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HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Govenor Holland visits State Welfare...
 Letter of transmittal
 Part I. Expansion of public...
 Part II. Public assistance...
 Part III. Services to children
 Part IV. Adoption services
 Part V. War services
 Part VI. Case correspondence
 Part VII. Personnel
 Part VIII. Statewide interpret...
 Part IX. Florida council for the...
 Part X. Commodity distribution
 Report of the twelve Florida welfare...


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Annual report of the State Welfare Board as made to Governor ... for the period ..
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the State Welfare Board as made to Governor ... for the period ..
Physical Description: 14 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Welfare Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1943
Publication Date: 1938-1951
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Public welfare -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (1937/38)-14th (1950/51).
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: "With reports of the twelve Florida welfare districts."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02253169
lccn - sf 98086789
System ID: UF00053473:00001
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report of the State Department of Public Welfare

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Govenor Holland visits State Welfare Board
        Page 4
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 5
    Part I. Expansion of public assistance
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Part II. Public assistance services
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Part III. Services to children
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Part IV. Adoption services
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Part V. War services
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Part VI. Case correspondence
        Page 18
    Part VII. Personnel
        Page 19
    Part VIII. Statewide interpretation
        Page 20
    Part IX. Florida council for the blind
        Page 21
    Part X. Commodity distribution
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Report of the twelve Florida welfare districts
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        District I
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        District II
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        District III
            Page 44
            Page 45
        District IV
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        District V
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        District VI
            Page 52
            Page 53
        District VII
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
        District VIII
            Page 57
            Page 58
        District IX
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
        District X
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        District XI
            Page 65
            Page 66
        District XII
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
Full Text
/"
i-


Seventh Annual


State


Welfare


I) ~i.L-)


Report
Board


JULY 1, 1943 JUNE 30, 1944







STATE OF FLORIDA


Seventh Annual Report
OF THE

State Welfare Board
AS MADE TO
GOVERNOR SPESSARD L. HOLLAND

FOR THE PERIOD
July 1, 1943 -June 30, 1944

As Required by
The State Welfare Act



With Reports of the
Twelve Welfare Districts


STATE WELFARE BOARD MEMBERS: Emmet Safay, Jackson-
ville, Chairman; O. C. Minton, Ft. Pierce, Vice-Chairman; J. D.
Carroll, Pensacola, Secretary; Mrs. Hollis Rinehart, Jr., Miami;
W. J. Gardiner, Daytona Beach; David W. Ireland, Ft. Myers;
David A. Falk, Tampa.
Leland W. Hiatt, Commissioner































Governor Holland visits State Welfare Board


























GOVERNOR HOLLAND VISITS STATE
WELFARE BOARD
Governor Spessard L. Holland paid an official visit to the State
Welfare Board at its meeting in Jacksonville on June 7.
The photo appearing on the opposite page was taken at that time,
with all members of the State Welfare Board present.
Reading from left to right: Seated, Mrs. Hollis Rinehart, Jr.,
Miami; Governor Holland; W. J. Gardiner, Daytona Beach, who is
also the State Welfare Board member of the Florida Council for the
Blind. Standing, J. D. Carroll, Pensacola, secretary; 0. C. Minton, Ft.
Pierce, vice-chairman; Emmet Safay, Jacksonville, chairman; David
W. Ireland, Ft. Myers; David A. Falk, Tampa.
Members of the three permanent committees of the Board are:
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION: D. A. Falk, chairman; J. D. Carroll,
O. C. Minton.
PERSONNEL: O. C. Minton, Chairman; D. W. Ireland, D. A. Falk.
SOCIAL SERVICE: W. J. Gardiner, chairman; Mrs. Hollis Rine-
hart, Jr., D. W. Ireland, J. D. Carroll.
















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
Honorable Spessard L. Holland
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
We have the honor to transmit herewith the Seventh Annual
Report of the State Welfare Board.
The fiscal year reviewed--July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944-has wit-
nessed the intensification of the war effort. During the period per-
sonnel shortages and turn-over, the increased cost of living and varia-
tions in the incomes of recipients of public assistance, the migration
of workers and their families to defense and industrial areas, emo-
tional stress with a resultant increase in juvenile delinquency, and
similar factors have had fundamental implications in the adminis-
tration of the state welfare program.
Despite abnormal conditions, we are pleased to report that through
Legislative action in assuring an increase in state funds, cash pay-
ments to the eligible aged, blind and near-blind and dependent child-
ren exceeded those of any previous year both in the aggregate amount
and the average grant. Investigation of applications is more nearly
current than ever before. Social services, still inadequate, have been
extended as much as a limited staff would permit.
The progress made reflects the splendid cooperation received from
the district welfare boards and the loyal service rendered by employes
of the Agency.
At this time we deem it appropriate to express to you our appre-
ciation of the interest you have shown in the welfare cause throughout
your administration. Your counsel and recommendations, based on
a thorough knowledge of the program and procedures and of the
needs of the people, have been most encouraging and helpful.
Respectfully submitted as of the close of business June 30, 1944.

STATE WELFARE BOARD

Emmet Safay, chairman
O. C. Minton, vice-chairman
J. D. Carroll, secretary
Mrs. Hollis Rinehart, Jr.
David W. Ireland
David A. Falk
W. J. Gardiner

Leland W. Hiatt, Commissioner










PART I-EXPANSION OF PUBLIC ASSISTANCE
Significant of the expansion of the State-Federal public assistance
program during the fiscal year reviewed in this report-July 1, 1943
to June 30, 1944-is the increase in the average monthly old-age
assistance cash grant from $14.61 to $24.11, the average aid to the
blind grant from $15.52 to $25.42, and the opening for investigation
of all applications for aid to dependent children filed on or before
April 1. 1944.
The advancement of the three categories is noteworthy in that it
was accomplished during the stress of war. It may be attributed,
fundamentally, to public consciousness of responsibility for the relief
of need, more acute because of the increased cost of living. Because
of the nature of the source of revenues and the fortuitous fact that
the income from taxes levied upon horse racing exceeded expectations,
the raising of additional state funds bore lightly upon the general
taxpayer.
Recognizing the obligation to more adequately care for the needy
aged, the needy blind and near-blind and dependent children, the
1943 session of the State Legislature had levied an increased wine tax
for the payment of aid to dependent children, and guaranteed racing
revenues for the payment of old-age assistance in the amount of
$2,000,000 per year for the biennium with revenues to be derived from
a newly-levied tax on cigarettes.
Although no occasion developed for invoking the guarantee of old-
age funds, this Legislative assurance justified the State Welfare Board
in budgeting an average increase in grant of approximately $4.00 per
month immediately after the Legislature adjourned. Revenues from
increased wine taxes, supplemented by the underwriting from a healthy
General Fund of any deficit from the sale of maintenance tags in the
amount of $500,000 annually, as authorized by the 1941 session of the
Legislature but not previously feasible, made possible the resumption
of investigations of eligibility for aid to dependent children, static
since early in 1942.
The full effect of additional state financial participation in the
public assistance program is assured for the remainder of the biennium
expiring June 30, 1945, through the action of the State Welfare Board
in budgeting all grant increases for that period.
STATE APPROPRIATIONS
State appropriations available as of June, 1944 for the support of
the welfare program as a whole, consist of:
$3,400,000 annually for the payment of old-age assistance, aid to
the blind and "administrative costs of performing the duties of the
Board," as outlined in the State Welfare Act.
$400,000 annually for the payment of aid to dependent children
and for "administrative cost of this Act (State Welfare Act) at the
discretion of the State Welfare Board."
$3,132,828.98 for the payment of old-age assistance only, derived
from racing revenues.
$427,122.94 for the payment of aid to dependent children only,
derived fromwine tax.
$500,000 for the payment of aid to dependent children, derived in
part from the sale of maintenance tags, with the deficit made up
from the General Fund.
(The amount produced by the 1941-tag selection tax, allocated to
the support of the aid to dependent children program by legislative
enactment, was so small that no separate accounting was kept.)
State funds expended in the payment of aid to the blind and aid








to dependent children are supplemented in an equal amount by the
federal government which also pays half the cost of administering
the two programs. The federal government in addition to paying
half the amount expended for old-age assistance allows 5 per cent of
such an amount for the payment of old-age administrative costs, or
for old-age assistance, and for no other purpose.
Although the distribution of public assistance funds had not then
reached a maximum, due in part to the time required to investigate
accumulated applications for aid to dependent children, cash assis-
tance payments for June, 1944, in all categories, were at the rate
of $12,905,094.00 per annum. The rate of disbursement was the
largest for any single year since the state-federal program was launched
on July 1, 1937.
The progressive increase in the amount of public assistance dis-
bursements, by years, follows:
Fiscal year ended June, 1938..............................................$ 4,057,639.24
Fiscal year ended June, 1939.................................. ..... 6,347,012.33
Fiscal year ended June, 1940........................... ..... -- 6,202,799.75
Fiscal year ended June, 1941....................... ........... 6,882,609.66
Fiscal year ended June, 1942.... .................................... 8,224,008.00
Fiscal year ended June, 1943................................ ........... 9,081,171.00
Fiscal year ended June, 1944 --------................................. ... 10,066,684.85
Net expenditures for public assistance during the fiscal year, July
1, 1943-June 30, 1944, by months, were:


Aid to
Month Total Old Age Aid to Dependent
Assistance Blind Children

July, 1943 ....... $ 721,270.00 $ 598,249.00 $38,371.50 $84,649.50
August .......... 712,477.00 591,819.00 38,288.50 82,369.50
September....... 729,634.50 608,080.50 39,670.50 81,883.50
October.......... 748,316.50 626,567.50 40,709.50 81,039.50
November........ 765,370.50 644,415.50 41,997.00 78,958.00
December........ 785,348.50 663,753.50 43,414.50 78,180.50
January, 1944.... 800,853.00 680,273.00 44,449.00 76,131.00
February......... 812,083.00 688,984.50 45,568.50 77,530.00
March........... 831,684.00 705,962.50 46,505.50 79,216.00
April............ 1,026,725.35 895,691.85 49,604.50 81,429.00
May.............. 1,057,498.00 914,962.50 57,279.00 85,256.50
June............ 1,075,424.50 925,750.50 58,612.50 91,061.50
Total........ $10,066,684.85 $8,544,509.85 $544,470.50 $977,704.50


The number of recipients of public assistance at the beginning
and end of the fiscal year were:
June, 1943 June, 1944
OAA ...................40,730 OAA ....................38,395
AB ................... 2,464 AB .............. 2,306
ADC ............. 3,313 (families) ADC ................... 3,115 (families)
7,620 (children) 7,165 (children)
AVERAGE MONTHLY GRANT PAID IN JUNE, 1943 and JUNE 1944:
June, 1943 June, 1944
OAA ................................ $14.61 OAA -................... ....................$24.11
AB .................................... .. 15.52 AB ....................................... 25.42
ADC ..................................... 26.33 ADC ............ ...................... 29.23








MORE RECEIVE MAXIMUM
The Florida Welfare Act and the Federal Social Security Act
are in accord in that they limit the amount that may be paid any
recipient of old-age assistance to $40.00 per month, regardless of.
the extent of his need. One of the pleasing results of more ample
old-age funds is reflected in the increase in the number of persons
receiving this maximum from 172 as of the beginning of the fiscal
year to 2970 as of June, 1944. The principal increase in the number
of those receiving the maximum payment resulted from the distribu-
tion in April of racing revenues in addition to the $2,000.000 guaran-
teed by the cigarette tax. Since assistance payments are legally based
on need, the amount of grant is determined by the need of the
individual, the maximum allowed by law, the number of eligible reci-
pients and the funds provided by state and federal governments.
It may be presupposed that the need of recipients will vary.
1944-45 BUDGET: Public assistance disbursements in Florida will
be larger for the fiscal year ahead than ever before. The State Wel-
fare Board, at its meeting in June, adopted a budget that provides
for the payment of an average monthly grant of $24.00 to 39.000
recipients of old-age assistance, an annual expenditure of $11,232,000;
an average monthly grant of $25.00 to 2,350 recipients of aid to the
blind, an annual expenditure of $705.000; and an average monthly
grant of $30.00 per case to 6,750 families (16,000 children) receiving
aid to dependent children, an annual expenditure of $2,430,000. Ex-
penditures in the three categories, as budgeted, aggregate $14,367,000
for the fiscal year, exclusive of administrative and other costs.

CASE LOAD MAY INCREASE
In determining the budget, the State Welfare Board faced even-
tualities that might result in an increased public assistance case load.
It was recognized that favorable progress of the war effort might
return to normal pursuits large numbers of persons employed in war
industry or enlisted in the armed forces, thereby limiting employment
opportunities and military allotments to relatives or dependents, both
of which would result in the return to the rolls of a considerable num-
ber of recipients who had become temporarily self-supporting. Private
incomes of some recipients would also be affected as would the ability
of relatives and others to aid.
As the time and extent of any turn in the tide of war was purely
speculative, the Board was confronted with the difficult problem of
estimating the average number of persons who would receive as-
sistance during the fiscal year, taking into consideration the down-
ward trend in case loads and making allowance for any potential
up-swing.
Established facts were that the number of recipients of old-age
assistance had steadily declined from a high of 43,356 as of September,
1942, to a low of 38,367 as of May, 1944, and the number of recipients
of aid to the blind from 2,722 as of July, 1942, to 2,292 as of May,
1944, largely because of increased incomes resulting from improved
economic conditions. (The aid to dependent children case load had
also reflected increased family income during the war period, but
is not comparable in that it was governed by fluctuations in the
amount of available state funds).
Case load decreases in Florida were in proportion to those of all
other states, as reported by the Social Security Board.










PART II-PUBLIC ASSISTANCE SERVICES

The progress made during the fiscal year in meeting economic need
more adequately in the public assistance categories of old-age assis-
tance, aid to the blind and aid to dependent children imposed the
responsibility of assuring the fair sharing of greater benefits as well
as the speeding up of distribution of additional funds as they became
available.
At the beginning of the year a standard budget guide for the use
of staff in determining need on a more uniform basis had just been
completed. This guide was based on the federal and state require-
ment to provide eligible recipients minimum subsistence "compatible
with decency and health," within the limitations imposed by the. ex-
tent of funds, the number of eligibles and the maximum grant.
A study had revealed that at that time funds were sufficient to
meet 80 per cent of the need of recipients of old-age assistance and
aid to the blind, permitting an average increase in grant of $4.00
per month. Food prices continued to climb and in November a review
of revised food allowances was necessary, a budget increase of approxi-
mately $1.50 being authorized, which brought the increase in average
grant to approximately $5.50 per month.
To affect an equitable adjustment of grants requires a discussion
with each recipient of his individual needs. Usually an undertaking'
of such proportions would have required a whole year. In view, how-
ever, of the Agency's desire to make the needed increases as quickly
as possible special emphasis was given toward this end. Necessary con-
tacts with recipients were practically completed in March, or within
two-thirds of the time that would ordinarily have been consumed.
As cases were completed in one section of the state, workers were
loaned to another locality.
During April it was recognized that revenues -from horse tracks,
ear-marked by law for the payment of old-age assistance only, would
exceed earlier expectations. Accordingly the State Welfare Board
authorized an increase in average grant from 80 per cent to 90 per
cent. The percentage increase, taken in connection with additional
and increased budget allowances, added up to a second average increase
in grant of $4.00 per month. Since redetermination of need of the
case load had just been completed and no interview with the recipient
was required, the State Welfare Board, in making the distribution,
applied a mathematical formula based upon the need, the amount
of additional funds, the restriction imposed by the maximum grant
and the number of eligible recipients. So rapidly was the distribution
effected that regular mailing schedules for recipient's checks were
uninterrupted. The mark-up had been made in record time through
careful advance planning and the full cooperation of the district wel-
fare boards and employed agency personnel.
It is definitely felt that the citizens of Florida will be justly proud
that within the fiscal year covered by this report it has been possible
to more nearly meet the needs of recipients of old-age assistance and
aid to the blind. During the fiscal year ahead it is anticipated that
100 per cent of the need of recipients in these two categories will be
met. This will be a "red letter" day for those dependent upon public
assistance.

EXCEPTION TO THE RULE
It should be pointed out here, however, that there is one particular
type of case on which the recent increase in grant has had little
effect. The reference is to the. sick and infirm, principally, who
require care in nursing or boarding homes. Without family care,
the aged often become ill or despondent. It is frequently necessary
for the Agency to assist them in their living arrangements. With a








maximum allowance of $40.00 per month, as fixed by both the Social
Security Act and the State Welfare Act, it is difficult to find homes
where they can obtain food, shelter, clothing, medicines and nursing
service for so small an amount. This is especially true of the metro-
politan centers and other areas where the cost of living is high. It
is obvious that the $40.00 limitation compels recipients to live under
conditions which are questionable so far as health and sanitation
are concerned. In some instances it has been possible for staff to
aid the recipient in securing additional help from relatives or or-
ganizations.
As the number of persons receiving the maximum grant increases
in proportion to increased state financial participation in the pro-
gram, it becomes more obvious that those who receive less are in one
sense fortunate, as their need is met in full on the basis of the budget-
ary formula.

MORE ADC CASES INVESTIGATED
The progress that has been made in the aid to dependent children
program has mainly centered around the investigation of pending
applications. While some increases in average grants for families
receiving this form of assistance were possible, need could not be as
adequately met as in the old-age assistance and aid to the blind pro-
grams because of the restriction of maximum allowances. For ex-
ample, each recipient of old-age assistance or aid to the blind may
receive a maximum payment of $40.00 per month if his need warrants.
On the other hand, a mother must have three eligible children to re-
ceive a $40.00 monthly grant. A mother with one child is allowed
only $18.00 per month. Where there are additional children in the
family, each is allowed $12.00 per month.
During the year the State Welfare Board authorized the opening
for investigation of all applications for aid to dependent children
filed on or before April 1, 1944. This meant that more than 6,500
applications could be investigated, many of which had been pending
for years because of the lack of funds. As the investigations proceeded,
it was revealed that many families had moved to localities where em-
ployment was available. In some instances the mother had secured
employment away from home and left her children with relatives or
friends or had boarded them out. There were also cases where children
had left school to obtain work. Whatever the circumstances, the
Agency realized that it had a real responsibility in providing every
mother who had at one time applied for assistance for her children
the opportunity of discussing her plans for her children.
Where whole families had moved in order for the mother to
obtain work, often housing conditions were extremely inadequate and
children were left unsupervised. Mothers who had left their children
with others so that they might earn a livelihood, frequently expressed
concern over the breaking up of their home as well as to the welfare
of their children who were growing up under the care of others.
Fears were expressed for the future of children who had left school
during a period where practically every person could find a job.
In every instance, the Agency placed emphasis on what the mother
thought was best for her particular children. ADC funds, in some
cases, made it possible for small children to remain at home. Where
the children were in school, it was sometimes possible to assist the
mother in securing part-time employment which would allow her to
be at home when her children were there. Where mothers felt it
necessary to continue full-time employment, staff was often able to
point out and encourage the use of any recreational or child-care
facilities that were available in the community. An aid to dependent
children grant in some instances made it possible for employed child-
er to give up their jobs and return to school. Assistance was given








dependent children in securing employment after school hours or on
Saturday.
In all of its attempts to carry out the objectives of the Aid to De-
pendent Children program, the State Welfare Board has been con-
stantly faced with the problem of low maximum grants. Present
maximums will not provide even minimum food and shelter and are
totally inadequate to provide such other essentials as clothing, utilities,
household supplies, medicine, recreation and other requirements neces-
sary for the well-being of any family. It is a source of gratification,
however, that despite these limitations, the needs of dependent child-
ren in Florida are being more fully met than ever before.


PART III-SERVICES TO CHILDREN

,Child Welfare Services, administratively financed by funds al-
located by the United States Children's Bureau under the Social Se-
curity Act, were offered in twelve counties of the State during the
past year. Funds from this source have been allocated to Florida
since 1936 for the purpose of strengthening and extending services to
children in rural areas and in areas of special need. Child Welfare
Services provided under the Act is only a part of the total child wel-
fare program in the development of resources for care and protection
of children in their own communities, and an integral part of the
entire general public welfare program. The Act specifies that the
funds may be used for administration only and all money for the
direct care of children must be secured from the State or from the
local communities participating in the plan.
Services provided for children under the Child Welfare Services
program are purposefully broad in an effort to meet the general needs
of children in areas where few or no local resources have been de-
veloped, as well as to supplement existing resources for meeting spe-
cific needs of children.
The twelve counties offering special Child Welfare Services during
this past year were: Alachua, Broward, Dade, Duval, Escambia, Hills-
borough, Indian River and St. Lucie, Jackson, Orange, Palm Beach,
and Volusia. The Child Welfare Services program in Dade County has
been confined to the licensing of independent boarding homes, although
the need for expansion of the program to include general services
to children has been great and has been urgently sought by the. com-
munity. Scarcity of qualified and trained child welfare personnel
has prevented expansion this past year. In Duval County the Child
Welfare Services program has been confined largely to adoption
services, although general services to children have been given in a
number of instances. In the remainder of the counties participating
in the Child Welfare Services program, however, both general and
special services to children have been given and funds for direct
care have been provided locally.
CASE WORK SERVICE
Case work service to children with personality adjustment prob-
lems, with behavior difficulties, with physical or mental difficulties;
to unmarried mothers in need of public support and of help in
planning for the care of themselves and their children; and to
neglected and abused children was given in 71 per cent of the
cases under care during the year. Service and help with planning for
adequate care of abandoned, homeless, and destitute children, children
of working mothers and children in need of care away from their
own homes was given in more than 11 per cent of the cases (900
children). Eighteen per cent of the cases under care (1200 children)
received other services, such as special diets, supervision in foster
homes, transportation to places of residence, assistance and service

:11








to young girls in need of social protection, and adoption services.
Case work service was given, also, to many children and their families
when the problem focused primarily around the children.
The agency has continued to emphasize that a child's own home
is the best place for him, if it can meet his basic emotional needs
in a sufficiently satisfying fashion to promote his wholesome' growth
and development. Every effort has been made to maintain, strengthen,
or reestablish a child's own home in order that he might remain
in it or return to it. Sixty-eight per cent of the children receiving
agency service in the twelve counties offering special Child Welfare
Services were living with their own families or with relatives during
the period of service. Placement in foster care has been a necessary
part of planning for the welfare of 22 per cent of the children under
care. Of these, 13 per cent were placed in paid foster homes, 7 per
cent in free homes, 1 per cent in work or wage homes, and 1 per cent
in institutions. The number of children receiving service in their own
homes showed a slight decrease this year over last, and may be largely
attributable to the increased war activities which have forced many
mothers out of their homes into industry, and thereby necessitated
outside living arrangements for their children. Ten per cent of the
children were living in adoption homes under agency supervision.
The problem of youth in distress, and, frequently, in open conflict
with the law, has received considerable attention. Child welfare
workers have tried to work with children and their families before
delinquencies developed, believing prevention to be a more hopeful
approach to the problem and of more help to the child and his family,
as well as to the community, than service after delinquencies and
tragedies have occurred. To supplement case work service to children
in need, child welfare workers have entered actively into cooperative
planning with other agencies and into community planning for the
development of local resources designed to help prevent delinquency
and neglect of children.
In all of these twelve counties, well-qualified child welfare workers
have been employed to give case work service to children and their
families. In the other 55 counties of the State, many, if not all, of
these services to children have been needed because the same problems
of children have occurred, but neither funds for direct care nor suf-
ficient skilled child welfare personnel have been available. During
the past year, however, the agency has made a definite effort to
meet, in some measure, as much of the need of these other children
as the lack of funds and the scarcity of child welfare personnel would
permit. Family workers, carrying public assistance case loads, have
given many services over and above assistance grants, on a less in-
tensive scale, to more than 2,500 children in need. Thus it has been
possible to give service to more than 4,000 children during the year.
Some of these children received services for one month, some for two
or three months, and some for the entire twelve-month period.
In an effort to secure more information regarding children in
need, and the nature of their needs, a statewide survey was made in
April. This survey revealed that almost 20,000 children were known
to be in need of services which the State Welfare Board was unable
to meet. In many instances money for direct care would alleviate
and go far toward mitigating the problem; in many others direct case
work-services would be required.
SOURCE OF FUNDS
In counties offering general, as well as specialized child welfare
services, funds for direct care of children have been supplied entirely
from local public and private sources. Receipts for the year in these
counties totaled $20,708.86, contributed locally in this manner:









Boards of county commissioners............ ..........$9,151.50 or 51%%
Boards of city commissioners............................. ..... .... 2,699.96 or 15%
Individuals ............................. ................................... 4,062.60 or 22%
Civic or fraternal organizations.................................... 1,884.05 or 11%%
Expenditures of the locally contributed funds for the year in these
counties totaled $15,664.78:
Paid foster care................................................... .....$12,051.49 or 77%
Clothing for children ..... ....................... ........ 658.30 or 4%
Food (Special dietary needs)...................................... 687.97 or 4%%
Other Needs ............. ............................................... 2,267.02 or 14% %
(Medical care and diagnosis, transportation, allowances, personal
maintenance, etc.)
EDUCATIONAL LEAVE
The State Welfare Board has long been concerned about the
lack of sufficient trained child welfare personnel even in peace
times and has given much thought and consideration to various plans
of in-service training. The impact of war has served to ac-
centuate and increase the need of trained personnel to the point
of acuteness. To meet the situation, the Board in January, 1944,
approved an educational leave plan to be financed from Federal
Child Welfare Services Funds, at no cost to the state. Seven staff
members were granted scholarships for one-half to one school year
at recognized schools of social work of their own choosing, agreeing
to return to the employ of the Agency for a period of one year for
a half-year's and two years for a full year's educational leave. Should
the plan be continued for a number of years a trained child welfare
staff will have been built up and will be capable of giving case work
services of increasing quality and value to children and their families
who are in need.

LICENSING
The State Welfare Board, performing its delegated responsibility of
prescribing minimum standards of care upon which to base the grant-
ing of licenses to individuals, institutions, societies, and associations
caring for dependent children, issued licenses during the year to thirty
child-caring institutions, five child-placing agencies, and eighty foster
homes throughout the State. A member of the Division of Child Wel-
fare visited each institution and agency and a member of the local
Child Welfare staff or of the duly licensed child-placing agency visited
each foster home prior to making recommendations to the State Wel-
fare Board for the issuance of a license.
In addition, in Dade County the State Welfare Board licensing re-
sponsibility is extended to cover child-care facilities for non-dependent
children under seventeen years of age. The licensing of such facilities
for non-dependent children is limited to counties having more than
267,000 population, which, according to 1940 census, would include
only Dade County. In all other counties of the State, commercial
boarding homes, or boarding homes caring for non-dependent children,
operated unsupervised by any agency and with no standard for care
required to be met which would assure the children placed of minimum
safeguards for their protection and well-being.
Annual visits are made by a representative of the Division of
Child Welfare to each child-caring institution and child welfare
agency subject to licensing for the purpose of determining whether
the institution or agency is meeting the prescribed standards requisite
for the issuance of a license, as well as to offer consultation service
in planning program improvements and, often, the development of new
service or the increased quality of service currently offered. By work-
ing together toward more coordinated services, toward the develop-
ment of new services, and toward the increased quality of present









services, Florida's children in need will have adequate opportunity
for wholesome growth and development.


PART IV-ADOPTION SERVICES
The present Adoption Law, proposed and sponsored by the Child-
ren's Code Advisory Committee, went into effect in May, 1943. This
law designates the State Welfare Board, for the purposes of adoption,
as the official guardian of minor children of Florida who have no
parents or guardian, or who have been abandoned or released by the
natural parents, and who have not been permanently committed to
a licensed child-placing agency. The law requires that the State
Welfare Board, or the licensed child-placing agency to which a child
has been permanently committed, make a study of the adoptive par-
ents to determine their suitability and a study of the child to ascer-
tain that it is a proper subject for adoption, and to make recommen-
dations to the Circuit Court as to the desirability of the proposed
adoption. The law is very specific in regard to the securing of con-
sents to the adoption from the child's parents or guardians, and/or
the services of notice of the proposed adoption to all persons having
any legal claim to the child. The law further requires an interlocutory
period between the initial hearing on an adoption and the issuance
of a final decree, the length of this period depending on the circum-
stances of the case. This interlocutory period gives opportunity for
a sounder determination that the adoption is for the best interest
of the child.
During the year since this law was passed, 684 petitions for adop-
tion of children have been filed in the State. In 42 petitions or 6%
of the total the placements were made by licensed child-placing
agencies which made the studies and recommendations to the Court
in regard to the adoptions. For the other 642 petitions, the State
Welfare Board had full responsibility for the investigations and rec-
ommendations to the Court. Forty-nine per cent of these adoption
petitions were filed in the three largest urban areas of the State:
Duval County-141 petitions, approximately 25% of the State total;
Dade County-121, approximately 20%, and Hillsborough County-75
or 11%.
The law allows 60 days for investigation of adoptions by the agency
and recommendation to the Court. During the year, the investiga-
tion of 526 of the petitions was completed and recommendations filed
with the Circuit Court. In 98% of these cases the State Welfare
Board made a favorable recommendation in regard to the adoption.
In 2% of the cases the agency investigation revealed that the proposed
plan was not in the best interest of the child and it was recommended
that the petitions be dismissed.
MAJOR AREAS OF SERVICE
Reviewing the year of administration of the Adoption Law, it is
apparent that the law and the accompanying services of the State
Welfare Board and licensed child-placing agencies have afforded new
and important protections to more than 684 children, their parents,
and adoptive parents. The areas in which the services stand out as
of major importance are as follows:
(1) A careful determination that the adoption is handled in ac-
cordance with the requirements of the law has assured the children
and adoptive parents less likelihood of future complications, litiga-
tions, or invalid adoptions, at the same time protecting the rights of
natural parents. The State Welfare Board has assumed responsibility
for clarifying any contradiction that appeared between birth registra-
tions and facts set forth in the adoption petitions, thus avoiding later
complications in securing new birth certificates, costly Court litiga-









tion over inheritance, and the like. The agency also determines that
all persons having a claim to a child are duly notified of the adoption
proceeding, understand its meaning, and have their rightful oppor-
tunity for presentation of objections. The agency, with its resources
for securing information, both within the State and in other States,
has been able to assist the attorneys in a number of cases in locating
absent parents, so that they might be notified of the adoption action.
The services of the agency in verifying facts presented to the Court
has afforded the Court additional basis for sound legal action. Many
attorneys and judges throughout the State have expressed their ap-
preciation of these services and, in numerous instances, have request-
ed the assistance of staff in these matters before filing a petition. In
one urban area alone in one-third of all the petitions studied the State
Welfare Board's investigation revealed certain omissions or incorrect
procedures that might have served as grounds for contested or vacated
adoptions.
(2) The value of skilled and impartial inquiry into the parentage
of children sought to be adopted and their physical potentiality has
given adoptive parents and the Courts factual information regarding
the suitability of children for adoption. Adoptive parents, if they
choose, may take these facts into consideration before proceeding to
final adoption. The agency has made every effort to secure initial
information about the heritage of children placed for adoption, at
the same time guarding against any exposure of the own mother and
her situation.
(3) A thorough determination of the financial, physical, moral,
and emotional aspects of adoptive homes through home contacts, con-
sultations with references, and careful evaluations has given knowl-
edge of the type homes in which children are being placed. If the
standards of a home are not such that the child will have reasonable
security, wholesome affection, and sound parental guardians, the
situation is brought to the attention of the Court.
(4) Through the year's administration of this new Adoption Law,
it is apparent that the law affords some definite protections to a large
group of children and, therefore, is quite valuable. However, certain
facts brought out through the work of the agency indicate need for
accompanying laws regulating the placement of children. In a large
percentage of the cases, it has been found that little is known of
children or the adoptive parents before placements are made. Place-
ments were arranged by the own mother or her family in 73% of the
cases, without the advantage of assistance from any agency that would
be in the position of making some study of the advisability of the
plan. In a number of instances the placements were arranged through
advertisements, the own parent and adoptive parents assuring each
other than "no questions would be asked." In 37% of the cases the
mothers were from other states and locating them to secure essen-
tial information that should have been known before the placement
is not an easy task.
SUPPORTING LAWS NEEDED
Still another disadvantage of independent placements is that when
the placements are already made and affection built up over several
months, alteration in the plans for the children is much less simple
even though the placements may not be satisfactory in some important
respects. Such findings point to the fact that an adequate and far-
reaching program for children cannot be accomplished by an adop-
tion law alone, but must be supported by other laws in the interest
of sound child welfare practice; for example, laws regulating the place-
ment of children for adoption and laws governing inter-state place-
ments.
Gaining the confidence of doctors, attorneys, other persons par-
ticipating in some way in adoption placements and those persons









responsible for the laws of the State and helping them to a broader
understanding of the importance of sound child welfare practice is
an important part of the agency's responsibility.


PART V-WAR SERVICES

The State Welfare Board, throughout the fiscal year, has continued
to cooperate with State, Federal and local agencies and organizations
in the rendering of special wartime services for the welfare of the
people of Florida. These varied in extent and duration, as the danger
of invasion lessened and conditions changed.
In addition to meeting current emergencies and necessities as fully
as was possible within its province, the Board has also developed in-
formation regarding social services that will be needed during the
post-war period, at the request of the State Planning Board.
Civilian War Assistance: This program, designed by the Federal
Government to meet the need for assistance to the civilian popula-
tion in the event of attack, fortunately has not been called into play
for that purpose. During the period, however, when "token" bombings
were a possibility, State Welfare Board staff stood by prepared to
render aid to any stricken communities.
In several instances, the Agency was called upon to assist in re-
habilitating and planning for American citizens whom the Federal
Government evacuated from its territory, as well as those repatriated
to the United States from enemy countries. Since the State Welfare
Board acted only as its agent, all costs in connection with these services
were borne by the Federal Government.
Assistance to Enemy Aliens and Others Affected by Restriction: As
an agent for the Federal Social Security Board, welfare staff has
assisted in giving needed services to enemy aliens who were restricted
as a protective measure. As those aliens who had been interned were
as a rule released or paroled if it was established that they were
not or had not been involved in subversive activities, the Agency was
asked to help them in making adjustments upon returning to their
home communities. In the limited number of cases referred, it was
found that these people were hesitant to face their old friends and to
*seek employment for fear of prejudices and accusations which they
felt they would meet. It is believed that a real service was rendered
by helping them to become self-maintaining and to contribute to
the war effort through their employment.
COOPERATION WITH SELECTIVE SERVICE
Dependency claims: During the past year the State Welfare Board
has continued its services to selective service boards in making in-
vestigations of dependency claims of registrants. Only 650 investiga-
tions were made during the year, as compared to 1,457 for the previous
year, the decrease being attributed to legislation pertaining to induc-
tion regulations and to increased benefits available for the dependents
of service men. In all instances staff findings were reported to the
respective local draft boards for their information in reaching final
decisions on requests for deferment.
S Medical survey. At the request of the State Selective Service
System, the State Board agreed to give further service to that agency
by participating in a nation-wide plan called the Medical Survey
Program. Because of the large number of men who had been dis-
charged from military service due to mental or physical disorders, the
War Department recognized the need for devising a plan whereby
induction stations might be furnished with medical and social in-
formation on registrants prior to induction. The program began op-
erating in Florida on May 15, 1944, and certain members of the district
staff were designated as medical field agents to work with the local








draft boards. Upon request of the local board, medical and social
,information is secured on those registrants whose ability to fit into
the military service is questioned. The reports of the field agents
are sent directly to the induction center where they are used by ex-
amining physicians. During the period May 15-June 30, a total
of 638 requests'for investigation were received.
ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW FOR NAVY
In October, 1943, the State Board responded to the request of the
Secretary of the Navy by making a study of administrative procedures
used by the U. S. Navy in its Family Allowances Program. As only
four states were asked to participate in this review, Florida was
honored in being selected as one of them. Within the month members
of the social work staff interviewed some 600 families receiving family
allowances, and submitted their findings to the U. S. Navy Department.
The Secretary of the Navy has since reported that the results of the
study served to facilitate and improve the program of family allow-
ances to the dependents of Navy Personnel.
SOCIAL PROTECTION
One of the important war services rendered by the State Welfare
Board during the past year has been the work of social staff in de-
veloping plans for social protection. This was not a new problem in
Florida, but the war had emphasized the need for communities to
assume responsibility for locating, treating and rehabilitating girls
infected with venereal disease. A survey made by District staff in
December, 1943, revealed that more than 1,000 girls had been in jails
during that month on social protection charges. The State Welfare
Board helped to meet this problem by cooperating with the State
Board of Health in making plans for the rehabilitation of girls who
were being treated in Rapid Treatment Centers. Several hundred
cases of this type have been handled during the past six months.
Experience has revealed that no one agency can solve the prob-
lem, since it is one with which law enforcement officers, public health
officials,' and social welfare agencies are concerned. District welfare
staffs, however, have provided leadership and guidance in developing
local plans for the prevention of delinquency and for working more
effectively with those girls who have gotten into difficulty. In almost
every county members of the staff are cooperating with local agencies
in interviewing girls prior to their commitment to jails and hospitals
and assisting them in making plans for their return to a more satis-
factory community life.
DEFENSE COUNCILS
During the year the State Welfare Board has continued to co-
operate with state and local defense councils in the activities and
interests of that organization. Members of the State and District
Boards and staff have served on committees of their local defense
councils. These committees are not only concerned with meeting
present-day problems but are also making post-war plans.
DAY CARE FOR CHILDREN
State and local staff members have continued to cooperate with
the State Department of Education, Child-care Committees and other
agencies in their efforts to provide local facilities for the care of
children while their mothers are employed. As the President's Emer-
gency fund for Day Care had been exhausted at the close of the fiscal
year of 1943, and no additional appropriation was made, the State
Welfare Board was unable to continue its program of day care for
the children of working mothers.
DEFENSE REPORTS
The State Welfare Board, through its district staff, has continued
to compile informational material pertaining to local war activities
and their effect on the economic and social life of the people of the
state. These reports, submitted quarterly from every county, cover
such subjects as economic and employment trends, health activities,
youth and recreation problems, and plans for the care of veterans.









PART VI-CASE CORRESPONDENCE

The State Welfare Board through its Special Services Division, pro-
vides a channel through which all inquiries on case situations are
analyzed, acknowledged, and handled in accordance with the prob-
lems presented.
This correspondence comes not only from the individual citizens of
the State but from federal and State officials, and from welfare
agencies throughout the nation.
During the year a total of 4976 letters were received and acknowl-
edged. by the State Office. Of this number 3915 were received from
welfare agencies and individuals interested in securing assistance for
persons who needed the services of the State Welfare Board.
All case correspondence is classified in one of the following groups:
1. Inquiries from other welfare agencies requesting the State Wel-
fare Board to render some specific service to their clients. Within
the year 1870 such letters were handled, which included 548
requests for verification of residence and authorization to return
stranded families and individuals to Florida.
Although the State Welfare Board does not have the responsi-
bility for authorizing the return of persons to this State, the
agency does refer such requests to the proper county officials
who are vested with this authority. A large number of inquiries
from other welfare agencies pertains to the investigation or
review of those persons who receive public assistance in other
states but are temporarily residing in Florida. The State Wel-
fare Board maintains a reciprocal agreement with other agen-
cies whereby such service is given to recipients of public as-
sistance from Florida who visit in other communities.
2. Requests for assistance, service or information on welfare ac-
tivites or resources that are available within the State and/or
agency. During the year, 1424 such letters were received, the
majority being requests for old age assistance and information
regarding the proper procedure for obtaining old age assistance.
3. Complaints from individuals who receive public assistance or
who have been denied assistance, and complaints from other
persons who are dissatisfied with some phase of the welfare
program. Although 1682 letters of complaint were received
during the year, this represents an unusually small percentage
of the total number of persons who received assistance or who
were denied the assistance for which they applied. A further
analysis of these letters reveals that 1089 were concerned with,
inadequacy of public assistance grants, while 386 were concerned
with inability to obtain public assistance. An even greater
number of such complaints might have been expected during
this period when so much public attention was given to the in-
creased costs of living and the availability of additional public
assistance funds with which grants could be raised to meet cur-
rent living expenses.
A comparatively small number of letters referred to discrimina-
tion on the part of Board or staffs, ill treatment by members of
the staff or objections to the policies or procedures of the
agency.
The State Welfare Board recognizes the importance of having a
central office responsible for handling this volume of correspondence
coming from many different sources, and covering every phase of
welfare activity in the State. Each letter is acknowledged and if the
service or information requested can be given from the State Office,
this is done, otherwise it is referred to the proper district office for








further attention. It is often necessary for the State Office to secure
information on specific cases or situations which have been brought
to their attention through correspondence. As a result, adjustments
can be made if needed and a report given to the individual who re-
ferred it for attention.
The State Welfare Board believes that definite values are to be
gained through a review of case situations as presented through cor-
respondence. Through this procedure the agency is assured that its
policies and procedures are being followed and that individuals are
receiving uniform treatment throughout the State. Through letters
written to thousands of individuals each year the State Office has
the opportunity of interpreting the State Welfare program as well
as pointing up the unmet social needs which exist in all sections of
the State.


PART VII-PERSONNEL

Peronnel turnover has continued to be one of the major problems
of the agency during the past year. A study of staffs of all state
public assistance agencies recently released by the Social Security
Board showed that for the year ending June, 1943, Florida had the
highest percentage of separations of all the states. Only seven states
had a higher percentage of social work vacancies than Florida. This
presents a most serious picture, since excessive personnel turnover is
recognized as an expensive process, in terms of both money and ser-
vice to the public. The State Welfare Board has been entrusted with
tremendous responsibilities, and can carry out these only if sufficient,
well qualified staff is available to give service.
Many factors account for the excessive shortage of staff. While
there is a nation-wide general shortage of professionally trained social
workers, the State Welfare Board has had the additional handicap
of having a lower, salary scale than most other organizations and
agencies in the state. The administration of'a social welfare program
requires a high degree of skill and experience, particularly in key po-
sitions in which are placed the chief administrative and supervisory
responsibilities. In comparing the salary scales of the State Welfare
Board with other state departments of public welfare, it is imme-
diately obvious that in this state there is a great discrepancy between
the remuneration and the degree of responsibility carried in admin-
istrative and supervisory positions.
An adequate well balanced compensation plan is prohibited by
the State Welfare Act, which sets a maximum salary for State Welfare
Board employees of $250 monthly. It is almost impossible to recruit
and retain administrative personnel with the necessary basic require-
ments of education and experience when handicapped by the low
salary scale caused by the existing statutory limitation. This limita-
tion has tended to keep all salaries at a lower level than is desirable
for the securing of sufficient staff in all positions. It has become
increasingly difficult to secure qualified visitors who are expected, at
an entrance salary of $115.00 monthly to supply their own automobiles.
Persons who would otherwise be interested in entering the field of
social work turn to other positions with higher salaries which require
no automobile and less strenuous work.
At the close of the last fiscal year ending June, 1943, there were
55 vacancies, but on June 30, 1944, there were 79 vacancies. An aver-
age of 72 vacancies existed during the past fiscal year. In May there
were 95 vacancies. The reason for the reduction in, vacancies from
May to June was the employment of school teachers on a temporary
basis during the summer. During the year there was a total of 397
separations from the staff, with only 381 appointments; There was
an average of approximately 500 regular employees. Although many








additional duties have been added, this means that the agency has
operated with less employees than at any time in its history. A total
of 101, or 26% of those who were separated, left to move to other cities
or states. The next largest single reason for separations was the secur-
ing of other employment, which accounted for 74, or 19% of separa-
tions. Seventy, or 18% left for personal reasons-most of them be-
cause of their home responsibilities and the inability to secure do-
mestic help. Fifty-three, or 13% resigned due to maternity or other
health reasons.
EDUCATIONAL LEAVE:
A notable gain in the personnel practices of the agency was the
granting of educational leaves with pay to seven members of the staff.
Because of the alarming shortage of trained child welfare workers,
these scholarships were made available by using unexpended Federal
Child Welfare funds and were granted to persons who could return
to the agency to strengthen child welfare services.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT:
During the year the staff has started on a study of standards of
performance. This is considered a part of the staff development pro-
gram which assists in improving the level of performance of each
staff member. The supervisory staff has necessarily placed a great
deal of. emphasis upon the careful orientation of new staff members.
A guide for orientation of clerical staff members has been developed
in addition to those, developed previously for social workers. By giving
careful attention to training on the job the inevitable loss caused by
each resignation and replacements is lessened. The staffs have also
studied recording and child welfare work during the year.
MERIT SYSTEM COUNCIL:
The Merit System Council has continued to give valuable service
to the agency. Members of the Merit System Council are: Mr. George
T. Shannon, Tampa, Chairman; Mr. Arthur R. Boring, Plant City,
Vice-Chairman; Miss Mary B. Merritt, Coral Gables; Dr. James W.
Day, Gainesville; Mr. E. Brannon Casler, Clearwater, and Mr. E. D.
Patterson, Graceville. The Merit System staff has been headed by
Dr. E. D. Hinckley.
PERSONNEL DIVISION RESPONSIBILITIES:
SThe Personnel Division Is responsible for the maintenance of in-
dividual personnel records on all employees, for recruiting staff and
assisting the districts to fill vacancies and obtain reference material,
for serving in a liaison capacity with the Merit System office and other
agencies working under the Merit System, for the general administra-
tion of service ratings, for tabulation of attendance and leave reports
and clearing of all personnel actions and applications. The volume
of work has steadily increased with the tremendous personnel turn-
over of the past few years.


PART VIII-STATEWIDE INTERPRETATION

Plans for the State Welfare Board and the district welfare boards
to coordinate their efforts in the development of a statewide inter-
pretation program that would better acquaint the public with the use
that is being made of taxpayers' funds, and of the services and assis-
tance rendered those in need, were initiated at a meeting of repre-
sentatives of each of the district boards and of the State Board, held
in Jacksonville in March.
At this meeting, the organization of a Statewide Informational
Committee was authorized, and the Chairman of the State Welfare
Board committee and one other member of the State Board, and the








chairmen of three district boards were appointed as an executive
committee to outline the scope and nature of the work to be undertaken.
Questionnaire submitted: The first action of the joint committee
was to submit a questionnaire to all district board members, for the
purpose of ascertaining the extent to which the welfare program as
a whole was understood in their respective communities and the
need for stronger interpretation. These queries were especially in-
tended to discover if the public was aware of the extent of the service
which the Agency renders other than in the distribution of public
assistance funds; of the procedures that are used to insure that
such funds are fairly distributed; of the fact that both state and
federal laws base such payments upon individual need, and the further
fact that in order to obtain matching federal funds the state must
comply with conditions imposed by the federal Social Security Act.
It was thought desirable to know, also, if the public confused procedures
required by law to establish the eligibility of applicants for and the
continuing eligibility of recipients of public assistance with "red
tape;" and if it was aware that the State Welfare Board practices
every possible economy in the administration of the program, and
assures the efficiency of employes through merit system examinations
and periodic evaluations during the period of employment.
Both State and district welfare board members were of the opinion
that better understanding of the state welfare program as a whole
would lead to helpful and constructive criticism upon the part of the
public, as well as assuring the confidence and contentment of re-
cipients of public assistance. It was agreed that since the program
was intended to benefit all sections of the state and a large group
of needy citizens, and was administered by the State Welfare Board
and the district welfare boards without compensation, that fuller co-
operation of the public and recipients alike would be obtained through
wider interpretation and that this would be of inestimable value.
The chairman of the State Board Committee, at the preliminary
meeting, had asserted that much of the progress made in Florida wel-
fare work was due to the high community standing of district board
members. He said that they were in an excellent strategic position to
properly present the program to their home communities, and that
they could render no greater service than by assuming local leader-
ship in all welfare movements.
Plans of the Committee, carefully worked out, were practically
complete at the time this report was written.


PART IX-FLORIDA COUNCIL FOR THE BLIND
The State Welfare Board, through its state and district staffs, has
cooperated closely with the Florida Council for the Blind in carrying
out its program of specialized services for the prevention of blind-
ness, restoration of sight, social adjustment and rehabilitation of the
blind. During the past year a series of conferences were held through-
out the state, to which all district directors and supervisors were in-
vited, to further coordinate the efforts of the two agencies to better
serve the purposes of each.
Due to the fact that the Council has a limited centralized staff
in its state headquarters at Tampa, the district and county offices
of the State Welfare Board serve as its local in-take offices. Referrals
are made to the Council on specialized analysis forms which are
evaluated by Council staff and referred to the department of the
Council best suited to fill the requested service. The Council has
three such departments, Sight Conservation, Special Services, and
Employment.
During the past year, the Sight Conservation Department has ar-
ranged for medical treatment of surgery for 86 persons, most of whom









were referred by State Welfare Board staff. Thirty-three of the per-
sons who received eye medical service by the Council were classified
as employable as a result of the treatment rendered. The department
has also distributed more than 15,000 pamphlets on various aspects of
prevention of blindness, and carried on a number of exhibits and other
activities to increase the public interest and information on the im-
portance of preserving good eye sight.
The Special Services Department renders a series of specialized ser-
vices designed to adjust blind persons to the condition of being with-
out sight. This department has distributed more than 335 talking
books, 45 white canes, 20 braille slates, 30 writing boards for long-
hand, and much other specialized equipment for the use of the blind.
The department also advises with partly-sighted children as to their
educational problems, and refers some children to the School for the
Blind, and assists others with continuing their education in the regular
public school system. The department maintains a library of sound
toys for blind children and many games for the adult blind, which are
'loaned upon request. A small library is also maintained on profes-
sional books relating to the rehabilitation of the blind.
The Employment Department of the Council has principally devoted
its efforts to the setting up of small vending stands in public build-
ings throughout the state. The Council now has 22 such stands, lo-
cated from Pensacola to Key West. During the past year these stands
earned a net to the operators of more than $27,000. This is more
than the entire annual appropriation of the Florida Council for the
Blind.
Under recent federal legislation, the Council is extending its re-
habilitation program and has already employed an additional place-
ment agent to place blind persons in many types of useful private
employment.


PART X-COMIfMODITY DISTRIBUTION
Discontinuance in April, 1943, of the distribution to relief clients of
surplus agricultural commodities, together with the earlier withdrawal
from the state of the Food Stamp Plan, limited federal outlets for
overloaded warehouses and for the breaking without waste of food
gluts to the School Lunch Program, state institutions and charitable
institutions.
Due, primarily, to the fact that the State Welfare Board was the
only agency charged by law to "receive and distribute all commodities
donated by the United States or any agency thereof," with considera-
tion also given to the benefits of which the state would be deprived
should no method of distribution be provided, the Board continued
the Commodity Department on a skeleton basis.
That it was justified in doing so was established by the receipt and
distribution during the fiscal year of commodities in the following
amounts:
To schools....................................................................................... $255,187.21
To state institutions............................................................. ..... 158,588.35
To charitable institutions........................................ ...... 10,074.60

Total ........... ......... ........... ......................$423,850.16
In this connection, the following statistics are pertinent:
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM:
Number counties participating.................... ................... 64
Number schools participating................................................. 809
Number children participating......................... .......................144,654
INSTITUTIONS:
Number receiving commodities................. ............... ........... 44
Inm ates .......................................... ............... .... 9,712









It is interesting to note that the number of children benefitting
from the School Lunch Program was larger than for any similar
period. This may be ascribed to a change in federal policy whereby
lunches were provided on a nutritional rather than a need basis. The
continuation of this program after related food programs had been
discarded is ascribed to national recognition of the importance of safe-
guarding the health and assuring the mental and physical develop-
ment of the citizens of tomorrow.
In order that the expense of maintaining the Commodity Depart-
ment might be borne to as large an extent as possible by those who
were directly benefitted, the State Welfare Board sought the coopera-
tion of state and charitable institutions and of the schools in which
lunch programs were in effect in defraying administrative cost. Fi-
nancial participation on the part of the schools was hampered by lack
of legal authorization. However, the cost to the State Welfare Board
of maintaining the Department for the entire fiscal year was but
$5,876,01, as contributions totaling $4,200.01 were received from state
institutions. The return from each, dollar of state funds expended
(including those provided by state institutions) was at the rate of
forty-two to one.
Under the procedure now in effect, commodities are routed direct
to state and charitable institutions, and are accepted at rail destina-
tions by school authorities or county commissioners who arrange for
local transportation. This minimizes the cost to the Agency of
handling.
Florida, incidentally, profited materially from the buying program
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, intended to supply military
and lend-lease needs and as an incentive to continued production by
protecting growers from financial loss and discouragement through
spoilage, distribution delays, or a sharply falling market.












ANALYSIS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944


Fund Balance July 1, 1943-State OAA and AB..........
State Appropriations for OAA and AB...................

Fund Balance July 1, 1943-State ADC ................
State Appropriations for ADC.........................
Total State Funds ....................

Fund Balance July 1, 1943-Federal OAA...............
Federal Grants for OAA ............... .............

Fund Balance July 1, 194--Federal AB.................
Federal Grants for AB .............................

Fund Balance July 1, 1943-Federal ADC...............
Federal Grants for ADC ...............................

Total Federal Funds ..................

Miscellaneous Funds Received-
Reimbursement for State Office Rent...............
Reimbursement for Commodity Division ............
Other Miscellaneous Income...... ..............

Total Funds Available for Period............


RECEIPTS

$ 93,998.82
6,540,220.86

80,748.10
845,066.96


72,221.21
4,586,724.79
5,342.95
311,899.00

35,175.13
674,202.97


$ 6,634,219.68

925,815.06



4,658,946.00

317,241.95

709,378.10



8 2,700.00
4,200.01
6,989.62


$ 7,560,034.74


5,685,566.05


13,889.63


$13,259,490.42







ANALYSIS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

DISBURSEMENTS


For Old Age Assistance ............................
Less: Cancellations .............................
Refunds ..................................
Net OAA Payments................................. .
From State OAA Fund....................
From Federal OAA Fund .........................
For Aid to the Blind .................................
Less: Cancellations ..............................
Refunds ..................................
Net AB Payments ....................................
From State AB Fund. ....... .......... ........
From Federal AB Fund ...........................
For Aid to Dependent Children ........................
Less: Cancellations ........ .....................
SRefunds...................................
Net ADC Payments ..............................
From State ADC Fund...........................
From Federal ADC Fund.........................
Total Assistance Payments............................
For Administrative Expenditures-
From State Funds-
Old Age Assistance.............................
Aid to the Blind .............................
Aid to Dependent Children ....................
All Other Services............................
From Federal Funds-
Old Age Assistance... ........................
Aid to the Blind ................. ....... ...
Aid to Dependent Children.....................
Total Administrative Expenditures .........
Total Disbursements for Period .................... .....
Excess of Receipts over Disbursements ................


$ 64,063.00
677.65




3,151.50-
21.50




2,966.CO
12.CO






$ 464,741.73
26,556.04
65,719.89
82.068.29


$ 8,609,250.50

64,740.65
8,544,50.>5


547,643.50

3,173.00
544,470.50


980,682.50

2,978.00
977,704.50


10,066,684.85


639,086.05


$ 213,628.30
26,556.05
65,719.50 $ 305,904.25


4,272,254.93
4,272,254.92




272,235.25
272,235.25




488,852.25
488.852.25


$ 944.990.30 944,990.30
$11,011,675.15
$ 2,247,815.27




















PROOF OF EXCESS OF RECEIPTS OVER DISBURSEMENTS


Fund Balance, June 30, 1944-State OAA & AB ...................................... ................................................. $1,531,957.27
Fund Balance, June 30, 1944--State ADC .................................. ................................................. 371,216.92
Fund Balance, June 30,1944-Federal OAA ......................................................................................... 173,321.25
Fund Balance, June 30, 1944-Federal AB ..... ........................................................... ................... 17,933.21
Fund Balance, June 30, 1944-Federal ADC .. ................... ............... .................... 153,386.62

Total Fund Balances, June 30, 1944 .... ................ ................................................


$2,247,815.27








EXPENDITURE OF THE STATE WELFARE DOLLAR IN
FLORIDA DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1943 1944

BY TYPE OF EXPENDITURE


State Welfare Board disbursements of state and federal funds
for the fiscal year June 30, 1943-July 1, 1944, totaled $11,011,675.15,
which included the cost of administration. Disbursements by pro-
grams were: Services to the Aged, $9,222,879.88; Services to the Blind,
$597,582.59; Services to Dependent Children, $1,109,144.29; *Other
Welfare Services, $82,068.39.
*Does not include Federal Child Welfare Services or other federal-
supported programs.












ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944
(State Total)

AID TO
Old Age DEPENDENT CHILDREN Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children


REPUE ,T3 FOR APPLI-
CATIONS REJECTED
AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible... 1,452 73 98 47
Disposed of for Other
Reasons............ 490 46 68 18

Applications-
Pending (July 1, 1943) 982 8,490 21,455 79
Received (July 1, 1943
to June 30, 1944)... 4,867 688 2,019 244
Total During Period.. 5,849 9,178 23,474 323
Total Disposed of.... 4,084 3,340 8,046 238
Approved for Pay-
ment ........... 3,206 669 1,815 161
Denied as Ineligible 682 1,827 4,230 65
Other Reasons..... 196 844 2,001 12
Pending (June 30, 1944) 1,765 5,838 15,428 85
CASES RECEIVING
AS iISTANCE-
Cases Receiving As-
sistance (July 1,
1943)*............ 41,046 3,330 7,705 2,484
Added (July 1, 1943,
to June 30, 1944)** 5,672 1,201 2,889 329
Total Cases Assisted
July 1, 1943, to
June 30, 1944)..... 46,718 4,531 10,594 2,813
Removed from Payroll
(July 1, 1943 to
June 30, 1944)*** 8,155 .1,409 3,259 506
Total Receiving As-
sistance (June 30,
1944)**** .......... 38,563 3,122 7,335 2,307

Cases receiving assistance are from the statistical records of the
agency and are gross.
** Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other cis-
tricts, and reinstatement of suspended cases.
*** Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts and suspended cases.
**** Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.










Aid to
Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind


Total Reviews Completed
(July 1, 1943 to June 30,1944) 51,586 5,979 3,220 60,785

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services ............... .... .... .............. 7,387
Active Service Cases.................. .................... 2,733
M ental H hospitals ......................................... 46
Penal Institutions........................................ 41
Children's Institutions ................... ................. 34
Juvenile Courts.... ...................................... 138
Courts on Adult Cases ..................................... 4
County and City Welfare Departments ......................... 1,869
Crippled Children's Commission..................... ......... 52
States- Reciprocal ............................................ 5,007
Selective Service Investigations................................. 650'
Interpretation Activities........................................ 3,448
Others........................ .............. ......2,347










PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS TO RECIPIENTS BY COUNTIES
July, 1943 June, 1944 ,
(Cases shown are those receiving assistance as of June, 1944. Assistance is the total amount received for the period July, 1943, to June, 1944.)

AID TO
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE AID TO THE BLIND DEPENDENT CHILDREN

Cases Cases Cases TOTAL
Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of All Assistance
Financial Payments* Financial Payments Financial' Payments Payments *
Assistance Assistance Assistance


DISTRICT NO. 1--
B ay ....................................
Escambia. ..............................
H olm es.................................
Okaloosa................................
c Santa Rosa. .............................
Walton.................................
Washington .............................

Total................................

DISTRIcT No. 2-
Calhoun ............................. .
Franklin.................... ... ... .
Gadsden ...............................
Gulf ...................................
Jackson................................
Jefferson................................
L eon ...................................
Liberty .................................
W akulla ................................

Total ........................... .. .


440
1,2E6
474
491
603
567
502

4,333

214
152
694
120
1,281
546
857
159
217

4,240


3 95,343.50
244,834.50
83,621.50
103,904.50
122,917.00
110,963.50
100,403.50

$ 861,988.00

47,892.00
29,430.50
124,790.50
22,479.00
233,660.00
89,544.50
143,439.00
33,549.00
40,469.50

$ 765,254.00


S 6,639.50
13,903.50
7,494.00
4,441.50
10,863.50
8,611.50
8,853.00

$ 60,806.50

4,659,50
2,266.00
6,054.50
1,113.00
10,593.50
4,074.50
7,812.00
1,667.00
3,046.00

$ 41,286.00


$ 11,321.50
30,852.00
16,645.00
13,314.50
14,529.50
19,469.00
18,665.50


$ 113,304.50
289,590.00
107,760.50
121,660.50
148,310.00
139,044..00
127,922.00


124,797.00 $1,047,591.50


6,310.00
2,299.50
12,488.50
2,607.00
25,078.00
5,520.00
14,232.00
3,235.00
6,430.00


58,861.50
33,996.00
143,333.50
26,199.00
269,331.50
99,139.00
165,483.00
38,451.00
49,945.50


$ 78,200.00 $ 884,740.00










DISTRICT NO. 3-
Columbia......... ..................
Dixie............. .................
Gilchrist........ .................. .
Hamilton.............................
Lafayette ...........................
Levy ................................
M adison ..............................
Suwannee.............. ..........
Taylor.... .....................

Total................. ... ..........

DISTRICT No. 4-
Citrus .............. .......... ...
Hernando ................... .........
w Pasco ................. ...............
Pinellas ...........................

T otal............ ...... ............

DISTRICT No. 5-
Alachua...............................
Baker ...............................
Bradford................................
C lay...................................
Flagler...... ...........................
N assau ................................
Putnam .... ............................
St. Johns .............................
Union.................................

Total ....... ....... ..............


91,956.50
24,850.50
18,266.00
54,257.50
26,546.50
67,846.50
115,026.00
106,463.00
59,087.50


4,599.50
2,905.50
2,027.00
2,749.00
1,040.00
2;868.00
4,774.50
6,043.50
3,654.00


11,111.00
7,522.50
6,524.50
10,362.50
5,487.50
9,290.50
14,547.50
16,125.00
11,822.00


$ 107,667.00
35,278.50
26,817.50
67,369.00
33,045.00
80,005.00
134,348.00
128,631.50
74,563.50


3,089 564,300.00 157 30,661.00 355 $ 92,793.00 $ 687,754.00

217 $ 43,229.00 15 $ 2,970.50 13 $ 5,051.00 $ 51,250.50
185 37,527.00 6 1,344.00 6 1,574.00 40,445.00
408 81,514.00 23 5,023.50 19 6,903.00 93,440.50
1,782 461,690.50 64 17,296.00 86 31,529.00 510,515.50

2,592 $623,960.50 108 $ 26,634.00 124 $ 45,057.00 $ 695,651.50

1,160 $ 238,827.00 '80 $ 17,098.00 92 $ 28,743.50 $ 284,668.50
199 43,598.50 15 3,969.00 34 8,266.50 55,834.00
269 61,175.00 12 2,982.00 27 8,138.00 72,295.00
221 52,982.50 7 1,503.00 24 5,507.50 59,993.00
89 19,262.50 3 426.50 3 1,594.00 21,283.00
314 70,062.50 15 3,345.50 31 10,833.50 84,241.50
652 144,612.00 61 12,226.00 31 11,918.00 168,756.00
579 130,130.00 29 6,301.00 29 11,192.00 147,623.00
178 37,781.50 3 812.50 17 5,335.00 43,929.00


3,661


$ 798,431.50


288 $ 91,528.00


$ 938,623.00


$ 48,663.50









PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS TO RECIPIENTS BY COUNTIES
July, 1943- JUNE, 1944
(Cases shown are those receiving assistance as of June, 1944. Assistance is the total amount received for the period July, 1943, to June, 1944.)

AID TO
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE AID TO THE BLIND DEPENDENT CHILDREN
TOTAL
All Assistance
Cases Cases Cases Payments*
Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of Receiving Amount of
Financial Payments* Financial Payments* Financial Payments*
Assistance Assistance Assistance


DISTRICT No. 6-
Duval ..................................

DISTRICT No. 7-
Hillsborough ..........................

2 DISTRICT No. 8-
Charlotte......... .......... .........
Collier..................... ...........
De Soto.............. ........ .....
Glades...................................
Hardee.... .................. .......
Hendry....... ....................
Highlands .............. .........
Lee..... ............... .........
Manatee .............................
Sarasota ................................

Totals.............................

DISTRICT No. 9-
Dade................ ... ............ .

DISTRICT No. 10-
Broward ................................
Indian River ............................


3,141

2,726

133
52
218
67
307
89
168
352
490
214


2,090

2,719

364
161


$ 770,553.50

$ 583,917.50

$ 32,162.50
11,548.50
45,796.50
14,234.00
71,952.00
19,668.00
38,226.00
83,456.00
102,715.50
45,188.50


$ 464,947.50

$ 754,481.50

$ 81,386.50
37,767.00


.222 $1 53,872.50


$ 41,076.00

$ 1,152.00
967.50
2,748.00
724.50
3,847.50
740.50
2,665.00
4,024.50
3,173.00
3,320.50


97 $ 23,363.00

127 $ 38,279.00


$ 8,824.50
5,086.00


$ 81,421.00 $ 905,847.00


$ 683,948.50

$ 38,822.50
13,278.50
52,846.00
15,338.00
88,836.50
22,627.50
46,534.50
99,602.50
112,259.00
53,390.00


$ 543,535.00


$ 828,477.50

$ 100,988.50
50,241.00


164 $ 58,955.00

13 $ 5,508.00
3 762.50
12 4,301.50
2 379.50
35 13,037.00
3 2,219.00
15 5,643.50
32 12,122.00
15 6,370.50
13 4,881.00


$ 55,224.50

5 35,717.00

$ 10,777.50
7,388.00










M artin ................. ...............
Monroe.... .............................
Okeechobee ..........................
Palm Beach.............. ......... ....
St. Lucie................. ..............

Total................ .:...... :...

DISTRICT No. 11-
Lake ............................... ....
M arion ................. ............ ....
Polk................................ ....
Sum ter ........................ ........

Total..............................

DISTRICT No. 12-
Brevard................ .......
S Orange .............. ......... ... .
Osceola................. ....... ....
Seminole. .. ............. .. .........
Volusia ................. ............ ....


Total.............. ................


23,694.00
77,839.00
21,910.50
226,009.50
42,200.50


1,607.50
21,490.00
5,547.50
15,096.50
3,983.00


2,364.00
14,686.00
2,699.50
37,930.50
8,608.50


27,665.50
114,015.00
30,157.50
279,036.50
54,792.00


2,007 S 510,807.00 242 $ 61,635.00 217 $ 84,454.00 $ 656,896.00


628 $ 155,987.50 43 $ 9,376.50 50 $ 14,416.50 $ 179,780.50
1,129 214,667.50 63 13,034.00 69 22,235.00 249,936.50
1.941 496,557.50 125 33,760.50 230 83,427.00 613,745.00
404 94,647.50 24 5,280.50 43 10,988.50 110,916.50

4,102 $ 961,860.00 255 $. 61,451.50 392 $ 131,067.00 $1,154,378.50


408 $ 93,018.00 14 $ 3,907.50 36 $ 13,183.50 $ 110,109.00
1,274 319,265.00 76 20,788.00 136 49,403.50 389,456.50
388 95,530.00 19 5,302.50 30 8,414.50 109,247.00
562 127,812.50 19 4,245.00 26 8,002.00 140,059.50
1,231 302,279.50 101 24,783.00 70 22,039.00 349,101.50


3,863


$ 937,905.00


$ 59,026.00


$ 101,042.50 $1,097,973.50


STATE TOTAL.................................. 38,563 $8,598,406.00* 2,307 $ 546,754.00* 3,122 $ 980,256.00* $10,125,416.00*


Assistance payments shown on this table are gross and represent obligations incurred by the Agency at the time payrolls were written.
For net total amounts see table showing analysis of receipts and disbursements.














REPORT OF THE


TWELVE
FLORIDA WELFARE
DISTRICTS


July 1, 1943-June 30, 1944








DISTRICT DIRECTORS
(AS OF JUNE 30, 1944)
District 1. Mrs. Anna Hollingsworth.......................DeFuniak Springs
District 2. Miss Sada Bostick... ................................ .........................Quincy
District 3. Miss Scott Turnbull.......................................................ike Oak
District 4. Mrs. Nenabelle G. Dame................................ Clearwater
District 5. Miss Estelle Long................................... Green Cove Springs
District 6. Miss Dasibel Clement............................................Jacksonville
District 7. Mrs. Furma DeWitt.........................................................Tampa
District 8. Miss Virginia Millsip...............................................ort Myers
District 9. Miss Winfred L. Cox (acting)........................................Miami
District 10. Mrs. Mamie Ruth Simon................................West Palm Beach
District 11. Miss Emma Maurer, (acting)...................................Leesburg
District 12. Mrs. Evelyn Cummins... ............................................ Orlando

DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS
(AS OF JUNE 30, 1944)
District 1. Mr. A. G. Campbell, Jr., DeFuniak Springs, Chairman; Mrs.
F. E. Mitchell, Valparaiso, Vice-Chairman; Reverend A. Clarke
Dean, Panama City; Mrs. J. E. Daniels, Pensacola; Mr. H. A.
Brosnaham, Pensacola; Mr. J. A. Jacobi, Molino; Mr. J. T. Evans,
Bonifay; Mr. T. W. Jones, Milton.
District 2. Mrs. W. N. Faircloth, Quincy, Chairman; Mr. B. H. Dickens,
Port St. Joe, Vice-Chairman; Mrs. Eleanor Floyd, Apalachicola;
Mrs. Flora Burton, Marianna; Mr. H. D. Ward, Cottondale; Miss
Sallie Puleston, Monticello; Mrs. O. O. Mickler, Tallahassee; Mrs.
Eva Rhoden, Bristol; Mr. Otis M. Ashmore, Sopchoppy; Reverend
Tenney I. Deane, Quincy; Mr. C. Edgerton Patterson, Tallahassee.
District 3. Mr. B. W. Helvenston, Jr. Live Oak, Chairman; Mr. S. B.
Hardee, Trenton, Vice-Chairman; Dr. E. F. Montgomery, ;Lake
City; Mrs. Mamie C. Redding, Cross City; Mrs. Barney Howard,
Jasper; Mrs. Maude Adamson, Mayo; Mr. J. P. Kimble, Bronson;
Mrs. Van H. Priest, Madison.
District 4. Mr. Frank J. Booth, Clearwater, Chairman; Mr. Jasper C.
Carter, Dade City, Vice Chairman; Mrs. Niel W. Upham, St.
Petersburg; Dr. Grace Whitford, Ozona; Mrs. A. B. Endsley,
Brooksville; Mr. Henry D. Bassett, Inverness.
District 5. Mr. Ira Thomas, Green Cove Springs, Chairman; Mr. H.
M. Agin, Waldo, Vice-Chairman; Mrs. J. W. McCollum, Gaines-
ville; Mrs. William Knabb, MacClenny; Mr. L. A. Rennolds, Starke;
Mrs. Nell L. Allen, Bunnell; Mrs. Adele S. Fisher, Fernandina;
Mrs. Jean L. B. Burt, Palatka; Mr. George B. Gorman, St. Augus-
tine; Mrs. Joe Hill Williams, Lake Butler.
District 6. Mr. George M. Tanner, Baldwin, Chairman; Mr. Milton C.
Moore, Jacksonville, Vice-Chairman; Mrs. Ben Stein, South Jack-
sonville; Mrs. Charles R. Norton, South Jacksonville; Mrs. Francis
B. Childress, Jacksonville; Dr. Robert Cleveland, Jacksonville;
Mr. George L. Rosborough, Jacksonville.
District 7. Mr. Gettis B. Henderson, Tampa, Chairman; Mr. L. B.
Poston, Tampa, Vice-Chairman; Mrs. Maude Hough, Tampa; Mrs.
R. W. Simpson, Tampa; Mrs. R. A. Marsicano, Tampa; Mr. Raul
Vega, Tampa; Reverend A. R. Larrick, Plant City.
District 8. Mr. C. Parke Anderson, Avon Park, Chairman; Mr. Sam W.
Johnston, Fort Myers, Vice-Chairman; Mrs. May D. Durrance,
Punta Gorda; Mr. Howard W. Robarts, Arcadia; Mr. Lloyd M.
Lilly, Moore Haven; Mrs. J. A. McGehee, Clewiston; Judge W. H.
Tucker, Bradenton; Mr. A. B. Shogren, Sarasota.








District 9. Mr. Troy C. Davis, Miami, Chairman; Mrs. Bernard Simon,
Miami, Vice-Chairman; Dr. R. L. Allen, Miami; Miss Marie An-
derson, Miami; Mr. T. Paul Haley, Homestead; Mr. Neil J. Hayes,
Miami; Mr. A. L. Reynolds, Miami.
District 10. Dr. Carl N. Herman, West Palm Beach, Chairman; Mr.
M. R. Cartwright, Stuart, Vice-Chairman; Mr. Warren T. Zeuch,
Vero Beach; Mr. E. H. Hunt, Okeechobee; Mr. Joe Hill, West Palm
Beach; Mrs. R. L. Murray, Belle Glade; Mr. Gerald Saunders, Key
West.
District 11. Mrs. J. M. Douglas, Weirsdale, Chairman; Mr. R. B. Fuller,
Mulberry, Vice-Chairman; Mr. L. C. Sinclair, Winter Haven; Mr.
Nye Jordan, Bartow; Mr. J. B. McLean, Lakeland; Mr. S. H. Bow-
man, Clermont; Mrs. A. B. Dean, Eustis; Mrs. Elmer Boring, Wild-
wood; Mr. Merrill M. Shaw, Ocala.
District 12. Mr. Eldridge Hart, Winter Park, Chairman; Mr. George
I. Fullerton, New Smyrna Beach, Vice-Chairman; Mr. H. H. Hud-
son, Titusville; Mr. W. F. Cappleman, Winter Garden; Mrs. Ruth
Maguire, Orlando; Mrs. P. K. Weaver, Kissimmee; Mrs. Mary G.
Holler, Sanford; Mr. John A. Holder, DeLand; Mrs. L. W. Sum-
merlin, Daytona Beach.








DISTRICT I
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944
Old Age Aid to Dependent Aidtothe
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943......... $55,458.50 810,166.50 $ 3,595.00
August............ 55,121.00 9,869.00 3,644.00
September.......... 56,839.50 9,670.50 4,206.50
October............ 60,824.50 9,429.50 4,598.00
November.......... 63,997.50 9,269.50 4,819.00
December.......... 67,539.50 9,167.50 4,975.00
January,1944...... 69,985.50 9,008.00 5,152.00
February........... 71,759.50 10,025.00 5,419.00
March............. 73,780.50 10,570.00 5,499.50
April.............. 95,091.50 11,217.50 5,689.50
May............... 95,359.50 12,465.50 6,603.50
June............... 96,231.00 13,938.50 6,605.50

Total...... 861,988.00 $124.797.00 $60,806.50 $1,047,591.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........... 207 10 21 7
Disposed of for Other Reasons............ .......... ......... .........
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 43 1,454 3,627 11
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30,1944)................... 529 126 343 35
Total During Period........... 572 1,580 3,970 46
Total Disposed of............. 468 793 1,898 37
Approved for Payment...... 403 172 431 27
Denied as Ineligible......... 54 290 723 10
Other Reasons ............. 11 331 744 .. ..
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 104 787 2,072 9

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance July
1, 1943).................... 4,545 498 1,081 279
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 624 265 630 56
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 5,169 763 1,711 335
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t.. .. 836 239 509 69
Total Receiving Assistance
(June30. 1944)$............ 4,333 524 1,202 266

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.









CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Chiloren the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 0, 1944)..... 5,773 988 409 7,170

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Sern ices to-
intake Services... ............... ............................ 846
Active Service Cases.................. ..................... 213
? ental Hospitals ........................................ 2
Penal Institt tions .................. .......... ............... 3
Cl ildren's Institutions....................................... 1
Juvenile Cot rts .......................................... 43
Cril pled Cl i'oren's Ccmmission.............................. 10
States-Re( ii rocal......................................... 471
Selective Sern ice investigations ..... ....................... 54
Interpretation Acitvities.................................... 72
Others.................................................. 190


SPECIAL SERVICES
During the past year District I staff have continued to cooperate
with other agencies, such as the Health Unit, Red Cross, Tuberculosis
Association, Crippled Children's Commission, Council for the Blind,
civic and church organizations. Staff also continued active participa-
tion in such local projects as USO, civic clubs, Red Cross volunteer
service and War Fund drives.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Organization of the Gulf Health and Wel-
fare Council, composed of representatives of social agencies and in-
terested lay persons, has been a healthful development. The broad
purpose .of the Council is to develop whatever social resources may be
found lacking for the proper protection of the community against
damaging influences. District staff members were active in the for-
mation of the Council and a district unit supervisor is its welfare
adviser The District Welfare Board cooperated with the Red Cross,
Salvation Army, Associated and Catholic Charities, USO and Travelers'
Aid over a period of four months in the handling of social protection
problems resulting in the arousing of public interest to the extent that
the City and County have employed a medical social worker. The
district-welfare board field representative, director and supervisor each
attended one or more meetings of the Negro Wartime Health Commit-
tee, advising on special problems. The principal purpose of the Com-
mittee is to consider and promote venereal disease control. The Agency
has continued cooperative planning with Pensacola Community Chest
and the City of Pensacola regarding child welfare services. Welfare
funds come from the two sources named.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Staff cooperated in a community clinic,
held in June, for the purpose of assisting the town of Milton in planning
to meet problems arising from the establishment of the Naval base at
Whiting Field. A permanent committee on Health and Welfare has
been appointed, among the members of which are the Santa Rosa
County member of the District I Welfare Board, the district welfare
supervisor, and four district welfare visitors.
OKALOOSA COUNTY: Several members of district welfare board
staff, including the district director, unit supervisor, visitors and senior








stenographer took an active part in the organization of the Crestview
Pilot Club, sponsored by the DeFuniak Springs Pilot Club. The purpose
of the Club is to improve the moral, civic, industrial, commercial and
intellectual welfare of the community. District welfare board director
and supervisors for Units 2 and 3 have been working with the staff
of health units in Okaloosa, Walton and Holmes counties to secure a
written agreemerit regarding cooperative handling of cases between
the two agencies. One of the proposed articles of agreement has as
its objective the raising of funds to meet emergency needs of clients.
WALTON COUNTY: Staff members and district board member
were instrumental in perfecting an organization intended to meet
emergency welfare needs of residents and transients when no other
resource is available. The chairman of the district board serves as a
member of the governing board of the organization.
HOLMES COUNTY: Staff members have directed their efforts
over a period of seven years toward the establishment of a health
unit. This unit was established in Holmes County in January, 1944.
A definite contribution from the Agency was the relinquishing of its
office building to the health unit, as no other suitable space was avail-
able in the town of Bonifay for this purpose. The Holmes County
district board member, welfare staff and the staff of the health unit
are now attempting to raise a local fund for use in emergency sit-
uations.
BAY COUNTY: The district welfare board has participated in
an inter-agency agreement in handling social protection cases. A
Council of Social Agencies has been organized in Panama City, with
the Agency represented on two committees. With the assistance of
the Community Chest it has been possible to arrange for a child
welfare worker in this county., Prior to the organization of the Council
of Social Agencies, several informal group meetings were held by rep-
resentatives of the various Bay County agencies. At these meetings,
staff members presented the need for organized and supervised recrea-
tion for children. This led to the setting up of an organized recreation-
al program and the securing of a recreational director. The district
welfare supervisor serves as chairman of the child care committee of
the Civilian Defense Council in Panama City.








DISTRICT II
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943......... $49,671.00 $ 6,579.00 $ 2,751.50
August............ 49,531.00 6,437.00 2,813.50
September......... 50,856.00 6,264.00 2,891.00
October............ 52,581.50 6,214.00 3,055.00
November......... 55,360.50 6,113.50 3,180.00
December.......... 58,385.00 5,956.50 3,244.50
January, 1944....... 60,479.00 5,660.00 3,351.50
February.......... 62,258.50 5,834.50 3,546.00
March............. 65,145.00 6,540.50 3,671.00
April.............. 86,295.00 6,920.50 3,772.50
May............... 86,939.00 7,544.50 4,477.00
June............... 87,752.50 8,136.00 4,532.50

Total...... $765,254.00 $78,200.00 $41,286.00 $ 884,740.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age _______ Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible........... 115 6 2 3
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 142 12 .......... 4

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 70 569 1,408 5
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30,1944)................... 375 85 236 25
Total During Period........... 445 654 1,644 30
Total Disposed of............. 357 417 985 24
Approved for Payment ...... 288 94 236 13
Denied as Ineligible......... 56 285 649 11
Other Reasons.............. 13 38 100
Pending (June 30, 1944) ....... 88 237 659 6

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943).............. 4,564 266 .585 227
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 454 128 307 26
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 5,018 394 892 253
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t...... 778 107 236 51
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)t............ 4,240 287 656 202

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
41










Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1,-1943to June 30, 1944)..... 5,307 464 309 6,080

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services. ............................................ 276
Active Service Cases......................................... 143
Penal Institutions ............................................ 3
Children's Institutions ...................................... 1
Juvenile Courts ...................................... ....... 2
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 41
Crippled Children's Commission....................... .... 3
States- Reciprocal......................................... 275
Selective Service Investigations .............................. 28
Interpretation Activities ..................................... 210
O others ........................................... 79



SPECIAL SERVICES
In all communities of the district board members and staff have
assisted in the development of resources for the welfare needs of the
people.
GADSDEN COUNTY: Various communities are planning for the es-
tablishment of a local fund to care for emergencies. Staff members are
working with the Woman's Club and taking part in "Play Night," a
club sponsored to provide recreation for junior and senior high school
students in Quincy.
CALHOUN COUNTY: Staff is working with other groups to establish
a county health unit. The Agency is also working with the Red
Cross in encouraging low-income groups in the organization of nutri-
tion, home nursing and first aid classes in every community.
LIBERTY COUNTY: There is no doctor and no health facilities avail-
able in the county, and staff has aided in the establishment of a health
unit. Plans have been discussed with county commissioners for cre-
ating a general relief fund. Staff has assisted the Red Cross in or-
ganizing a nurse's aid course, and has worked with the health depart-
ment in arranging examinations for the mobile X-ray unit.
JACKSON COUNTY: The child welfare worker is a member of the
Jackson County Child Care Committee of the State Defense Council
and assists in planning for existing nursery schools. This group has
provided facilities for the care of white children between the ages
of 6 and 16 during'the summer months. Staff has worked with other
organizations toward the establishment of a permanent recreation
program for the youth of Marianna, with a playground fully equipped
and a full-time recreational worker.
JEFFERSON COUNTY: There is only one doctor in the county and
staff is working with other organizations in securing a full-time phy-
sician under plans provided by the national government. Staff mem-
bers are also cooperating in providing social protection for girls.
LEON COUNTY: Staff members participated in the joint planning
of all agencies on the social protection program. They are serving on
a number of community committees, including one that is planning
services needed in the community in the post-war period. The Social









Service Exchange is being carried forward as a community resource
and this group has been responsible for securing a Traveler's Aid
worker.
GULF COUNTY: The visitor has worked with the Woman's Club in
planning for a fund to provide for health needs of children.
WAKULLA COUNTY: The visitor is a member of a group responsible
for providing recreation for young people in the Crawfordville com-
munity.
FRANKLIN COUNTY: Staff members have made plans with county
commissioners to provide funds for transients stranded in Apalachi-
cola, particularly where children are concerned. As members of the
Franklin County Health Council, staff has been responsible for se-
curing funds to provide needs of children for spectacles, tonsilectomies,
ear treatments and in other cases. Staff and district board are par-
ticipating in planning recreational facilities for adolescent groups.








DISTRICT III
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $37,167.00 $ 7,661.00 $ 2,065.00
August............ 37,295.50 7,577.00 2,101.50
September......... 37,674.50 7,560.00 2,169.50
October........... 38,892.00 7,551.50 2,243.00
November.......... 40,380.00 7,374.50 2,289.50
December.......... 42,678.00 7,248.50 2,432.50
January, 1944 ...... 43,733.00 7,114.00 2,441.00
February........... 45,029.00 7,396.00 2,487.50
March.............. 46,471.50 7,754.50 2,550.50
April.............. 59,470.00 7,851.00 2,552.50
May............... 67,462.00 8,309.00 3,687.50
June............... 68,047.50 9,396.00 3,641.00
Total...... $564,300.00 $92,793.00 $30,661.00 $ 687,754.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible........... 39 1 4 1
Disposed of for Other Reasons. ..................... ........
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 100 612 1,541 7
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 473 78 229 14
Total During Period........... 573 690 1,770 21
Total Disposed o'f............. 383 300 749 16
Approved for Payment ..... 326 96 253 9
Denied as Ineligible......... 43 125 298 7
Other Reasons.......... .... 14 79 198 .... ...
Pending (June 30, 1944) ....... 190 390 1,021 5
CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943) .............. 3,226 334 742 174
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 417 127 323 13
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)...... 3,643 461 1,065 187
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944) ...... 554 106 248 30
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)t ............ 3,089 355 817 157

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t.Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
44











Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944).... 3,899 459 198 4,556

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services........................................... 247
Active Service Cases...... ................... ............. 160
Juvenile Courts ................................... ............ 1
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 62
States-Reciprocal ........................................ 368
Selective Service Investigations ................... ......... 1
Interpretation Activities .................................... 158
O others. ............. ................................ .. 11


SPECIAL SERVICES
District staff feels that in many ways the Agency has been helpful
to civic clubs and other organizations in the development of community
consciousness of the needs of individuals. This is reflected in in-
creased assistance.
GILCHRIST COUNTY: The county has developed a resource in the
form of an emergency hospital fund, administered by the county
commissioners. A family is permitted, in emergency, to borrow as
much as $75 during a year to be used for needed medical treatment.
The money is repaid in small amounts as the family is able. Two
thousand dollars ($2,000) of race track funds was earmarked by the
commissioners for this purpose. The district welfare visitor cooperated
with interested groups in getting the movement started, resulting in
special legislative authorization to use these funds to meet such a
need. The visitor, upon request, assists the commissioners in the in-
vestigation of need. As a member of the Woman's Club Committee
the visitor is participating in the effort of the Rotary Club to secure
an agreement with the county school board to provide lunches for
school children of the county.
HAMILTON COUNTY: District welfare visitors have cooperated with
interested citizens in efforts to provide a recreational program for
young people, by supplying information as to the needs of children in
families receiving aid to dependent children and data regarding
similar programs in other areas. The district board member was
among the first to become interested in such a program and has been
active in pointing out its need to others.
COLUMBIA COUNTY: There has been some agitation in this county
by interested citizens and the district welfare staff for permitting the
Lake City school nurse to work in county schools, or for the commis-
sioners to employ another nurse for this purpose. Visitors have given
information as to the needs of children throughout the county, as
there is no health unit.









DISTRICT IV
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $47,323.50 $ 4,180.50 $ 1,977.00
August........... 47,418.00 4,012.50 1,998.00
September. ........ 47,247.50 3,942.00 2,071.00
October............ 47,371.00 3,944.00 2,114.50
November.......... 48,406.50 3,831.00 2,207.50
December......... 48,936.50 3,710.00 2,194.50
January, 1944..... 49,511.50 3,613.00 2,198.00
February.......... 49,921.50 3,573.00' 2,251.50
March............. 50,563.00 3,509.00 2,198.00
April.............. 61,425.50 3,513.00 2,242.50
May............... 62,454.00 3,557.00 2,517.50
June............... 63,382.00 3,672.00 2,664.00
Total...... $623,960.50 $45,057.00 $26,634.00 $ 695,651.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible .......... 88 1 3 3
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 14 1 1 1
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 86 347 888 6
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)...... ............ 378 34 99 16
Total During Period ........... 464 381 987 22
Total Disposed of............. 274 84 187 9
Approved for Payment...... 189 9 23 3
Denied as Ineligible......... 63 60 119 5
Other Reasons ............. 22 15 45 1
Pending (June 30, 1944) ....... 190 297 800 13
CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943). ............. 2,820 152 380 116
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)* ................. 322 30 67 11
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 3,142 182 447 127
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t..... 550 58 149 19
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 20, 1944)t............ 2,592 124 298 108

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
t Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
46









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 3,389 228 148 3,765


OTHER ACTIVITIES


Services to-
Intake Services.............. ............................ .18
Active Service Cases........................................ 54
Mental Hospitals.......................................... 2
Penal Institutions ......................................... 1
Juvenile Courts............. .............................. 7
County and City Welfare Departments....................... 14
States-Reciprocal. .................................... .. 312
Selective Service Investigations ............................. 30
Interpretation Activities.................................... 10
Others.......................................... ....... 59


SPECIAL SERVICES
The Agency has been helpful in developing a variety of services
in all counties of the district.
PINELLAS COUNTY: The St. Petersburg Lions Club accepts any
referral from the Agency for glasses and has offered to provide funds
to meet special services for the blind that cannot otherwise be fi-
nanced. The Agency was asked to make a local survey to determine
the extent of unmet needs, and the Florida Council for the Blind has
offered to assist. A visitor who majored in home economics represents
the Agency on the Nutrition Committee of the Defense Council. The
director is a member of the St. Petersburg Community Welfare Council
and the board of directors of the Pinellas County Tuberculosis Associa-
tion.
Other services: The director named the local welfare agencies and
briefly explained the duties of teachers in connection with the Lanham
Day Nursery; each year a representative of the Agency explains the
state welfare program to Junior League provisionals; the agency helps
local civic groups select families for Christmas benevolences; it refers
children to the local Crippled Children's Home; it helps local church
groups select projects for use of "welfare funds;" cooperates in case
work planning with the sheriff, probation officers and the judge of
the juvenile court where the family of the child is known to the
agency; worked with the Junior League in using volunteers whose ma-
jor project will be to help catalogue and set up the Agency library;
has a referral agreement with the Dental Association and Medical
Association; handles requests from established agencies on a reciprocal
basis.
PASCO COUNTY: The supervisor is a member of the County Wel-
fare Board which meets monthly to approve all direct relief cases.
The County Administrative Board has agreed to use the Agency as
a clearing house, which thereby serves as a social service exchange
to avoid duplication. Staff makes all investigations for the Lions Club
where glasses have been requested and follows through on cases re-
ferred to and by the Florida Council For the Blind. The supervisor
has been instrumental in securing USO funds by accepting the leader-
ship in setting up the club and in developing other leadership; she is







also a member of the Junior Woman's Club Welfare Committee, and
arranged a program on "service to the blind."
HERNANDO COUNTY: Staff cooperates with county commissioners by
making investigations and recommendations for direct relief. Also
with the Tuberculosis Association, county nurse and Crippled Children's
Commission. Under the social protection program, an agreement has
been worked out with the sheriff to give case work service at the
time girls are arrested. The sheriff often asks staff to give case work
services on juvenile delinquency cases.
CITRUS COUNTY: A new Board member has been instrumental in
securing a paid, part-time Red Cross home service secretary and a
stenographer, after seeing the need for this service as a resource of
the community and the Agency. He is now endeavoring to interest
local civic groups in sponsoring a health clinic. Cooperation is given
county authorities in investigations for direct relief, and in other
activities.













DISTRICT V
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $55,942.50 $ 8,302.50 $ 3,663.00
August............ 55,703.00 8,112.00 3,644.50
September......... 56,641.50 7,925.50 3,643.50
October............ 57,717.00 7,690.50 3,521.00
November.......... 59,700.50 7,426.00 3,734.00
December.......... 61,808.50 7,222.00 3,887.50
January,1944...... 63,520.50 7,096.50 3,885.50
February........... 65,338.50 7,096.50 4,001.00
March............. 66,957.50 7,288.00 4,145.50
April.............. 82,589.50 7,509.00 4,220.50
May ............... 84,778.50 7,718.50 5,012.50
June............... 87,734.00 8,141.00 5,305.00

Total...... $798,431.50 $91,528.00 $48,663.50 $ 938,623.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age _Aid to
Assistance I the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........... 103 6 13 3
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 13 1 .......... 1

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 61 661 1,752 4
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 510 68 219 22
Total During Period........... 571 729 1,971 26
Total Disposed of............. 372 294 758 19
Approved for Payment..... 315 77 196 12
Denied as Ineligible......... 44 147 381 7
Other Reasons............. 13 70 181 .. ..
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 199 435 1,213 7

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943) .............. 3,860 312 727 242
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*........... ...... 475 83 191 23
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 4,335 '395 918 265
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t..... 674 107 269 40
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944) ............ 3,661 288 649 225

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
49














Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 5,147' 522 303 5,972

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services............................................. 805
Active Service Cases........ ................................ 668
M ental Hospitals. ........................................... 3
Penal Institutions .......................................... 6
Children's Institutions ............................ ......... 11
Juvenile Courts ............................................ 54
Courts on Adult Cases ...................................... 2
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 1,093
Crippled Children's Commission .............................. 22
States-Reciprocal ..... ................................... 461
Selective Service Investigations .................. ............ 41
Interpretation Activities ........................ ........... 464
O others .................................................... 1,260


SPECIAL SERVICES
ALACHUA COUNTY: Board and staff members have participated in
many community projects concerned with health and welfare services.
One board member has served on the Alachua County Hospital Board,
another is a sponsor of the Junior Welfare League, has been active
with the Gainesville Inter-Racial Council, and has worked with a
community committee on juvenile delinquency. The local supervisor
has served in the following capacities: Member of the Tuberculosis
Association, discussion leader for volunteer groups being trained by
the Red Cross, member of a committee on juvenile delinquency, chair-
man of the Project Committee of the Pilot Club and as lay counselor
in the area of social work for the Vocational Guidance of the Alachua
County Board of Education. Welfare visitors assisted a fraternity in
planning a Christmas party for underprivileged children. They also
assisted with the registration for the X-ray Mobile Unit and have
worked with the county nurse in planning for tuberculosis patients who
require isolation facilities. One visitor works as a nurses' aide at
the county hosiptal. Another has served as a member of the Girl
Scout Camp Committee which held its first camp in May, 1944. The
staff has had active membership in the Alachua County Council on
Health and Welfare. Representatives from the District Board and
staff, with members of other organizations, met with the City Com-
missioner to discuss the need for a county health unit and an initial
appropriation for the unit was made. The District has administered
the General Relief fund for Alachua County and a grocery fund for
the City of Gainesville. Investigations have been made for the Jay-
cees and the Child Care Committee of the Defense Council of requests
for free care at the Lanham Day Nursery.
BAKER, BRADFORD, CLAY AND NASSAU COUNTIES: Staff members have
worked with the police and health officials in planning for girls with
venereal disease infections. They have assisted in the transportation
of children to the State Deaf and Blind School, and in securing cloth-
ing for some children in the school who are from low income families.
The County Commissioners have asked the agency to determine the
legal residence of needy persons desiring to return to the county. In









Bradford and Clay Counties, the agency administers the County Gen-
eral Relief Fund. Welfare visitors worked closely with community
organizations in planning for the giving of baskets at Christmas time.
The local supervisor is a member of the Clay County Hospital Aid
Committee and cases are investigated for that committee. The super-
visor and a welfare visitor are members of the Health and Welfare
Committee of the Clay County Woman's Club. In Baker and Nassau
Counties, investigations are made for the Lion's Club to determine
need for free eye examinations and glasses. The staff investigates
need of persons who apply to the County Commissioners for general
relief.
PUTNAM COUNTY: Staff has worked with the county commissioners
and county social worker to meet the needs of persons in the com-
munity for hospitalization, medical attention and nursing home care.
They have consulted with the superintendent of public schools regard-
ing more recreational facilities and the need for more playgrounds.
Services have been given the selective service board in securing medical
and social histories of selectees, upon request. The unit supervisor has
consulted with local police officials in determining needs of the com-
munity in the area of juvenile delinquency. Investigations and reports
to the American Legion for child welfare aid for the Veteran's Bureau
have been made. Staff has planned with the field executive of Boy
Scouts and other Boy Scout leaders on guidance for boys, and has
cooperated with law enforcement officers in connection with the social
protection program. Visitors have worked with the various clubs, such
as Rotary, Kiwanis, P-TA, and American Legion Welfare Department
in securing services for individual children.
UNION COUNTY: Visitor has cooperated with law enforcement of-
ficers, health officers, and other social agencies in connection with
the social protection program. Services have been rendered the se-
lective service board, upon request, in determining the ability of
selectees to adjust.
ST. JOHNS COUNTY: Staff has acted as medical field agent for the
selective service board; has cooperated with law enforcement officers,
health officials and social agencies in connection with the social pro-
tection program; has planned with the St. Johns County Welfare
Federation for medical services, hospitalization, and nursing care of
public assistance and service cases; has planned with the Red Cross
and the Defense Council for the administration of the civilian war
assistance program in event of an emergency; has cooperated with the
Red Cross in planning for public assistance cases who have a member
of their family in the military service; have planned and worked with
the St. Johns County Welfare Federation, city, county and law enforc-
ing officers on problems of delinquency.
FLAGLER COUNTY: Visitor has planned with county judge for em-
ployment and supervision of delinquents; has planned with county
judge, county commissioners and community leaders for hospitaliza-
tion, boarding care and nursing home care for persons in need of these
services; has worked with county commissioners in obtaining rent and
maintenance for families not eligible for public assistance or until they
receive public assistance; has cooperated with local authorities in the
social protection program and the screening of selectees.








DISTRICT VI
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $53,494.00 $ 6,347.50 $ 3,713.50
August............ 53,590.50 6,505.50 3,834.50
September......... 56,216.00 6,903.00 3,923.50
October............ 58,325.50 6,897.00 4,165.50
November.......... 60,626.00 6,971.00 4,280.00
December.......... 61,998.00 7,200.-0 4,320.50
January, 1944...... 62,983.00 6,975.50 4,311.L0
February........... 63,749.00 6,975.50 4,356.00
March............. 63,967.50 6,708.50 4,690.50
April.............. 77,272.00 6,720.60 4,813.00
May............... 78,647.50 6,560.50 5,585.-0
June............... 79,684.50 6,626.00 5,878.50

Total..... $770,553.50 $81,421.00 $53,872.50 $ 905,847.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........... 198 5 8 4
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 104 3 5 3

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 55 807 1,983 5
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 332 13 54 15
Total During Period............ 387 820 2,037 20
Total Disposed of............. 284 55 153 19
Approved for Payment...... 222 14 62 15
Denied as Ineligible......... 55 41 91 4
Other Reasons.............. 7
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 103 765 1,884 1

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943).............. 3,372 260 628 232
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.......... ....... 434 77 198 31
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 3,806 337 826 263
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944) ...... 665 128 325 41
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)$ ............ 3,141 209 501 222

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
52









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 3,913 545 257 4,715


OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services.............. ............................ 241
Active Service Cases...................................... 47
Mental Hospitals............ ............................... 8
Penal Institutions .................. ....................... 16
Children's Institutions ...................................... 7
Juvenile Courts ..................... ....................... 2
States-Reciprocal ....................................... 490
Selective Service Investigations ................... .......... 29
O thers.......................................... 94


SPECIAL SERVICES
The fiscal year has been significant in regard to community plan-
ning for meeting the needs of the people of Duval County, the area
served by the District 6 Welfare Board. As an urban area with a
number of welfare agencies and allied groups, the community has
supported a combined Council of Social Agencies and Community Chest
for a number of years. During the past year an executive secretary
has been employed by the Council of Social Agencies, resulting in in-
creased community planning.
The district director has been a member of the Executive Commit-
tee of the' Council of Social Agencies throughout the year, as have two
present members of the district board, one of whom served as vice-
president.
Community awareness of the need of planning has centered in two
areas-the prevention of juvenile delinquency and the social protec-
tion of young girls in difficulty. In an endeavor to meet the needs
of youth, the Council of Social Agencies has organized a Youth Se-
curity Committee to study what services are being provided in the
community and what needs are being met, and to make recommenda-
tions for a coordinated program of activities. In the second area, the
Council of Social Agencies has organized a Committee For the Care
of Girls, on which the district director has served. This committee
has been instrumental in arranging a program whereby a social worker
will interview each young girl or woman arrested for vagrancy or sus-
picion of venereal disease.
During the past two months a third area of need has been recog-
nized-that of the discharged service man in becoming readjusted to
the community and to civilian life. Here again the Council of Social
Agencies has accepted leadership in planning to meet this need.
It is hoped that during the year ahead interest can be broadened to
the point of developing resources to meet the needs of Duval County
children. The major needs are for funds with which to direct the care
of children and the development of a boarding home program.







DISTRICT VII
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1913 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943........... $41,463.L0 $ 5,541.C0 $ 2,976.L0
August....... .. 41,563.L0 5,342.C0 2,925.C0
September......... 41,661.l0 5,210.C0 2,993.CO
Octobei............ 42,275.LO 5,1C6.CO 3,065.00
November......... 42,t03.LO 5,015.L0 3,107.L0
DecemLer .......... 44,189.00 4, 86.L0 3,223.10
January, 1944...... 4b,lC6.CO 4,626.10 3,379..0
February........... 47,Ul6.10 4,618.0C 3,526.00
March............. 49,441.L0 4,602.C0 3,541.00
April.............. 61,722.10 4,627.CO 3,667.L0
May............. 62,456.C0 4,627..0 4,295.CO
June............... 63,328.L0 4,743.00 4,376-.0
Total...... $583,917.f0 $18,955.C0 $41,076.00 $ 683.948.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children


REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible. .. ...... 124 6 14 10
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 80 10 24 2
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 117 664 1,730 7
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 359 34 121 16
Total During Period........... 476 698 1,851 23
Total Disposed of............. 269 62 160 17
Approved for Payment...... 214 5 21 11
Denied as Ineligible......... 48 57 139 6
Other Reasons.............. 7 ...............
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 207 636 1,691 6
0
CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943).............. 2,898 221 546 189
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)* ................. 468 47 126 29
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 toJune30. 1944)...... 3,366 268 672 218
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t..... 640 104 259 41
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)............. 2,726 164 413 177

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Cld Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (Jul3
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 3,934 335 267 4,536


OTHER ACTIVITIES

Applications for SURPLUS
Certification_ COMMODITIES
Pending (July 1, 1943).................... .................... 0
Received (July 1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)......................... 11
Total during Period....... ...................................11
Total Disposed of ..................... ..... ... .......... 11
Certified as Eligible ................. ...................... 8
Denied as Ineligible ... ..................................... 0
Disposed of for Other Reasons............................... 3
Pending (June 30, 1944) .............. ...... .................. 0


Services to-
Intake Services........................... ........... 855
Active Service Cases......................................... 26
Mental Hospitals......................................... 2
Penal Institutions ......................................... 2
Children's Institutions ...................................... 2
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 4
States-Reciprocal ...................... ........... 283
Selective Service Investigations ... ......................... 56
Interpretation Activities..................................... 254
Others ................................................ 41


SPECIAL SERVICES
The District 7 Welfare Board, during the past year, has cooperated
with the Council of Social Agencies in planning for case work service
for social protection cases. The Council, following the disbanding of
the original committee on social protection, has been instrumental in
organizing a new Hillsborough County Social Protection Committee to
draw upon all case work agencies for planning. The Board has agreed,
if requested, to accept for referral all local unmarried girls not over
18, all local married women over 18 who have young children whose
care needs to be planned for, and all local girls in the Agency case load.
Child Welfare Service has accepted referrals for case work service
from school attendance officers and from the Juvenile Court. The
Child Welfare worker has been instrumental in bringing to the atten-
tion of the Youth Council (which organized the "Teen-age Canteen")
the desirability of case work service for adolescents showing behavior
problems.
The Agency has received requests for investigation of private day
nurseries reported to be mistreating children. The fact that it has
no jurisdiction is being brought to the attention of other agencies and
the Juvenile Court in an effort to stress the need of licensing and
supervision. The Child Welfare Committee of the District Board has
plans for enlisting the cooperation of other groups in- the enactment
of a city ordinance which will establish some legal control over day
nurseries.








The District is represented on the Child Care Committee of the
Council of Social Agencies, which has done good work in planning for
the recreational needs of children during the summer months. The
agency assisted in interpreting the need for psychological services.
The Community Chest has now given funds through the Family
Welfare Agency for a psychological clinic.
At Christmas, 1943, the Agency, at the request of the Citizen's
Christmas Committee, selected 150 families to receive vouchers for
Christmas baskets.








DISTRICT VIII
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $32,396.50 $ 5,236.50 $ 1,553.50
'August........... 32,543.50 5,010.00 1,546.00
September......... 32,962.50 4,786.00 1,604.50
October........... 33,969.00 4,799.00 1,681.00
November.......... 34,816.00 4,746.00 1,740.00
December.......... 35,476.00 4,595.00 1,874.00
January, 1944...... 36,270.00 4,429.00 1,900.00
February........... 37,266.00 4,355.00 1,948.00
March............ 38,320.50 4,405.50 2,049.50
April............. 48,630.50 4,329.50 2,395.00
May.............. 50,981.00 4,219.50 2,503.50
June.............. 51,316.00 4,313.50 2,568.00

Total...... $464,947.50 $55,224.50 $23,363.00 $ 543,535.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........... 72 3 12 2
Disposed of for other Reasons 4 1 7 ..........

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 58 409 1,008 7
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 259 26 77 9
Total During Period........... 317 435 1,085 16
Total Disposed of............. 219 115 277 12
Approved for Payment...... 167 14 43 10
Denied as Ineligible.:....... 42 89 205 2
Other Reasons.............. 10 12 29 ..........
Pending (June 30, 1944) ....... 98 320 808 4
CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943) ............ 2,195 181 422 104
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 418 57 116 16
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 2,613 238 538 120
Removed trom Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t...... 523 95 210 23
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)............ 2,090 143 328 97

SIncludes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
: Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
57










Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 3,204 336 166 3,706

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services.......................................... 250
Active Service Cases.................................... ..... 2
Juvenile Courts ........................................... 2
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 1
States-Reciprocal ....... ............. ............. 309
Selective Service Investigations .............................. 42
Interpretation Activities ................................... 306

SPECIAL SERVICES.
In all counties of the district the workers have had occasion to
approach county officials in the interest of active cases whose needs
could not be met through the agency. These cases have been used as
a springboard to broaden discussions of divisions of responsibility in
meeting more completely the total welfare needs of people. In some
sections of Hardee and DeSoto counties, county commissioners rely on
district staff to assist them in determining eligibility for county as-
sistance. The District has begun to work with service clubs in most
sections. Lions clubs have requested recommendations from the agency
as to eligibility for assistance in two counties. In Lee, Sarasota and
Manatee counties, where county welfare workers are employed, the
working relationship has been completely informal. The Agency has
recently attempted to set down in writing ways for the two agencies
to work out their joint problems, but the project is still in the em-
bryonic stage. In some counties there is much local interest in the
development of better boarding facilities for the aged and otherwise
incapacitated groups, including recipients of public assistance. This
is particularly true of Sarasota, Hardee and De Soto counties. Both
board and staff have been active.








DISTRICT IX
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $56,348.60 $ 3,194.60 S 2,843.00
August............. 66,387.00 3,064.10 2,787.CO
September......... 66, 26.50 3,010.60 2,678.00
October............. 57,836.L0 2,800.C0 2, 06.L0
November......... .8,524.00 2,827.CO 2, 96.C0
December......... 58,877.00 2,822.(0 3,026.10
January, 1944...... 69,031.00 2,823.60 3,157.60
February............ 59,653.00 2,714.60 3,175.00
MJ arch ............ 61,560.00 2.741t.1 3,238.60
April............... 75,280.60 2,735.60 3,776.60
1vjay............... 76,891.L0 3,177.00 3,8C6.00
June............... 77,176.00 3,7,6.60 3,858.50

Total..... $754,481.60 $35,717.00 $38,279.00 $ 828,477.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age ____ A to
Assistance the Blind
Families Chil3ren

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........ 98 ........ .. ... ..... 1
Disposed of for Other Reasons. 56 8 21 1

APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)........ 59 474 1,186 5
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
1 30, 1944) .................. 373 38 111 14
Total During Period........... 432 512 1,297 19
Total Disposed of............. 338 308 706 16
Approved for Payment...... 261 38 123 13
Denied as Ineligible......... 55 181 376 2
Other Reasons............. 22 89 207 1
Pending (June 30, 1944)..... 94 204 591 3

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943).............. 2,893 113 272 139
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 490 64 166 31
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 39, 1944)...... 3,383 177 438 170
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t ..... 664 56 140 43
Total Receiving A distance
(June 30, 1944: ............ 2,719 121 298 127

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
t Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
59










Aid to
CASE, REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 4,090 286 252 4,628

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services............................................ 1,741
Active Service Cases..........; ............................ 1,109
Mental Hospitals......... ................................. 12
Penal Institutions .......................................... 3
Courts on Adult Cases ...................................... 1
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 1
States-Reciprocal ................. ...................... 480
Selective Service Investigations .............................. 174
Others......................................... 106
Interpretation Activities ........................ ........... 1

SPECIAL SERVICES
The agency's greatest activity by district board members and staff
has been in assisting in community planning, in analysis of community
needs and resources, and helping to discover where and how welfare
needs could be met.
The common problem of all public relief agencies--the need of
adult boarding homes for those unable to care for themselves and
having no relatives able to do so-has been under discussion with the
County and City Charities, Clinics, Public Welfare Department of the
City of Miami, and Dade County Health Unit. Effort is being made
to present to county and city commissioners the need for properly op-
erated facilities in addition to those available for the care of the
aged. The Agency discussed with members of the Masonic order ways
and means of obtaining an estimate on the cost of an old peoples home
which would not be restricted to members of the fraternity. Through
contacts by district board members and the director with the City
Council, the payment of city garbage tax by recipients of public assis-
tance was abated. The Agency has cooperated with the American
Association of Social Workers in a study to be presented to the
Council of Social Agencies for further consideration and planning
to meet psychiatric needs in the community. Staff, agency and one
Board member have been working with the YMCA and camp groups
to make camp and counseling services available to underprivileged
children as a means of combating juvenile delinquency. The agency
has worked consistently with the Council of Social Agencies and the
community through board and staff to discover unmet needs of child-
ren and to work out plans for meeting these needs. The Junior League
is interested in a public assistance foster home placement program,
and the agency has made available to it the needs of children pointing
toward the need for local funds. The agency is cooperating with the
Red Cross in setting up services in the event of hurricane. In case of
disaster, as many of staff as can be spared have volunteered to ad-
minister relief until the Red Cross steps in. Initial contacts were
made with the sheriff and others to offer services to young women
going to and from rapid treatment centers. A district board member
and a staff worker were members of a committee working with the
Urban League and Council of Social Agencies through which a survey
of the need of negroes of the area was made. From the recommenda-








tions, effort was concentrated on the procurement of a Negro Youth
Center as an instrument in combating juvenile delinquency. The
project has been approved by the City Commission which gave a site
and authorized the expenditure of $25,000. Through the same staff
member a report was made to the Atlantic Division of the Federal
Housing Authority on the need of a colored USO. As a result the
best and most extensive colored USO in this section is now in operation.








DISTRICT X
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943......... $39,749.50 $ 7,370.50 8 4,640.00
August............ 39,448.00 7,328.50 4,623.50
September......... 39,947.50 7,177.50 4,702.00
October............. 40,458.00 7,215.50 4,735.50
November.......... 40,436.00 7,016.00 4,837.50
December........... 40,676.50 7,025.50 4,957.50
January, 1944...... 40,341.50 6,766.50 4,992.50
February........... 40,407.50 6,713.50 5,180.00
March ............ 40,211.50 6,666.50 5,219.00
April.............. 48,616.50 6,676.00 5,410.50
May............... 49,868.00 7,129.00 6,135.50
June............... 50,646.50 7,369.00 6,201.50

Total .............. $510,807.00 $84,454.00 $61,635.00

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children


REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ........... 110 9 10 5
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 19 2 1 2
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)........ 91 624 1,610 8
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 306 44 146 28
Total During Period........... 397 668 1,756 36
Total Disposed of............. 263 316 767 23
Approved for Payment...... 169 29 108 18
Denied as Ineligible......... 72 225 513 3
Other Reasons.............. 22 62 146 2
Pending (June 30, 1944) ....... 134 352 989 13
CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943) .............. 2,219 244 604 263
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 380 71 186 34
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)...... 2,599 315 790 297
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t ..... 592 98 219 55
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)t............ 2,007 217 571 242

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and-refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 3,074 419 317 3,180

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services ................. ......................... 1,097
Active Service Cases ....................................... 38
Mental Hospitals .................. ....................... 17
Penal Institutions .......................................... 6
Children's Institutions ..................................... 10
Juvenile Courts........: ................................... 9
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 119
Crippled Children's Commission...... ................... ..... 13
-States- Reciprocal ............. .......................... 412
Selective Service Investigations ............................. 65
Interpretation Activities............... ....... 1,267
Others .. .............................................. 446

SPECIAL SERVICES
Staff and board members have participated actively during the
year in community planning in all of the counties comprising the
district.
ST. LUCIE COUNTY: During the past six months there has been
an obvious awakening of community interest in local social problems,
particularly in planning all types of care of children. It is believed
that this has resulted from the coordinated efforts of the district
board member, child welfare worker and unit supervisor, who initiated
the formation of a community child care organization when participat-
ing in the reorganization of the local health council in January. The
organization was primarily interested in coordinating the efforts of
existing agencies and resources to analyze the community and de-
termine unmet needs. Through the activity of the Child Welfare
Committee of the parent organization, the child welfare worker has
been afforded many opportunities to speak before groups and interpret
Child Welfare Services. This committee is also responsible for se-
curing funds for use in carrying on child welfare services. These funds,
the committee realized, would provide only temporary financing and
it was through its efforts that the county commissioners were ap-
proached for an appropriation of $600, to be included in the coming
year's budget for continuance of Child Welfare Services. The Re-
search and Study Committee has discussed many unmet needs of
children and other problems, the child welfare worker and the unit
supervisor being invited to meet with it.
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY: The district board member and staff have
initiated the formation of a child welfare committee whose primary
concern is centered around problems confronting children. The com-
mittee has discussed the possibility of a school recreation director
who could serve as part-time attendance officer, and a survey to de-
termine the need for special recreational facilities for children in sec-
tions where delinquency is most prevalent. A luncheon meeting, was
recently held for the purpose of creating a better understanding upon
the part of attorneys of the 1943 adoption law and the value of social
investigations made by the agency in connection with adoptions.
PALM BEACH COUNTY: The outstanding accomplishment in the line








of services to children of the county during the year was the setting
up and operation of the Palm Beach County receiving home for child-
ren under the age of 6 years, through the cooperation of the district
director, supervisor, child welfare worker, county and city commis-
sioners and other interested groups and individuals. The receiving
home is supervised by the Child Welfare Department of this unit. A
report made on June 16 showed that 19 children had received care
with an average of 65 days at a cost per day per child of $1.86.
Members of the staff have attended meetings and participated in
the discussion of plans for the Health and Welfare Council in regard
to the need for a detention home for girls and women. The supervisor
and child welfare worker attended meetings of the Palm Beach County
Youth Security Committee to discuss services to be rendered and how
all organizations could work together toward the establishment of
youth centers. In an effort to work out a community plan for medical
care of individuals, including public assistance recipients, the district
director, supervisor and the chairman of the District 10 Board met
with a representative of a local civic club interested in the problem.
The discussion clarified referral policies of agencies within the county.
During the past year staff has worked in close cooperation with the
Palm Beach County Defense Council and the American Red Cross in
perfecting procedures for the Civilian War Assistance program.
IThrough the efforts of the visitor, the need for glasses among the in-
digent of the southern section of the county was brought to the at-
tention of local clubs and a resource developed for meeting this need.
Plans have developed for aiding girls in connection with the social
protection program.
MONROE COUNTY: Staff members have participated in the organi-
zation of the Monroe County Health Unit, intended to aid community
betterment through sound social planning and action in the fields of
health and sanitation, child welfare, zoning, education, better govern-
ment, and inter-racial harmony. In planning child welfare services,
district staff have worked with various groups. Staff has also tried to
develop community plans for direct relief for those cases that do not
fit into categorical groups or come under the care of another agency.
Efforts are now being made by district staff to develop a program of
re-employment and rehabilitation of war veterans.
BROWARD COUNTY:' Members of the staff have discussed with mem-
bers of the Health Clinic the need of a medicine cabinet. The Youth
Center in Ft. Lauderdale, in which the district board member was
interested, continues to be active and is an apparent success. During
the year youth centers have been established in Hollywood and Dania.
The Dania center is sponsored by women's clubs.








DISTRICT XI
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid tothe
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total

July, 1943.......... $67,058.50 $11,156.00 $ 4,401.00
August............. 67,226.50 11,071.50 4,412.50
September ......... 68,986.00 11,138.LO 4,491.00
October............ 71,292.00 10,916.00 4,522.00
November........... 73,518.00 10,577.00 4,711.00
December.......... 74,789.50 10,464.00 4,004.00
January, 1944...... 77,403.00 10,249.50 5,131.00
February........... 78,129.00 10,311.50 5,118.50
March.. :.......... 79,540.00 10,6r8.00 5,182.00
April .............. 99,137.50 11,066.50 5,425.50
May............... 101,909.00 11,404.00 6,501.00
June............... 102,871.00 12,054.50 6,652.00

Total...... 1961,860.00 $131,067.00 $61,451.50 $1,154,378.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS POR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE
Denied as Ineligible ............ 123 17 1. 1
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 32 3 4 .........
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)......... 140 966 2,408 8
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 467 73 227 23
Total During Period........... 607 1,039 2,635 31
Total Disposed of............. 423 384 916 22
Approved for Payment...... 306 72 203 14
Denied as Ineligible......... 91 227 505 7
Other Reasons.............. 26 85 208 1
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 184 655 1,719 9

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943).............. 4,446 416 957 276
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)*.................. 512 121 290 24
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 4,958 537 1,247 300
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t..... 856 145 326 45
Total Re-eiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944) ........... 4,102 392 921 255

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
65









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944)..... 4,942 775 325 6,042


OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services.............. ............................... 531
Active Service Cases .................. .................... 99
Children's Institutions ...................................... 2
Juvenile Courts .................. ......................... 18
Courts on Adult Cases ...................................... 1
County and City Welfare Departments ....................... 148
Crippled Children's Commission........ ........................ 4
States- Reciprocal ....................................... 604
Selective Service Investigations ............................... 87
Interpretation Activities.................................... 319
Others. .................................................. 9


SPECIAL SERVICES
Additional services given in District 11 by board and staff members
to assist in community planning and development of resources to meet
the welfare needs of people have included referral of families to
service clubs at holiday time so that they might be given baskets and
toys.
In Polk county the agency made a survey to show the need for a
mobile dental clinic. This survey was sponsored by the Health De-
partment and Bartow Pilot Club. The agency is preparing some ma-
terial for Winter Haven on unmet needs in the community, to help
the city determine what the responsibility of the locality should be in
preparing to meet them.
Board members in all parts of the District are very active in service
clubs-the Kiwanis Club has had quite a close association-through
members of the district board who are also members of its welfare
committee.
In the area of one Polk county commissioner the agency makes
investigation for eligibility for county assistance at his request.
Unit supervisors have been members of such advisory groups as
County Committee of The Little White House Conference-Board of
Directors of Tuberculosis and Health Association-Nutritional Com-
mittee of Defense Council-Lakeland Day Nursery Board.








DISTRICT XII
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
July 1, 1943 June 30, 1944

Old Age Aid to Dependent Aid to the
MONTH Assistance Children Blind Total


July, 1943.......... $62,188.00 $ 8,914.00 $ 4,192.50
August............ 63,473.00 8,592.00 4,280.50
September......... 66,233.00 8,578.00 4,412.00
October............. 69,049.00 8,467.50 4,466.50
November........... 71,618.50 8,208.50 4,585.50
December.......... 73,956.00 8,060.50 4,723.50
January, 1944...... 75,389.00 8,008.00 4,691.00
February............ 76,682.00 8,032.00 4,845.50
March.............. 77,662.00 8,212.50 4,939.50
April .............. 99,086.00 8,248.50 ,5,285.50
May............... 100,763.50 8,672.50 6,274.00
June............... 101,805.00 9,048.50 6,330.00

Total...... $937,905.00 $101,042.50 $59,026.00 $1,097,973.50

ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT

AID TO DEPENDENT
CHILDREN
Old Age Aid to
Assistance the Blind
Families Children

REQUESTS FOR APPLICATIONS
REJECTED AT INTAKE *
Denied as Ineligible ........... 175 9 6 7
Disposed of for Other Reasons.. 26 5 5 4
APPLICATIONS
Pending (July 1, 1943)........ 102 903 2,314 6
Received (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)................... 506 69 157 27
Total During Period........... 608 972 2,471 33
Total Disposed of.............. 434 212 490 24
Approved for Payment...... 346 49 116 16
Denied as Ineligible.......... 59 100 231 1
Other Reasons .............. 29 63 143 7
Pending (June 30, 1944)....... 174 760 1,981 9

CASES RECEIVING ASSISTANCE
Cases Receiving Assistance
(July 1, 1943) .............. 4,008 333 761 243
Added (July 1, 1943 to June
30, 1944)* .................. 678 131 289 35
Total Cases Assisted (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)....... 4,686 464 1,050 278
Removed from Payroll (July 1,
1943 to June 30, 1944)t ..... 823 166 369 49
Total Receiving Assistance
(June 30, 1944)$............ 3,863 298 681 229

Includes new cases approved for payment, transfers from other
districts, and reinstatements of suspended cases.
t Includes closed cases, transfers to other districts, and suspended
cases.
$ Includes cancellations and refunds subsequent to issuance of rolls.
67









Aid to
CASES REVIEWED Old Age Dependent Aid to Total
Assistance Children the Blind

Total Reviews Completed (July
1, 1943 to June 30, 1944).... 4,914 622 269 5,805

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Services to-
Intake Services ........................................... 480
Active Service Cases .................. ..................... 174
Penal Institutions.......................................... 1
County and City Welfare Departments ............. ...... 386
States- Reciprocal ...................................... 542
Selective Service Investigations ............................. 43
Interpretation Activities............... ................... 387
O thers................. ................................. 55


SPECIAL SERVICES
ORANGE COUNTY: The District Board appointed seven leading
citizens as a new child welfare committee., The purpose of the com-
mittee is to study child welfare problems and make recommendations
to the District Board. The child welfare worker has served as a mem-
ber of the counseling committee in connection with a day-care program,
and has represented the Agency on the Youth Council, an organiza-
tion formed to study youth problems. As members of the Central
Florida Association of Social Workers, several members of the staff
participated in the planning of a venereal disease control institute,
held in Orlando in June. The District has worked with other health
and welfare agencies to develop a venereal disease control program.
A welfare visitor has served as a member of the inter-racial Commis-
sion and the Women's Defense Council. The District Board has con-
tinued to administer funds for the Winter Park Welfare Association,
paying for the half-time services of a visitor who is a regular member
of the district staff. This visitor has been made an ex-officio member
of the white day-nursery board with the privilege of attending meet-
ings of the executive committee. She has also served on committees
concerned with housing, and juvenile delinquency and is a member
of the local Health and Welfare Committee.
SEMINOLE COUNTY: Staff has been active in reorganizing the local
group of social workers, with the view of meeting existing needs and
making a study of resources. Although the re-organization has been
in effect only three months, during that time it has been decided to
publish an agency directory, to. be distributed among the health, edu-
cational, welfare and civic clubs. A staff member is chairman of the
committee. During the past year a staff member was active in the
organization of a Seminole County USO Council.
VOLUSIA COUNTY: A staff member has recently been a member of
a committee on summer playground work for the DaLand area. A
junior helpers club has been organized, the group consisting of teen
age boys and girls who volunteer their services daily in assisting in
carrying out the summer program, under the direction of both paid
and volunteer adult workers. The school grounds are being used. A
staff worker is a member-at-large of the West Volusia Chapter of the
Red Cross. In East Volusia, the welfare supervisor is chairman of the
Red Cross Disaster Committee. The staff has studied the unmet needs
of children. This study was used in presenting the need for county








and city appropriations for child welfare services, which resulted in
an appropriation of $750 by the city and $1,500 by the county. It is
planned during July to work out an agreement between health, wel-
fare and law enforcement agencies regarding the handling of social
protection and VD control.
BREVARD COUNTY: Staff has been active in bringing to the atten-
tion of civic groups, law enforcement officers and health agencies,
community needs in various fields. Health and law enforcement agen-
cies were contacted in making a survey of the unmet needs of children.
It is planned during July to work out an agreement with health and
law enforcement agencies relating to social protection.
OSCEOLA COUNTY: Since there has been no organization for social
protection in the county, city and county officials, ministers and in-
terested citizens were invited by staff to attend a venereal disease in-
stitute held in Orlando. Those who attended are interested in having
the Agency assist in forming a community organization for social
protection. In one town in the county, a church auxiliary has set up
a supply of sick room items which can be loaned to the ill who are
unable to buy them. The auxiliary works through the welfare staff.