• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Rob's tramp
 A pig in a feather-bed
 Old Jack and the pies
 The Aurora Borealis
 How Jimmy stole the meal
 A little coat
 Our Freddy
 Ponto and Ben
 Carlo
 Contrary Billy
 Smut and the twins
 Greedy Topsy
 Back Cover






Group Title: Rob's tramp : and other stories
Title: Rob's tramp
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053415/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rob's tramp and other stories
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [1885?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1884   ( lcsh )
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: profusely illustrated.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053415
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236714
notis - ALH7192
oclc - 61332263

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Rob's tramp
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A pig in a feather-bed
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Old Jack and the pies
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The Aurora Borealis
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    How Jimmy stole the meal
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    A little coat
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Our Freddy
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Ponto and Ben
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Carlo
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Contrary Billy
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Smut and the twins
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Greedy Topsy
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text






























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ROB'S TRAMP


AND OTHER STORIES















PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED.


BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN STREET




























COPYRIGHT, 1885.
D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.











ROB'S TRAMP.

Every night
when Rob goes up-
stairs to bed, Rob's
Smamma goes too.
She sits by his
bed and reads to
Shim.
l Her voice is
sweet.
She reads pleas-
ay 1T[ "" ant stories.
ROB TRIES TO SEE OUT Rob likes to fall






ROB'S TRAMP.

asleep with his mamma's sweet
voice sounding in his ears, like the
ripple of a brook.
But last night Rob's mamma
could not go up-stairs with him.
She had to stay with grand-
mamma.
Grandmamma was sick. So Rob
had to go alone.
He felt lonely. He lay still for a
few moments. Then he sat up in
bed.
He could see the fields and or-
chards through the window.
He knew they were full of daisies,
and buttercups, and red clovers; he






ROB'S TRAMP.

knew that bees, and butterflies, and
birds flew to and fro there, in the
daytime.
But to-night they looked dark and
lonely.
Just then a tiny spark flew up
from the meadow. Then another
tiny spark burst out, and another,
and another.
They came faster and faster.
The dark field was full of sparks.
"What is daisies, in the daytime
must be fire-flies at night," said Rob
to himself.
t -ft
But what is that noise ?
Poof, poof, foof, poof /







ROB'S TRAMP.

"Oh, dear," said Rob. "I wish
grandma was not
sick. I do hate to
go to sleepalone 1"
Rob thought it had
been two
hours since
he had come
up-stairs.
There was
"that noise
S\ again: Poof
i oof, foofl
Rob listened
ROB SEES OUT.
Poof, foof/
Rob left his bed and crept softly






ROB'S TRAMP.

across the carpet to the window.
The window-sill was too high.
He raised himself on his toes.
Then he stuck his toes on the
edge of the mop-board, and raised
himself a little more.
He could see out now, a very
little.
It was very dark. It was not
quite time for the moon to rise.
Poof, oof, Poof/
The poof was louder this time
than it had been.
Rob made up his mind that it
was a tramp."
Now Rob heard another sound.






ROB'S TRAMP.

It was a very bad sound. He was
sure that somebody was trying to
get in at the pantry window.
Perhaps, by this time, the tramp
was running off with a loaf of
grandmamma's cake, and a jar of
jam I
Poof, foof, poof
Up came the moon in front of
Rob. She threw a great square of
light on the carpet.
Up came something else behind
Rob.
It was papa.
Mamma had sent him to see if
Rob was asleep.







ROB'S TRAMP.

"What I my little boy out of bed I"
The little night-gowned figure was
drawn away from the window.
"Hush, papa," said Rob. "The
tramp will hear you I "
Then papa heard the tramp.
Poof fioof, oof /
The sound was under Rob's win-
dow.
Papa laughed.
He swung his little boy up on the
window-seat. He opened the window.
He held Rob so that he should not
fall, and let him lean out, and look.
Under the window, Rob saw his
tramp.






ROB'S TRAMP.

It was Daisy, grandma's pet white
COW.
She had come up through the
lawn gate, which Rob had left open.
Papa shouted to her, and she
walked off under the clothes-line.
She carried a table-cloth off on her
back.
Then papa went down and drove
her into the pasture.
After that grandma's pet cow was
called Rob's Tramp."
U.












A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

Mr. Kendall lives in a country
town.
It is so far from Boston that you
would have to ride in the cars all
day to get there.
Mr. Kendall is a farmer.
He has a large farm and a pleasant
house.
The barn is not far from the house.
It is a large barn and has seven
windows and three doors.







A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

Two of the doors are wide, double
doors.
The other is a small door.














MR. KENDALL.

Over the small door is a room.
Roscoe works on Mr. Kendall's
farm.






A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

He sleeps in the room over the
door.
On one side of the barn are stalls
for four oxen and nine cows.
The four horses are on the other
side.
Toff and Tipp are young ponies.
Mr. Kendall is the only person that
can drive them.
Tipp has run away twice.
Toff is afraid of the steam-cars.
Mr. Kendall will not let any
stranger drive them.
Another horse is Muff.
The fourth horse is Grandpa Gray.
One of the cows is named Mag-






A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

gfe; one is Elsie, and one Bright
Eyes.
Under the barn is a great pen
where seven pigs live.
The pen is in two parts.
In one part is a black pig.
The black pig is cross.
Nobody likes her.
Tiger teases her sometimes.
Tiger is Mr. Kendall's dog.
He is a pretty good dog, but
sometimes he gets up and looks over
the wall of the pen and barks at the
black pig.
Six little white pigs live in the
other part of the pen.







A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

One fine day Mr. Kendall told
Roscoe to open the pen and let the
six little white pigs go into the
orchard and eat apples.
They played about and had a fine
t;me.
By and by one little pig left the
rest and went away.
Nobody noticed him, for pigs can-
not count, and they did not know that
only five were there.
There was a board fence by the
orchard.
In the fence was a little hole.
The sixth little pig crawled
through that hole.







A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

He was not far from the house,
and he ran toward the kitchen door.
The door was open, and in he
went.
He ran through the.kitchen.
No one was there.
Then he went into a long entry.
At the end of the entry was aunt
Jane Kendall's bedroom.
Piggy trotted in.
Aunt Jane had taken the feather-
bed off from her bed-stead.
She had put it on the window-sill
in the sun
It had slipped off and fallen on the
floor.







A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.







til











PIGGY TROTTED THROUGH THE KITCHEN.

In the feather-bed was an open
place where aunt Jane puts her
hand in to shake up the feathers.-
The little pig crawled into that







A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

hole in the feather-bed. He curled
up and went to sleep.
Aunt Jane came in when he had
been asleep as. much as ten min-
utes.
She is an old lady, and cannot see
very well.
She lifted up the feather-bed.
How heavy it seemed I
She stooped down to look.
There was the little pig's head
sticking out from the hole.
Aunt Jane screamed.
Then she called Mr. Kendall and
Mrs. Kendall.
All the children came too.








A PIG IN A FEATHER-BED.

0, how they laughed I
But Mr. Kendall said, "Take that
little scamp out I "
MA. 0.
















OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

Old Jack is uncle May's horse.
Sometimes I go and spend a whole
day at my uncle May's house.
My cousin Robby lives there.
Robby is four months older than I.
He was six years old in June, and
I wis six years old in October.
I remember one day last Septem-
ber. I went to uncle May's very
early in the morning.






OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

It was baking day. Aunt Anna
was baking squash-pies.
She made four big pies for the
big folks.
She made two little pies for Robby
and me. The little pies were made
in saucers.
They looked yellow like gold;
and how sweet and spicy they
smelled I
"Do let us have them right away,
mamma I" said Robby.
"They are scalding hot, child,"
said aunty. "You must wait for
them to cool."
So aunt Anna put the four big






OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

pies and the two little pies by
the north window in the pantry.
Then she went up into the great
attic.
Robby and I went out to the
orchard to swing.
While we were swinging, Old Jack
came along.
He walked slowly. He was eating
the grass by the side of the fence.
The yard gate was open. He
walked in.
Uncle May never allows Old
Jack in the yard.
He tramples down aunt Anna's
flower beds. He eats her roses.






OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

We ran to the barn to call uncle;
but he had gone to the saw-mill.
Old Jack walked round by the
porch.
He walked right up to the pantry
window.
He smelled the pies.
He began to eat.
Oh dear It did not take him
long to eat up a pie I
Mammal" cried Robby, just as
loud as he could.
" Aunty I screamed I. Come
quick."
Aunt Anna put her head out of
the attic window.






OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

There was Old Jack with his great
nose covered with squash.
"What shall I do?" said aunt
Anna. "You naughty Jack !"
There was one pie he could not
reach. We had that pie for dinner.
But he had eaten the saucer
pies.
After dinner Robby and I went
down to the pond to fish.
Old Jack was shut into the
pasture.
He looked over the fence.
He smelled my hand.
Dear old Jack I suppose he
wanted some more squash-pie.









































DO YOU LIKE THIS?

ROBBY TELLS HER WHAT HE SAW JACK DO.







OLD JACK AND THE PIES.

We did not catch any fish that
afternoon. But we had a lovely time.
Robby told me ever so many
pretty stories about Old Jack.












THE AURORA BOREALIS.

In the far North the nights are
long.
How should you like to live where
the sun does not rise for many
weeks ?
I suppose you think such long
nights must be very dark.
Here is a picture of a night in the
far North.
The stars are shining.
See the bright light on the hills I








































NORTHERN LIGHTS.






THE AURORA BOREALIS.

There are trees. But the trees
are small.
They cannot grow tall where it
is so cold.
There is a man riding in a sledge.
The sledge is drawn by a reindeer.
There is another man riding in a
sledge.
His horses are dogs.
The long shining arch in the sky
is the beautiful Aurora Borealis.
We sometimes call it the North-
ern Lights.
We sometimes see it in our land.
But it is never so bright here as
it is in the far North.







THE AURORA BOREALIS.

There it makes the night seem
almost as bright as the day.
Sometimes it is white, as you see
it in the picture.
Sometimes it is rosy red.
Sometimes it has colors like the
rainbow.
Sometimes it streams far up in
the heavens.
Bayard Taylor travelled once in
the far North. It was in the winter.
He saw a very beautiful aurora.
It hung from the sky like a great
curtain of light.











HOW JIMMY STOLE THE
MEAL.

Who is Jimmy?
He is a large, gray horse.
He belongs to Mr. Allen.
Mr. Allen drives about a great
deal.
Jimmy is often tired and hungry
at night.
When Mr. Allen comes home to
supper, he takes off Jimmy's har-
ness.






HOW JIMMY STOLE THE MEAL

Then, if it is pleasant, he lets him
go out in the road awhile.
He likes to eat the fresh grass by
the roadside.
The neighbors know Jimmy.
They are not afraid of him.
He does not kick or bite.
One night Mr. Allen was in a
hurry. He was going to the store
to do some errands.
So he did not take off Jimmy's
harness.
He let him go out in the road with
it on.
Pretty soon a Tnan came along
with a load of meal.







HOW JIMMY STOLE THE MEAL.

The meal had just been ground at
the grist-mill. It was in bags.













JIMMY HELPS HIMSELF TO MEAL.

There were two bushels of meal
in each bag.
The man hitched his horse and
went into a house.







HOW JIMMY STOLE THE MEAL.

Jimmy was walking slowly along.
He was eating grass.
By and by he came to the wagon.
He lifted his head. He smelled
the meal. He was hungry. The
meal smelt nice.
He tried to get some of it to eat;
but he could not. The bags were
made of very thick cloth.
Then, what did Jimmy do?
He took one of the bags in his
mouth; he lifted it out of the wagon
and trotted off with it.
He carried it to his own barn.
When Mr. Allen came back from
the store, there was Jimmy and the






HOW JIMMY STOLE THE MEAL.

bag of meal! Jimmy was biting
and pulling the string.
Mr. Allen did not know where
Jimmy got the meal.
But little May Glover told him all
about it. May is one of Mr. Allen's
neighbors. She saw Jimmy take
the bag of meal out of the wagon,
and trot off with it.
So Mr. Allen carried back the meal.
Then he gave Jimmy a good sup-
per out of his own meal-bin.













A LITTLE COAT.

Johnny spent last summer on his
grandfather's farm.
His three sisters went with him.
Their names are Belle, Bertha,
and Marian.
They played out-of-doors from
morning till night.
But Johnny liked best to go out in
the fields to see his grandfather work.
One day they went to see 'the
sheep and lambs.






A LITTLE COAT.

Grandpa told him a great many
things about the sheep and lambs.
Thcir wool is cut off and made
into cloth; your coat came off a
sheep's back," said grandpa.
The lambs' wool makes very
fine, soft cloth. Your coat is very fine.
I think it must have been taken from
some little lamb."
The next day Johnny took a walk
by himself.
He saw a sheep lying under a tree.
A little lamb lay beside her.
It was a very small lamb. Its
legs looked like sticks. It had
hardly a bit of wool.







A LITTLE COAT.

Lambs always look like that when
they are very young.
But Johnny did not know that.
He thought, "Perhaps my nice
coat belongs to this very lamb."
The lamb looked cold. It said,
" Ba-a-a," in a very weak voice.
The mother sheep said Ba-a-a,"
very loud, and looked at Johnny.
Johnny thought she tried to say,
" What right have you to wear my
lambie's coat?"
,Johnny was troubled.
I did not take it myself, ma'am,"
he said. I do not think it was fair
to take it, and I will give it back."


















































r!t





















SUMMER TIME ON GRANDPA'S FARM.






A LITTLE COAT.

He took off his coat and put it on
the lamb.
It did not fit well; it was loose,
and it hung down to the ground.
Johnny searched his pockets for a
string to tie it on. He found a bit
of. crumpled red ribbon.
He tied the ribbon about the lamb.
How funny the little creature
looked I But Johnny thought it
looked warm and comfortable.
Then he went to find Belle and
Bertha and Marian. They were in
the meadow picking wild flowers.
"Where is your coat, Johnny?"
Belle asked.






A LITTLE COAT.

Come and see," said Johnny, very
proudly. I have given it back to
the lamb."
How those three girls laughed
when they saw the lamb I
Then they called grandma to come
and see. They called grandpa.
Everybody laughed except Johnny.
Then grandma told him the wool
would soon grow on the little lamb.
It did not need his little coat.
It was not really cold, in the warm
summer.
Before the cold winter came it
would have a thick warm coat of its
own. Then Johnny felt better.












OUR FREDDY.

Freddy lives on a farm.
He has a grown-up sister called
Bessy.
Her pupils call her Miss Walton.
She teaches school in Boston.
She comes home to the farm
every summer.
Then Freddy has fine times.
He takes her to drive. They go
fishing. He shows her the calves
and lambs and young colts.






OUR FREDDY.

Freddy owns a wagon. Watch is
his horse.
One morning Freddy invited
Bessy to ride in his wagon.
"Do, Bessyl it is such fun he
said. "My horse Watch is very
gentle."
But Bessy said she would see him
ride first.
So Freddy harnessed Watch to
the wagon.
He drove down the lane to the
house very fast.
But Watch would not stop at the
door.
He was very thirsty, and so he






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.j_7-7-. .z": ..'



A THIRST ,
w *, ~r -






SI I






A THIRSTY STEED.






OUR FREDDY.

trotted right down into a little pond
to drink.
Freddy jumped out. He was
afraid Watch would upset him into
the water.
Bessy said she was afraid to ride
after such a frisky horse.
Now I want to tell you a story
about Freddy. It will show you
what a good boy he is.
Last summer, Bessy and Jack and
Freddy were all going on a journey
with their mother.
They were going to ride twenty
miles in the cars.
Then they were going to sail forty







OUR FREDDY.

miles in a steamboat, over a lovely
lake. Freddy had never been on a
steamboat.
He talked about it every day. He
used to wake up in the night and
think about that steamboat.
He told all the boys at school
about it.
Each one of the boys wished he
was going too.
Freddy thought the day to go
would never come. At last it came.
Now Freddy likes to go to school
barefoot.
But when boys go barefoot they
are apt to hurt their feet. The day






OUR FREDDY.

before the journey Freddy had
bruised one of his feet against a
stone.
That morning he put on his shoes,
His foot was very sore. He could
not wear them.
Just think of it Of course he
could not go on that steamer bare-
foot.
What do you think he did ? Do
you think he cried? I know some
boys who would have cried.
Perhaps I should have cried myself I
But Freddy went to his mother.
He said, I cannot go."
Then he helped the rest to get ready.







OUR FREDDY.

He brought the water from the
well for Jack. He wiped the dishes
for his mother. He helped Bessy
pack the lunch basket.
When school-time came, he
trudged off to school.
When his mother and Bessy and
Jack came home, he met them with
a very happy face.
Bessy calls Freddy her hero."
I, too, think he was brave. Don't
you ?













PONTO AND BEN.

Ponto is a dog.
Ben is a monkey.
Ponto is very fond of Ben. He
takes good care of him.
Sometimes Ponto's young master
takes him to the village.
Then Ben hops on Ponto's back.
He puts his funny little arms round
Ponto's neck; Ponto trots off looking
very happy.







PONTO AND BEN.

Ponto does not allow any one to
touch Ben while he is riding on his
ack.














BEN RIDING ON PONTO'S BACK.

If a little boy or girl should touch
Ben, Ponto would growl and be
very angry.






PONTO AND BEN.

Ben makes himself very useful
to Ponto.
He is much smaller than Ponto.
He can go between the bars of
a fence when Ponto cannot.
He climbs into the boxes and
barrels on the sidewalk, and hunts
for bones.
He gives the bones to Ponto.
They never quarrel.
They have a pleasant home.
The children are never tired of
watching Ben. He has very funny
ways.
He swings to and fro on the fence.
He takes his food in his queer






PONTO AND BEN.

little hands and eats-like a squirrel.
I am sorry to say that Ben is
not always as pleasant as he might
be.
He is like a few little folks I
have seen.
If he can have his own way, he
behaves very well.
But if he cannot have his own
way he frets and scolds.
Such behavior is not pretty, even
in a monkey.
When little boys and girls fret
it is wrong, for they know better.
Ben sleeps on the hay in the barn
with Ponto.


































9C










THE TRIO DRINKING.







PONTO AND BEN.

A beautiful gray-and-white kitten
sleeps there too.
They all drink from one dish.
They are a very happy trio.















CARLO.

Carlo is Mrs. Pratt's dog.
He is a dark brown dog. He is a
pointer.
Mr. Pratt bought Carlo in Canada
two years ago.
He was a little puppy.
A baby dog is called a puppy.
Carlo grew very fast, and learned
a great many little tricks that Mrs.
Pratt taught him.
He learned to shut all the doors
in the house.







CARLO.

He tried to learn to open doors,
but could not turn the handles.
There is one door he can open,
that is the closet door in Mrs. Pratt's
sitting-room.
The door fastened with a little
bolt.
Carlo takes the bolt in his teeth.
He pulls hard and the bolt slips back,
and then he can push the door wide
open.
There are some things in the closet
that are Carlo's own.
You could not guess what they are I
They are bed-clothes.
There are two little sheets, a little
pillow, a nice wool quilt, and a little
feather-bed.
Every evening when the clock







CARLO.

strikes nine, Mrs. Pratt says, Carlo,
do you hear the clock? It is time
for you to go to bed I "
Then Carlo goes to the closet door
and opens it. He goes to his pile of
bed-clothes.
First he gets his feather-bed. He
takes it in his mouth and brings it
out.
He carries it behind the stove very
carefully.
There he lays it down. Then he
brings his sheets, one at- a time, and
spreads them on the feather-bed.
He spreads the quilt on top. He
turns down the upper sheet, and last
of all puts on his little pillow.
Mrs. Pratt says "Now get into
bed."







CARLO.

So Carlo gets into bed, and goes
to sleep.
It took Mrs. Pratt a long while to
teach Carlo, but now he never for-
gets just the way to do his work.













CONTRARY BILLY.

Billy was a peddler's horse.
Every day he drew a large wagon
along the country roads.
This large wagon was loaded with
tin and brooms. It was a heavy load
to draw.
He stopped at all the houses so
that his master could sell the brooms
and tins.
One day, after he had trotted along
several miles, Billy stopped where
there was no house in sight.
Go along!" said his master.






CONTRARY BILLY.

I won't," said Billy.
This is the way Billy said I
won't."
He set his fore feet out. He laid
back his ears. He shook his head.
His master got out of the wagon
and patted him.
Billy would not stir.
He moved the harness a little,
here and there.
Billy would not stir.
He talked to him in a very pleas-
ant tone.
But Billy would not stir. He
said I won't."
What was to be done?
The peddler wished to sell his
brooms and tins and go home to
supper.







CONTRARY BILLY.

But he could not do this if Billy
refused to do his part.
He went to the back of the














BILLY SAYS, "I WON'T.f"

wagon. A gentleman who passed
by, thought he was going to get
some heavy thing and whip the
horse.






CONTRARY BILLY.

Instead, the peddler took a pail
from the wagon.
There was some meal in this pail.
He showed this to Billy.
Then he walked on and set the
pail down.
Billy could see the pail.
Pretty soon Billy lifted his ears.
He looked very good-natured. He
went forward to the pail.
His master let-him eat the meal.
Then he put the pail back in the
wagon.
Then he took the reins and jumped
in, and Billy trotted off briskly with
his load.
The meal was better for Billy than

-- Q. Q.















SMUT AND THE TWINS.

Smut is a little pug dog.
His ears are long and silky.
His tail is curled up over his
back.
He loves his mistress
When she sits on the sofa he
lies down by her side and sleeps.
He takes a walk every day.
One morning he walked out be-
fore breakfast.
Mike was out in the yard.
Come here and help me, Smut,"






SMUT AND THE TWINS.

he said. "These rogues are out
again."
The rogues were two little black
and white pigs.
We called them The Twins."



-





TIE CHASE.
The Twins lived in a house cf
their own.
But they liked to get out once
in a while and take a walk in the
garden.







SMUT AND THE TWINS.

They were in the garden that
morning.
They were digging up the pota-
toes with their little pink noses.
That would not do I
Hurry up, Smut said Mike.
'At 'em I"
Smut ran at the Twins and
barked. Then the chase began.
The Twins started down the gar-
den path. Smut was close behind
them.
They ran right over the melons
and squashes.
They ran through the potatoes
and asparagus.
How funny they looked I
Squeak, squeak, squeak I" said
the Twins.






SMUT AND THE TWINS.

"Bow, wow, wow!" said Smut.
"Ha, ha, ha!" laughed Mike.
They ran and hid in the wood-pile.,
But Smut barked at them so
loudly, they did not dare to stay
there.
So out they ran again, down un-
der the currant bushes, and over
the squashes and melons.
Poor little piggies 1
They thought they had just as
good right to walk ini the garden
as Smut had.
After a while Smut drove them
into their house.
Then Mike brought them some
sour milk to drink.
They were very glad to drink
and lie down and rest.







SMUT AND THE TWINS.

Smut, too, lay down on the cool
wet grass. He was very warm.
Mike patted his head.
Good dog I fine fellow I" he
said.
Smut is sitting by me now.
"I am telling a story about you,
Smut," I say.
"Bow, wow," says Smut.
But Smut has never been to
school.
He does not know what a
.tory is.












GREEDY TOPSY.

Topsy is a horse.
She is small and slim and glossy.
She likes to go very fast, but she
is so kind, that children can drive
her.
Topsy has one fault. She is al-
ways hungry.
Her master thinks he gives her
enough to eat.
Topsy does not think so at all.
Topsy knows she is always hungry.
Topsy has hay, oats, corn and fresh
water three times a day.







GREEDY TOPSY.

Sometimes she is let out for a
run in the clover pasture.











TOPSY AND PRINCE.
But Topsy never runs when she is
let into the clover pasture.
No, indeed!
Topsy buries her nose among the
green grasses and the red clover
blossoms.
She never lifts her head and looks
about as the other horses do,






GREEDY TOPSY.

She does not even look up when
the cars go by.
Topsy just eats and eats.
When she goes back into the sta-
ble, she goes straight to her man-
ger.
She eats all the grain in the food-
box, every kernel.
Then she eats all the hay in the
rack.
Next she scrapes up all her straw
bed with her hind feet. She draws
it forward with her fore feet. She
eats all the straw she can reach.
Then she whinnies to Prince.
Prince is Topsy's colt.
There is only a low partition be-
tween their stalls.







GREEDY TOPSY.

Prince knows what Topsy wants
him to do when she whinnies.
Prince pulls out a wisp of hay
from his own rack.
He reaches it up to Topsy.
Topsy takes it from his mouth.
Then Prince pulls out another
mouthful.
Topsy takes that too. She eats it.
She eats the next, and the next, un-
til Prince's hay is all gone.
Even then Topsy seems to think
she would like a little more.






























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