March............. 64,420.00 6,724.50 2,881.50 74,026.00
April .............. 65,076.00 7,401.00 2,865.50 75,342.50
May............... 65,132.00 7,666.50 2,785.00 75,583.50
June............... 66,017.50 7,756.50 2,825.50 76,599.50
TOTAL....... $751,998.50 $ 71,822.50 $ 34,549.50 $ 858,370.50



DISTRICT IX

July, 1944.......... .$ 77,928.50 $ 4,543.00 $ 3,861.00 $ 86,332.50
August............. 87.684.00 5,563.50 4,292.50 97,540.00
September........... 88,184.00 5,770.00 4,352.50 98,306.50
October............ 88,089.50 6,209.00 4,250.50 98,549.00
November.......... 88,713.00 6,692.00 4,245.00 99,650.00
December.......... 88,850.50 7,007.00 4,241.50 100,099.00
January, 1945 ....... 88,815.00 7,213.00 4,213.50 100,241.50
February............ 89,667.50 7,353.00 4,215.00 101,235.50
March............. 89,090.50 7,287.00 4,001.00 100,378.50
April............... 88,753.00 7,389.00 3,907.00 100,049.00
May............... 88,368.00 7,455.50 3,940.50 99,764.00
June............... 88,330.00 7,339.50 4,003.00 99,672.50

TOTAL ....... $1,052,473.50 $ 79,821.50 $ 49,523.00 $1,181,818.00










MONTHLY ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS BY DISTRICTS
(July 31, 1944-June 30, 1945)
DISTRICT X

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1944.......... $ 50,743.50 $ 7,457.50 $ 6,167.50 $ 64,368.50
August............. 59,220.00 7,969.00 7,115.50 74,304.50
September.......... 59,668.00 8,537.50 7,143.00 75,348.50
October............ 60,307.50 8,948.00 7,300.00 76,555.50
November.......... 60,758.00 9,224.00 7,296.00 77,278.00
December.......... 60,931.50 9,483.50 7,276.50 77,691.50
January, 1945 ....... 60,839.00 9,887.00 7,311.00 78,037.00
February........... 61,026.00 10,176.00 7,290.00 78,492.00
March............. 61,054.50 10,589.00 7,298.50 78,942.00
April............... 60,766.00 10,664.50 7,277.00 78,707.50
Mav............... 60,634.50 10,775.00 7,255.50 78,665.00
June............... 60,406.00 10,721.00 7.161.00 78,288.00
TOTAL....... $716,354.50 $114,432.00 $ 85,891.50 $916.678.00


DISTRICT XI

July, 1944.......... $103,305.00 $ 12,804.00 $ 6,705.50 $ 122,814.50
August............. 120,809.50 15,315.50 7,639.50 143,764.50
September ......... 122,077.00 18,819.50 7,740.50 148,637.00
October............ 122,410.50 20,734.00 7,803.00 150,947.50
November......... 125,412.50 22,702.00 7,827.00 155,941.50
December .......... 126,887.50 23,867.50 7,855.00 158,610.00
January, 1945....... 127,543.00 24,572.00 7,735.00 159,850.00
February........... 128,752.00 25,390.50 7,660.00 161,802.50
March............. 130,786.00 26,359.00 7,659.00 164,804.00
April............... 131,885.00 26,498.00 7,745.00 166,128.00
ay ............... 132,766.00 27,383.50 7,760.00 167,909.50
June .............. 134,670.00 28,498.50 7,787.00 170,955.50
TOTAL....... $1,507,304.00 $272,944.00 $ 91,916.50 $1,872,164.50


DISTRICT XII

July, 1944.......... $103,245.00 $ 9,327.00 $ 6,435.00 $ 119,007.00
August ............. 117,247.00 10,425.00 7,137.50 134,809.50
September.......... 118,866.00 10,803.00 7,060.50 136,729.50
October............ 120,169.00 11,342.50 6,987.50 138,499.00
November ......... 120,765.50 11,843.50 7,145.00 139,754.00
December.......... 120,961.00 12,455.00 7,150.50 140,566.50
January, 1945....... 121,127.50 12,669.50 7,040.00 140,837.00
February........... 122,089.00 12,971.00 6,904.00 141,964.00
March.............. 122,347.00 13,260.50 6,876.00 142,483.50
April .............. 123,203.50 14,198.00 6,898.50 144,300.00
May............... 123,509.00 14,299.00 6,928.50 144,736.50
June............... 124,014.50 15,132.00 6,980.50 146,127.00
TOTAL....... $1,437,544.00 $148,726.00 $ 83,543.50 $1,669,813.50

*(Figures are from the statistical records of the agency and are gross).