• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Oxfordshire
 Herefordshire
 Shropshire
 Bedfordshire
 Warwickshire
 Staffordshire
 Monmouthshire
 Worcestershire
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Reuben Ramble's travels in the midland counties of England
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053197/00001
 Material Information
Title: Reuben Ramble's travels in the midland counties of England
Alternate Title: Travels in the midland counties of England
History of England
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill., maps ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Clark, Samuel, 1810-1875
Darton & Clark ( Publisher )
Publisher: Darton & Clark
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [between 1837 and 1845]
 Subjects
Subject: Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- England   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1841   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1841   ( local )
Bldn -- 1841
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title and publication date derived from reference to publisher in P.A.H. Brown, London publishers and printers, p. 53.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements p. 4 of wrappers.
General Note: Hand-colored illustrations.
General Note: With: Clark, Samuel, 1810-1875. Reuben Ramble's travels in the northern counties of England. London : Darton & Clark, between 1837 and 1845.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053197
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003461034
oclc - 63172978

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Oxfordshire
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Herefordshire
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Shropshire
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Bedfordshire
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Warwickshire
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Staffordshire
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Monmouthshire
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Worcestershire
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Advertising
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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OXFORDSHIRE.



OXFORDSHIRE is an inland county, containing
162,000 people. A part of the river Thames,
-which is called the Isis, runs through it. The
name of Oxford is said to have been given first to
the part of the county in which the city now stands,
because at that place there was a ford for oxen over-
the river Thames.
Oxford is one of the most beautiful cities irpt
England. It stands almost upon an island, being
nearly surrounded by the two rivers, the Isis and
the Cherwell; and on all sides, at a little distance,
there are pleasant hills, some of them covered with
fine wood. But the great beauty of the city con-
sists in the colleges, most of which are very hand-
some buildings, with fine gardens and avenues of
trees attached to them. These colleges are parts of
thle University of Oxford, one of the most famous
places of learning in the world.
A University is a place in which that know-
ledge is taught which concerns all men; and from
E





OXFORDSHIRE.
this it takes its name. It is not a place where
merely law or medicine is taught, to make men
lawyers or physicians; but a great part of the
instruction which is given at a University, is in
those subjects of which every man must learn
something; only they are here studied more deeply
than in common schools, in order that those who
learn them should know how to teach others.
The University of Oxford is said to have been
founded by king Alfred, and it is certain that it
existed before the time of Edward the Confessor.
The largest of the colleges is called Christ Church,
and was founded by Cardinal Wolsey. It is close
to the cathedral, which is a very ancient building,
but not so beautiful as many other cathedrals. The
college called University College is said to be the
most ancient in Oxford. The University Church,
which is dedicated to St. Mary, has a very beautiful
spire, and is a handsome building.
Blenheim House, which is in this county, is. a
very fine place, which was given by Queen Anne to
the great Duke of Marlborough, who gained so
many battles during her reign.






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HEREFORDSHIRE.



HEREFORDSHIRE is an inland county on the borders
of Wales, which contains 115,000 inhabitants. The
river Wye runs through it. The capital is the city
of Hereford.
The scenery of the banks of the river Wye is
not so beautiful in its course through this county as
in Monmouthshire, though it is very pleasing, and
so is the whole county. The soil is fertile, and
produces vast quantities of apples and hops. There
is no county in England which produces such fine
apples, and the cider which is made from them is
very celebrated. The oxen and the sheep are also
very fine.
Herefordshire was in ancient times the scene of
many battles with the Welch. Along with Shrop-
shire and Monmouthshire, it formed what was called
" the Marches," or Border-land, which the Earls of
March had to defend against the Welch. The
castles of the Barons who lived in these counties,
E2





HEREFORDSHIRE.
were very strong and numerous, as they were
almost always at war. There are many ruins of
these castles now remaining, and one of the most
famous of them is Goodrich Castle, which stands
upon a beautiful part of the river Wye.
Hereford is a pleasant city, and contains many
old buildings. In the reign of Offa, it was the
capital of the kingdom of Mercia, and the royal
palace was at Sutton, which is about three miles
distant. The cathedral was founded before the time
of King Offa, but in his 'day it was built of wood,
and was perhaps a very small building. It was
rebuilt of stone twice before the Norman conquest;
and in the reign of William, the present cathedral
was built by Bishop Losing. It was a very fine
old building till the year 1786, when a part of it
fell down, and it has been since repaired in a very
clumsy manner.
Ross is very beautifully situated on the Wye.
It was in this town that "the Man of Ross" lived,
respecting whom Pope has written a poem. His
name was Kyrle.





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SHROPSHIRE,



SHROPSHIRE is an extensive county, but not so
populous as most of the neighboring English
counties. It contains 240,000 inhabitants, is situated
on the borders of Wales, and the river Severn runs
through it. The capital is Shrewsbury.
A great part of the land of Shropshire is fertile,
and produces abundance of grain. The scenery is
pleasingly diversified by hill and dale. A very
remarkable hill, 1320 feet in height, called "the
Wrekin," stands not far from the town of Welling-
ton. There are a large number of productive coal
mines in the county, and great quantities of iron
come from the neighbourhood of Colebrook Dale
and other parts.
There is scarcely any county of which the
history is more interesting than that of Shropshire.
There are in it many traces of old British forti-
fications; and one of these, called Caer Caradoc,
was an encampment of the army of the famous hero
Caractacus, whose British name was Caradoc.





SHROPSHIRE.
There are also the remains of several Roman stations
and roads. When the Saxons had conquered
Britain, this county formed a chief part of the
kingdom of Mercia; and here it is that traces may
be seen of the fortification called Offa's Dyke, which
King Offa formed to defend the country against
the Welch.
The Earls of March, or of the Marches, as they
were sometimes called, lived chiefly in Shropshire.
They were appointed by the king, to defend the
march or border-land against the Welch, who used
frequently to make incursions into this' county.
There are some strong castles still remaining here,
but the most famous is Ludlow Castle, where
several kings have lived.
Shrewsbury is. a fine old town, near which there
was a famous battle fought, which is described in
Shakspere's play of Henry IV. The Welch had
been conquered by Edward I., but they submitted
to the English very unwillingly. In the time
of Henry IV. a man, named Owen Glendwyr, who
was descended from the ancient Kings of Wales,
stirred them up to rebel, but they were overcome in
this battle.
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"7, BEDFORDSHIRE.


BEDFORDSHIRE is a small inland county, which con-
tains 108,000 people. The capital is the town of
Bedford.
The soil of Bedfordshire is very different in.
different parts; and though a great part of it is not
naturally fertile, it is well cultivated, owing to the
care which the Dukes of Bedford have taken to
encourage agriculture. There is a large quantity of
butter and of vegetables produced here, and sent
to the London market.
Woburn Abbey is now the seat of the Duke of
Bedford, and is the most interesting object in the
county. It was formerly an abbey of the order of
Monks called Cistercians, and was. founded in the
year 1145, by Hugh de Bolebec. When the
Monks were turned out by King Henry VIII. the
place was given to Lord Russell, who afterwards
became the Earl of Bedford; and it has been held
by his family ever since. A small part of the old
building still remains, but the greater part of what
is now standing is a very handsome new building.





BEDFORDSHIRE.
The park which surrounds it is very large and
beautiful, abounding with fine trees. The gardens
are extensive, and laid out with great taste. The
abbey contains a great many paintings, a noble
library, a gallery of sculpture, and a great collection
of curious and beautiful things of different kinds.
There are the remains of an old British town
not far from Dunstable, and near the same place is
Toternhoe Castle, as it is called, which is either of
British or Roman origin. It is a circular mount,
surrounded by two circular banks.
Bedford is a very ancient town, which was
probably standing when the Romans were in
Britain. There was once a famous castle in the
town, which was built in the reign of William
Rufus. During the wars between the Kings and
the Barons, in the reigns of John and Henry III.
it was very often beseiged and taken; but at last it
was destroyed by Henry, and has never been rebuilt.
It was at Bedford that John Bunyan, the author of
"Pilgrim's Progress," lived, and the chapel in which
he preached, and the prison in which he was con-
fined, may still be seen. Bedford is a famous place
for schools and charitable institutions.








WARWI CKSHIRE.



THIS is an inland county, and very populous, con-
taining 402,000 inhabitants. The largest place in
the county is Birmingham, of which the population
is 140,000; but the capital is Warwick.
Warwickshire is a fine county, with plenty of
wood and rich pasture. It contains a great many
interesting places.
Warwick is a handsome and ancient town; but
its great ornament is the castle, in which the Earl
of Warwick now lives. It was a royal castle in the
time of Edward the Confessor, but having been
destroyed, it was rebuilt by Thomas Beauchamp,
Earl of Warwick, who fought bravely in the battles
of Cressy and Poictiers, when the Black Prince so
distinguished himself. It has been kept in repair
exactly in the style in which it was first built, and
is now the finest specimen of a Baronial Castle in
England
Kenilworth is another noble castle in this





WARWICKSHIRE.
county, but it is now in ruins. It was here that
the famous John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster,
lived; and, in later times, the Earl of Leicester
entertained Queen Elizabeth in a very magnificent
style.
Coventry is a large and very ancient town, with
some fine churches. It is famous for the manufac-
ture of silk goods and watches.
Birmingham is the most celebrated place in the
world for the manufacture of iron, brass and plated
articles. It is a very large town, with some fine
buildings in it. The town hall is a noble speci-
men of architecture, and the Grammar School and
the market place are built in excellent style.. But
it is not an agreeable place, from the smoke of
the forges and furnaces which abound in it.
But the most interesting place in the county is
Stratford-upon-Avon, the native place of Shakspere,
the greatest poet that ever lived. The house in
which he was born is still standing; and his tomb,
with a bust of him, is to be seen in the Church.




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STAFFORDSHIRE.



STAFFORDSHIRE is an inland county. It is very
populous, and contains 510,000 people. The
capitals are the city of Lichfield and the town of
Stafford.
Some parts of this county are well wooded, and
contain some fine estates. But it is not in general
fertile, and is more remarkable for what it contains
underground than above. There are many coal and
iron mines; and in the neighbourhood of Newcastle-
under-Lyne are the most extensive manufactories
in the world of china and other earthenware. The
towns of Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, and their neighbour-
hoods, containing several small towns and villages,
are called the Potteries." The North part of the
county contains fine beds of clay, out of which the
pottery is made; while the South part contains
great quantities of iron. Plenty of coal is to be
found almost every where; and it is used in the
North for baking the earthenware, and in the South
for working the iron. The town of Wolverhamp-





STAFFORDSHIRE.
ton, and the places round it, are very famous for
their iron trade.
Tamworth is a very ancient town, where some
of the Kings of Mercia resided in the time of the
Saxon Heptarchy. There is a very ancient castle
Overlooking the town.
Dudley is a very interesting town, which was
founded by Dodo, a Saxon prince, about the year
7700 The castle was a very strong place, and the
ruins now form a beautiful object at the top of a
tall hill. Under the castle there is a curious stone
quarry, from which limestone is obtained for the use
of the iron works which are near. It is in the form
of a long passage or tunnel, more than a mile in
length, and thirteen feet high. The town is sup-
ported chiefly by the trade in iron goods.
Lichfield is a very pleasant city, and has a very
beautiful cathedral, which was much injured during
the civil wars, but was restored by the excellent
Bishop Hackett, chiefly at his own expense. It
contains a monument to two children, by Sir
Francis Chantry, which is said to be one of the
finest in England.














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MONMOUTHSHIRE.

THIS county is on the borders of Wales, and is
bounded on the South by the Bristol Channel. It
contains 134,000 inhabitants. The river Wye runs
through it, and the banks of the stream between
Chepstow and Monmouth present some of the most
beautiful scenery in England.
A great quantity of limestone, iron, and coal is
obtained in this county. The coal is not of a fit
kind to burn in houses, but it is used in great
quantities for steam engines, furnaces and kilns.
Some of the towns, and especially Merthyr Tidril, I
are strange black-looking places, from the number
of furnaces which are always burning around
them.
There are several very ancient towns in Mon-
mouthshire, which deserve to be noticed. Caerwent
was the capital of the Silures, who fought so
bravely against the Romans, in the time of the
Emperor Claudius, under their king, Caractacus, of
whom you may read an account in the history of
England. Caerleon is the place, where the famous
|i i ~ ^





MONMOUTHSHIRE.
British Kings, Uther Pendragon and Arthur are
said to have lived. Chepstow was founded when
the Romans were here, and now contains the ruins
of a very large and strong castle.
In the times of the Saxon Heptarchy, and for a
long time afterwards, the English and the Welch
were always fighting for Monmouthshire, and some-
times one nation held it, and sometimes the other.
It was hardly determined to be a part of England
till the reign of Charles II.
The ruins of Tintern Abbey are considered to
be the most beautiful ruins in England. The
Abbey was founded, in 1131, by Walter de Clare,
and was inhabited by Cistercian Monks. The
Church of the Abbey was built by the Earl of
Norfolk, in the year 1268. When the Monasteries
were put down by Henry VIII. the Abbey was
given to the Earl of Worcester, but at present it
belongs to the Duke of Beaufort.
The ruins of Llanthony Abbey are now almost
destroyed, but what remain are very interesting.
The style of architecture belongs to an earlier age
than that of Tinterni, and the buildings were most
likely erected a hundred years before.
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WORCESTERSHIRE.



WORCESTERSHIRE is a very pleasant county. The
river Severn runs through it, and it contains
233,000 inhabitants. The capital is the city of
Worcester.
The land of this county is generally fertile, and
produces plenty of corn of all kinds; but it is
more famous for trees and fruit, especially apples
and pears. A very large quantity of salt is made
from the salt springs which rise at Droitwich. The
part called the Vale of Evesham is very beautiful,
and so is the scenery of the Malvern Hills.
Worcester is a fine city, with wide and well-
built streets. The cathedral was founded by
Ethelred, King of Mercia, one of the states of the
Saxon Heptarchy in which Worcester stood; but
it has been rebuilt several times since his days.
The present structure was built about five hundred
years ago. It contains the tombs of King John
and of his nephew Prince Arthur, whom, it is said,
he cruelly murdered, because the prince had a claim





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VWORCESTERSHI-RE.
to the throne of England which interfered with his
own. ,These tombs originally stood in the old
:building.
There was a great battle fought at Worcester,
between Oliver Cromwell and the Scotch friends of
Charles II., after which Charles was obliged to fly
from the country. There are a great many gloves
made at Worcester, and a fine sort of China-ware.
The town of Kidderminster is famous for the manu-
facture of carpets, and there is one kind of carpet
which takes its name from the town.
Evesham is a very interesting town, and
beautifully situated. It contains the ruins of an
abbey, which was founded in the year 709. The
part which remains is called the Abbot's Tower,
having been built by one of the abbots, named
Clement Lichfield, in the time of Henry VI. It
"was at Evesham that Prince Edward, afterwards
King Edward I., conquered the celebrated Simon
de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, who had rebelled
against King Henry III. Simon de Montfort was
a Frenchman, who was the author of the plan of
the English House of Commons.








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PRICE ONE SHILLING EACH.
QIUADRUPEDS AND THEIR USES TO MAN
THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS oRTHE CHILDS BOOKorWILD BEASTS
BIRDS AND THEIR USES TO MAN.
THE OCEAN AND ITS INHABITANTS.
INSECTS &,-REPTILES WITH THEIR USES TO MAN
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THE BIBLE PICTURE BOOK. OBLONc 4T'
THE WORLD AND ITS INHABITANTS :
UNCLE BENJAMIN'S FARM.
LIVING &, MOVING oR HORSES. COACHES & RAILWAYS.
.ONGS FOR THE NURSERY. A COLLECTION'OF THE OLD
NURSERY RHVAIS wrn' COLOURED rPOD CUTS
FAIRY TALES IN VERSE.WITH COLOURED WOOD CUTS.

JUST OUT, ON THE SAME PLAN,
PRIC-Z- OE SHILLING EACH.
"i REVPEPI RAMBLES TRAVELS IN
I. THE NORTHERN COUNTIES OF ENGLAND.
"11. THE EASTERN C'OJNTIES ..
III. THE SOUTHERN COUNTIES ..
IV. THE MIDLAND COUNTIES ..
4' V. THE WESTERN COUNTIES ..


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