• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Life of Aesop
 The wolf turned shepherd
 The stag at the pool
 The fox and the mask
 The bear and the fox
 The wolf and the lamb
 The one-eyed doe
 The wolf and the shepherds
 The dog, cock and fox
 The mouse, the frog, and the...
 The dog and the oyster
 The hares and the frogs
 The lion and the boar
 The mischievous dog
 The quack frog
 The ass, the fox, and the lion
 The wolf and the sheep
 The fox and the lion
 The gnat and the lion
 The cock and the jewel
 The town mouse and the country...
 The game-cocks and the partrid...
 The trumpeter taken prisoner
 The fatal marriage
 The ass and the charger
 The vain jackdaw
 The milkmaid and her pot of...
 The man and the satyr
 The boys and the frogs
 The shepherd and the wolf
 The oak and the reeds
 The lion and the fox
 The crab and its mother
 The mother and the wolf
 The fighting cocks and the...
 The birds, the beasts, and the...
 The ox and the frog
 The dogs and the hides
 The horse and the ass
 The fisherman and the little...
 The dove and the crow
 The camel and the Arab
 The boy and the nettle
 The huntsman and the fisherman
 The two pots
 The widow and her little maide...
 The monkey and the dolphin
 The bull and the goat
 The charcoal-burner and the...
 The lion and the mouse
 The horse and the stag
 The lion and the dolphin
 The mice in council
 The crow and the pitcher
 The ass eating thistles
 The wolf and the lion
 The old hound
 The playful ass
 The old man and the three young...
 The tree and the axe
 The seaside travelers
 The sea-gull and the kite
 The monkey and the camel
 The shepherd and the sheep
 The rat and the elephant
 The wolf and the shepherd
 The swallow and the crow
 The man and the lion
 The king's son and the painted...
 The ass and his purchaser
 The fisherman piping
 The blind man and the whelp
 The north wind and the sun
 The fox and the goat
 The dog and his master's dinne...
 The laborer and the snake
 The kites and the swans
 The dog in the manger
 The bull and the calf
 The kid and the wolf
 The mouse and the boasting rat
 The hare and the hound
 The farmer and the stork
 The geese and the cranes
 The dogs and the fox
 The wolf and the house-dog
 The old man and death
 The eagle and the kite
 The ass and his driver
 The goat and the ass
 The boasting traveler
 The bear and the two travelers
 The wolf and the crane
 The mountain in labor
 The fox and the leopard
 The cat and the cock
 The ass, the cock, and the...
 The site kite
 The fox and the crow
 The hen and the golden eggs
 The vine and the goat
 The stag and the fawn
 The two frogs
 The sick stag
 The fowler and the ringdove
 The thief and the house-dog
 The eagle and the arrow
 The dog invited to supper
 The wolf and the horse
 The two soldiers and the robbe...
 The monkey and the cat
 The cat and the fox
 The crow and the serpent
 The partridge and the fowler
 The eagle and the fox
 The bear and the gardener
 The hare and the tortoise
 Jupiter and the monkey
 The bald knight
 The horse and groom
 The porcupine and the snakes
 The fox who had lost his...
 The horse and his rider
 The heifer and the ox
 The fawn and this mother
 The boy and the Filberts
 The lark and her young ones
 The woman and her hen
 The hawk and the nightingale
 The boar and the ass
 The buffoon and the countryman
 The lamb and the wolf
 The prophet
 The frogs asking for a king
 The oxen and the butchers
 The dog and the hare
 The bowman and lion
 The dog and the shadow
 The mules and the robbers
 The owl and the grasshopper
 The farmer and the cranes
 The herdsman and the lost bull
 The hawk, the kite, and the...
 The hen and the swallow
 The cat and the mice
 The lion and the three bulls
 The three tradesmen
 The ass carrying the image
 The thirsty pigeon
 The ass and his shadow
 The shepherd's boy and wolf
 The fox and the grapes
 The ants and the grasshopper
 The father and his sons
 The horse and the loaded ass
 The tortoise and the eagle
 The ass and the wolf
 The old lion
 The ass and the lap-dog
 The flies and the honey
 The great and the little fishe...
 The lion in love
 The cock and the fox
 The miser
 The boy bathing
 The oxen and the axle-trees
 The ass and the grasshopper
 The lion, the bear, and the...
 The wolf and the goat
 The kid and the wolf
 The fox and the wood-cutter
 The wolves and the sheep
 The fox and the stork
 The bat and the weasels
 The ass in the lion's skin
 The dancing monkeys
 The eagle and the jackdaw
 The viper and the file
 The stag in the ox-stall
 The thrush and the swallow
 The bear and the bee-hives
 The sensible ass
 The miller, his son and their...
 The lion and the ass
 The fox and the ape
 The two goats
 The peacock and the crane
 The countryman and the snake
 The mouse and the weasel
 The cat, the weasel and the...
 The hawk and the farmer
 The robbers and the ass
 The mule
 The fox and the turkeys
 The peacock and the magpie
 The eagle, the cat, and the wild...
 The hare afraid of his ears
 The madman who sold wisdom
 The fox and the tiger
 The ant and the chrysalis
 The dove and the ant
 The travelers and the plane-tr...
 The eagle and the beetle
 The tortoise and the two ducks
 The lion and the wolf
 The leopard and the fox
 The rat and the frog
 The widow and the sheep
 The man bitten by a dog
 The horse and the wolf
 The old woman and the wine-jar
 The goatherd and the goats
 The goose with the golden eggs
 The ass carrying salt
 The gnat and the bull
 The lion and the gnat
 The wind and the sun
 The lion, the ass and the...
 The dog whose ears were croppe...
 The thief and his mother
 The wild boar and the fox
 The hunter and the wolf
 The bulls and the frogs
 The man and his two wives
 The astronomer
 The heifer, the goat, the sheep...
 The swan and the goose
 The bees, the drones, and...
 The dolphins and the sprat
 The shepherd and the sea
 The fox and the hedgehog
 The wolf, the goat and the kid
 The camel and the travelers
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Aesop's fables
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053418/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aesop's fables
Physical Description: 159, 1 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Aesop
Worthington, R ( Publisher )
Pannemaker, Adolphe François, b. 1822 ( Engraver )
Bertrand, Antoine Valérie ( Engraver )
Gauchard, Félix Jean ( Engraver )
Dumont, Louis-Phillipe, 1765-1853 ( Engraver )
Ettling, Theodor, b. 1823 ( Engraver )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1884
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1884   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1884   ( rbgenr )
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Illustrated t.p., engraved; other illustrations engraved by Dumont, Gauchard, Pannemaker, Bertrand and Ettling.
General Note: Includes index.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053418
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002471064
notis - AMH6581
oclc - 09938917

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Life of Aesop
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The wolf turned shepherd
        Page 7
    The stag at the pool
        Page 7
    The fox and the mask
        Page 8
    The bear and the fox
        Page 8
    The wolf and the lamb
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The one-eyed doe
        Page 11
    The wolf and the shepherds
        Page 11
    The dog, cock and fox
        Page 11
    The mouse, the frog, and the hawk
        Page 12
    The dog and the oyster
        Page 12
    The hares and the frogs
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The lion and the boar
        Page 15
    The mischievous dog
        Page 15
    The quack frog
        Page 16
    The ass, the fox, and the lion
        Page 16
    The wolf and the sheep
        Page 16
    The fox and the lion
        Page 17
    The gnat and the lion
        Page 17
    The cock and the jewel
        Page 17
    The town mouse and the country mouse
        Page 18
    The game-cocks and the partridge
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The trumpeter taken prisoner
        Page 21
    The fatal marriage
        Page 21
    The ass and the charger
        Page 21
    The vain jackdaw
        Page 22
    The milkmaid and her pot of milk
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The man and the satyr
        Page 25
    The boys and the frogs
        Page 25
    The shepherd and the wolf
        Page 25
    The oak and the reeds
        Page 25
    The lion and the fox
        Page 26
    The crab and its mother
        Page 26
    The mother and the wolf
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The fighting cocks and the eagle
        Page 29
    The birds, the beasts, and the bat
        Page 29
    The ox and the frog
        Page 29
    The dogs and the hides
        Page 30
    The horse and the ass
        Page 30
    The fisherman and the little fish
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The dove and the crow
        Page 33
    The camel and the Arab
        Page 33
    The boy and the nettle
        Page 33
    The huntsman and the fisherman
        Page 33
    The two pots
        Page 34
    The widow and her little maidens
        Page 34
    The monkey and the dolphin
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The bull and the goat
        Page 37
    The charcoal-burner and the fuller
        Page 37
    The lion and the mouse
        Page 37
    The horse and the stag
        Page 38
    The lion and the dolphin
        Page 38
    The mice in council
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The crow and the pitcher
        Page 41
    The ass eating thistles
        Page 41
    The wolf and the lion
        Page 41
    The old hound
        Page 42
    The playful ass
        Page 42
    The old man and the three young men
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The tree and the axe
        Page 45
    The seaside travelers
        Page 45
    The sea-gull and the kite
        Page 45
    The monkey and the camel
        Page 46
    The shepherd and the sheep
        Page 46
    The rat and the elephant
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The wolf and the shepherd
        Page 49
    The swallow and the crow
        Page 49
    The man and the lion
        Page 49
    The king's son and the painted lion
        Page 50
    The ass and his purchaser
        Page 50
    The fisherman piping
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The blind man and the whelp
        Page 53
    The north wind and the sun
        Page 53
    The fox and the goat
        Page 54
    The dog and his master's dinner
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The laborer and the snake
        Page 57
    The kites and the swans
        Page 57
    The dog in the manger
        Page 57
    The bull and the calf
        Page 58
    The kid and the wolf
        Page 58
    The mouse and the boasting rat
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The hare and the hound
        Page 61
    The farmer and the stork
        Page 61
    The geese and the cranes
        Page 61
    The dogs and the fox
        Page 61
    The wolf and the house-dog
        Page 62
    The old man and death
        Page 62
    The eagle and the kite
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The ass and his driver
        Page 65
    The goat and the ass
        Page 65
    The boasting traveler
        Page 65
    The bear and the two travelers
        Page 66
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 66
    The mountain in labor
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    The fox and the leopard
        Page 69
    The cat and the cock
        Page 69
    The ass, the cock, and the lion
        Page 69
    The site kite
        Page 69
    The fox and the crow
        Page 70
    The hen and the golden eggs
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    The vine and the goat
        Page 73
    The stag and the fawn
        Page 73
    The two frogs
        Page 73
    The sick stag
        Page 74
    The fowler and the ringdove
        Page 74
    The thief and the house-dog
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    The eagle and the arrow
        Page 77
    The dog invited to supper
        Page 77
    The wolf and the horse
        Page 78
    The two soldiers and the robber
        Page 78
    The monkey and the cat
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The cat and the fox
        Page 81
    The crow and the serpent
        Page 81
    The partridge and the fowler
        Page 81
    The eagle and the fox
        Page 82
    The bear and the gardener
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    The hare and the tortoise
        Page 85
    Jupiter and the monkey
        Page 85
    The bald knight
        Page 85
    The horse and groom
        Page 86
    The porcupine and the snakes
        Page 86
    The fox who had lost his trail
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    The horse and his rider
        Page 89
    The heifer and the ox
        Page 89
    The fawn and this mother
        Page 89
    The boy and the Filberts
        Page 89
    The lark and her young ones
        Page 90
    The woman and her hen
        Page 90
    The hawk and the nightingale
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The boar and the ass
        Page 93
    The buffoon and the countryman
        Page 93
    The lamb and the wolf
        Page 94
    The prophet
        Page 94
    The frogs asking for a king
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    The oxen and the butchers
        Page 97
    The dog and the hare
        Page 97
    The bowman and lion
        Page 97
    The dog and the shadow
        Page 98
    The mules and the robbers
        Page 98
    The owl and the grasshopper
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    The farmer and the cranes
        Page 101
    The herdsman and the lost bull
        Page 101
    The hawk, the kite, and the pigeons
        Page 102
    The hen and the swallow
        Page 102
    The cat and the mice
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    The lion and the three bulls
        Page 105
    The three tradesmen
        Page 105
    The ass carrying the image
        Page 105
    The thirsty pigeon
        Page 105
    The ass and his shadow
        Page 106
    The shepherd's boy and wolf
        Page 106
    The fox and the grapes
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    The ants and the grasshopper
        Page 109
    The father and his sons
        Page 109
    The horse and the loaded ass
        Page 109
    The tortoise and the eagle
        Page 110
    The ass and the wolf
        Page 110
    The old lion
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    The ass and the lap-dog
        Page 113
    The flies and the honey
        Page 113
    The great and the little fishes
        Page 113
    The lion in love
        Page 114
    The cock and the fox
        Page 114
    The miser
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    The boy bathing
        Page 117
    The oxen and the axle-trees
        Page 117
    The ass and the grasshopper
        Page 117
    The lion, the bear, and the fox
        Page 117
    The wolf and the goat
        Page 118
    The kid and the wolf
        Page 118
    The fox and the wood-cutter
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    The wolves and the sheep
        Page 121
    The fox and the stork
        Page 121
    The bat and the weasels
        Page 121
    The ass in the lion's skin
        Page 122
    The dancing monkeys
        Page 122
    The eagle and the jackdaw
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    The viper and the file
        Page 125
    The stag in the ox-stall
        Page 125
    The thrush and the swallow
        Page 126
    The bear and the bee-hives
        Page 126
    The sensible ass
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    The miller, his son and their ass
        Page 129
    The lion and the ass
        Page 130
    The fox and the ape
        Page 130
    The two goats
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    The peacock and the crane
        Page 133
    The countryman and the snake
        Page 133
    The mouse and the weasel
        Page 133
    The cat, the weasel and the rabbit
        Page 134
    The hawk and the farmer
        Page 134
    The robbers and the ass
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    The mule
        Page 137
    The fox and the turkeys
        Page 137
    The peacock and the magpie
        Page 137
    The eagle, the cat, and the wild sow
        Page 138
    The hare afraid of his ears
        Page 138
    The madman who sold wisdom
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    The fox and the tiger
        Page 141
    The ant and the chrysalis
        Page 141
    The dove and the ant
        Page 142
    The travelers and the plane-tree
        Page 142
    The eagle and the beetle
        Page 142
    The tortoise and the two ducks
        Page 143
    The lion and the wolf
        Page 143
    The leopard and the fox
        Page 143
    The rat and the frog
        Page 144
    The widow and the sheep
        Page 144
    The man bitten by a dog
        Page 144
    The horse and the wolf
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    The old woman and the wine-jar
        Page 147
    The goatherd and the goats
        Page 147
    The goose with the golden eggs
        Page 147
    The ass carrying salt
        Page 148
    The gnat and the bull
        Page 148
    The lion and the gnat
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    The wind and the sun
        Page 151
    The lion, the ass and the fox hunting
        Page 151
    The dog whose ears were cropped
        Page 151
    The thief and his mother
        Page 152
    The wild boar and the fox
        Page 152
    The hunter and the wolf
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    The bulls and the frogs
        Page 155
    The man and his two wives
        Page 155
    The astronomer
        Page 155
    The heifer, the goat, the sheep and the lion
        Page 155
    The swan and the goose
        Page 156
    The bees, the drones, and the wasp
        Page 156
    The dolphins and the sprat
        Page 156
    The shepherd and the sea
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
    The fox and the hedgehog
        Page 159
    The wolf, the goat and the kid
        Page 159
    The camel and the travelers
        Page 159
    Index
        Page 160
    Back Cover
        Page 161
        Page 162
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COPYRIGHT, 1884,
BY

R. WORTHINGTON.













LIFE OF ASOP.
THE Life and History of Asop is in- the court of Crcesus with Solon, Thales,
evolved, like that of Homer, the most famous and other sages, and is related so to have
of Greek poets, in much obscurity. Sardis, pleased his royal master, by the part he
the capital of Lydia; Samos, a Greek took in the conversations held with these
island; Mesembria, an ancient colony in philosophers, that he applied to him an
Thrace; and Cotiseum, the chief city of a expression which has since passed into a
"province of Phrygia, contend for the dis- proverb, ",PliXov 6 p'S-"-"The Phrygian
tinction of being the birthplace of AEsop. has spoken better than all."
Although the honor thus claimed cannot On the invitation of Crcesus he fixed his
be definitely assigned to any one of these residence at Sardis, and was employed by
places, yet there are a few incidents now that monarch in various difficult and
generally accepted by scholars as estab- delicate affairs of state. In his discharge
lished facts, relating to the birth, life, and of these commissions he visited the different
death of Asop. He is, by an almost uni- petty republics of Greece. At one time
versal consent, allowed to have been born he is found in Corinth, and at another in
about the year 620 B.C., and to have been Athens, endeavoring, by the narration of
by birth a slave. He was owned by two some of his wise fables, to reconcile the
masters in succession, both inhabitants of inhabitants of those cities to the adminis-
Samos, Xanthus and Jadmon, the latter of tration of their respective rulers, Pariander
whom gave him his liberty as a reward and Pisistratus. One of these ambas-
for his learning and wit. One of the sadorial missions, undertaken at the com-
S privileges of a freedman in the ancient mand of Croesus, was the occasion of his
republics of Greece was the permission to death. Having been sent to Delphi with
take an active interest in public affairs; a large sum of gold for distribution among
and Asop, like the philosophers Phaedo, the citizens, he was so provoked at their
Menippus, and Epictetus, in later times, covetousness that he refused to divide the
raised himself from the indignity of a money, and sent it back to his master.
servile condition to a position of high The Delphians, enraged at this treatment,
renown. In his desire alike to instruct accused him of impiety, and, in spite of
and to be instructed, he travelled through his sacred character as ambassador, ex-
many countries, and among others came to ecuted him as a public criminal. This
Sardis, the capital of the famous king of cruel death of Esop was not unavenged.
Lydia, the great patron in that day, of The citizens of Delphi were visited with a
learning and of learned men. He met at series of calamities, until they made a







6 LIFE OF 1ESOP.

public reparation of their crime; and Mezeriac. The substantial truth of his
"The blood of Asop" became a well- statements has been confirmed by later
known adage, bearing witness to the truth criticism and inquiry.
that deeds of wrong would not pass un- It remains to state, that prior to this
punished. Neither did the great fabulist publication of M. Mezeriac, the life of
lack posthumous honors; for a statue AEsop was from the pen of Maximus
was erected to his memory at Athens, the Planudes, a monk of Constantinople, who
work of Lysippus, one of the most famous was sent on an embassy to Venice by the
of Greek sculptors. Phaedrus thus im- Byzantine Emperor Andronicus the elder,
mortalizes the event:- and who wrote in the early part of the
.Esopo ingentem statuam posuere Attici, fourteenth century. His life was prefixed
Servumque collocarunt eterna in basi: to all the early editions of these fables,
Patere honors scirent ut cuncti viam; and was republished as late as 1727 by
Nec generi tribui sed virtuti gloriam. Archdeacon Croxall as the introduction to
These few facts are all that can be relied his edition of Asop. This life by Planudes
on with any degree of certainty, in ref- contains, however, so small an amount of
erence to the, birth, life, and death of truth, and is so full of absurd pictures of
Asop. They were first brought to light, the grotesque deformity of IEsop,. of won-
after a patient search and diligent perusal drous apocryphal stories, of lying legends,
of ancient authors, by a Frenchman, M. and gross anachronisms, that it is now uni-
Claude Gaspard Bachet de Mezeriac, who versally condemned as false, puerile, and
declined the honor of being tutor to Louis unauthentic.* It is given up in the present
XIII. of France, from his desire to devote day, by general consent, as unworthy of
himself exclusively to literature. He pub- the slightest credit.
listed his life of Asop, Anno Domini M. Bayle thus characterizes this life of Esop by Planudes:
1632. The later investigations of a host Tous les habiles gens conviennent que c'est un roman, et
of English and German scholars have que les absurdit6s grossibres qui l'on y trouve le rendent
indigne de toute crdance."-Dictionnaire Historique, art.
added very little to the facts given by M. Esope.







,i^;^

': *'*-i '- { '*' *










I -
N. ,z -__.-



E SOP'S FABLES.



The Wolf Turned Shepherd. preached himself: "Woe is me! How
A WOLF, finding that the sheep were so have I deceived myself! These feet which
afraid of him that he could not get near
them, disguised himself in the dress of a
shepherd, and thus attired approached the
flock. As he came near, he found the
shepherd fast asleep. As the sheep did
not run away, he resolved to imitate the
voice of the shepherd. In trying to do so,
he only howled, and awoke the shepherd.
,As he could not run away, he was soon .f- ----- ----
killed.
Those who attempt to act in disguise
are apt to overdo it.
would have,.saved me I despised, and I
gloried in these antlers which have proved
The Stag at the Pool. my destruction."
A STAG saw his shadow reflected in the What is most truly valuable is often
water, and greatly admired the size of his underrated.
horns, but felt angry with himself for hav- .' ."
ing such weak feet. While he was thus '
contemplating himself, a Lion appeared at '
the pool. The Stag betook himself to : '
flight, and kept himself with ease at a safe
distance from the Lion, until he entered a
wood and became entangled with his horns.
The Lion quickly came up with him and,
caught him. When too late he thus re-










I -
N. ,z -__.-



E SOP'S FABLES.



The Wolf Turned Shepherd. preached himself: "Woe is me! How
A WOLF, finding that the sheep were so have I deceived myself! These feet which
afraid of him that he could not get near
them, disguised himself in the dress of a
shepherd, and thus attired approached the
flock. As he came near, he found the
shepherd fast asleep. As the sheep did
not run away, he resolved to imitate the
voice of the shepherd. In trying to do so,
he only howled, and awoke the shepherd.
,As he could not run away, he was soon .f- ----- ----
killed.
Those who attempt to act in disguise
are apt to overdo it.
would have,.saved me I despised, and I
gloried in these antlers which have proved
The Stag at the Pool. my destruction."
A STAG saw his shadow reflected in the What is most truly valuable is often
water, and greatly admired the size of his underrated.
horns, but felt angry with himself for hav- .' ."
ing such weak feet. While he was thus '
contemplating himself, a Lion appeared at '
the pool. The Stag betook himself to : '
flight, and kept himself with ease at a safe
distance from the Lion, until he entered a
wood and became entangled with his horns.
The Lion quickly came up with him and,
caught him. When too late he thus re-






8 jESOP'S FABLES.

"Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted
.' me." Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a
mournful tone of voice, "I was not then
born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed
in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied
-- -..- the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass."




The Fox and the Mask.
A Fox entered the house of- an actor, -". --
and, rummaging through all his properties,
came upon a Mask, an admirable imitation
of a human head. He placed his paws on
it, and said, What a beautiful head yet it
is of no value, as it entirely wants brains."
A fair face is of little use without sense.


e B a t F Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my
The Bear and the Fox. well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I
A. BEAR boasted very much of his phil- never yet drank water, for as yet my
anthropy, saying "that of all animals he mother's milk is both food and drink to
was the most tender in his regard for man, me." On which the Wolf seized him,
for he had such respect for him, that he and ate him up, saying, Well! I won't
would not even touch his dead body." A remain supperless, even though you refute
Fox hearing these words said with a smile every one of my imputations."
to the Bear, Oh that you would eat the The tyrant will always find a pretext for
dead and not the living." his tyranny, and it is useless for the inno-
We should not wait till a person is cent to try by reasoning to get justice,
dead, to give him our respect. when the oppressor intends to be unjust.


The Wolf ard the Lamb. -'.
A WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray
from the fold, resolved not to lay violent
hands on him, but to find some plea, which .' --
should justify to the Lamb himself his .
right to eat him. He then addressed him: s' --






8 jESOP'S FABLES.

"Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted
.' me." Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a
mournful tone of voice, "I was not then
born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed
in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied
-- -..- the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass."




The Fox and the Mask.
A Fox entered the house of- an actor, -". --
and, rummaging through all his properties,
came upon a Mask, an admirable imitation
of a human head. He placed his paws on
it, and said, What a beautiful head yet it
is of no value, as it entirely wants brains."
A fair face is of little use without sense.


e B a t F Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my
The Bear and the Fox. well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I
A. BEAR boasted very much of his phil- never yet drank water, for as yet my
anthropy, saying "that of all animals he mother's milk is both food and drink to
was the most tender in his regard for man, me." On which the Wolf seized him,
for he had such respect for him, that he and ate him up, saying, Well! I won't
would not even touch his dead body." A remain supperless, even though you refute
Fox hearing these words said with a smile every one of my imputations."
to the Bear, Oh that you would eat the The tyrant will always find a pretext for
dead and not the living." his tyranny, and it is useless for the inno-
We should not wait till a person is cent to try by reasoning to get justice,
dead, to give him our respect. when the oppressor intends to be unjust.


The Wolf ard the Lamb. -'.
A WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray
from the fold, resolved not to lay violent
hands on him, but to find some plea, which .' --
should justify to the Lamb himself his .
right to eat him. He then addressed him: s' --






8 jESOP'S FABLES.

"Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted
.' me." Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a
mournful tone of voice, "I was not then
born." Then said the Wolf, "You feed
in my pasture." "No, good sir," replied
-- -..- the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass."




The Fox and the Mask.
A Fox entered the house of- an actor, -". --
and, rummaging through all his properties,
came upon a Mask, an admirable imitation
of a human head. He placed his paws on
it, and said, What a beautiful head yet it
is of no value, as it entirely wants brains."
A fair face is of little use without sense.


e B a t F Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my
The Bear and the Fox. well." "No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I
A. BEAR boasted very much of his phil- never yet drank water, for as yet my
anthropy, saying "that of all animals he mother's milk is both food and drink to
was the most tender in his regard for man, me." On which the Wolf seized him,
for he had such respect for him, that he and ate him up, saying, Well! I won't
would not even touch his dead body." A remain supperless, even though you refute
Fox hearing these words said with a smile every one of my imputations."
to the Bear, Oh that you would eat the The tyrant will always find a pretext for
dead and not the living." his tyranny, and it is useless for the inno-
We should not wait till a person is cent to try by reasoning to get justice,
dead, to give him our respect. when the oppressor intends to be unjust.


The Wolf ard the Lamb. -'.
A WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray
from the fold, resolved not to lay violent
hands on him, but to find some plea, which .' --
should justify to the Lamb himself his .
right to eat him. He then addressed him: s' --












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zESOP'S FABLES. 11

.-- The Dog, Cock ard Fox.
"* .A DOG and a Cock, traveling together,
took shelter at night in a thick wood.
"- The Cock perched himself on a high
"branch, while the Dog found a bed at
the foot of the tree. When morning
dawned, the Cock, as usual, crowed very
Loudly. A Fox, hearing the sound, and
"wishing to make a breakfast on him, came
and stood under the branches, saying how
S. --.. earnestly he desired to make the acquaint-
-.ance of the owner of so sweet a voice.
The Cock said: "Sir, do me the favor to
e Oe-Eyed Doe. go round and wake up my porter, that he
A DOE, blind of an eye, was accustomed
to graze as near to the edge of the cliff as
she possibly could, to secure greater safety. i i
She turned her eye towards the land, that
she might perceive the approach of a hunter y
or hound, and her injured eye towards the X
sea, from which she entertained no antici- --i"
pation of danger. Some boatmen, sailing
by, saw her, and, taking a successful aim, may open the door, and
mortally wounded her. Said she: "0 let you in." On the Fox
wretched creature that I am to take such approaching the tree, the
precaution against the land, and after all Dog sprang out and caught
to find this seashore, to which I had come him and quickly tore him
for safety, so much more perilous." in pieces.
Danger sometimes comes from a source Those who try to entrap
that is least suspected. others are often caught by
their own schemes. g
Tlhe Wolf ard tihe Shepherds.
A WOLF passing by, saw some shepherds -.
in a hut eating for their dinner a haunch
of mutton. Approaching them, he said:
"What a clamor you would raise, if I were
to do as you are doing -- --
"Men are too apt to condemn in others,
the very things they practice themselves.







zESOP'S FABLES. 11

.-- The Dog, Cock ard Fox.
"* .A DOG and a Cock, traveling together,
took shelter at night in a thick wood.
"- The Cock perched himself on a high
"branch, while the Dog found a bed at
the foot of the tree. When morning
dawned, the Cock, as usual, crowed very
Loudly. A Fox, hearing the sound, and
"wishing to make a breakfast on him, came
and stood under the branches, saying how
S. --.. earnestly he desired to make the acquaint-
-.ance of the owner of so sweet a voice.
The Cock said: "Sir, do me the favor to
e Oe-Eyed Doe. go round and wake up my porter, that he
A DOE, blind of an eye, was accustomed
to graze as near to the edge of the cliff as
she possibly could, to secure greater safety. i i
She turned her eye towards the land, that
she might perceive the approach of a hunter y
or hound, and her injured eye towards the X
sea, from which she entertained no antici- --i"
pation of danger. Some boatmen, sailing
by, saw her, and, taking a successful aim, may open the door, and
mortally wounded her. Said she: "0 let you in." On the Fox
wretched creature that I am to take such approaching the tree, the
precaution against the land, and after all Dog sprang out and caught
to find this seashore, to which I had come him and quickly tore him
for safety, so much more perilous." in pieces.
Danger sometimes comes from a source Those who try to entrap
that is least suspected. others are often caught by
their own schemes. g
Tlhe Wolf ard tihe Shepherds.
A WOLF passing by, saw some shepherds -.
in a hut eating for their dinner a haunch
of mutton. Approaching them, he said:
"What a clamor you would raise, if I were
to do as you are doing -- --
"Men are too apt to condemn in others,
the very things they practice themselves.







zESOP'S FABLES. 11

.-- The Dog, Cock ard Fox.
"* .A DOG and a Cock, traveling together,
took shelter at night in a thick wood.
"- The Cock perched himself on a high
"branch, while the Dog found a bed at
the foot of the tree. When morning
dawned, the Cock, as usual, crowed very
Loudly. A Fox, hearing the sound, and
"wishing to make a breakfast on him, came
and stood under the branches, saying how
S. --.. earnestly he desired to make the acquaint-
-.ance of the owner of so sweet a voice.
The Cock said: "Sir, do me the favor to
e Oe-Eyed Doe. go round and wake up my porter, that he
A DOE, blind of an eye, was accustomed
to graze as near to the edge of the cliff as
she possibly could, to secure greater safety. i i
She turned her eye towards the land, that
she might perceive the approach of a hunter y
or hound, and her injured eye towards the X
sea, from which she entertained no antici- --i"
pation of danger. Some boatmen, sailing
by, saw her, and, taking a successful aim, may open the door, and
mortally wounded her. Said she: "0 let you in." On the Fox
wretched creature that I am to take such approaching the tree, the
precaution against the land, and after all Dog sprang out and caught
to find this seashore, to which I had come him and quickly tore him
for safety, so much more perilous." in pieces.
Danger sometimes comes from a source Those who try to entrap
that is least suspected. others are often caught by
their own schemes. g
Tlhe Wolf ard tihe Shepherds.
A WOLF passing by, saw some shepherds -.
in a hut eating for their dinner a haunch
of mutton. Approaching them, he said:
"What a clamor you would raise, if I were
to do as you are doing -- --
"Men are too apt to condemn in others,
the very things they practice themselves.







12 .ESOP'S FABLES











The Mouse, the Frog, aid tlhe .- -
Hawk.
A MOUSE, by an unlucky chance, formed
an intimate acquaintance with a Frog. The Hares arid the Frogs.
The Frog one day, intent on mischief,
bound the foot of the Mouse tightly to his THE Hares, oppressed with a sense of
own. Thus joined-together, the Frog led their own exceeding timidity, and weary of
his friend toward the pool in which he the perpetual alarm to which they were
lived, until he reached the very brink, exposed, with one accord determined to
when suddenly jumping in, he dragged the Put an end to themselves and their
VMouse in with him. The Frog enjoyed the troubles, by jumping from a lofty precipice
water amazingly, and swam croaking about into a deep lake below. As they scam-
as if he had done a meritorious action. pered off in a very numerous body to carry
The unhappy Mouse was soon suffocated out their resolve, the Frogs lying on the
with the water, and his dead body floated banks of the lake heard the noise of their
about on the surface, tied to the foot of feet, and rushed helter-skelter to the deep
the Frog. A Hawk observed it, and, water for safety. On seeing the rapid dis-
pouncing upon it, carried it up aloft. The appearance of the Frogs, one of the Hares
Frog, being still fastened to the leg of the cried out to his companions: "Stay, my
Mouse, was also carried off a prisoner, and friends, do not do as you intended; for
was eaten by the Hawk. you now see that other creatures who yet
Harm hatch, harm catch. live are more timorous than ourselves."

The Dog and tl\e Oyster. -
A DOG, seeing an Oyster, thought it
was an egg and swallowed it. Soon after, -
suffering great pain, he said: "I deserve -k'- '
this torment for my greedy haste."
He who acts in haste, will repent at '-
leisure.







12 .ESOP'S FABLES











The Mouse, the Frog, aid tlhe .- -
Hawk.
A MOUSE, by an unlucky chance, formed
an intimate acquaintance with a Frog. The Hares arid the Frogs.
The Frog one day, intent on mischief,
bound the foot of the Mouse tightly to his THE Hares, oppressed with a sense of
own. Thus joined-together, the Frog led their own exceeding timidity, and weary of
his friend toward the pool in which he the perpetual alarm to which they were
lived, until he reached the very brink, exposed, with one accord determined to
when suddenly jumping in, he dragged the Put an end to themselves and their
VMouse in with him. The Frog enjoyed the troubles, by jumping from a lofty precipice
water amazingly, and swam croaking about into a deep lake below. As they scam-
as if he had done a meritorious action. pered off in a very numerous body to carry
The unhappy Mouse was soon suffocated out their resolve, the Frogs lying on the
with the water, and his dead body floated banks of the lake heard the noise of their
about on the surface, tied to the foot of feet, and rushed helter-skelter to the deep
the Frog. A Hawk observed it, and, water for safety. On seeing the rapid dis-
pouncing upon it, carried it up aloft. The appearance of the Frogs, one of the Hares
Frog, being still fastened to the leg of the cried out to his companions: "Stay, my
Mouse, was also carried off a prisoner, and friends, do not do as you intended; for
was eaten by the Hawk. you now see that other creatures who yet
Harm hatch, harm catch. live are more timorous than ourselves."

The Dog and tl\e Oyster. -
A DOG, seeing an Oyster, thought it
was an egg and swallowed it. Soon after, -
suffering great pain, he said: "I deserve -k'- '
this torment for my greedy haste."
He who acts in haste, will repent at '-
leisure.







12 .ESOP'S FABLES











The Mouse, the Frog, aid tlhe .- -
Hawk.
A MOUSE, by an unlucky chance, formed
an intimate acquaintance with a Frog. The Hares arid the Frogs.
The Frog one day, intent on mischief,
bound the foot of the Mouse tightly to his THE Hares, oppressed with a sense of
own. Thus joined-together, the Frog led their own exceeding timidity, and weary of
his friend toward the pool in which he the perpetual alarm to which they were
lived, until he reached the very brink, exposed, with one accord determined to
when suddenly jumping in, he dragged the Put an end to themselves and their
VMouse in with him. The Frog enjoyed the troubles, by jumping from a lofty precipice
water amazingly, and swam croaking about into a deep lake below. As they scam-
as if he had done a meritorious action. pered off in a very numerous body to carry
The unhappy Mouse was soon suffocated out their resolve, the Frogs lying on the
with the water, and his dead body floated banks of the lake heard the noise of their
about on the surface, tied to the foot of feet, and rushed helter-skelter to the deep
the Frog. A Hawk observed it, and, water for safety. On seeing the rapid dis-
pouncing upon it, carried it up aloft. The appearance of the Frogs, one of the Hares
Frog, being still fastened to the leg of the cried out to his companions: "Stay, my
Mouse, was also carried off a prisoner, and friends, do not do as you intended; for
was eaten by the Hawk. you now see that other creatures who yet
Harm hatch, harm catch. live are more timorous than ourselves."

The Dog and tl\e Oyster. -
A DOG, seeing an Oyster, thought it
was an egg and swallowed it. Soon after, -
suffering great pain, he said: "I deserve -k'- '
this torment for my greedy haste."
He who acts in haste, will repent at '-
leisure.










--__ -. -,I _& k'
Cr _l, F I-, ;'i .-,..-.;



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-IF

















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._-r--




























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-







.ESOP'S FABLES 15

might give notice of. his presence wher-
ever he went, and sometimes he fastened a






-- ,,Sfa .^ ^ ^ ^ .t^ "^ 1 -.. ..... .






The Lion and tl\e Boar.
chain about his neck, to which was attached
ON a summer day, when the great heat a heavy clog.
induced a general thirst, a Lion and a Boar The Dog grew proud of his bell and clog,
came at the same moment to a small well and went with them all over the market-
to drink. They fiercely disputed which place. An old hound said to him: "Why
of them should drink first, and were soon do you make such an exhibition of your-
engaged in the agonies of a mortal combat. self ? That bell and clog that you carry
On their stopping on a sudden to take are not, believe me, orders of merit, but,
breath for the fiercer renewal of the strife, on the contrary, marks of disgrace, a pub-
they saw some Vultures waiting in the lic notice to all men to avoid you as an ill-
distance to feast on the one which should mannered dog."
fall first. They at once made up their Notoriety is often mistaken for fame.
quarrel, saying: "It is better for us to
make friends, than to become the food of
Crows or Vultures."
Those who strive are often watched by --
others who will take advantage of their i_--
defeat to benefit themselves. .--- 1


Tl e Mischievous Dog.
A DoG used to run up quietly to the / i
heels of those he met, and to bite them
without notice. His master sometimes -
suspended a bell about his neck, that he -







.ESOP'S FABLES 15

might give notice of. his presence wher-
ever he went, and sometimes he fastened a






-- ,,Sfa .^ ^ ^ ^ .t^ "^ 1 -.. ..... .






The Lion and tl\e Boar.
chain about his neck, to which was attached
ON a summer day, when the great heat a heavy clog.
induced a general thirst, a Lion and a Boar The Dog grew proud of his bell and clog,
came at the same moment to a small well and went with them all over the market-
to drink. They fiercely disputed which place. An old hound said to him: "Why
of them should drink first, and were soon do you make such an exhibition of your-
engaged in the agonies of a mortal combat. self ? That bell and clog that you carry
On their stopping on a sudden to take are not, believe me, orders of merit, but,
breath for the fiercer renewal of the strife, on the contrary, marks of disgrace, a pub-
they saw some Vultures waiting in the lic notice to all men to avoid you as an ill-
distance to feast on the one which should mannered dog."
fall first. They at once made up their Notoriety is often mistaken for fame.
quarrel, saying: "It is better for us to
make friends, than to become the food of
Crows or Vultures."
Those who strive are often watched by --
others who will take advantage of their i_--
defeat to benefit themselves. .--- 1


Tl e Mischievous Dog.
A DoG used to run up quietly to the / i
heels of those he met, and to bite them
without notice. His master sometimes -
suspended a bell about his neck, that he -







16 -.ESOP'S FABLES

\ Fox approached the Lion and promised
to contrive for him the capture of the Ass,
'' if he would pledge his word that his
own life should be spared. On his as-
Ssuring him that he w would not injure him ,
the Fox led the Ass to a deep pit, and con-
"trived that he should fall into it. The
Lion, seeing that the Ass was secured, im-
mediately clutched the Fox, and then at-
tacked the Ass at his leisure.
Traitors must expect treachery.


Ttle Quack Frog.
A FROG once made proclamation to all
the beasts that he was a learned physician,
and able to heal all diseases. A Fox asked
him: How can you pretend to prescribe '__
for others, and you are unable to heal your -,y (
own lame gait and wrinkled skin ?"
Those who can mend others should first
mend themselves.





Tlhe Wolf arid the Sheep.
A WOLF, being sick and maimed, called
to a Sheep, who was passing, and asked
him to fetch some water from the stream.
For," he said, "if you will bring me
drink, I will find ifeans to provide myself
with meat." "Yes," said the Sheep, if I
Tlte Ass, tile Fox, and the Lior. should bring you the draught, you would
THE Ass and the Fox, having entered doubtless make me provide the meat
into a partnership together, went out into also."
the forest to hunt. They had not pro- Hypocritical speeches are easily seen
needed far, when they met a Lion. The through.







16 -.ESOP'S FABLES

\ Fox approached the Lion and promised
to contrive for him the capture of the Ass,
'' if he would pledge his word that his
own life should be spared. On his as-
Ssuring him that he w would not injure him ,
the Fox led the Ass to a deep pit, and con-
"trived that he should fall into it. The
Lion, seeing that the Ass was secured, im-
mediately clutched the Fox, and then at-
tacked the Ass at his leisure.
Traitors must expect treachery.


Ttle Quack Frog.
A FROG once made proclamation to all
the beasts that he was a learned physician,
and able to heal all diseases. A Fox asked
him: How can you pretend to prescribe '__
for others, and you are unable to heal your -,y (
own lame gait and wrinkled skin ?"
Those who can mend others should first
mend themselves.





Tlhe Wolf arid the Sheep.
A WOLF, being sick and maimed, called
to a Sheep, who was passing, and asked
him to fetch some water from the stream.
For," he said, "if you will bring me
drink, I will find ifeans to provide myself
with meat." "Yes," said the Sheep, if I
Tlte Ass, tile Fox, and the Lior. should bring you the draught, you would
THE Ass and the Fox, having entered doubtless make me provide the meat
into a partnership together, went out into also."
the forest to hunt. They had not pro- Hypocritical speeches are easily seen
needed far, when they met a Lion. The through.







16 -.ESOP'S FABLES

\ Fox approached the Lion and promised
to contrive for him the capture of the Ass,
'' if he would pledge his word that his
own life should be spared. On his as-
Ssuring him that he w would not injure him ,
the Fox led the Ass to a deep pit, and con-
"trived that he should fall into it. The
Lion, seeing that the Ass was secured, im-
mediately clutched the Fox, and then at-
tacked the Ass at his leisure.
Traitors must expect treachery.


Ttle Quack Frog.
A FROG once made proclamation to all
the beasts that he was a learned physician,
and able to heal all diseases. A Fox asked
him: How can you pretend to prescribe '__
for others, and you are unable to heal your -,y (
own lame gait and wrinkled skin ?"
Those who can mend others should first
mend themselves.





Tlhe Wolf arid the Sheep.
A WOLF, being sick and maimed, called
to a Sheep, who was passing, and asked
him to fetch some water from the stream.
For," he said, "if you will bring me
drink, I will find ifeans to provide myself
with meat." "Yes," said the Sheep, if I
Tlte Ass, tile Fox, and the Lior. should bring you the draught, you would
THE Ass and the Fox, having entered doubtless make me provide the meat
into a partnership together, went out into also."
the forest to hunt. They had not pro- Hypocritical speeches are easily seen
needed far, when they met a Lion. The through.






.ESOP'S FABLES. 17

'am altogether more powerful than you;
and if you doubt it, let us fight and see
S who will conquer." The Gnat, having
Sounded his horn, fastened itself upon the
-Lion, and stung him on the nostrils. The
Lion, trying to crush him, tore himself

severely. The Gnat thus prevailed over
The Fox and the Lion. the Lion, and buzzing about in a song of
triumph, flew away. But shortly after-
A Fox who had never yet seen a Lion, wards he became entangled in the meshes
when he fell in with him by a certain of a cobweb, and was eaten by a spider.
chance for the first time in the forest, was He greatly lamented his fate, saying: Woe
so frightened that he was near dying with is me, that I, who can wage war success-
fear. On his meeting with him for the fully with the hugest beasts, should perish
second time, he was still much alarmed, myself from this spider."
but not to the same extent as at first. On
seeing him the third time, he so increased
in boldness that he went up to him, and
commenced a familiar conversation with
him.
Acquaintance softens prejudices.










The Cock a\d the Jewel.
AThe G t a t COCK, scratching for food for himself
e Gnat and the io. and his hens, found a precious stone; on
A GNAT came and said to a Lion: "I do which he said: "If thy owner had found
not the least fear you, nor are you stronger thee, and not I, he would have taken thee
than I am. For in what does your strength up, and have set thee in thy first estate;
consist ? You can scratch with your but I have found thee for no purpose. I
claws, and bite with your teeth-so can a would rather have one barleycorn than all
woman in her quarrels. I repeat that I the jewels in the world."






.ESOP'S FABLES. 17

'am altogether more powerful than you;
and if you doubt it, let us fight and see
S who will conquer." The Gnat, having
Sounded his horn, fastened itself upon the
-Lion, and stung him on the nostrils. The
Lion, trying to crush him, tore himself

severely. The Gnat thus prevailed over
The Fox and the Lion. the Lion, and buzzing about in a song of
triumph, flew away. But shortly after-
A Fox who had never yet seen a Lion, wards he became entangled in the meshes
when he fell in with him by a certain of a cobweb, and was eaten by a spider.
chance for the first time in the forest, was He greatly lamented his fate, saying: Woe
so frightened that he was near dying with is me, that I, who can wage war success-
fear. On his meeting with him for the fully with the hugest beasts, should perish
second time, he was still much alarmed, myself from this spider."
but not to the same extent as at first. On
seeing him the third time, he so increased
in boldness that he went up to him, and
commenced a familiar conversation with
him.
Acquaintance softens prejudices.










The Cock a\d the Jewel.
AThe G t a t COCK, scratching for food for himself
e Gnat and the io. and his hens, found a precious stone; on
A GNAT came and said to a Lion: "I do which he said: "If thy owner had found
not the least fear you, nor are you stronger thee, and not I, he would have taken thee
than I am. For in what does your strength up, and have set thee in thy first estate;
consist ? You can scratch with your but I have found thee for no purpose. I
claws, and bite with your teeth-so can a would rather have one barleycorn than all
woman in her quarrels. I repeat that I the jewels in the world."






.ESOP'S FABLES. 17

'am altogether more powerful than you;
and if you doubt it, let us fight and see
S who will conquer." The Gnat, having
Sounded his horn, fastened itself upon the
-Lion, and stung him on the nostrils. The
Lion, trying to crush him, tore himself

severely. The Gnat thus prevailed over
The Fox and the Lion. the Lion, and buzzing about in a song of
triumph, flew away. But shortly after-
A Fox who had never yet seen a Lion, wards he became entangled in the meshes
when he fell in with him by a certain of a cobweb, and was eaten by a spider.
chance for the first time in the forest, was He greatly lamented his fate, saying: Woe
so frightened that he was near dying with is me, that I, who can wage war success-
fear. On his meeting with him for the fully with the hugest beasts, should perish
second time, he was still much alarmed, myself from this spider."
but not to the same extent as at first. On
seeing him the third time, he so increased
in boldness that he went up to him, and
commenced a familiar conversation with
him.
Acquaintance softens prejudices.










The Cock a\d the Jewel.
AThe G t a t COCK, scratching for food for himself
e Gnat and the io. and his hens, found a precious stone; on
A GNAT came and said to a Lion: "I do which he said: "If thy owner had found
not the least fear you, nor are you stronger thee, and not I, he would have taken thee
than I am. For in what does your strength up, and have set thee in thy first estate;
consist ? You can scratch with your but I have found thee for no purpose. I
claws, and bite with your teeth-so can a would rather have one barleycorn than all
woman in her quarrels. I repeat that I the jewels in the world."






18 .ESOP'S FABLES.

I themselves. At last the Country Mouse,
""i' almost famished, thus addressed his friend:






The Towrn Mouse and the Coun-
try Mouse. -
A COUNTRY Mouse invited a Town -
Mouse, an intimate friend, to pay him a "Although you have prepared for me so
visit, and partake of his country fare. As dainty a feast, I must leave you to enjoy it
they were on the bare plough-lands, eating by yourself. It is surrounded by too many
their wheat-stalks and roots pulled up from dangers to please me."
the hedge-row, the Town Mouse said to his Better a little in safety than an abun-
friend: "You live here the life of the ants, dance surrounded by danger.
while in my house is the horn of plenty.
I am surrounded with every luxury, and if
you will come with me, as I much wish The Game-cocks and the Par-
you would, you shall have an ample share tridge.
of my dainties." The Country Mouse was A MAN had two Game-cocks in his poul-
easily persuaded, and returned to town try-yard. One day, by chance, he fell in
with his friend. On his arrival, the Town with a tame Partridge for sale. He pur-
Mouse placed before him bread, barley, chased it, and brought it home that it
beans, dried figs, honey, raisins, and, last might be reared with his Game-cocks. On
of all, brought a dainty piece of cheese its being put into the poultry-yard they
from a basket. The Country Mouse, being struck at it, and followed it about, so that
much delighted at the sight of such good the Partridge was grievously troubled in
cheer, expressed his satisfaction in warm mind, and supposed that he was thus badly
terms, and lamented his own hard fate. treated because he was a stranger. Not
Just as they were beginning to eat, some long afterwards he saw the Cocks fighting
one opened the door, and they both ran together, and not separating before one
off squeaking, as fast as they could, to a had well beaten the other. He then said
hole so narrow that two could only find to himself: "I shall no longer distress my-
room in it by squeezing. They had scarcely self at being struck at by these Game-cocks,
again begun their repast when some one when I see that they cannot even refrain
else entered to take something out of a from quarreling with each other."
cupboard, on which the two Mice, more Strangers should avoid those who quar-
frightened than before, ran away and hid rel among themselves.






18 .ESOP'S FABLES.

I themselves. At last the Country Mouse,
""i' almost famished, thus addressed his friend:






The Towrn Mouse and the Coun-
try Mouse. -
A COUNTRY Mouse invited a Town -
Mouse, an intimate friend, to pay him a "Although you have prepared for me so
visit, and partake of his country fare. As dainty a feast, I must leave you to enjoy it
they were on the bare plough-lands, eating by yourself. It is surrounded by too many
their wheat-stalks and roots pulled up from dangers to please me."
the hedge-row, the Town Mouse said to his Better a little in safety than an abun-
friend: "You live here the life of the ants, dance surrounded by danger.
while in my house is the horn of plenty.
I am surrounded with every luxury, and if
you will come with me, as I much wish The Game-cocks and the Par-
you would, you shall have an ample share tridge.
of my dainties." The Country Mouse was A MAN had two Game-cocks in his poul-
easily persuaded, and returned to town try-yard. One day, by chance, he fell in
with his friend. On his arrival, the Town with a tame Partridge for sale. He pur-
Mouse placed before him bread, barley, chased it, and brought it home that it
beans, dried figs, honey, raisins, and, last might be reared with his Game-cocks. On
of all, brought a dainty piece of cheese its being put into the poultry-yard they
from a basket. The Country Mouse, being struck at it, and followed it about, so that
much delighted at the sight of such good the Partridge was grievously troubled in
cheer, expressed his satisfaction in warm mind, and supposed that he was thus badly
terms, and lamented his own hard fate. treated because he was a stranger. Not
Just as they were beginning to eat, some long afterwards he saw the Cocks fighting
one opened the door, and they both ran together, and not separating before one
off squeaking, as fast as they could, to a had well beaten the other. He then said
hole so narrow that two could only find to himself: "I shall no longer distress my-
room in it by squeezing. They had scarcely self at being struck at by these Game-cocks,
again begun their repast when some one when I see that they cannot even refrain
else entered to take something out of a from quarreling with each other."
cupboard, on which the two Mice, more Strangers should avoid those who quar-
frightened than before, ran away and hid rel among themselves.




















. ,. 1 -



~-:
A ii






...








i:~ : .
S',"-. "







,,,'l I -' t
.... ,



it .~ -'t.. ,

Tis
4, ;



fr,, 2











.ESOP'S FABLES 21

proper for him to ask, as what was in the
powers of his prince to grant; and so de-
"manded his princely daughter, the young
lioness, in marriage. The Lion consented;
but, when he would have given the royal
virgin into his possession, she, like a giddy
thing as she was, not minding how she
walked, by chance set her paw upon her
S spouse, who was coming to meet her, and
". , crushed him to ,pieces.
Beware of unequal matches. Alliances
'- "' prompted by ambition often prove fatal.

The Trurpeter taker Prisoner.
A TRUMPETER, bravely leading on the
soldiers, was captured by the enemy. He ts i
cried out to his captors: "Pray spare me,
and do not take my life without cause or
without injury. I have not slain a single /- -_
man of your troop. I have no arms, and
carry nothing but this one brass trumpet." -
"That is the very reason for which you
should be put to death," they said; "for Te Ass ad t Cbarger.
while you do not fight yourself, your
loud trumpet stirs up all the other soldiers AN Ass congratulated a Horse on being
to battle." so ungrudgingly and carefully provided
He who incites strife is as guilty as they for, while he himself had scarcely enough
who strive. to eat, nor even that without hard work.
*-- But when war broke out, the heavy armed
soldier mounted the Horse, and rushed
The Fatal Marriage. into the very midst of the enemy, and the
THE Lion, touched with gratitude by Horse, being wounded, fell dead on the
the noble procedure of a Mouse, and battle-field. Then the Ass, seeing all these
resolving not to be outdone in generosity things, changed his mind, and commiser-
by any wild beast whatsoever, desired his ated the Horse, saying: How much more
little deliverer to name his own terms, for fortunate am I than a charger. I can re-
that he might depend upon his complying main at home in safety while he is exposed
with any proposal he should make. The to all the perils of war."
Mouse, fired with ambition at this gracious Be not hasty to envy the condition of
offer, did not so much consider what was others.








.ESOP'S FABLES 21

proper for him to ask, as what was in the
powers of his prince to grant; and so de-
"manded his princely daughter, the young
lioness, in marriage. The Lion consented;
but, when he would have given the royal
virgin into his possession, she, like a giddy
thing as she was, not minding how she
walked, by chance set her paw upon her
S spouse, who was coming to meet her, and
". , crushed him to ,pieces.
Beware of unequal matches. Alliances
'- "' prompted by ambition often prove fatal.

The Trurpeter taker Prisoner.
A TRUMPETER, bravely leading on the
soldiers, was captured by the enemy. He ts i
cried out to his captors: "Pray spare me,
and do not take my life without cause or
without injury. I have not slain a single /- -_
man of your troop. I have no arms, and
carry nothing but this one brass trumpet." -
"That is the very reason for which you
should be put to death," they said; "for Te Ass ad t Cbarger.
while you do not fight yourself, your
loud trumpet stirs up all the other soldiers AN Ass congratulated a Horse on being
to battle." so ungrudgingly and carefully provided
He who incites strife is as guilty as they for, while he himself had scarcely enough
who strive. to eat, nor even that without hard work.
*-- But when war broke out, the heavy armed
soldier mounted the Horse, and rushed
The Fatal Marriage. into the very midst of the enemy, and the
THE Lion, touched with gratitude by Horse, being wounded, fell dead on the
the noble procedure of a Mouse, and battle-field. Then the Ass, seeing all these
resolving not to be outdone in generosity things, changed his mind, and commiser-
by any wild beast whatsoever, desired his ated the Horse, saying: How much more
little deliverer to name his own terms, for fortunate am I than a charger. I can re-
that he might depend upon his complying main at home in safety while he is exposed
with any proposal he should make. The to all the perils of war."
Mouse, fired with ambition at this gracious Be not hasty to envy the condition of
offer, did not so much consider what was others.








.ESOP'S FABLES 21

proper for him to ask, as what was in the
powers of his prince to grant; and so de-
"manded his princely daughter, the young
lioness, in marriage. The Lion consented;
but, when he would have given the royal
virgin into his possession, she, like a giddy
thing as she was, not minding how she
walked, by chance set her paw upon her
S spouse, who was coming to meet her, and
". , crushed him to ,pieces.
Beware of unequal matches. Alliances
'- "' prompted by ambition often prove fatal.

The Trurpeter taker Prisoner.
A TRUMPETER, bravely leading on the
soldiers, was captured by the enemy. He ts i
cried out to his captors: "Pray spare me,
and do not take my life without cause or
without injury. I have not slain a single /- -_
man of your troop. I have no arms, and
carry nothing but this one brass trumpet." -
"That is the very reason for which you
should be put to death," they said; "for Te Ass ad t Cbarger.
while you do not fight yourself, your
loud trumpet stirs up all the other soldiers AN Ass congratulated a Horse on being
to battle." so ungrudgingly and carefully provided
He who incites strife is as guilty as they for, while he himself had scarcely enough
who strive. to eat, nor even that without hard work.
*-- But when war broke out, the heavy armed
soldier mounted the Horse, and rushed
The Fatal Marriage. into the very midst of the enemy, and the
THE Lion, touched with gratitude by Horse, being wounded, fell dead on the
the noble procedure of a Mouse, and battle-field. Then the Ass, seeing all these
resolving not to be outdone in generosity things, changed his mind, and commiser-
by any wild beast whatsoever, desired his ated the Horse, saying: How much more
little deliverer to name his own terms, for fortunate am I than a charger. I can re-
that he might depend upon his complying main at home in safety while he is exposed
with any proposal he should make. The to all the perils of war."
Mouse, fired with ambition at this gracious Be not hasty to envy the condition of
offer, did not so much consider what was others.







22 ,ESOP'S FABLES

I, N, The eggs, allowing for all mishaps, will
.-'i produce two hundred and fifty chickens.
The chickens will become ready for market
:-" when poultry will fetch the highest price;
Sso that by the end of the year I shall have






The Vain Jackdaw.
JUPITER determined, it is said, to create
a sovereign over the birds, and made
proclamation that, on a certain day, they
should all present themselves before him,
when he would himself choose the most
beautiful among them to be king. The i
Jackdaw, knowing his own ugliness, 1-
searched through the woods and fields,
and collected the feathers which had
fallen from the wings of his companions, money enough to buy a new gown. In
and stuck them in all parts of his body. this dress I will go to the Christmas
When the appointed day arrived, and the junketings, when all the young fellows
birds had assembled before Jupiter, the will propose to me, but I will toss my
Jackdaw also made his appearance in his head, and refuse them every one." At this
many-feathered finery. On Jupiter pro- moment she tossed her head in unison with
posing to make him king, on account of her thoughts, when down fell the Milk-pot
the beauty of his plumage, the birds indig- to the ground, and all her schemes perished
nantly protested, and each plucking from in a moment.
him his own feathers, the Jackdaw was Count not your chickens before they
again nothing but a Jackdaw. are hatched.
Hope not to succeed in borrowed plumes.

The Milkmaid arid her Pot of
Milk. "'" '
A MAID was carrying her pail of milk
to the farm-house, when she fell a-musing.
"The money for which this milk will be
sold will buy at least three hundred eggs. -- -







22 ,ESOP'S FABLES

I, N, The eggs, allowing for all mishaps, will
.-'i produce two hundred and fifty chickens.
The chickens will become ready for market
:-" when poultry will fetch the highest price;
Sso that by the end of the year I shall have






The Vain Jackdaw.
JUPITER determined, it is said, to create
a sovereign over the birds, and made
proclamation that, on a certain day, they
should all present themselves before him,
when he would himself choose the most
beautiful among them to be king. The i
Jackdaw, knowing his own ugliness, 1-
searched through the woods and fields,
and collected the feathers which had
fallen from the wings of his companions, money enough to buy a new gown. In
and stuck them in all parts of his body. this dress I will go to the Christmas
When the appointed day arrived, and the junketings, when all the young fellows
birds had assembled before Jupiter, the will propose to me, but I will toss my
Jackdaw also made his appearance in his head, and refuse them every one." At this
many-feathered finery. On Jupiter pro- moment she tossed her head in unison with
posing to make him king, on account of her thoughts, when down fell the Milk-pot
the beauty of his plumage, the birds indig- to the ground, and all her schemes perished
nantly protested, and each plucking from in a moment.
him his own feathers, the Jackdaw was Count not your chickens before they
again nothing but a Jackdaw. are hatched.
Hope not to succeed in borrowed plumes.

The Milkmaid arid her Pot of
Milk. "'" '
A MAID was carrying her pail of milk
to the farm-house, when she fell a-musing.
"The money for which this milk will be
sold will buy at least three hundred eggs. -- -












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.ESOP'S FABLES 25

SWhat we do in sport often makes great
trouble for others.

The Shepherd arnd the Wolf.
A SHEPHERD once found a young Wolf,
Sand brought it up, and after a while
S. taught it to steal lambs from the neigh-
Sboring flocks. T he W olf, having show n
Himself an apt pupil, said to the Shep-
herd: Since you have taught me to steal,
you must keep a sharp look-out, or you
The Man and the Satyr, will lose some of your own flock."
A MAN and a Satyr once formed a bond The vices we teach may be practiced
of alliance. One very cold wintry day, against us.
as they talked together, the Man put his -
fingers to his mouth and blew on them.
On the Satyr inquiring the reason, he
told him that he did it to warm his t '
hands. Later on in the day they sat
down to eat, the food prepared being --
quite scalding. The Man raised one of
his dishes towards his mouth and blew
in it. On the Satyr again inquiring the
reason, he said that he did it to cool the
meat. "I can no longer consider you as
a friend," said the Satyr, "a fellow who
with the same breath blows hot and 4.a .-:
cold."
A man who talks for both sides is not to The Oak ard the lEeeds.
be trusted by either. A VERY large Oak was uprooted by the
wind, and thrown across a stream. It
fell among some Reeds, which it thus
The Boys ard the Frogs. addressed: "I wonder how you, who are
SOME boys, playing near a pond, saw so light and weak, are not entirely crushed
a number of Frogs in the water, and be- by these strong winds." They replied:
gan to pelt them with stones. They killed You fight and contend with the wind, and
several of them, when one of the Frogs, consequently you are destroyed; while we,
lifting his head out of the water, cried on the contrary, bend before the least breath
out: "Pray stop, my boys: what is sport of air, and therefore remain unbroken."
to you is death to us." Stoop to conquer.







.ESOP'S FABLES 25

SWhat we do in sport often makes great
trouble for others.

The Shepherd arnd the Wolf.
A SHEPHERD once found a young Wolf,
Sand brought it up, and after a while
S. taught it to steal lambs from the neigh-
Sboring flocks. T he W olf, having show n
Himself an apt pupil, said to the Shep-
herd: Since you have taught me to steal,
you must keep a sharp look-out, or you
The Man and the Satyr, will lose some of your own flock."
A MAN and a Satyr once formed a bond The vices we teach may be practiced
of alliance. One very cold wintry day, against us.
as they talked together, the Man put his -
fingers to his mouth and blew on them.
On the Satyr inquiring the reason, he
told him that he did it to warm his t '
hands. Later on in the day they sat
down to eat, the food prepared being --
quite scalding. The Man raised one of
his dishes towards his mouth and blew
in it. On the Satyr again inquiring the
reason, he said that he did it to cool the
meat. "I can no longer consider you as
a friend," said the Satyr, "a fellow who
with the same breath blows hot and 4.a .-:
cold."
A man who talks for both sides is not to The Oak ard the lEeeds.
be trusted by either. A VERY large Oak was uprooted by the
wind, and thrown across a stream. It
fell among some Reeds, which it thus
The Boys ard the Frogs. addressed: "I wonder how you, who are
SOME boys, playing near a pond, saw so light and weak, are not entirely crushed
a number of Frogs in the water, and be- by these strong winds." They replied:
gan to pelt them with stones. They killed You fight and contend with the wind, and
several of them, when one of the Frogs, consequently you are destroyed; while we,
lifting his head out of the water, cried on the contrary, bend before the least breath
out: "Pray stop, my boys: what is sport of air, and therefore remain unbroken."
to you is death to us." Stoop to conquer.







.ESOP'S FABLES 25

SWhat we do in sport often makes great
trouble for others.

The Shepherd arnd the Wolf.
A SHEPHERD once found a young Wolf,
Sand brought it up, and after a while
S. taught it to steal lambs from the neigh-
Sboring flocks. T he W olf, having show n
Himself an apt pupil, said to the Shep-
herd: Since you have taught me to steal,
you must keep a sharp look-out, or you
The Man and the Satyr, will lose some of your own flock."
A MAN and a Satyr once formed a bond The vices we teach may be practiced
of alliance. One very cold wintry day, against us.
as they talked together, the Man put his -
fingers to his mouth and blew on them.
On the Satyr inquiring the reason, he
told him that he did it to warm his t '
hands. Later on in the day they sat
down to eat, the food prepared being --
quite scalding. The Man raised one of
his dishes towards his mouth and blew
in it. On the Satyr again inquiring the
reason, he said that he did it to cool the
meat. "I can no longer consider you as
a friend," said the Satyr, "a fellow who
with the same breath blows hot and 4.a .-:
cold."
A man who talks for both sides is not to The Oak ard the lEeeds.
be trusted by either. A VERY large Oak was uprooted by the
wind, and thrown across a stream. It
fell among some Reeds, which it thus
The Boys ard the Frogs. addressed: "I wonder how you, who are
SOME boys, playing near a pond, saw so light and weak, are not entirely crushed
a number of Frogs in the water, and be- by these strong winds." They replied:
gan to pelt them with stones. They killed You fight and contend with the wind, and
several of them, when one of the Frogs, consequently you are destroyed; while we,
lifting his head out of the water, cried on the contrary, bend before the least breath
out: "Pray stop, my boys: what is sport of air, and therefore remain unbroken."
to you is death to us." Stoop to conquer.







.ESOP'S FABLES 25

SWhat we do in sport often makes great
trouble for others.

The Shepherd arnd the Wolf.
A SHEPHERD once found a young Wolf,
Sand brought it up, and after a while
S. taught it to steal lambs from the neigh-
Sboring flocks. T he W olf, having show n
Himself an apt pupil, said to the Shep-
herd: Since you have taught me to steal,
you must keep a sharp look-out, or you
The Man and the Satyr, will lose some of your own flock."
A MAN and a Satyr once formed a bond The vices we teach may be practiced
of alliance. One very cold wintry day, against us.
as they talked together, the Man put his -
fingers to his mouth and blew on them.
On the Satyr inquiring the reason, he
told him that he did it to warm his t '
hands. Later on in the day they sat
down to eat, the food prepared being --
quite scalding. The Man raised one of
his dishes towards his mouth and blew
in it. On the Satyr again inquiring the
reason, he said that he did it to cool the
meat. "I can no longer consider you as
a friend," said the Satyr, "a fellow who
with the same breath blows hot and 4.a .-:
cold."
A man who talks for both sides is not to The Oak ard the lEeeds.
be trusted by either. A VERY large Oak was uprooted by the
wind, and thrown across a stream. It
fell among some Reeds, which it thus
The Boys ard the Frogs. addressed: "I wonder how you, who are
SOME boys, playing near a pond, saw so light and weak, are not entirely crushed
a number of Frogs in the water, and be- by these strong winds." They replied:
gan to pelt them with stones. They killed You fight and contend with the wind, and
several of them, when one of the Frogs, consequently you are destroyed; while we,
lifting his head out of the water, cried on the contrary, bend before the least breath
out: "Pray stop, my boys: what is sport of air, and therefore remain unbroken."
to you is death to us." Stoop to conquer.








26 XESOP'S FABLES.


The Mother
S. and the Wolf.
F e A FAM1ISHED Wolf
Swas prowling
-a. about in the morn-
ing in search of
food. As he passed
Af.. the door of a cot-
tage built in the
fo rest, he heard a
mother say to her
The Lion and the Fox. child: "Be quiet,
A Fox entered into partnership with a or I will throw you
Lion, on the pretense of becoming his ser- out of the window,
vant. Each undertook his proper duty and the Wolf shall eat you." The
in accordance with his own nature and Wolf sat all day waiting at the
powers. The Fox discovered and pointed door. In the evening he heard
out the prey, the Lion sprang on it and
seized it. The Fox soon became jealous of
the Lion carrying off the Lion's share, and -
said that he would no longer find out the
prey, but would capture it on his own ac-
count. The next day he attempted to
snatch a lamb from the fold, but fell him- the same woman fondling her child, and say-
self a prey to the huntsman and his hounds. ing: "He is quiet now, and if the Wolf
Keep to your place, if you would succeed, should come, we will kill him." The Wolf,
hearing these words, went home, gaping
The Crab and its Mother. with cold and hunger.
A CRAB said to her son: "Why do you Be not in haste to believe what is said
walk so one-sided, my child? It is far in anger or thoughtlessness.
more becoming to go straightforward." .-- -
The young Crab replied: "Quite true, dear
mother; and if you will show me the ,.
straight way, I will promise to walk in it." J-- '
"The mother tried in vain, and submitted '
without remonstrance to the reproof of her
.child. -
Example is more powerful than precept.








26 XESOP'S FABLES.


The Mother
S. and the Wolf.
F e A FAM1ISHED Wolf
Swas prowling
-a. about in the morn-
ing in search of
food. As he passed
Af.. the door of a cot-
tage built in the
fo rest, he heard a
mother say to her
The Lion and the Fox. child: "Be quiet,
A Fox entered into partnership with a or I will throw you
Lion, on the pretense of becoming his ser- out of the window,
vant. Each undertook his proper duty and the Wolf shall eat you." The
in accordance with his own nature and Wolf sat all day waiting at the
powers. The Fox discovered and pointed door. In the evening he heard
out the prey, the Lion sprang on it and
seized it. The Fox soon became jealous of
the Lion carrying off the Lion's share, and -
said that he would no longer find out the
prey, but would capture it on his own ac-
count. The next day he attempted to
snatch a lamb from the fold, but fell him- the same woman fondling her child, and say-
self a prey to the huntsman and his hounds. ing: "He is quiet now, and if the Wolf
Keep to your place, if you would succeed, should come, we will kill him." The Wolf,
hearing these words, went home, gaping
The Crab and its Mother. with cold and hunger.
A CRAB said to her son: "Why do you Be not in haste to believe what is said
walk so one-sided, my child? It is far in anger or thoughtlessness.
more becoming to go straightforward." .-- -
The young Crab replied: "Quite true, dear
mother; and if you will show me the ,.
straight way, I will promise to walk in it." J-- '
"The mother tried in vain, and submitted '
without remonstrance to the reproof of her
.child. -
Example is more powerful than precept.








26 XESOP'S FABLES.


The Mother
S. and the Wolf.
F e A FAM1ISHED Wolf
Swas prowling
-a. about in the morn-
ing in search of
food. As he passed
Af.. the door of a cot-
tage built in the
fo rest, he heard a
mother say to her
The Lion and the Fox. child: "Be quiet,
A Fox entered into partnership with a or I will throw you
Lion, on the pretense of becoming his ser- out of the window,
vant. Each undertook his proper duty and the Wolf shall eat you." The
in accordance with his own nature and Wolf sat all day waiting at the
powers. The Fox discovered and pointed door. In the evening he heard
out the prey, the Lion sprang on it and
seized it. The Fox soon became jealous of
the Lion carrying off the Lion's share, and -
said that he would no longer find out the
prey, but would capture it on his own ac-
count. The next day he attempted to
snatch a lamb from the fold, but fell him- the same woman fondling her child, and say-
self a prey to the huntsman and his hounds. ing: "He is quiet now, and if the Wolf
Keep to your place, if you would succeed, should come, we will kill him." The Wolf,
hearing these words, went home, gaping
The Crab and its Mother. with cold and hunger.
A CRAB said to her son: "Why do you Be not in haste to believe what is said
walk so one-sided, my child? It is far in anger or thoughtlessness.
more becoming to go straightforward." .-- -
The young Crab replied: "Quite true, dear
mother; and if you will show me the ,.
straight way, I will promise to walk in it." J-- '
"The mother tried in vain, and submitted '
without remonstrance to the reproof of her
.child. -
Example is more powerful than precept.










~ I : -F g..- L,; ...... : -- --- -
Imp'
I;' l/1 f1.t. -i = --" -,,,.;.---- : ----. -- -

I In


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f !111 ~cII !
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b'-._:_








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-_- ,: -- _- :_ __--- __=_ = -__'-:__ ..









:.-=.~ ..._
---- S --; -- -- : ..--:---_ ..




























































































1






2ESOP'S FABLES 29

"V-" of day, and henceforth concealed himself
-T-.._ -_^i -. ln dark hiding-places, flying always alone
and at night.
Those who practice deceit must expect
to be shunned.








The Figlhting Cocks and the
Eagle.
Two Game Cocks were fiercely fighting
for the mastery of the farm-yard. One at
last put the other to flight. The van-'
quished Cock skulked away and hid him-" -
self in a quiet corner. The conqueror, ..-__
flying up to a high wall, flapped his wings
and crowed exultingly with all his might. Tl1e Ox and te Frog.
An Eagle sailing through the air pounced
upon him, and carried him off in his talons. AN Ox, drinking at a pool, trod on a
The vanquished Cock immediately came brood of young frogs, and crushed one of
out of his corner, and ruled henceforth them to death. The mother coming up,
with undisputed mastery. and missing one of her sons, inquired of
Pride goes before destruction, his brothers what had become of him.
"He is dead, dear mother; for just now a
very huge beast with four great feet came
is, B a to the pool, and crushed him to death with
e Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat. his cloven heel." The Frog, puffing her-
THE Birds waged war with the Beasts, self out, inquired, "If the beast was as big
and each party were by turns the con- as that in size." "Cease, mother, to puff
querors. A Bat, fearing the uncertain yourself out," said her son, "and do not be
issues of the fight, always betook himself angry; for you would, I assure you, sooner
to that side which was the strongest. burst than successfully imitate the hugeness
When peace was proclaimed, his deceitful of that monster."
conduct was apparent to both the com- Impossible things we cannot hope to
batants; he was driven forth from the light attain, and it is of no use to try.






2ESOP'S FABLES 29

"V-" of day, and henceforth concealed himself
-T-.._ -_^i -. ln dark hiding-places, flying always alone
and at night.
Those who practice deceit must expect
to be shunned.








The Figlhting Cocks and the
Eagle.
Two Game Cocks were fiercely fighting
for the mastery of the farm-yard. One at
last put the other to flight. The van-'
quished Cock skulked away and hid him-" -
self in a quiet corner. The conqueror, ..-__
flying up to a high wall, flapped his wings
and crowed exultingly with all his might. Tl1e Ox and te Frog.
An Eagle sailing through the air pounced
upon him, and carried him off in his talons. AN Ox, drinking at a pool, trod on a
The vanquished Cock immediately came brood of young frogs, and crushed one of
out of his corner, and ruled henceforth them to death. The mother coming up,
with undisputed mastery. and missing one of her sons, inquired of
Pride goes before destruction, his brothers what had become of him.
"He is dead, dear mother; for just now a
very huge beast with four great feet came
is, B a to the pool, and crushed him to death with
e Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat. his cloven heel." The Frog, puffing her-
THE Birds waged war with the Beasts, self out, inquired, "If the beast was as big
and each party were by turns the con- as that in size." "Cease, mother, to puff
querors. A Bat, fearing the uncertain yourself out," said her son, "and do not be
issues of the fight, always betook himself angry; for you would, I assure you, sooner
to that side which was the strongest. burst than successfully imitate the hugeness
When peace was proclaimed, his deceitful of that monster."
conduct was apparent to both the com- Impossible things we cannot hope to
batants; he was driven forth from the light attain, and it is of no use to try.






2ESOP'S FABLES 29

"V-" of day, and henceforth concealed himself
-T-.._ -_^i -. ln dark hiding-places, flying always alone
and at night.
Those who practice deceit must expect
to be shunned.








The Figlhting Cocks and the
Eagle.
Two Game Cocks were fiercely fighting
for the mastery of the farm-yard. One at
last put the other to flight. The van-'
quished Cock skulked away and hid him-" -
self in a quiet corner. The conqueror, ..-__
flying up to a high wall, flapped his wings
and crowed exultingly with all his might. Tl1e Ox and te Frog.
An Eagle sailing through the air pounced
upon him, and carried him off in his talons. AN Ox, drinking at a pool, trod on a
The vanquished Cock immediately came brood of young frogs, and crushed one of
out of his corner, and ruled henceforth them to death. The mother coming up,
with undisputed mastery. and missing one of her sons, inquired of
Pride goes before destruction, his brothers what had become of him.
"He is dead, dear mother; for just now a
very huge beast with four great feet came
is, B a to the pool, and crushed him to death with
e Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat. his cloven heel." The Frog, puffing her-
THE Birds waged war with the Beasts, self out, inquired, "If the beast was as big
and each party were by turns the con- as that in size." "Cease, mother, to puff
querors. A Bat, fearing the uncertain yourself out," said her son, "and do not be
issues of the fight, always betook himself angry; for you would, I assure you, sooner
to that side which was the strongest. burst than successfully imitate the hugeness
When peace was proclaimed, his deceitful of that monster."
conduct was apparent to both the com- Impossible things we cannot hope to
batants; he was driven forth from the light attain, and it is of no use to try.







30 iESOP'S FABLES




0' '-
_i-






__ _----- "~-----:.~ -

TTle Dogs and the Hides.
SOME Dogs, famished with hunger, saw
some cow-hides steeping in a river. Not The Fisherinan and the Little
being able to reach them, they agreed to Fisli.
drink up the river; but it fell out that they A FISHERMAN who lived on the produce
burst themselves with drinking long before of his nets, one day caught a single small
they reached the hides. fish as the result of his day's labor. The
Attempt not impossibilities, fish, panting convulsively, thus entreated
for his life: O Sir, what good can I be
to you, and how little am I worth I am
The Horse and the Ass. not yet come to my full size. Pray spare
my life, and put me back into the sea. I
A HORSE, proud of his fine trappings, shall soon become a large fish, fit for the
met an Ass on the highway. The Ass tables of the rich; and then you can catch
being heavily laden moved slowly out of me again, and make a handsome profit of
the way. "Hardly," said the Horse, "can me." The fisherman replied: "I should
I resist kicking you with my heels." The be a very simple fellow, if I were to forego
Ass held his peace, and made only a silent my certain gain for an uncertain profit."
appeal to the justice of the gods. Not
long afterward the Horse, having become
broken-winded, was sent by his owner to --
the farm. The Ass seeing him drawing a -.
dung-cart, thus derided him: "Where, 0 '
boaster, are now all thy gay trappings, '-- Ii
thou who art thyself reduced to the con-
dition you so lately treated with con- -
tempt ?" ..-







30 iESOP'S FABLES




0' '-
_i-






__ _----- "~-----:.~ -

TTle Dogs and the Hides.
SOME Dogs, famished with hunger, saw
some cow-hides steeping in a river. Not The Fisherinan and the Little
being able to reach them, they agreed to Fisli.
drink up the river; but it fell out that they A FISHERMAN who lived on the produce
burst themselves with drinking long before of his nets, one day caught a single small
they reached the hides. fish as the result of his day's labor. The
Attempt not impossibilities, fish, panting convulsively, thus entreated
for his life: O Sir, what good can I be
to you, and how little am I worth I am
The Horse and the Ass. not yet come to my full size. Pray spare
my life, and put me back into the sea. I
A HORSE, proud of his fine trappings, shall soon become a large fish, fit for the
met an Ass on the highway. The Ass tables of the rich; and then you can catch
being heavily laden moved slowly out of me again, and make a handsome profit of
the way. "Hardly," said the Horse, "can me." The fisherman replied: "I should
I resist kicking you with my heels." The be a very simple fellow, if I were to forego
Ass held his peace, and made only a silent my certain gain for an uncertain profit."
appeal to the justice of the gods. Not
long afterward the Horse, having become
broken-winded, was sent by his owner to --
the farm. The Ass seeing him drawing a -.
dung-cart, thus derided him: "Where, 0 '
boaster, are now all thy gay trappings, '-- Ii
thou who art thyself reduced to the con-
dition you so lately treated with con- -
tempt ?" ..-







30 iESOP'S FABLES




0' '-
_i-






__ _----- "~-----:.~ -

TTle Dogs and the Hides.
SOME Dogs, famished with hunger, saw
some cow-hides steeping in a river. Not The Fisherinan and the Little
being able to reach them, they agreed to Fisli.
drink up the river; but it fell out that they A FISHERMAN who lived on the produce
burst themselves with drinking long before of his nets, one day caught a single small
they reached the hides. fish as the result of his day's labor. The
Attempt not impossibilities, fish, panting convulsively, thus entreated
for his life: O Sir, what good can I be
to you, and how little am I worth I am
The Horse and the Ass. not yet come to my full size. Pray spare
my life, and put me back into the sea. I
A HORSE, proud of his fine trappings, shall soon become a large fish, fit for the
met an Ass on the highway. The Ass tables of the rich; and then you can catch
being heavily laden moved slowly out of me again, and make a handsome profit of
the way. "Hardly," said the Horse, "can me." The fisherman replied: "I should
I resist kicking you with my heels." The be a very simple fellow, if I were to forego
Ass held his peace, and made only a silent my certain gain for an uncertain profit."
appeal to the justice of the gods. Not
long afterward the Horse, having become
broken-winded, was sent by his owner to --
the farm. The Ass seeing him drawing a -.
dung-cart, thus derided him: "Where, 0 '
boaster, are now all thy gay trappings, '-- Ii
thou who art thyself reduced to the con-
dition you so lately treated with con- -
tempt ?" ..-


































AA .0) ,,





















4,










/ESOP'S FABLES. 33

he would like best, to go up hill or down
hill. The poor beast replied, not without
a touch of reason: Why do you ask me ?
Is it that the level way through the desert
is closed ?"


T The Boy and the Nettle.
A BOY was stung by a Nettle. He ran
home and told his mother, saying: Al-
though it pains me so much, I did but
touch it ever so gently." "That was just
S it," said his mother, "which caused it to
S sting you. The next time you touch a
Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft
The Dove arnd the Crow. as silk to your hand, and not in the least
A DovE shut up in a cage was boasting hurt you."
Whatever you do, do with all your
of the large number of the young ones
which she had hatched. A Crow, hearing might.
her, said: "My good friend, cease from
this unreasonable boasting. The larger The Huntsman arid tl\e Fisher-
the number of your family, the greater your man.
cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in
this prison-house." A HUNTSMAN, returning with his dogs
" To enjoy our blessings we must have from the field, fell in by chance with a
freedom. Fisherman, bringing home a basket laden
with fish. The Huntsman wished to have
the fish, and their owner experienced an
"equal longing for the contents of the game-
bag. They quickly agreed to exchange
the produce of their day's sport. Each
was so well pleased with his bargain,
that they made for some time the same
exchange day after day. A neighbor said
to them: "If you go on in this way, you
"will soon destroy, by frequent use, the
pleasure of your exchange, and each will
Tlte Camel anrd the Arab. again wish to retain the fruits of his own
Al Arab Camel-driver having completed sport."
the lading of his Camel, asked him which Pleasures are heightened by abstinence.
3







/ESOP'S FABLES. 33

he would like best, to go up hill or down
hill. The poor beast replied, not without
a touch of reason: Why do you ask me ?
Is it that the level way through the desert
is closed ?"


T The Boy and the Nettle.
A BOY was stung by a Nettle. He ran
home and told his mother, saying: Al-
though it pains me so much, I did but
touch it ever so gently." "That was just
S it," said his mother, "which caused it to
S sting you. The next time you touch a
Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft
The Dove arnd the Crow. as silk to your hand, and not in the least
A DovE shut up in a cage was boasting hurt you."
Whatever you do, do with all your
of the large number of the young ones
which she had hatched. A Crow, hearing might.
her, said: "My good friend, cease from
this unreasonable boasting. The larger The Huntsman arid tl\e Fisher-
the number of your family, the greater your man.
cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in
this prison-house." A HUNTSMAN, returning with his dogs
" To enjoy our blessings we must have from the field, fell in by chance with a
freedom. Fisherman, bringing home a basket laden
with fish. The Huntsman wished to have
the fish, and their owner experienced an
"equal longing for the contents of the game-
bag. They quickly agreed to exchange
the produce of their day's sport. Each
was so well pleased with his bargain,
that they made for some time the same
exchange day after day. A neighbor said
to them: "If you go on in this way, you
"will soon destroy, by frequent use, the
pleasure of your exchange, and each will
Tlte Camel anrd the Arab. again wish to retain the fruits of his own
Al Arab Camel-driver having completed sport."
the lading of his Camel, asked him which Pleasures are heightened by abstinence.
3







/ESOP'S FABLES. 33

he would like best, to go up hill or down
hill. The poor beast replied, not without
a touch of reason: Why do you ask me ?
Is it that the level way through the desert
is closed ?"


T The Boy and the Nettle.
A BOY was stung by a Nettle. He ran
home and told his mother, saying: Al-
though it pains me so much, I did but
touch it ever so gently." "That was just
S it," said his mother, "which caused it to
S sting you. The next time you touch a
Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft
The Dove arnd the Crow. as silk to your hand, and not in the least
A DovE shut up in a cage was boasting hurt you."
Whatever you do, do with all your
of the large number of the young ones
which she had hatched. A Crow, hearing might.
her, said: "My good friend, cease from
this unreasonable boasting. The larger The Huntsman arid tl\e Fisher-
the number of your family, the greater your man.
cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in
this prison-house." A HUNTSMAN, returning with his dogs
" To enjoy our blessings we must have from the field, fell in by chance with a
freedom. Fisherman, bringing home a basket laden
with fish. The Huntsman wished to have
the fish, and their owner experienced an
"equal longing for the contents of the game-
bag. They quickly agreed to exchange
the produce of their day's sport. Each
was so well pleased with his bargain,
that they made for some time the same
exchange day after day. A neighbor said
to them: "If you go on in this way, you
"will soon destroy, by frequent use, the
pleasure of your exchange, and each will
Tlte Camel anrd the Arab. again wish to retain the fruits of his own
Al Arab Camel-driver having completed sport."
the lading of his Camel, asked him which Pleasures are heightened by abstinence.
3







/ESOP'S FABLES. 33

he would like best, to go up hill or down
hill. The poor beast replied, not without
a touch of reason: Why do you ask me ?
Is it that the level way through the desert
is closed ?"


T The Boy and the Nettle.
A BOY was stung by a Nettle. He ran
home and told his mother, saying: Al-
though it pains me so much, I did but
touch it ever so gently." "That was just
S it," said his mother, "which caused it to
S sting you. The next time you touch a
Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft
The Dove arnd the Crow. as silk to your hand, and not in the least
A DovE shut up in a cage was boasting hurt you."
Whatever you do, do with all your
of the large number of the young ones
which she had hatched. A Crow, hearing might.
her, said: "My good friend, cease from
this unreasonable boasting. The larger The Huntsman arid tl\e Fisher-
the number of your family, the greater your man.
cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in
this prison-house." A HUNTSMAN, returning with his dogs
" To enjoy our blessings we must have from the field, fell in by chance with a
freedom. Fisherman, bringing home a basket laden
with fish. The Huntsman wished to have
the fish, and their owner experienced an
"equal longing for the contents of the game-
bag. They quickly agreed to exchange
the produce of their day's sport. Each
was so well pleased with his bargain,
that they made for some time the same
exchange day after day. A neighbor said
to them: "If you go on in this way, you
"will soon destroy, by frequent use, the
pleasure of your exchange, and each will
Tlte Camel anrd the Arab. again wish to retain the fruits of his own
Al Arab Camel-driver having completed sport."
the lading of his Camel, asked him which Pleasures are heightened by abstinence.
3







34 ,ESOP'S FABLES









T1e- Monkey and the Dolphin.
The Two Pots. A SAILOR, bound on a long voyage, took
A RIVER carried down in its stream two with him a Monkey to amuse him while
Pots, one made of earthenware, and the on shipboard. As he sailed off the coast
other of brass. As they floated along on of Greece, a violent tempest arose, in which
the surface of the stream, the Earthen Pot the ship was wrecked, and he, his Monkey
said to the Brass Pot: "Pray keep at a and all the crew were obliged to swim for
distance, and do not come near me, for if their lives. A Dolphin saw the Monkey
you touch me ever so slightly, I shall be contending with the waves, and supposing
broken in pieces; and besides, I by no him to be a man (whom he is always said
means wish to come near you." to befriend), came and placed himself un-
Equals make the best friends. der him, to convey him on his back in
safety to the shore. When the Dolphin
---arrived with his burden in sight of land not
far from Athens, he demanded of the Mon-
The Widow and her Little
S Maidens. key if he were an Athenian, who answered
that he was, and that he was descended
A wIDow woman, fond of cleaning, had from one of the noblest families in that city.
two little maidens to wait on her. She The Dolphin then inquired if he knew
was in the habit of waking them early in the Piraeus (the famous harbor of Athens).
the morning, at cockcrow. The maidens, The Monkey, supposing that a man was
being aggrieved by such excessive labor, meant, and being obliged to support his
resolved to kill the cock who roused their previous lie, answered that he knew him
mistress so early. When they had done very well, and that he was an intimate
this, they found that they had only pre- friend, who would, no doubt, be very glad
pared for themselves greater troubles, for to see him. The Dolphin, indignant at
their mistress, no longer hearing the cock, these falsehoods, dipped the Monkey under
was unable to tell the time, and so woke the water, and drowned him.
them up to their work in the middle of the He who once begins to tell falsehoods
night, is obliged to tell others to make them
Unlawful acts to escape trials only i, appear true, and, sooner or later, they will
crease our troubles, get him into trouble.







34 ,ESOP'S FABLES









T1e- Monkey and the Dolphin.
The Two Pots. A SAILOR, bound on a long voyage, took
A RIVER carried down in its stream two with him a Monkey to amuse him while
Pots, one made of earthenware, and the on shipboard. As he sailed off the coast
other of brass. As they floated along on of Greece, a violent tempest arose, in which
the surface of the stream, the Earthen Pot the ship was wrecked, and he, his Monkey
said to the Brass Pot: "Pray keep at a and all the crew were obliged to swim for
distance, and do not come near me, for if their lives. A Dolphin saw the Monkey
you touch me ever so slightly, I shall be contending with the waves, and supposing
broken in pieces; and besides, I by no him to be a man (whom he is always said
means wish to come near you." to befriend), came and placed himself un-
Equals make the best friends. der him, to convey him on his back in
safety to the shore. When the Dolphin
---arrived with his burden in sight of land not
far from Athens, he demanded of the Mon-
The Widow and her Little
S Maidens. key if he were an Athenian, who answered
that he was, and that he was descended
A wIDow woman, fond of cleaning, had from one of the noblest families in that city.
two little maidens to wait on her. She The Dolphin then inquired if he knew
was in the habit of waking them early in the Piraeus (the famous harbor of Athens).
the morning, at cockcrow. The maidens, The Monkey, supposing that a man was
being aggrieved by such excessive labor, meant, and being obliged to support his
resolved to kill the cock who roused their previous lie, answered that he knew him
mistress so early. When they had done very well, and that he was an intimate
this, they found that they had only pre- friend, who would, no doubt, be very glad
pared for themselves greater troubles, for to see him. The Dolphin, indignant at
their mistress, no longer hearing the cock, these falsehoods, dipped the Monkey under
was unable to tell the time, and so woke the water, and drowned him.
them up to their work in the middle of the He who once begins to tell falsehoods
night, is obliged to tell others to make them
Unlawful acts to escape trials only i, appear true, and, sooner or later, they will
crease our troubles, get him into trouble.







34 ,ESOP'S FABLES









T1e- Monkey and the Dolphin.
The Two Pots. A SAILOR, bound on a long voyage, took
A RIVER carried down in its stream two with him a Monkey to amuse him while
Pots, one made of earthenware, and the on shipboard. As he sailed off the coast
other of brass. As they floated along on of Greece, a violent tempest arose, in which
the surface of the stream, the Earthen Pot the ship was wrecked, and he, his Monkey
said to the Brass Pot: "Pray keep at a and all the crew were obliged to swim for
distance, and do not come near me, for if their lives. A Dolphin saw the Monkey
you touch me ever so slightly, I shall be contending with the waves, and supposing
broken in pieces; and besides, I by no him to be a man (whom he is always said
means wish to come near you." to befriend), came and placed himself un-
Equals make the best friends. der him, to convey him on his back in
safety to the shore. When the Dolphin
---arrived with his burden in sight of land not
far from Athens, he demanded of the Mon-
The Widow and her Little
S Maidens. key if he were an Athenian, who answered
that he was, and that he was descended
A wIDow woman, fond of cleaning, had from one of the noblest families in that city.
two little maidens to wait on her. She The Dolphin then inquired if he knew
was in the habit of waking them early in the Piraeus (the famous harbor of Athens).
the morning, at cockcrow. The maidens, The Monkey, supposing that a man was
being aggrieved by such excessive labor, meant, and being obliged to support his
resolved to kill the cock who roused their previous lie, answered that he knew him
mistress so early. When they had done very well, and that he was an intimate
this, they found that they had only pre- friend, who would, no doubt, be very glad
pared for themselves greater troubles, for to see him. The Dolphin, indignant at
their mistress, no longer hearing the cock, these falsehoods, dipped the Monkey under
was unable to tell the time, and so woke the water, and drowned him.
them up to their work in the middle of the He who once begins to tell falsehoods
night, is obliged to tell others to make them
Unlawful acts to escape trials only i, appear true, and, sooner or later, they will
crease our troubles, get him into trouble.






































~-----
-~rA-































:f- M-



-nZWT -- -----
________________ --- _---

________________~~-~--~r-- ~-___ -*




































































I'







1ESOP'S FABLES. 37

immediately blacken again with your
S. charcoal."
'!;--_^;< Like will draw like.











The Bull arid the Goat.
A BULL, escaping from a Lion, entered
a cave, which some shepherds had lately 1 .
occupied. A He-goat was left in it, who
sharply attacked him with his horns.
The Bull quietly addressed him-" Butt The Liorn and the Mouse.
away as much as you will. I have no fear w a f s
T A Lio was awakened from sleep by a
of you, but of the Lion. Let that monster o e fr.
Mouse running over his face. Rising up
once go, and I will soon let you know .
what is the respective strength of a Goat anger, e caught him and was about to
and a Bull." kill him, when the Mouse piteously en-
It shows an evil disposition to take ad- treated, saying: "If you would only spare
vantage of a friend in distress, my life, I would be sure to repay your
kindness." The Lion laughed and let him
go. It happened shortly after this that
Ter ad te the Lion was caught by some hunters,
e Carcoal-Burer and te who bound him by strong ropes to the
Fuller. ground. The Mouse, recognizing his roar,
A CHARCOAL-BURNER carried on his trade came up and gnawed the rope with his
in his own house. One day he met a teeth, and, setting him free, exclaimed:
friend; a Fuller, and entreated him to come "You ridiculed the idea of my ever being
and live with him, saying that they should able to help you, not expecting to receive
be far better neighbors, and that their from me any repayment of your favor;
housekeeping expenses would be lessened. but now you know that it is possible for
The Fuller replied: The arrangement is even a Mouse to confer benefits on a
impossible as far as I am concerned, for Lion."
whatever I should whiten, you would No one is too weak to do good.







1ESOP'S FABLES. 37

immediately blacken again with your
S. charcoal."
'!;--_^;< Like will draw like.











The Bull arid the Goat.
A BULL, escaping from a Lion, entered
a cave, which some shepherds had lately 1 .
occupied. A He-goat was left in it, who
sharply attacked him with his horns.
The Bull quietly addressed him-" Butt The Liorn and the Mouse.
away as much as you will. I have no fear w a f s
T A Lio was awakened from sleep by a
of you, but of the Lion. Let that monster o e fr.
Mouse running over his face. Rising up
once go, and I will soon let you know .
what is the respective strength of a Goat anger, e caught him and was about to
and a Bull." kill him, when the Mouse piteously en-
It shows an evil disposition to take ad- treated, saying: "If you would only spare
vantage of a friend in distress, my life, I would be sure to repay your
kindness." The Lion laughed and let him
go. It happened shortly after this that
Ter ad te the Lion was caught by some hunters,
e Carcoal-Burer and te who bound him by strong ropes to the
Fuller. ground. The Mouse, recognizing his roar,
A CHARCOAL-BURNER carried on his trade came up and gnawed the rope with his
in his own house. One day he met a teeth, and, setting him free, exclaimed:
friend; a Fuller, and entreated him to come "You ridiculed the idea of my ever being
and live with him, saying that they should able to help you, not expecting to receive
be far better neighbors, and that their from me any repayment of your favor;
housekeeping expenses would be lessened. but now you know that it is possible for
The Fuller replied: The arrangement is even a Mouse to confer benefits on a
impossible as far as I am concerned, for Lion."
whatever I should whiten, you would No one is too weak to do good.







1ESOP'S FABLES. 37

immediately blacken again with your
S. charcoal."
'!;--_^;< Like will draw like.











The Bull arid the Goat.
A BULL, escaping from a Lion, entered
a cave, which some shepherds had lately 1 .
occupied. A He-goat was left in it, who
sharply attacked him with his horns.
The Bull quietly addressed him-" Butt The Liorn and the Mouse.
away as much as you will. I have no fear w a f s
T A Lio was awakened from sleep by a
of you, but of the Lion. Let that monster o e fr.
Mouse running over his face. Rising up
once go, and I will soon let you know .
what is the respective strength of a Goat anger, e caught him and was about to
and a Bull." kill him, when the Mouse piteously en-
It shows an evil disposition to take ad- treated, saying: "If you would only spare
vantage of a friend in distress, my life, I would be sure to repay your
kindness." The Lion laughed and let him
go. It happened shortly after this that
Ter ad te the Lion was caught by some hunters,
e Carcoal-Burer and te who bound him by strong ropes to the
Fuller. ground. The Mouse, recognizing his roar,
A CHARCOAL-BURNER carried on his trade came up and gnawed the rope with his
in his own house. One day he met a teeth, and, setting him free, exclaimed:
friend; a Fuller, and entreated him to come "You ridiculed the idea of my ever being
and live with him, saying that they should able to help you, not expecting to receive
be far better neighbors, and that their from me any repayment of your favor;
housekeeping expenses would be lessened. but now you know that it is possible for
The Fuller replied: The arrangement is even a Mouse to confer benefits on a
impossible as far as I am concerned, for Lion."
whatever I should whiten, you would No one is too weak to do good.







38 AESOP'S FABLES.

inhabitants of the ocean. The Dolphin
gladly consented to this request. Not long
afterwards the Lion had a combat with a
wild bull, and called on the Dolphin to
.., help him. The Dolphin, though quite
Swilling to give him assistance, was unable
to do so, as he could not by any means
reach the land. The Lion abused him as
a traitor. The Dolphin replied: '- Nay, my
friend, blame not me, but Nature, which,
while giving me the sovereignty of the sea,
S has quite denied me the power of living
upon the land."
The Horse ard the Stag. Let every one stick to his own element.
THE Horse had the plain entirely to
himself. A Stag intruded into his domain .
and shared his pasture. The Horse, desir- ,
ing to revenge himself on the stranger, /, '
requested a man, if he were willing, to '
help him in punishing the Stag. The man
replied, that if the Horse would receive a i'::
bit in his mouth, and agree to carry him,
he would contrive very effectual weapons ----
against the Stag. The Horse consented, The Mice in Couqcil.
and allowed the man to mount him. From
that hour he found that, instead of obtain- THE Mice summoned a council to decide
ing revenge on the Stag, he had enslaved how they might best devise means for ob-
himself to the service of man. training notice of the approach of their
He who seeks to injure others often in- great enemy the Cat. Among the many
jures only himself. plans devised; the one that found most
favor was the proposal to tie a bell to
the neck of the Cat, that the Mice being
The Lior( arid the Dolphin. warned by the sound of the tinkling might
A LION roaming by the sea-shore, saw a run away and hide themselves in their
Dolphin lift up its head out of the waves, holes at his approach. But when the
and asked him to contract an alliance with Mice further debated who among them
him; saying that of all the animals they should thus bell the Cat," there was no
ought to be the best friends, since the one one found to do it.
was the king of beasts on the earth, and Let those who propose be willing to
the other was the sovereign ruler of all the perform.







38 AESOP'S FABLES.

inhabitants of the ocean. The Dolphin
gladly consented to this request. Not long
afterwards the Lion had a combat with a
wild bull, and called on the Dolphin to
.., help him. The Dolphin, though quite
Swilling to give him assistance, was unable
to do so, as he could not by any means
reach the land. The Lion abused him as
a traitor. The Dolphin replied: '- Nay, my
friend, blame not me, but Nature, which,
while giving me the sovereignty of the sea,
S has quite denied me the power of living
upon the land."
The Horse ard the Stag. Let every one stick to his own element.
THE Horse had the plain entirely to
himself. A Stag intruded into his domain .
and shared his pasture. The Horse, desir- ,
ing to revenge himself on the stranger, /, '
requested a man, if he were willing, to '
help him in punishing the Stag. The man
replied, that if the Horse would receive a i'::
bit in his mouth, and agree to carry him,
he would contrive very effectual weapons ----
against the Stag. The Horse consented, The Mice in Couqcil.
and allowed the man to mount him. From
that hour he found that, instead of obtain- THE Mice summoned a council to decide
ing revenge on the Stag, he had enslaved how they might best devise means for ob-
himself to the service of man. training notice of the approach of their
He who seeks to injure others often in- great enemy the Cat. Among the many
jures only himself. plans devised; the one that found most
favor was the proposal to tie a bell to
the neck of the Cat, that the Mice being
The Lior( arid the Dolphin. warned by the sound of the tinkling might
A LION roaming by the sea-shore, saw a run away and hide themselves in their
Dolphin lift up its head out of the waves, holes at his approach. But when the
and asked him to contract an alliance with Mice further debated who among them
him; saying that of all the animals they should thus bell the Cat," there was no
ought to be the best friends, since the one one found to do it.
was the king of beasts on the earth, and Let those who propose be willing to
the other was the sovereign ruler of all the perform.







38 AESOP'S FABLES.

inhabitants of the ocean. The Dolphin
gladly consented to this request. Not long
afterwards the Lion had a combat with a
wild bull, and called on the Dolphin to
.., help him. The Dolphin, though quite
Swilling to give him assistance, was unable
to do so, as he could not by any means
reach the land. The Lion abused him as
a traitor. The Dolphin replied: '- Nay, my
friend, blame not me, but Nature, which,
while giving me the sovereignty of the sea,
S has quite denied me the power of living
upon the land."
The Horse ard the Stag. Let every one stick to his own element.
THE Horse had the plain entirely to
himself. A Stag intruded into his domain .
and shared his pasture. The Horse, desir- ,
ing to revenge himself on the stranger, /, '
requested a man, if he were willing, to '
help him in punishing the Stag. The man
replied, that if the Horse would receive a i'::
bit in his mouth, and agree to carry him,
he would contrive very effectual weapons ----
against the Stag. The Horse consented, The Mice in Couqcil.
and allowed the man to mount him. From
that hour he found that, instead of obtain- THE Mice summoned a council to decide
ing revenge on the Stag, he had enslaved how they might best devise means for ob-
himself to the service of man. training notice of the approach of their
He who seeks to injure others often in- great enemy the Cat. Among the many
jures only himself. plans devised; the one that found most
favor was the proposal to tie a bell to
the neck of the Cat, that the Mice being
The Lior( arid the Dolphin. warned by the sound of the tinkling might
A LION roaming by the sea-shore, saw a run away and hide themselves in their
Dolphin lift up its head out of the waves, holes at his approach. But when the
and asked him to contract an alliance with Mice further debated who among them
him; saying that of all the animals they should thus bell the Cat," there was no
ought to be the best friends, since the one one found to do it.
was the king of beasts on the earth, and Let those who propose be willing to
the other was the sovereign ruler of all the perform.










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ESO'P'S FABLES. 41

I now carry But to me this bitter, prickly
Thistle is more savory and relishing than
the most exquisite and sumptuous ban-
quet. Let others choose what they-may
for food, but give me, above everything, a
Fine juicy thistle like this and 1 will be
content."
Every one to his taste : one man's meat
is another man's poison, and one man's
S-* 1"^ poison is another man's meat; what is re-
jected by one person may be valued very
highly by another.
The Crow ard the Pitcher. .-
A CRow, perishing with thirst, saw a '
pitcher, and, hoping to find water, flew to --
it with great delight. When he reached
it, he discovered to his grief that it con-
tained so little water that he could not
possibly get at it. He tried everything
he could think of to reach the water, but '.
all his efforts were in vain. At last he
collected as many stones as he could carry,
and dropped them one by one with his ;- .
beak into the pitcher, until he brought the
water within his reach, and thus saved his
life.
Necessity is the mother of invention. The Wolf and the Liort.
A WOLF, having stolen a lamb from a
fold, was carrying him off to his lair. A
The Ass Eatine Thistles.
The A Eating Thistes. Lion met him in the path, and, seizing the
AN Ass was loaded with good provis- lamb, took it from him. The Wolf, stand.
ions of several sorts, which, in time of har- ing at a safe distance, exclaimed: "You
vest, he was carrying into the field for his have unrighteously taken from me that
master and the reapers to dine upon. By which was mine." The Lion jeeringly
the way he met with a fine large Thistle, replied: "It was righteously yours, eh?
and, being very hungry, began to mumble Was it the gift of a friend, or did you get
it; and while he was doing so he entered it by purchase ? If you did not get it in
into this reflection: "How many greedy one way or the other, how then did you
epicures would think themselves happy, come by it ?"
amidst such a variety of delicate viands as One thief is no better than another.







ESO'P'S FABLES. 41

I now carry But to me this bitter, prickly
Thistle is more savory and relishing than
the most exquisite and sumptuous ban-
quet. Let others choose what they-may
for food, but give me, above everything, a
Fine juicy thistle like this and 1 will be
content."
Every one to his taste : one man's meat
is another man's poison, and one man's
S-* 1"^ poison is another man's meat; what is re-
jected by one person may be valued very
highly by another.
The Crow ard the Pitcher. .-
A CRow, perishing with thirst, saw a '
pitcher, and, hoping to find water, flew to --
it with great delight. When he reached
it, he discovered to his grief that it con-
tained so little water that he could not
possibly get at it. He tried everything
he could think of to reach the water, but '.
all his efforts were in vain. At last he
collected as many stones as he could carry,
and dropped them one by one with his ;- .
beak into the pitcher, until he brought the
water within his reach, and thus saved his
life.
Necessity is the mother of invention. The Wolf and the Liort.
A WOLF, having stolen a lamb from a
fold, was carrying him off to his lair. A
The Ass Eatine Thistles.
The A Eating Thistes. Lion met him in the path, and, seizing the
AN Ass was loaded with good provis- lamb, took it from him. The Wolf, stand.
ions of several sorts, which, in time of har- ing at a safe distance, exclaimed: "You
vest, he was carrying into the field for his have unrighteously taken from me that
master and the reapers to dine upon. By which was mine." The Lion jeeringly
the way he met with a fine large Thistle, replied: "It was righteously yours, eh?
and, being very hungry, began to mumble Was it the gift of a friend, or did you get
it; and while he was doing so he entered it by purchase ? If you did not get it in
into this reflection: "How many greedy one way or the other, how then did you
epicures would think themselves happy, come by it ?"
amidst such a variety of delicate viands as One thief is no better than another.







ESO'P'S FABLES. 41

I now carry But to me this bitter, prickly
Thistle is more savory and relishing than
the most exquisite and sumptuous ban-
quet. Let others choose what they-may
for food, but give me, above everything, a
Fine juicy thistle like this and 1 will be
content."
Every one to his taste : one man's meat
is another man's poison, and one man's
S-* 1"^ poison is another man's meat; what is re-
jected by one person may be valued very
highly by another.
The Crow ard the Pitcher. .-
A CRow, perishing with thirst, saw a '
pitcher, and, hoping to find water, flew to --
it with great delight. When he reached
it, he discovered to his grief that it con-
tained so little water that he could not
possibly get at it. He tried everything
he could think of to reach the water, but '.
all his efforts were in vain. At last he
collected as many stones as he could carry,
and dropped them one by one with his ;- .
beak into the pitcher, until he brought the
water within his reach, and thus saved his
life.
Necessity is the mother of invention. The Wolf and the Liort.
A WOLF, having stolen a lamb from a
fold, was carrying him off to his lair. A
The Ass Eatine Thistles.
The A Eating Thistes. Lion met him in the path, and, seizing the
AN Ass was loaded with good provis- lamb, took it from him. The Wolf, stand.
ions of several sorts, which, in time of har- ing at a safe distance, exclaimed: "You
vest, he was carrying into the field for his have unrighteously taken from me that
master and the reapers to dine upon. By which was mine." The Lion jeeringly
the way he met with a fine large Thistle, replied: "It was righteously yours, eh?
and, being very hungry, began to mumble Was it the gift of a friend, or did you get
it; and while he was doing so he entered it by purchase ? If you did not get it in
into this reflection: "How many greedy one way or the other, how then did you
epicures would think themselves happy, come by it ?"
amidst such a variety of delicate viands as One thief is no better than another.







42 AESOP'S FABLES

Ass said: "Why, I saw the Monkey do
this very thing yesterday, and you all
laughed heartily, as if it afforded you very
S great amusement."
S.. -Those who do not know their right
place must be taught it.









The Old Hound.




boldly by the ear, but could not retain his make sport of him, saying: "It shows
hold because of the decay of his teeth, so your foolishness to be planting a tree at
that the boar escaped. His master, quickly your age. The tree cannot bear fruit for
coming up, was very much disappointed, many years, while you must very soon die.
and fiercely abused the dog. The Hound What is the use of your wasting your time
looked up and said: "It was not my fault, in providing pleasure for others to share
master; my spirit was as good as ever, but long after you are dead ?" The old man
I could not help mine infirmities. I rather stopped in his labor and replied: Others
deserve to be praised for what I have before me provided for my happiness, and
been, than to be blamed for what I am." it is my duty to provide for those who
No one should be blamed for his infirm- shall come after me. As for life, who is
cities. sure of it for a day ? You may all die be.
"* fore me." The old man's words came true;
The Playful Ass. one of the young men went on a voyage at
sea and was drowned, another went to war
AN Ass climbed up to the roof of a build- and was shot, and the third fell from a tree
ing, and, frisking about there, broke in the and broke his neck.
tiling. The owner went up after him, and We should not think wholly of our-
quickly drove him down, beating him selves, and we should remember that life
severely with a thick wooden cudgel. The is uncertain.







42 AESOP'S FABLES

Ass said: "Why, I saw the Monkey do
this very thing yesterday, and you all
laughed heartily, as if it afforded you very
S great amusement."
S.. -Those who do not know their right
place must be taught it.









The Old Hound.




boldly by the ear, but could not retain his make sport of him, saying: "It shows
hold because of the decay of his teeth, so your foolishness to be planting a tree at
that the boar escaped. His master, quickly your age. The tree cannot bear fruit for
coming up, was very much disappointed, many years, while you must very soon die.
and fiercely abused the dog. The Hound What is the use of your wasting your time
looked up and said: "It was not my fault, in providing pleasure for others to share
master; my spirit was as good as ever, but long after you are dead ?" The old man
I could not help mine infirmities. I rather stopped in his labor and replied: Others
deserve to be praised for what I have before me provided for my happiness, and
been, than to be blamed for what I am." it is my duty to provide for those who
No one should be blamed for his infirm- shall come after me. As for life, who is
cities. sure of it for a day ? You may all die be.
"* fore me." The old man's words came true;
The Playful Ass. one of the young men went on a voyage at
sea and was drowned, another went to war
AN Ass climbed up to the roof of a build- and was shot, and the third fell from a tree
ing, and, frisking about there, broke in the and broke his neck.
tiling. The owner went up after him, and We should not think wholly of our-
quickly drove him down, beating him selves, and we should remember that life
severely with a thick wooden cudgel. The is uncertain.







42 AESOP'S FABLES

Ass said: "Why, I saw the Monkey do
this very thing yesterday, and you all
laughed heartily, as if it afforded you very
S great amusement."
S.. -Those who do not know their right
place must be taught it.









The Old Hound.




boldly by the ear, but could not retain his make sport of him, saying: "It shows
hold because of the decay of his teeth, so your foolishness to be planting a tree at
that the boar escaped. His master, quickly your age. The tree cannot bear fruit for
coming up, was very much disappointed, many years, while you must very soon die.
and fiercely abused the dog. The Hound What is the use of your wasting your time
looked up and said: "It was not my fault, in providing pleasure for others to share
master; my spirit was as good as ever, but long after you are dead ?" The old man
I could not help mine infirmities. I rather stopped in his labor and replied: Others
deserve to be praised for what I have before me provided for my happiness, and
been, than to be blamed for what I am." it is my duty to provide for those who
No one should be blamed for his infirm- shall come after me. As for life, who is
cities. sure of it for a day ? You may all die be.
"* fore me." The old man's words came true;
The Playful Ass. one of the young men went on a voyage at
sea and was drowned, another went to war
AN Ass climbed up to the roof of a build- and was shot, and the third fell from a tree
ing, and, frisking about there, broke in the and broke his neck.
tiling. The owner went up after him, and We should not think wholly of our-
quickly drove him down, beating him selves, and we should remember that life
severely with a thick wooden cudgel. The is uncertain.









k,-,
J v.


It -4 1 k'--, -


I .









i' '-i

















~_7_
-. .-} -. :_ -- ... -.-


.... -: ..-:::o:.: _.-.. .- ..-. .--_, -.-.
.--:: -.I. .... -::. _ -- : .. j:.
- "' : --- -: ---- --.: : :--:: ;: -.' -,.'; ' '-
'_ _- -- -, -- ,- -. ., -" ;.
. F~ ": -:-- .. ,1_---: '-''""-;





;-- '. :.. ---.:= ..: .,.,,-



S"- =1 li ?~





J ..



S.-~



:~ -l ._. r. -


_~ --:
---'- -!-
I:::- _--- ._.










_ESOP'S FABLES. 45

large ship, and waited in the hope of see-
ing it enter the harbor. But as the object
So- n which they looked was driven by the
Illy wind nearer to the shore, they found that
Sit could at the m ost be a sm all boat, and
.:- i' '- not a ship. When, however, it reached
-. the beach, they discovered that it was only
a large fagot of sticks, and one of them
said to his companions: We have waited
"-".. I for no purpose, for after all there is noth-
ing to see but a fagot."
Our mere anticipations of life outrun its
"-. realities.
----. .--
The Tree and the Axe.
A MAN came into a forest, and made a
petition to the Trees to provide him a
handle for his axe. The Trees consented
to his request, and gave him a young ash-
tree. No sooner had the man fitted from
it a new handle to his axe. than he began
to use it, and quickly felled with his
strokes the noblest giants of the forest.
An old oak, lamenting when too late the -
destruction of his companions, said to a -
neighboring cedar : "The first step has lost
us all. If we had not given up the rights
of the ash, we might yet have retained The Sea-gull arid the Kite.
our own privileges, and have stood for A SEA-GULL, who was more at home
ages." swimming on the sea than walking on the
In yielding the rights of others, we may land, was in the habit of catching live fish
endanger our own. for its food. One day, having bolted down
too large a fish, it burst its deep gullet-bag,
and lay down on the shore to die. A Kite,
seeing him, and thinking him a land bird
The Seaside Travelers. like itself, exclaimed: You richly deserve
SOME travelers, journeying along the sea- your fate; for a bird of the air has no
shore, climbed to the summit of a tall cliff, business to seek its food from the sea."
aId from thence looking over the sea, saw Every man should be content to mind
in the distance what they thought was a his own business.







_ESOP'S FABLES. 45

large ship, and waited in the hope of see-
ing it enter the harbor. But as the object
So- n which they looked was driven by the
Illy wind nearer to the shore, they found that
Sit could at the m ost be a sm all boat, and
.:- i' '- not a ship. When, however, it reached
-. the beach, they discovered that it was only
a large fagot of sticks, and one of them
said to his companions: We have waited
"-".. I for no purpose, for after all there is noth-
ing to see but a fagot."
Our mere anticipations of life outrun its
"-. realities.
----. .--
The Tree and the Axe.
A MAN came into a forest, and made a
petition to the Trees to provide him a
handle for his axe. The Trees consented
to his request, and gave him a young ash-
tree. No sooner had the man fitted from
it a new handle to his axe. than he began
to use it, and quickly felled with his
strokes the noblest giants of the forest.
An old oak, lamenting when too late the -
destruction of his companions, said to a -
neighboring cedar : "The first step has lost
us all. If we had not given up the rights
of the ash, we might yet have retained The Sea-gull arid the Kite.
our own privileges, and have stood for A SEA-GULL, who was more at home
ages." swimming on the sea than walking on the
In yielding the rights of others, we may land, was in the habit of catching live fish
endanger our own. for its food. One day, having bolted down
too large a fish, it burst its deep gullet-bag,
and lay down on the shore to die. A Kite,
seeing him, and thinking him a land bird
The Seaside Travelers. like itself, exclaimed: You richly deserve
SOME travelers, journeying along the sea- your fate; for a bird of the air has no
shore, climbed to the summit of a tall cliff, business to seek its food from the sea."
aId from thence looking over the sea, saw Every man should be content to mind
in the distance what they thought was a his own business.







_ESOP'S FABLES. 45

large ship, and waited in the hope of see-
ing it enter the harbor. But as the object
So- n which they looked was driven by the
Illy wind nearer to the shore, they found that
Sit could at the m ost be a sm all boat, and
.:- i' '- not a ship. When, however, it reached
-. the beach, they discovered that it was only
a large fagot of sticks, and one of them
said to his companions: We have waited
"-".. I for no purpose, for after all there is noth-
ing to see but a fagot."
Our mere anticipations of life outrun its
"-. realities.
----. .--
The Tree and the Axe.
A MAN came into a forest, and made a
petition to the Trees to provide him a
handle for his axe. The Trees consented
to his request, and gave him a young ash-
tree. No sooner had the man fitted from
it a new handle to his axe. than he began
to use it, and quickly felled with his
strokes the noblest giants of the forest.
An old oak, lamenting when too late the -
destruction of his companions, said to a -
neighboring cedar : "The first step has lost
us all. If we had not given up the rights
of the ash, we might yet have retained The Sea-gull arid the Kite.
our own privileges, and have stood for A SEA-GULL, who was more at home
ages." swimming on the sea than walking on the
In yielding the rights of others, we may land, was in the habit of catching live fish
endanger our own. for its food. One day, having bolted down
too large a fish, it burst its deep gullet-bag,
and lay down on the shore to die. A Kite,
seeing him, and thinking him a land bird
The Seaside Travelers. like itself, exclaimed: You richly deserve
SOME travelers, journeying along the sea- your fate; for a bird of the air has no
shore, climbed to the summit of a tall cliff, business to seek its food from the sea."
aId from thence looking over the sea, saw Every man should be content to mind
in the distance what they thought was a his own business.







46 zESOP'S FABLES.

.?.7 gt grateful creatures! you provide wool to
make garments for all other men, but you
l.r.' iC destroy the clothes of him who feeds
you..
*. Tll The basest ingratitude is that which in-
"jures those who serve us.






Tie Monkey arid tile Camel.
THE beasts of the forest gave a splendid
entertainment, at which the Monkey stood
up and danced. Having vastly delighted "
the assembly, he sat down amidst univer- The I at arid the Elephant.
sal applause. The Camel, envious of the
praises bestowed on the Monkey, and de- A RAT, traveling on the highway, met a
sirous to divert to himself the favor of the huge elephant, bearing his royal maste
and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, proposed to stand up in his turn, and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, p cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance for their amusement. He moved cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance frt The great beast and his attendants were
about in so very ridiculous a manner, that The great beast and his attendants were
followed by an admiring crowd, taking up
the Beasts, in a fit of indignation, set upon all of the road. "What fools you are,"
him with clubs, and drove him out of the sa the Rat to the people, o ae
ae l said the Rat to the people, "to make
S' assembly such a hubbub over an elephant. Is it
It is absurd to ape our betters.
Shis great bulk that you so much admire ?
It can only frighten little boys and girls,
and I can do that as well. I am a beast as
Te Sleplerd arid te Sheep. well as he, and have as many legs and
e Seperd ad te Seep. ears and eyes. He has noright to take up
A SHEPHERD, driving his Sheep to a all the highway, which belongs as much to
wood, saw an oak of unusual size, full of me as to him." At this moment, the cat
acorns, and, spreading his cloak under the spied the rat, and, jumping to the ground,
branches, he climbed up into the tree, and soon convinced him that he was not an
shook down the acorns. The sheep, eat- elephant.
ing the acorns, frayed and tore the cloak. Because we are like the great in one re-
The Shepherd coming down, and seeing spect we must not think we are like them
what was done, said: "0 you most un- in all







46 zESOP'S FABLES.

.?.7 gt grateful creatures! you provide wool to
make garments for all other men, but you
l.r.' iC destroy the clothes of him who feeds
you..
*. Tll The basest ingratitude is that which in-
"jures those who serve us.






Tie Monkey arid tile Camel.
THE beasts of the forest gave a splendid
entertainment, at which the Monkey stood
up and danced. Having vastly delighted "
the assembly, he sat down amidst univer- The I at arid the Elephant.
sal applause. The Camel, envious of the
praises bestowed on the Monkey, and de- A RAT, traveling on the highway, met a
sirous to divert to himself the favor of the huge elephant, bearing his royal maste
and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, proposed to stand up in his turn, and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, p cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance for their amusement. He moved cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance frt The great beast and his attendants were
about in so very ridiculous a manner, that The great beast and his attendants were
followed by an admiring crowd, taking up
the Beasts, in a fit of indignation, set upon all of the road. "What fools you are,"
him with clubs, and drove him out of the sa the Rat to the people, o ae
ae l said the Rat to the people, "to make
S' assembly such a hubbub over an elephant. Is it
It is absurd to ape our betters.
Shis great bulk that you so much admire ?
It can only frighten little boys and girls,
and I can do that as well. I am a beast as
Te Sleplerd arid te Sheep. well as he, and have as many legs and
e Seperd ad te Seep. ears and eyes. He has noright to take up
A SHEPHERD, driving his Sheep to a all the highway, which belongs as much to
wood, saw an oak of unusual size, full of me as to him." At this moment, the cat
acorns, and, spreading his cloak under the spied the rat, and, jumping to the ground,
branches, he climbed up into the tree, and soon convinced him that he was not an
shook down the acorns. The sheep, eat- elephant.
ing the acorns, frayed and tore the cloak. Because we are like the great in one re-
The Shepherd coming down, and seeing spect we must not think we are like them
what was done, said: "0 you most un- in all







46 zESOP'S FABLES.

.?.7 gt grateful creatures! you provide wool to
make garments for all other men, but you
l.r.' iC destroy the clothes of him who feeds
you..
*. Tll The basest ingratitude is that which in-
"jures those who serve us.






Tie Monkey arid tile Camel.
THE beasts of the forest gave a splendid
entertainment, at which the Monkey stood
up and danced. Having vastly delighted "
the assembly, he sat down amidst univer- The I at arid the Elephant.
sal applause. The Camel, envious of the
praises bestowed on the Monkey, and de- A RAT, traveling on the highway, met a
sirous to divert to himself the favor of the huge elephant, bearing his royal maste
and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, proposed to stand up in his turn, and his suite, and also his favorite
guests, p cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance for their amusement. He moved cat and dog, and parrot and monkey.
and dance frt The great beast and his attendants were
about in so very ridiculous a manner, that The great beast and his attendants were
followed by an admiring crowd, taking up
the Beasts, in a fit of indignation, set upon all of the road. "What fools you are,"
him with clubs, and drove him out of the sa the Rat to the people, o ae
ae l said the Rat to the people, "to make
S' assembly such a hubbub over an elephant. Is it
It is absurd to ape our betters.
Shis great bulk that you so much admire ?
It can only frighten little boys and girls,
and I can do that as well. I am a beast as
Te Sleplerd arid te Sheep. well as he, and have as many legs and
e Seperd ad te Seep. ears and eyes. He has noright to take up
A SHEPHERD, driving his Sheep to a all the highway, which belongs as much to
wood, saw an oak of unusual size, full of me as to him." At this moment, the cat
acorns, and, spreading his cloak under the spied the rat, and, jumping to the ground,
branches, he climbed up into the tree, and soon convinced him that he was not an
shook down the acorns. The sheep, eat- elephant.
ing the acorns, frayed and tore the cloak. Because we are like the great in one re-
The Shepherd coming down, and seeing spect we must not think we are like them
what was done, said: "0 you most un- in all




















I, or1











-- --- _-- ---...

- ---_--- -


mi-' ---:_- -: - - ~- - { -:_
.- -~I _ --










ESOP'S FABLES. 49

occasion called him one day into the city,
he left the sheep entirely in his charge.
The Wolf, now that he had the opportu-
S-nity, fell upon the sheep, and destroyed the
greater part of the flock. The Shepherd, on
his return, finding his flock destroyed, ex-
ffclaimed: I have been rightly served: why
did I trust my sheep to a Wolf "
An evil mind will show in evil action,
The Wolf arid thle Sheplerd. sooner or later.
A WOLF followed a flock of sheep for a
long time, and did not attempt to injure
one of them. The Shepherd at first stood The Swallow and the Crow.
on his guard against him, as against an THE Swallow and the Crow had a con-
enemy, and kept a strict watch over his tention about their plumage. The Crow
movements. But when the Wolf, day after put an end to the dispute by saying:
day, kept in the company of the sheep, and '- Your feathers are all very well in the
did not make the slightest effort to seize spring, but mine protect me against the
winter."
"Fine weather friends are not worth
much.


The Man ard the Lion.
A MAN and a Lion traveled together
S_\-_-=- through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
"were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented "A Lion
"' 'strangled by a Man." The traveler pointed
7' to it and said : "See there How strong
we are, and how we prevail over even the
king of beasts." The Lion replied: "This
statue was made by one of you men. If
we Lions knew how to erect statues, you
them, the Shepherd began to look upon would see the man placed under the paw
him as a guardian of his flock rather than of the Lion."
as a plotter of evil against it; and when One story is good till another is told.







ESOP'S FABLES. 49

occasion called him one day into the city,
he left the sheep entirely in his charge.
The Wolf, now that he had the opportu-
S-nity, fell upon the sheep, and destroyed the
greater part of the flock. The Shepherd, on
his return, finding his flock destroyed, ex-
ffclaimed: I have been rightly served: why
did I trust my sheep to a Wolf "
An evil mind will show in evil action,
The Wolf arid thle Sheplerd. sooner or later.
A WOLF followed a flock of sheep for a
long time, and did not attempt to injure
one of them. The Shepherd at first stood The Swallow and the Crow.
on his guard against him, as against an THE Swallow and the Crow had a con-
enemy, and kept a strict watch over his tention about their plumage. The Crow
movements. But when the Wolf, day after put an end to the dispute by saying:
day, kept in the company of the sheep, and '- Your feathers are all very well in the
did not make the slightest effort to seize spring, but mine protect me against the
winter."
"Fine weather friends are not worth
much.


The Man ard the Lion.
A MAN and a Lion traveled together
S_\-_-=- through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
"were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented "A Lion
"' 'strangled by a Man." The traveler pointed
7' to it and said : "See there How strong
we are, and how we prevail over even the
king of beasts." The Lion replied: "This
statue was made by one of you men. If
we Lions knew how to erect statues, you
them, the Shepherd began to look upon would see the man placed under the paw
him as a guardian of his flock rather than of the Lion."
as a plotter of evil against it; and when One story is good till another is told.







ESOP'S FABLES. 49

occasion called him one day into the city,
he left the sheep entirely in his charge.
The Wolf, now that he had the opportu-
S-nity, fell upon the sheep, and destroyed the
greater part of the flock. The Shepherd, on
his return, finding his flock destroyed, ex-
ffclaimed: I have been rightly served: why
did I trust my sheep to a Wolf "
An evil mind will show in evil action,
The Wolf arid thle Sheplerd. sooner or later.
A WOLF followed a flock of sheep for a
long time, and did not attempt to injure
one of them. The Shepherd at first stood The Swallow and the Crow.
on his guard against him, as against an THE Swallow and the Crow had a con-
enemy, and kept a strict watch over his tention about their plumage. The Crow
movements. But when the Wolf, day after put an end to the dispute by saying:
day, kept in the company of the sheep, and '- Your feathers are all very well in the
did not make the slightest effort to seize spring, but mine protect me against the
winter."
"Fine weather friends are not worth
much.


The Man ard the Lion.
A MAN and a Lion traveled together
S_\-_-=- through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
"were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented "A Lion
"' 'strangled by a Man." The traveler pointed
7' to it and said : "See there How strong
we are, and how we prevail over even the
king of beasts." The Lion replied: "This
statue was made by one of you men. If
we Lions knew how to erect statues, you
them, the Shepherd began to look upon would see the man placed under the paw
him as a guardian of his flock rather than of the Lion."
as a plotter of evil against it; and when One story is good till another is told.







50 ESOP'S FABLES

S1, ,'' ing fit. A violent fever suddenly set in,
from which he died not many days after.
We had better bear our troubles brave-
ly than try to escape them.

The Ass and 11is Purchaser.
L-:.' i A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and
:"-. I agreed with its owner that he should try
him before he bought him. He took the
0 Ass home, and put him in the straw-yard
S- with his other Asses, upon which he left
all the others, and joined himself at once
to the most idle and the greatest eater of
them all. The man put a halter on him,
The Kirg's Son aid thle Painted and led him back to his owner, saying:
Lion. "I do not need a trial; I know that he
will be just such another as the one whom
A KING who had one only son, fond of
S he chose for his companion."
martial exercises, had a dream in which he h .
,. A man is known by the company he
was warned that his son would be killed A man is known by the company
by a lion. Afraid lest the dream should keeps.
prove true, he built for his son a pleasant
palace, and adorned its walls for his amuse- -S..
ment with all kinds of animals of the size
of life, among which was the picture of a
lion. When the young Prince saw this, .
his grief at being thus confined burst out !'
afresh, and standing near the lion, he thus '- .
spoke: "O you most detestable of ani- ; m-:
mals! through a lying dream of my
father's, which he saw in his sleep, I am The Fislherman. Pipinrg.
shut up on your account in this palace as A FISHERMAN skilled in music took his
if I had been a girl. What shall I now do flute and his nets to the sea-shore. Stand-
to you ?" With these words he stretched ing on a projecting rock he played several
out his hands toward a thorn-tree, mean- tunes, in the hope that the fish, attracted
ing to cut a stick from its branches that by his melody, would of their own accord
he might beat the lion, when one of its dance into his net, which he had placed
sharp prickles pierced his finger, and below. At last, having long waited in
caused great pain and inflammation, so vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting
that the young Prince fell down in a faint- his net into the sea, made an excellent hauL







50 ESOP'S FABLES

S1, ,'' ing fit. A violent fever suddenly set in,
from which he died not many days after.
We had better bear our troubles brave-
ly than try to escape them.

The Ass and 11is Purchaser.
L-:.' i A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and
:"-. I agreed with its owner that he should try
him before he bought him. He took the
0 Ass home, and put him in the straw-yard
S- with his other Asses, upon which he left
all the others, and joined himself at once
to the most idle and the greatest eater of
them all. The man put a halter on him,
The Kirg's Son aid thle Painted and led him back to his owner, saying:
Lion. "I do not need a trial; I know that he
will be just such another as the one whom
A KING who had one only son, fond of
S he chose for his companion."
martial exercises, had a dream in which he h .
,. A man is known by the company he
was warned that his son would be killed A man is known by the company
by a lion. Afraid lest the dream should keeps.
prove true, he built for his son a pleasant
palace, and adorned its walls for his amuse- -S..
ment with all kinds of animals of the size
of life, among which was the picture of a
lion. When the young Prince saw this, .
his grief at being thus confined burst out !'
afresh, and standing near the lion, he thus '- .
spoke: "O you most detestable of ani- ; m-:
mals! through a lying dream of my
father's, which he saw in his sleep, I am The Fislherman. Pipinrg.
shut up on your account in this palace as A FISHERMAN skilled in music took his
if I had been a girl. What shall I now do flute and his nets to the sea-shore. Stand-
to you ?" With these words he stretched ing on a projecting rock he played several
out his hands toward a thorn-tree, mean- tunes, in the hope that the fish, attracted
ing to cut a stick from its branches that by his melody, would of their own accord
he might beat the lion, when one of its dance into his net, which he had placed
sharp prickles pierced his finger, and below. At last, having long waited in
caused great pain and inflammation, so vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting
that the young Prince fell down in a faint- his net into the sea, made an excellent hauL







50 ESOP'S FABLES

S1, ,'' ing fit. A violent fever suddenly set in,
from which he died not many days after.
We had better bear our troubles brave-
ly than try to escape them.

The Ass and 11is Purchaser.
L-:.' i A MAN wished to purchase an Ass, and
:"-. I agreed with its owner that he should try
him before he bought him. He took the
0 Ass home, and put him in the straw-yard
S- with his other Asses, upon which he left
all the others, and joined himself at once
to the most idle and the greatest eater of
them all. The man put a halter on him,
The Kirg's Son aid thle Painted and led him back to his owner, saying:
Lion. "I do not need a trial; I know that he
will be just such another as the one whom
A KING who had one only son, fond of
S he chose for his companion."
martial exercises, had a dream in which he h .
,. A man is known by the company he
was warned that his son would be killed A man is known by the company
by a lion. Afraid lest the dream should keeps.
prove true, he built for his son a pleasant
palace, and adorned its walls for his amuse- -S..
ment with all kinds of animals of the size
of life, among which was the picture of a
lion. When the young Prince saw this, .
his grief at being thus confined burst out !'
afresh, and standing near the lion, he thus '- .
spoke: "O you most detestable of ani- ; m-:
mals! through a lying dream of my
father's, which he saw in his sleep, I am The Fislherman. Pipinrg.
shut up on your account in this palace as A FISHERMAN skilled in music took his
if I had been a girl. What shall I now do flute and his nets to the sea-shore. Stand-
to you ?" With these words he stretched ing on a projecting rock he played several
out his hands toward a thorn-tree, mean- tunes, in the hope that the fish, attracted
ing to cut a stick from its branches that by his melody, would of their own accord
he might beat the lion, when one of its dance into his net, which he had placed
sharp prickles pierced his finger, and below. At last, having long waited in
caused great pain and inflammation, so vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting
that the young Prince fell down in a faint- his net into the sea, made an excellent hauL









st"












.... . .-...
7 A
% -. o--. -_










_o" ~ ga I- i, -_ .- . __-_ ._ ._.__...
ro-f












77
I. .. .- "-
-__------ -_- -;~- I-~ -;:-;-1-.-__
- __- ---- -_ _ -[ _]







__----
__ .-
















Ii.. __ _. __
I. o __-_ .__-._ --_- ] -:. _o _..% _
N _
~____-=-r Iw a-









.ESOP'S FABLES. 53

Traveler wrapped his cloak around him,
till at last, resigning all hope of victory






14 --
-- .- -





The Blird Mar and the Whelp.
A BL an was accustomed to distin- he called upon the Sun to see what he
A BLInD Man was accustomed to distm-
Scould do. The Sun suddenly shone out
guish different animals by touching them .
Sguish diff t a s by t g with all his warmth. The Traveler no
with his hands. The whelp of a Wolf was
wit his. hands .L Th whl sooner felt his genial rays than he took off
brought him, with a request that he would soner et ea ra than t
one garment after another, and at last,
feel it, and say what it was. He felt it, o gar ment afer another, and atast,
and being in doubt, said: I do not quite fa iry overcome with heat, ud i iess
know whether it is the cub of a Fox, or
the whelp of a Wolf; but this I know full path.
well, that it would not be safe to admit Persuasion is better than Force.
him to the sheepfold."
Evil tendencies are shown early in life.



The Nortl Wind and the Sur. J
THE North Wind and the Sun disputed --
which was the most powerful, and agreed -
that he should be declared the victor who
could first strip a wayfaring man of his
clothes. The North Wind first tried his
power, and blew with all his might; but
the keener became his blasts, the closer the





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